ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL

BUSINESS OUTLOOK
Monday, October 31, 2016

NEW
MEXICO’S
ECONOMIC
DRIVERS
Story page 2
Profiles page 3
Rankings page 8

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PRIVATE 100

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

FROM PIZZA TO HIGH TECH:

CONTACT US

NM COMPANIES
DELIVER

BUSINESS EDITOR
Charlie Moore, 823-3847

ASSISTANT
BUSINESS EDITOR
Ellen Marks, 823-3842

REPORTERS

BY JESSICA DYER

Kevin Robinson-Avila:
Energy issues, technology,
Venture Capital and PRC,
823-3820,
krobinson-avila@
abqjournal.com

S

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

ome might be a part of
your everyday life — they
could be your go-to source
for breakfast burritos or

beer.
Others work largely out of the
limelight, excelling by virtue of
their highly specialized products
or services.
There are those just getting
started, but also many that
have roots going back at least 50
years.
The New Mexico Private 100,
now in its 21st edition, once
again demonstrates the range of
homegrown businesses thriving
in the Land of Enchantment.
The companies that
made this year’s list roast
coffee beans (New Mexico
Piñon Coffee), install air
conditioners (TLC Plumbing
& Utility) and manufacture
wireless microphone systems

Jessica Dyer: Retail,
tourism, One on One
interviews, and local
chambers of commerce.
823-3864
jdyer@abqjournal.com
Steve Sinovic: Commercial
real estate, banking and
finance, health care
823-3919
ssinovic@abqjournal.com
Editorial Assistant
Terry Feld: Briefcase,
general information,
823-3834,
tfeld@abqjournal.com
Designer Tim Bahr
Business Dept. Fax
823-3994
Advertising 823-3300

(Lectrosonics). They design.
They build. They deliver.
And together they employ
10,950 people — an average of
more than 100 apiece. They also
combined for $4 billion in gross
revenue last year.
It’s worthwhile to celebrate
them for those and other
accomplishments, said Steven
Keene, managing partner
of Moss Adams LLP, which
sponsors the Private 100 with
Modrall Sperling, Bank of
America Merrill Lynch and the
Journal.
“We tend to give a lot of focus
to new business and new jobs,”
Keene said. “This (is) important,
but equally important are those
businesses that have been here,
and that have continued to
provide employment and support
to New Mexico in many ways.”
While statistics often paint a
bleak economic picture — New
Mexico has not fully shaken

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MAESTAS

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Steve Maestas is our hero. He was instrumental in bringing
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economy. Learn how you can be a hero like Steve Maestas at
MyABQMeeting.com.

the recession and continues
to chart among the nation’s
worst for unemployment — the
list provides a forum to honor
those that have persevered and
continue to prosper.
“I think it shows that there are
still positive things happening
in New Mexico despite current
economic headwinds,” said Paul
Mondragon, market president
for Bank of America Merrill

Lynch.
That includes Mario’s Pizza,
a four-location restaurant
chain where business remains
steady despite the larger
economic forces and the
influx of national chains now
competing for both customers
and employees. Established in
1986, Mario’s employs 160 people
See FROM PIZZA >> 16

NOVEMBER MEETINGS & CONVENTIONS

BROUGHT HIS
MEETING

TO ABQ.

ABQjournal.com/business

ADOLPHE PIERRE-LOUIS/JOURNAL

Mario’s Pizza, a four-location restaurant chain, is among the homegrown businesses on this year’s Private 100 list. From left are Mario
Burgarello, sons Sal, Joe and Eddy and wife, Anna.

GROUP NAME

EST.
ATTENDANCE

MEETING
LOCATION

EST.
DIRECT
SPENDING

2016 Annual Conference

100

Embassy Suites by
Hilton Albuquerque
Hotel & Spa

$21,126

2016 Annual Conference

425

Albuquerque
Hyatt Regency

$365,472

2016 Annual Festival

400

Hotel Albuquerque
at Old Town

$258,246

2016 Annual National Conference

1,000

Albuquerque
Marriott Hotel

$496,812

2016 High Desert Regional Tournament

2,640

Mesa del Sol Park

$271,877

2016 ABQ Airport Roundtable Series

40

Hotel Andaluz

$25,422

2016 National CAFO Roundtable

130

Hotel Albuquerque
at Old Town

$63,693

New Mexico Association for Home & Hospice Care

American Association for Adult & Continuing Education

Western Music Association

Call To Action-USA

New Mexico Young American Football League (YAFL)

The Quotient Group

Association of Clean Water Administrators

Provided by Visit Albuquerque. A comprehensive list is provided to Visit Albuquerque partners.
For partnership information, please call 222-4338.
0001314189-01

0001314192-01

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

PRIVATE 100

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

3

COURTESY OF ERNEST HEALTH CARE

COURTESY OF SUMMIT ELECTRIC

Summit Electric Supply, this year’s No. 1 on the New Mexico Private 100, has made
customer service a priority over its 39 years in business.

WIRED FOR GROWTH:
SUMMIT ELECTRIC
STILL ON TOP

I

t began as an electrical supply
business in Albuquerque with five
employees, including the founders,
and is now an international
operation with customers ranging
from local contractors to nuclear power
plants and multinational corporations.
Summit Electric Supply is also atop
the New Mexico Private 100 list for the
second year running after three years
in the No. 2 spot.
From that single store opening 39
years ago, Summit has grown to nearly
30 locations, facilities that total nearly 1
million square feet and 670 employees.
About 125 of them work in New Mexico.
But CEO Victor Jury Jr. says he still
views his company as the young kid on
the block compared to the rest of his
industry.
“Even though we’re 39 years old, we
consider ourselves relatively young
... still kind of pushing ourselves into
space we didn’t have before,” he said.
That space is wholesale distribution
of industrial electrical equipment
and supplies. And Summit’s share
of it has grown to include customers
as wide-ranging as nuclear power
plants, Dow Chemical and the Mexican
maquiladora industry. It supplies
parts and equipment to customers in
construction, manufacturing, mining,

oil and gas and marine industries.
Summit prides itself on customer
service and being able to deliver hardto-find items. Do a product search on
the company’s website and you’ll come
up with more than 40,000 results, from
basic commodities to sophisticated
electrical components. Summit also
provides services such as electronic
data interchange allowing customers
to manage their accounts and
communicate with the company online,
just-in-time inventory programs,
24-hour emergency service and online
ordering.
It has facilities in Arizona, Texas,
Louisiana and Oklahoma, and
operates a service center in Dubai. A
division based in Houston is devoted to
international sales.
And while Summit’s meat and
potatoes is direct business-to-business
commerce, it is constantly improving
its e-commerce capabilities and plans to
roll out some new features on its site at
the end of the year.
Jury founded the company with
his father, Victor Jury Sr., and their
partner, David Meredith, in 1977. The
key to the company’s growth? “Building
a really strong team,” Jury says.
— Charlie Moore

Patients at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Southern New Mexico in Las Cruces use
this gym as part of their care. The hospital is owned by Ernest Health.

ERNEST HEALTH THRIVING
ON HOMETOWN CARE

A

group of employees at a
large rehab hospital chain,
some of them working in
Albuquerque, decided more
than a decade ago that they wanted
to bring similar services to people in
smaller towns.
That initial concept for what is
now Ernest Health was based on
the idea that patients have a much
better recovery when they can be
around family rather than traveling
long distances for care, said Sheryl
Gentile, Ernest’s senior vice
president of administration.
The group set up offices in
Albuquerque in 2004, and opened
its first hospitals in Las Cruces,
Brownsville, Texas, and Johnstown,
Colo., the following year.
Ernest Health now has 25
hospitals in 11 states, with its
corporate headquarters still in
Albuquerque.
It operates both in-patient
rehabilitation hospitals, where the
average stay is 14 days, and longterm acute care facilities, which
have an average stay of 25 days,
Gentile said.
“It’s been wild and woolly
growth,” she said. “I don’t think
anyone really realized how quickly
it was going to grow … but it struck
a nerve, and it still does. We’re a
growth company.”

Ernest was ranked No. 2 in terms
of revenue in this year’s Private 100
ranking, up from No. 3 last year.
Its corporate office has 70
employees in Albuquerque, while
the two hospitals in Las Cruces
employ 200 people. Nationwide,
Ernest has nearly 4,000 employees.
While the company initially
focused on the Rocky Mountain
states, it now also has hospitals in
Ohio, Indiana and South Carolina.
It recently broke ground in
Flagstaff on its 26th hospital,
Gentile said.
“We’re happy to look at any
market,” she said, adding that the
company does extensive research
before expanding.
Most of the patients in Ernest’s
hospitals are seniors, working to
recover from strokes or physical
problems.
The company’s intensive therapy
gives its patients a much better rate
of recovery than nursing home
facilities and they don’t have to
travel to larger cities to get the care,
Gentile said.
And that sums up the company’s
mission: “Just being able to give
everyone that fighting chance to get
back to your life.”
— Ellen Marks

4

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

PRIVATE 100

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

GREG SORBER/JOURNAL

The Garcia Automotive Group owns 15 franchises in Albuquerque, Santa Fe and El
Paso. It has two Subaru dealerships in Albuquerque, including the one shown here.

GARCIA DOESN’T BELIEVE
IN STANDING STILL

S

heilah Garcia presides over a
vast car empire — one with an
often-changing composition.
Today, Garcia Automotive
Group encompasses 15 franchises
across 13 locations in Albuquerque,
Santa Fe and El Paso, Texas.
But tomorrow, who knows?
The Garcia family business —
which includes a second generation
of company principals in brothers
Ed, Toby and Carlos — has bought
or sold about 30 dealerships in the
past 20 years alone.
“As we say, ‘if we’re not buying,
selling or trading, we might as well
be dead,’” Carlos says, attributing
the business style to his late father,
Julian.
The method has worked well for
Garcia, which ranks No. 3 on this
year’s Private 100.
But there was a time when just
selling a single car was a triumph.
Julian, who had previously run
a salvage yard with his father,
acquired his first new-car franchise
in 1967. He bought what he could
afford, bucking convention and
investing in Toyota before the
Japanese automaker had risen to
stateside prominence. His peers
around Albuquerque watched with
skepticism.
“The first month in business, they
only sold one car,” Carlos Garcia
says. “To my grandma.”
But the Garcias’ bet on the small,
fuel-efficient brand paid off during
the ensuing energy crisis. They

later added a Honda dealership, then
other brands.
Sheilah, a former school teacher
and mother of five, took over when
Julian died in 1984. And her sons
— who had grown up cleaning cars
and pulling weeds around the lots
— eventually joined the business
themselves.
“It’s all they ever wanted to do
from the time they were little kids,”
says Sheilah, company president.
“It was certainly self-motivated; it
didn’t come from me. I didn’t try to
discourage them, but I didn’t push
them into it.”
Customers can now turn to
Garcias whether seeking a $12,000
smart car or a $300,000-plus
Mercedes-Benz, a Subaru hatchback
or even a Cadillac — though not
a new Toyota since the company
sold their original dealership in the
1990s.
Carlos Garcia says representing
so many brands allows the family to
better notice and respond to larger
industry trends, but he and Sheilah
both credit customer satisfaction
for their long-term success. Better
than half the customers shopping
at the Garcias’ longest-held stores
have bought from the family before,
Carlos says.
“That’s pretty cool when every
other person who comes in the door,
we know,” he says.
— Jessica Dyer

GREG SORBER/JOURNAL

Daniel Chavez, owner of NRG Staging, in his office decorated with posters and pictures of artists his company has worked with.

DO-ANYTHING ATTITUDE
PAYS OFF FOR NRG STAGING

A

few years ago, Daniel
Chavez, the owner of NRG
Staging, was told to bring 24
stagehands to an airplane
hangar in Roswell and not ask
questions. He was expecting aliens,
but instead he discovered his
production company was staffing a
secret Foo Fighters concert.
“In this business, you’ve got to
be willing to try anything,” said
Chavez. “That can really pay off.”
It’s certainly paid off for Chavez.
Over 31 years in the business,
NRG has grown from four people
working in Santa Fe “for exercise”
to more than two thousand seasonal
employees across New Mexico,
Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma and
Texas. Chavez and his staff have
lunched with the likes of Garth
Brooks (“nicest guy in the world”)
and NRG has lent its services
— stagehand staffing, rigging,
carpentry and more — to thousands
of events countrywide. Among the
most memorable: the 1997 Rolling
Stones concert at University
Stadium and the Katy Perryheadlined halftime show at the 2015
Super Bowl in Arizona.
“We’ve really created something
out of scratch,” he said.
NRG is No. 91 on this year’s
Private 100 list.
Chavez attributes NRG’s growth
to the company’s adaptability. In the
early days, he said, if a client needed

someone to operate a spotlight and
NRG employees didn’t have anyone
on staff with that skill set, they
would go out and find someone to
teach them how to use a spotlight.
Then, they could not only serve that
client, but also any future clients
who needed that service.
While the company adopted
a do-anything attitude, it was
also careful not to overpromise.
Chavez said he adopts a policy of
brutal honesty with everyone he
works with, clients and employees
included.
“If you cheat employees, you’re
not going anywhere,” he said. “The
industry is too tightknit for that.”
When asked what advice he would
give to a small business looking to
scale up, Chavez turns practical.
“Make sure you get a great CPA,”
he said. “With everything else
you’re dealing with to grow your
business, the last thing you want is
to be audited.”
After so many years of helping
others make music, Chavez has
expanded his business portfolio
to include the Albuquerque-based
dueling piano bar Uptown Funk.
He said that the core values he’s
developed at NRG are applicable
regardless of the industry.
“It’s all about treating people
right,” he said.
— Marie C. Baca

Bank of America Merrill Lynch proudly
congratulates The New Mexico Private 100 on your
outstanding achievements.
bofaml.com

0001314465-01

“Bank of America Merrill Lynch” is the marketing name for the global banking and global markets businesses of Bank of America Corporation. Lending, derivatives, and other commercial banking activities
are performed globally by banking affiliates of Bank of America Corporation, including Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Securities, strategic advisory, and other investment
banking activities are performed globally by investment banking affiliates of Bank of America Corporation (”Investment Banking Affiliates”), including, in the United States,
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated and Merrill Lynch Professional Clearing Corp., both of which are registered broker-dealers and Members of SIPC, and, in other jurisdictions, by locally
registered entities. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Incorporated and Merrill Lynch Professional Clearing Corp. are registered as futures commission merchants with the CFTC and are members of the
NFA. Investment products offered by Investment Banking Affiliates: Are Not FDIC Insured • May Lose Value • Are Not Bank Guaranteed. ©2016 Bank of America Corporation. GBAM-103-AD ARCG9B5L

Congratulations on
10,000+ jobs well done.
The companies on this year’s New Mexico’s Private 100
employed more than 10,000 workers and grossed $4 billion
in revenue last year.
That’s an impact well worth celebrating. Congratulations to
all the organizations that made the list—and keep up
the good work.

6565 Americas Parkway NE, Suite 600 | Albuquerque, NM 87110
(505) 878-7200 W W W. M O S S A D A M S . C O M

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Internal Audit & Compliance Services
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

PRIVATE 100

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

7

SPONSOR

DEAN HANSON/JOURNAL

Matt DiGregory is the co-owner of The Range Cafe chain and the Freight House in
Bernalillo. DiGregory started The Range in 1992 with partner Tom Fenton.

HOME ON THE RANGE
FEASTING ON SUCCESS

H

erds of hungry customers
have flocked to the Range
Cafe since the day it opened in
Bernalillo in 1992, inspiring
co-owners Matt DiGregory and Tom
Fenton to build that initial success into
a flourishing chain of Home on the
Range restaurants.

The partners broke ground
on their fourth Range Cafe
in September on Rio Grande
Boulevard near Interstate 40, which
they expect to open by year-end.
And in the near future, they plan
to expand the homestead into two
or three more locations on the West
Side and in the South Valley before
moving onto pastures in other
states.
“So many people go into the
restaurant business and say they
plan to grow across the country, but
we didn’t really plan on opening
multiple locations when we started,”
said DiGregory, CEO of parent firm
Home on the Range Inc., which
includes all the Range Cafes, plus
the Freight House Kitchen and Tap
in Bernalillo.
“My gut feeling always told me
we’d be successful,” DiGregory said.
“It just felt right from the start and
it’s all sort of happened in the right
way. It’s worked out for us.”
It all started a bit spontaneously.
DiGregory was a pastry chef and
Fenton a line order cook at the
Prairie Star restaurant at Santa
Ana when DiGregory eyed a

location for rent in Bernalillo. He
leased it without a business plan
or even the finances to launch a
restaurant.
Then Fenton stepped in with
$17,000 and they launched as
partners. The plan: A fine dining
menu at everyday low prices.
With only two Mexican
restaurants and a few fast-food
joints in Bernalillo at the time, plus
a fast-growing population there
and in other towns like Placitas,
many people were hungry for more
choices.
“It was kind of an instant success,”
DiGregory said. “Our first day was
so busy for breakfast and lunch that
we didn’t have enough for dinner.
Business just kept building, kind of
like a cult following.”
Even a 1995 fire couldn’t stop
them. A community fundraiser
generated $10,000 to reopen and the
partners took up where they left off.
By 2000, the partners opened a
second location in the Northeast
Heights. A third one opened near
Uptown in 2004 and, last year, the
partners opened the Freight House
in Bernalillo.
Home on the Range now employs
300, up from just 15 when it started
in 1992.
“Business is the best it’s ever
been,” DiGregory said. “We’re doing
great.”
— Kevin Robinson-Avila

MARLA BROSE/JOURNAL

Paul Mondragon, New Mexico president for Bank of America, says the Private 100
list demonstrates the “growing diversity of New Mexico’s private sector.”

BANKING ON SHARED SUCCESS

“F

or over 20 years, the
Albuquerque Journal has
celebrated New Mexico’s
top 100 private companies
headquartered here in the state, and
Bank of America Merrill Lynch is once
again proud to be a partner to bring
well-deserved attention and recognition
to these firms,” said Paul Mondragon,
New Mexico president for Bank of
America.
“The list of honorees once again
demonstrates the growing diversity of
New Mexico’s private sector, and serves
as a reminder of the private sector’s
critical impact on local jobs and the
economy,” Mondragon said. “Bank of
America has one clear purpose — to
make financial lives better. We do this
based on shared success, meaning
that, when our clients and local
communities succeed, we will succeed.
From supporting small businesses to
commercial companies, we’ve already
provided over $17 million in lending
and credit to New Mexico businesses so
far this year, reflecting the economic
success, optimism and growth
happening statewide.”
Bank of America has served New
Mexico for 90 years, and is a statewide
leader in personal banking, strategic
investments and corporate social
responsibility.
Bank of America has a broad
network of banking centers, ATMs

and innovative technology to meet
the banking needs of consumers. This
includes 26 banking centers and a
national customer service center in Rio
Rancho that employees more than 300
local residents.
From small businesses to Fortune 500
companies, Bank of America Merrill
Lynch has dedicated teams to connect
businesses with the solutions they need
to compete and ultimately thrive both
locally and globally. In the first half of
2016, the company delivered more than
$17 million in new credit to businesses
in New Mexico.
Merrill Lynch Wealth Management
has six offices in New Mexico, including
locations in Albuquerque, Hobbs, Las
Cruces, Roswell and Santa Fe. Merrill
Lynch Wealth Management provides
comprehensive, strategic wealthmanagement solutions to individuals,
families and businesses. Its services
include portfolio management, asset
protection and tax minimization, all
designed to help clients manage their
unique financial challenges.
Just as Bank of America prioritizes
everyday financial needs, the company
invests back into New Mexico. In 2016,
Bank of America will give nearly a halfmillion dollars to nonprofits across the
state and Bank of America employees
will volunteer more than 5,000 hours of
time to local causes.

8

PRIVATE 100

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

Rank

Company name

City

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

Website address

CEO’s name

Year
established

Average total
full-time (or fulltime equivalent)
employees in New
Mexico in 2015

Industry

1

Summit Electric Supply
Co. Inc.

Albuquerque

summit.com

Victor R. Jury Jr.

1977

126

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

2

Ernest Health

Albuquerque

ernesthealth.com

Darby Brockette

2004

250

health care

3

Garcia Automotive
Group

Albuquerque

garciacars.com

Sheilah Garcia

1975

331

automotive dealer

4

Applied Research
Associates, Inc.

Albuquerque

ara.com

Robert H. Sues

1979

153

technology, life sciences

5

Jaynes Corporation

Albuquerque

jaynescorp.com

Rick Marquardt

1946

270

construction, real estate

6

Bradbury Stamm
Construction Inc.

Albuquerque

bradburystamm.com

Cynthia K. Schultz

1923

125

construction, real estate

7

Premier Distributing
Company

Albuquerque

premierdistributing.com

Edward Dobbs

1982

344

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

8

Los Alamos Technical
Associates, Inc.

Albuquerque

lata.com

Linda E. Kobel

1976

45

government contracting

9

Don Chalmers Ford,
Inc.

Rio Rancho

donchalmersford.com

Gary Housley

1996

175

automotive dealer

10

Sisbarro Dealerships

Las Cruces

sisbarro.com

Lou Sisbarro

1981

180

automotive dealer

11

Rinchem Company, Inc.

Albuquerque

rinchem.com

Bill Moore

1976

90

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

12

HB Construction

Albuquerque

hbconstruction.com

Jason Harrington

1991

74

construction, real estate

13

TLC Plumbing & Utility

Albuquerque

tlcplumbing.com

Dale Armstrong

1987

460

construction, real estate

14

AUI Inc.

Albuquerque

auiinc.net

Adam Triolo

1981

260

construction, real estate

15

Peter DeFries Corp.,
dba Dion’s

Albuquerque

dions.com

Mark Herman

1978

775

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

16

Weststar Mortgage
Corporation

Albuquerque

westloan.com

Kent Wiechert

1983

75

professional services,
insurance, financial services

17

Rose’s Southwest
Papers, Inc.

Albuquerque

rosessouthwest.com

Robert E. Espat

1984

135

manufacturing

18

Dreamstyle Remodeling

Albuquerque

dreamstyleremodeling.com

Larry Chavez

1989

200

construction, real estate

19

Affordable Solar

Albuquerque

thinkaffordablesolar.com

Ryan Centerwall

1998

58

construction, real estate

20

Holman’s USA, LLC

Albuquerque

holmans.com

Anthony D. Trujillo

1955

41

technology, life sciences

21

Cress Insurance
Consultants, Inc.

Albuquerque

cressinsurance.com

Tom Cress

1984

46

professional services,
insurance, financial services

22

Brycon Corporation

Rio Rancho

brycon.com

Bryant W. Lemon Sr.

1990

68

construction, real estate

23

Coldwell Banker Legacy

Albuquerque

cblegacy.com

Joe Gilmore/Mike Carter

1998

75

professional services,
insurance, financial services

24

HME Specialists

Albuquerque

hmespecialists.com

Mason Wells

2001

256

health care

25

Enterprise Builders
Corporation

Albuquerque

ebnm.com

Ralph P. Baldwin

1988

32

construction, real estate

26

JB Henderson
Construction Company,
Inc.

Albuquerque

jbhenderson.com

Mark G. Henderson

1959

196

construction, real estate

27

Klinger Constructors,
LLC

Albuquerque

klingerllc.com

Tom Novak

1982

100

construction, real estate

28

Broken Arrow
Communications, Inc.

Albuquerque

bacom-inc.com

Robert N. Denton

2004

30

construction, real estate

29

Abba Technologies, Inc.

Albuquerque

abbatech.com

Andrew Baca

1993

38

technology, life science

0001314655-01

10

PRIVATE 100

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

Rank

Company name

City

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

Website address

CEO’s name

Year
established

Average total
full-time (or fulltime equivalent)
employees in New
Mexico in 2015

Industry

30

Seattle Fish Company
of New Mexico

Albuquerque

seattlefishnm.com

Craig Risk

1987

37

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

31

Parts Plus of New
Mexico

Albuquerque

partsplusnm.com

Adam Honegger

1981

130

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

32

Sandia Office Supply

Albuquerque

sosnm.com

Todd Sandoval

2003

68

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

33

Miller Bonded Inc.

Albuquerque

millerbonded.com

Keith Wilson

1956

125

construction, real estate

34

DKD Electric, LLC

Albuquerque

dkdelectric.com

J. Dee Dennis III

1978

176

construction, real estate

35

Gordon Environmental,
Inc.

Bernalillo

gordonenvironmental.com

I. Keith Gordon, P.E.

2002

14

technology, life sciences

36

Dekker/Perich/Sabatini

Albuquerque

dpsdesign.org

Steven J. Perich

1959

145

professional services,
insurance, financial services

37

Lectrosonics, Inc.

Rio Rancho

lectrosonics.com

J. Gordon More

1971

160

manufacturing

38

Bohannan Huston Inc.

Albuquerque

bhinc.com

Brian G. Burnett

1959

155

professional services,
insurance, financial services

39

Westech International,
Inc.

Albuquerque

westech-intl.com

Dr. Betty P. Chao

1994

23

government contracting

40

Souder, Miller &
Associates

Albuquerque

soudermiller.com

Peter Fant

1985

179

professional services,
insurance, financial services

41

Twilight Homes of New
Mexico, LLC

Albuquerque

twilighthomesnm.com

Michael Fietz

2011

24

construction, real estate

42

Gardner Zemke
Company

Albuquerque

gardnerzemke.com

Rick Zemke

1965

65

construction, real estate

43

TMC Global
Professional Services

Albuquerque

tmcgps.com

Rob MacIvor

1997

10

government contracting

44

Raylee Homes, a new
generation

Rio Rancho

rayleehomes.com

Tammy Grady Thornton

2009

25

construction, real estate

45

Heads Up Landscape
Contractors, Inc.

Albuquerque

headsuplandscape.com

Gary Mallory

1973

275

construction real estate

46

Bridgers & Paxton
Consulting Engineers,
Inc.

Albuquerque

bpce.com

Michael E. Dexter, P.E.,
LEED AP

1951

112

professional services,
insurance, financial services

47

Menicucci Insurance
Agency, LLC

Albuquerque

mianm.com

Mark Menicucci

2007

19

professional services,
insurance, financial services

48

VKC Delights Inc. dba
Twisters

Albuquerque

mytwisters.com

Brij Agrawal

2015

102

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

49

DMC Logistics

Albuquerque

dmc-logistics.com

Stephen A. Griego

1986

71

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

50

Home on the Range,
Inc.

Bernalillo

rangecafe.com

Matt S. Digregory

1992

165

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

51

Ruidoso Ford Lincoln,
Inc.

Ruidoso

ruidosoford.com

Christopher P. Carusona

1988

25

automotive dealer

52

Defined Fitness, Inc.

Albuquerque

defined.com

Traci J. Wolf

1986

550

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

53

SDV Construction, Inc.

Albuquerque

sdvconstruction.com

Kirk McWethy

2005

45

construction, real estate

54

Reynolds & Rodar
Insurance Group Inc.

Santa Fe

reynoldsinsurance.com

Jake Rodar

1882

16

professional services,
insurance, financial services

55

Molzen-Corbin &
Associates, Inc.

Albuquerque

molzencorbin.com

Adelmo “Del” Archuleta

1960

70

professional services,
insurance, financial services

56

Innovative Technology
Partnerships, LLC

Albuquerque

itpnm.com

John Jekowski

1997

36

government contracting

57

Fiore Industries

Albuquerque

fiore-ind.com

Bill Miera

1989

37

government contracting

PRIVATE 100

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

Rank

Company name

City

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

Website address

CEO’s name

Year
established

Average total
full-time (or fulltime equivalent)
employees in New
Mexico in 2015

Industry

11

58

Hot Shot Services, Inc.

Albuquerque

hotshotservice.com

Kim Housholder

1989

45

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

59

Legacy Mortgage

Albuquerque

legacylending.mortgage

Jack Thompson

2002

54

professional services,
insurance, financial services

60

Allen Sigmon Real
Estate Group

Albuquerque

allensigmon.com

Brad Allen & Lance
Sigmon

2011

58

construction, real estate

61

Smith Engineering
Company

Albuquerque

smithengineering.pro

Rebecca Fink

1998

49

professional services,
insurance, financial services

62

Rodgers Plumbing and
Heating Co., Inc.

Albuquerque

rphi.biz

James Rodgers

1973

90

construction, real estate

63

Clark Truck Equipment
Co.

Albuquerque

cte-nm.com

Chuck Clark

1947

24

manufacturing

64

McKee Wallwork & Co
LLC

Albuquerque

mckeewallwork.com

Steve McKee

1997

22

professional services,
insurance, financial services

65

Ideum Inc.

Corrales

ideum.com

Jim Spadaccini

1999

37

manufacturing

66

Mario’s Pizza

Albuquerque

mariospizzaabq.com

Joe Burgarello

1986

160

retail

67

National Heating &
Ventilating

Albuquerque

nationalheat.com

Dana Skaar

1939

45

construction, real estate

68

RiskSense, Inc.

Albuquerque

risksense.com

Dr. Srinivas Mukkamala

2015

65

technology, life sciences

69

Santa Fe Brewing Co.

Santa Fe

santafebrewing.com

Brian Lock

1988

50

manufacturing

70

Rio Grande Realty &
Investments, LLC

Corrales

rgri.net

Todd J. Kruger

2001

2

construction, real estate

71

Home Instead Senior
Care

Albuquerque

homeinstead.com

Mary Martinez

1996

161

health care

72

Heart of the Desert, Inc.

Alamogordo

heartofthedesert.com

Marianne Schweers

1992

41

retail

73

FootPrints Home Care

Albuquerque

footprintshomecare.com

Brian Fletcher

2005

107

health care

74

Geolex, Inc.

Albuquerque

geolex.com

Alberto A. Gutierrez

1996

10

energy

75

Raysteel, Inc.

Albuquerque

raysteel.com

Kenneth A. Ray

1989

29

manufacturing

76

Hospital Services
Corporation

Albuquerque

nmhsc.com

Deborah Gorenz

1985

46

health care

77

Innovative Oncology
Business Solutions, Inc.

Albuquerque

innovativeobs.com

Barbara McAneny

2012

7

health care

78

Keres Consulting Inc.

Albuquerque

keresnm.com

Timothy J. Chavez

2001

12

government contracting

79

General Mailing &
Shipping Systems, Inc.

generalmailingnm.com

Kristen Briggs

1991

14

retail

80

Anderson Air Corps

Albuquerque

andersonaircorps.com

Mike Salmon

1961

32

construction, real estate

81

Chavez-Grieves
Consulting Engineers,
Inc.

Albuquerque

cg-engrs.com

Chris Youngblood

1980

30

professional services,
insurance, financial services

82

The Hartman +
Majewski Design Group

Albuquerque

designgroupnm.com

Doug Majewski

2002

28

professional services,
insurance, financial services

83

Computer Corner, Inc.

Albuquerque

compcorner.com

Carole Petranovich

1983

17

retail

84

Rainbow Ryders, Inc.

Albuquerque

rainbowryders.com

Scott Appelman

1992

35

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

85

New Mexico Piñon
Coffee

Albuquerque

nmpinoncoffee.com

Allen Bassett

1994

26

manufacturing

86

Great River Technology,
Inc.

Albuquerque

greatrivertech.com

Jon Alexander

1996

17

technology, life sciences

12

PRIVATE 100

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

Rank

Company name

City

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

Website address

CEO’s name

Year
established

Average total
full-time (or fulltime equivalent)
employees in New
Mexico in 2015

Industry

87

AeroLynx

Albuquerque

aerolynx.com

Stephen A. Griego

1999

9

wholesale, transportation,
distribution

88

Amazing Grace
Personal Care Services

Gallup

N/A

Tom Crider

2006

75

health care

89

Pension Planning
Consultants, Inc.

Albuquerque

pensionplanning
consultants.com

Tim Haist

1971

32

professional services,
insurance, financial services

90

GenQuest, Inc.

Albuquerque

genquestinc.com

Terri Giron-Gordon

2001

20

government contracting

91

NRG Staging

Albuquerque

nrgstaging.com

Daniel J. Chavez

1985

600

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

92

LoadPath

Albuquerque

loadpath.com

Greg Sanford

2009

11

technology, life sciences

93

Gallery Painting, Inc.

Albuquerque

www.gallerypaintinginc.com

Linda J. Rizzi

1998

15

construction, real estate

94

Rio Grande Floor
Covering

Albuquerque

riograndefloorcovering.com

Phil Lloyd

2004

3

construction, real estate

95

AccuStripe, Inc.

Albuquerque

accustripe.com

Daniel Martinez

1980

40

construction, real estate

96

STAR Cryoelectronics

Santa Fe

starcryo.com

Robin Cantor

1999

8

manufacturing

97

Griffin & Associates

Albuquerque

griffinassoc.com

Joan Griffin

1990

10

professional services,
insurance, financial services

98

Annapurna’s World
Vegetarian Cafe

Albuquerque

chaishoppe.com

Yashoda Naidoo

2002

55

hospitality, tourism,
entertainment

99

Get A Grip, Inc.

Albuquerque

getagrip.com

Sharon Dillard

1999

16

construction, real estate

100

Mike’s Quality Painting,
Inc.

Los Ranchos

mikesqualitypainting.com

Miriam Freeman

2011

30

construction, real estate

Good Publicity = Good Fortune

Consistent, Effective, Creative Marketing

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0001316909-01

PRIVATE 100 SPONSORS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY
AND TO BUSINESS

F

rom the outset,
Modrall Sperling
has been committed
to the homegrown
businesses of New Mexico.
The honorees of the New
Mexico Private 100 know
first-hand that nothing
replaces the rewards of
drive, discipline and selfdetermination.
We share your
entrepreneurial spirit:
In the midst of the
Great Depression, when
conventional wisdom
counseled working
for someone else and
letting employers take
the risk, our founders
instead heeded their
own wise counsel and set
out to create a law firm
dedicated to the needs of
New Mexico’s business
community.
Today, we are just as
committed to serving
businesses as ever.
Among our number we
are proud to count the
chair-elect of the Greater
Albuquerque Chamber
of Commerce and vicechair of the Albuquerque
Hispano Chamber of
Commerce. Still another
is currently board chair of
New Mexico First.

MARLA BROSE/JOURNAL

Modrall Sperling lawyers are, from left, Stuart Butzier,
Michelle Hernandez, Meg Meister and Chris Muirhead.
Dozens of New Mexico
charities and nonprofits
have Modrall Sperling
attorneys as board
members or volunteers,
including New Mexico
Kids Matter, New Mexico
School for the Blind and
Visually Impaired, St.
Martin’s Hospitality
Center, ALS Association
of New Mexico, Santa Fe
Opera and Albuquerque
Community Foundation.
Others of our attorneys
serve the business
community through their
work at Modrall Sperling,
where they advise clients
in real estate, bond, tax
and banking matters,
environmental and water
issues, and on ERISA/

employee benefits.
We believe our work for
New Mexico business is
important because the key
to success is finding the
right partners — just as
it was back when we first
opened our doors in 1937.
Congratulations
to all the honorees.
Modrall Sperling is
proud to recognize your
accomplishments.

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

INVESTING IN GROWTH

M

oss Adams is pleased
and honored to continue
our partnership with
Bank of America Merrill
Lynch, Modrall Sperling and the
Albuquerque Journal Business
Outlook to present the top 100 private
companies of 2016.
With 29 office locations, a staff of
more than 2,500 and approximately
290 partners, Moss Adams serves
public, private and not-for-profit
enterprises across the nation in a wide
range of industries.
Our Albuquerque office has
served privately owned businesses
and organizations throughout New
Mexico since 1947. Our professionals
maintain deep expertise in a variety
of industries throughout the region,
including automotive dealerships, real
estate, construction, communications
and media, health care, technology,
manufacturing and distribution, notfor-profit and financial institutions.
Like the New Mexico Private 100
honorees, we are invested not only in
our own growth, but also the growth
of our community. Our employees
serve as leaders in local civic
organizations, performing community

GREG SORBER/JOURNAL

The partners at Moss Adams are, from
left, Jim Thompson, Tony Royle, Lisa
Todd, Steve Keene, Valerie Allen, Josh
Lewis, and Dharval Patel.
service and investing hundreds of
thousands of dollars in communities
throughout New Mexico.
Sponsoring the New Mexico
Private 100 is another way we
give back — by strengthening the
business community in the Land of
Enchantment where we work and live.
Congratulations and Thank You to
all of the honorees for the 5,000+ jobs
you have created and for being the
economic engines that fuel growth in
our great state.
We are proud to sponsor all of you in
this well-deserved recognition of your
accomplishments.

Is it time
to sell your
business?
Don’t wait another minute.
With 20 years of business ownership
experience, I’ll work overtime to get you
the most return out of your investment.
And you can spend YOUR time on
your next big idea.

THANK
YOU!

JEANNIE RANDOLPH

Jeannie@gotspaceusa.com
505 998 1571 | www.NMBizSells.com

Great Coffee
is a Matter of a

Piñon

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13

14

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

Failing work search cries out for a fresh approach
DALE & J.T. TALK JOBS

Dale Dauten & Jeanine
J.T. O’Donnall

D

EAR J.T. & DALE:
I’ve been unemployed
for a year. Should I
explain why on my
résumé or in the cover letter?
— Gene
J.T.: Neither. Explaining will
only result in you being put in
the “no” pile. Sadly, recruiters
do discriminate: They want to
hire people who are currently
working.
Dale: Which sounds
completely depressing, but
here’s the good news: Based
on your question, I’m guessing
that the problem is your
search strategy, not you. That
means you can start over, with
improved prospects for success.

J.T.: Dale is assuming that
you’re sitting back, searching
job postings and expecting your
résumé to get you a job. That
works if you have a specialty
that’s in demand but, if not,
you’re just one of hundreds or
thousands of applicants, so the
odds are long.
Dale: Exactly. There are
circumstances where a résumé
is an unemployment tool. If your
résumé had been getting results,
you’d be asking us why you’re
getting meetings and interviews,
but no offers. Instead, you’re
stuck at the application stage.
If you’d never had a résumé in
the first place, I bet you’d have
landed a job months ago.
J.T.: So, how do you move
forward? The solution is to build
a target list of employers and ask
your network to introduce you to
people who work there; you need
an opportunity to explain in
person your gap in employment.
It’s always more compelling that
way and it enables those you
meet to get your résumé into
the right hands. Also, when it
comes time to explain your long-

term unemployment, you need
to avoid blaming the economy
or bad luck, and instead focus
on being accountable. Explain
what you’ve learned from being
unemployed and how you’ve
grown as a professional.
Dale: Here’s your explanation
for unemployment: “I learned
that my job search was
completely wrong.” Go to the
library and get job-search books,
and spend some time on J.T.’s
new website, WorkItDaily.com,
and restart your search. And, as
you do, consider meeting with
staffing firms, seeking contract
work and even doing volunteer
work related to your field. Get
out, use your skills, meet people
— that new energy will show up
in your search.
Dear J.T. & Dale: I’ve been
caring for my sick parents
for two years. My dad just
passed away. My mom still
requires care. I desperately
want to work outside the
house but, given the level
of care she needs, that’s
pretty impossible. We can’t

financially swing it for
someone to care for her. Do
you have any suggestions for
work I could do part-time?
I just miss being with other
people. — Raina
J.T.: Caring for family can
put a real strain on us; we never
realize how much we enjoyed
working until it’s taken away.
Have you ever considered
finding an elder-care company
where you could bring your
mom to the job? You’ve certainly
built up a lot of skills in this
area, so perhaps you could
work at a facility and your mom
could join you. That way, you’d
be with other people and would
be able to manage her care.
Additionally, folks in the health
care community may have other
suggestions. You are not alone in
this and I bet they’ll have some
options for you.
Dale: Great idea. I hope that
works. If not, I’d urge you to seek
part-time employment that you
could do at your mother’s home.
Plenty of employers have tapped
into the job pool of those who
want to work at home, mostly

young parents. You might think
that this possibility falls short
of your desire to get out and be
with other people, but maybe
not. You’ll have interactions
over the phone and you’ll make
enough money that you can hire
someone to come in and care for
Mom while you go into the office
for staff meetings or training.
Over time, you may find that you
can afford to spend additional
time at an office, plus you’ll
be putting yourself in a solid
position to eventually return full
time to the workforce.
Jeanine “J.T.” Tanner O’Donnell is a
professional development specialist
and the founder of the consulting
firm jtodonnell. Dale Dauten resolves
employment and other business
disputes as a mediator with
AgreementHouse.com. Please visit
them at jtanddale.com, where you
can send questions via email, or
write to them in care of King Features
Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., 15th Floor,
New York, NY 10019.

Lack of predictability doesn’t help NM’s business climate
JACOBSEN’S
COUNSEL

Joel Jacobsen

M

any years
ago, when I
was what is
universally
known in the profession
as a baby lawyer, a senior
partner sent me to advise
a client with a small legal
problem. I spent a few
hours reading the statutes
and looking up cases until
I had a pretty good grasp
of what needed to be done.

When I met the client the
following morning, I made
the mistake of starting
with a joke, saying: “There
are three ways of handling
this matter, two of which
are legal.” I outlined the
two options with their
pros and cons, then fell
silent, awaiting the client’s
choice. The client blandly
asked: “And our third
option?”
Some good things
came out of the episode. I
learned a little about client
management and the
partner never asked me to
work with that particular
client again.
The familiar phrase
“attorney and counsellor
at law” may sound
redundant, but it

accurately describes
the two different roles
that together go far
to define the legal
profession. Sometimes,
lawyers advocate on
behalf of their clients,
serving as tactician and
mouthpiece. That’s the
role of an attorney, one
who represents another.
It’s the role we assume
when things go wrong and
litigation impends.
But before that turning
point, while the fan blades
are still clean, lawyers
serve as counsellors at
law, advising clients how
to avoid legal difficulties.
That’s what I tried
to do for that client.
Sometimes giving advice
is straightforward. There

may be a statute directly
addressing the client’s
situation, spelling out in
recipe-like detail exactly
what can and can’t be
done.
But usually statutes
aren’t quite so clear.
No legislature can
foresee every possibility.
Language is slippery.
Sometimes the intent
of the statute is at odds
with the literal meaning
of some sub-sub-section.
When such ambiguities
arise, the statute requires
interpretation and that’s
the job of the courts. The
lawyer-as-counselor has
to predict how courts will
interpret the statute and
then work out what that
means for the client.

It’s generally easier to
make such predictions
about federal law because
the lawyer can research
how judges around the
country have dealt with
the problem. If all the
federal courts to have
considered a given statute
have adopted the same
interpretation, the odds
are excellent that our local
federal judges will fall in
line. That makes it easy to
give useful advice.
The situation is different
with regard to state law.
Here in New Mexico, it’s
not unusual for a statute
to sit on the books for
decades without ever
being interpreted in
any published appellate
decision. In part, that’s

a natural result of
our relatively small
population. According to
the website Ballotpedia,
the California Supreme
Court handles sixteen
times more cases than
the New Mexico Supreme
Court. So, of course, we
have fewer published
opinions, which means
more blank spaces on our
jurisprudential map.
Sometimes the only
See UNCERTAINTY >> 18

REROOF NOW!!
TERRITORIAL
ROOFING CO.
265-6152

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016

BUSINESS OUTLOOK

15

Without returns, Trump tax techniques a mystery
ON THE
MONEY

Jim Hamill

S

everal people have
asked me if I planned to
write about the Donald
Trump net operating-loss
disclosure from earlier this
month. I first responded that I
did not, for two reasons.
First, a variety of tax experts
had already weighed in on the
issue. Second, we really don’t
know enough about the losses in
question to have a well-informed
opinion.
But I decided to simply offer a
summary of what we know and
what we don’t know about those
1995 disclosures.
First, I’ll offer a conclusion.
I have seen many articles
explaining how to “make

sense” of the 1995 Trump tax
filings. They are all wrong.
Why? Because we do not have
sufficient information to
understand how the NOL was
computed, and how it was used
in pre- and post-1995 returns.
Without that added
information there is no making
sense of the limited disclosures.
But some things that have been
said are wrong. Others may be
right.
What is wrong is the statement
that a NOL is a “loophole.” A
NOL, if properly computed and
used, is a logical application of
the tax laws.
Our income tax system
taxes income (no surprise
there). But it does so using an
annual accounting period. We
file returns every year and
determine income, and the
resulting tax, for each year.
If a business makes $1 million
in its first year, it should pay
tax on that income. If it loses
$1 million in its second year,
it should pay no income tax in
year two.
But income for both years is

now zero. The government’s
tax collections in year one
occurred because the business
must report its income for a
12-month accounting period, not
24 months.
The NOL rule creates a very
logical policy result that the
business with zero net income
for two years should pay zero
net tax. The year two loss in my
example could be carried back
to year one and a refund would
be obtained for the taxes paid in
year one.
There is nothing wrong with
this. Any tax professional
has carried back and carried
forward business NOLs for
many clients.
The most shocking thing
about the Trump NOL is not that
it existed or that it was perhaps
used in other tax years. It is the
size of the NOL — $916 million —
that is staggering.
So calling the existence or the
use of an NOL a “loophole” is
simply an uninformed view. But
there are a few oddities about
the Trump story.
First, we have no idea how

the NOL was computed.
Its staggering size should
raise questions about this
computation. Without facts,
we do not know if the law was
followed in this computation.
Second, Trump has stated
that he was heavily leveraged
at the time the loss occurred.
If many of the deductions were
financed by borrowings that
were either canceled or reduced
through workouts, there should
be offsetting income from debt
discharge.
Again, no one knows how the
debt discharge issue affected the
Trump filings. We don’t have the
information to determine the
proper answer.
Lee Sheppard of Tax Analysts
has offered what I think is
the most logical, and tax
defensible, explanation for a
lack of offsetting debt discharge
income.
If Trump held his investments
through an S corporation,
a discharge of debt that had
financed tax losses would not
create income if the corporation
was insolvent at discharge.

And the losses could have been
claimed even if financed by that
debt.
This result required taking
an aggressive filing position
in 1995. But that aggressive
position, after being rejected
by the Tax Court and the 10th
Circuit, was accepted by the
Supreme Court in a January
2001 decision.
The law was changed shortly
after the Supreme Court
decision, but only for debt
discharges occurring after Oct.
11, 2001.
The Supreme Court decision
showed Congress there was a
loophole, so the law change was
to close the loophole.
So if Trump took advantage
of a loophole, it was not the
use of an NOL. It was avoiding
offsetting income for discharge
of debt that financed the NOL.
But no one knows. We don’t have
the returns, so we can’t know.
James R. Hamill is the director of Tax
Practice at Reynolds, Hix & Co. in
Albuquerque. He can be reached at
jimhamill@rhcocpa.com.

Launched in tough times, real estate
firm has gotten off to quick start
REAL ESTATE

Steve Sinovic

B

rad Allen and Lance Sigmon
hit the ground running
when they left Roger Cox
& Associates five years
ago to form their own real estate
brokerage, property management
and investment company.
With 10 kids between them, the
partners had a lot of mouths to feed
and were very motivated — not

only to provide for their families,
but also to help themselves and
others advance personally and
professionally.
Five years later, the partners now
have 64 employees on the payroll
and manage or own 1 million
square feet of retail, office, multifamily, hotel and industrial space
in New Mexico with a value of $100
million.
Allen and Sigmon got started
during the most challenging of
times when the commercial real
estate market was just starting to
show a pulse after the worst effects
of the recession. They launched
their business when three basic
measures of commercial real estate
health — property values, vacancy

and leases rates — had decreased by
double digits.
“When you are able to get through
those, you learn from them and it
makes you more adept at handling
other bad cycles,” said Allen, adding
the company picked up distressed
properties, bidding on foreclosed
real estate or defaulted loans,
improving them and leasing them.
Sigmon credits Allen for his fiscal
savvy. “He’s a saver,” he said of his
partner, who makes sure projects
are underwritten and financed with
the most advantageous terms and
rates.
As the company added to its
COURTESY OF ALLEN SIGMON REAL ESTATE GROUP
portfolio, the partners bought a
Lance
Sigmon,
left,
and
Brad Allen formed their own comcorporate headquarters and staffed
mercial real estate services firm five years ago. The comSee ABQ >> 17 pany has grown to 64 staffers, many of whom work offsite.

From pizza to high tech, NM’s
Private 100 companies deliver
From PAGE 2

and is currently seeking expansion
opportunities on Albuquerque’s West
Side.
“It makes us feel good (to make this
list),” said Eddy Burgarello, who owns
the business with brothers Joe and Sal,
building upon the foundation their father
started laying when he opened his first
Albuquerque restaurant in 1972.
Getting to this point also makes him
feel grateful.
“I’m proud of our employees that have
been with us for a long time. I’m proud
of our regulars who keep on supporting
us. They’re a godsend; without them, we
wouldn’t be around,” Burgarello said.
As is customary, the Private 100 is
Albuquerque-centric. Most companies
that made it call Albuquerque home,
though there are representatives from
Santa Fe, Las Cruces, Alamogordo and
Ruidoso.
Companies headquartered in New
Mexico apply for the New Mexico Private
100. The 100 with the highest revenue
make the final list.

The top three companies last year also
landed up there again, albeit in a slightly
different order. Summit Electric Supply
remains No. 1, though Ernest Health (No.
2) and Garcia Automotive Group (No. 3)
have swapped spots this year.
While none cracked the top three,
construction and real estate companies
have the highest concentration, with
a total of 29 spots. Jaynes Corp. at No.
5 leads the way in that sector; 11 other
firms landed in the top 30.
Many of them are stalwarts that have
made the Private 100 more years than
some of the list’s younger companies have
been in existence. Nearly a quarter (24)
of this year’s companies started in 2000
or later.
“This year’s Private 100 list provides
a good mix of companies in our state
— some have been around for many
years and have formed the backbone
of New Mexico’s economy, while others
are new to the list and provide evidence
that the entrepreneurial community
is developing,” said Modrall Sperling
President Walter Stern.

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BUSINESS OUTLOOK

ABQ real estate firm
off to quick start
From PAGE 15

up.
“We are rarely sellers;
we are typically buy-andhold guys,” said Allen,
who detailed a busy year,
which included the sale
of a 150,000-square-foot
industrial property in
Rio Rancho that had been
listed for $8.2 million. At
some point (as an investor),
you take those funds and
redeploy them elsewhere
where the growth
potential is higher,” he
said.
“We are actively looking
at other opportunities,
preferably the purchase of
another office-warehouse
type of product,” he said of
the rest of the company’s

partners, which includes
Robert Powell and Jeff
Martinez.
The firm is taking
a broad approach as
investors and developers.
Total Management
Systems and Allen Sigmon
signed an agreement
in April with Aggie
Development Inc. to build
and run a four-story, 122room hotel on 2.7 acres of
university land next to the
Las Cruces Convention
Center. Total Management
also worked with partners
from Allen Sigmon in
2015 to finish and open
the Home2 Suites by the
Hilton hotel near the Big-I.
“It takes more than two
people to be successful in

this business, to have a
vision and carry it out,”
said Sigmon. “It’s all about
having the right people in
the right seats,” he said,
adding the duo handpicked
every single employee —
from the maintenance
workers at the hotels to
project managers, sales
and leasing reps, and
accounting staffers.
While the team
wouldn’t look askance
at opportunities in
adjacent states, New
Mexico investments and
developments clearly will
remain the priority. “Most
of our partners are local,”
said Allen. “We want to
help grow New Mexico as
much as possible.”

17

PITCHING IN
JOURNAL STAFF REPORTS

Wells Fargo gives to
Habitat for Humanity
Wells Fargo & Co. has announced
it will donate $105,000 to Greater
Albuquerque Habitat for Humanity
and $80,000 to Habitat for Humanity
New Mexico as part of $6 million in
grants awarded across 56 nonprofits
through its 2016 Wells Fargo Housing
Foundation Priority Markets
Program.
The program provides support to
neighborhood revitalization projects
to further economic recovery in local
communities.
Greater Albuquerque Habitat
will use the funding to build out
eight home sites at its Mesa del Rio
project on the West Side; Habitat New
Mexico will distribute its funding to

affiliates in six rural New Mexican
communities.
Wells Fargo President for New
Mexico and El Paso Lisa Riley said,
“The work Habitat does to build
homes for low-income families is
essential in our communities. We’re
thrilled to provide financial support
and our team members look forward
to volunteering on the construction
projects, as well.”
“We are in awe of the support we
have received from Wells Fargo,
both in the past and currently,” said
Greater Albuquerque Habitat for
Humanity Executive Director Joan
Costello.
“Their support is a key factor for
us in continuing our mission to build
single-family homes for low-income
families.”

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