Volume IX Issue 11

S O N S O F C O N FE D E RAT E V E T E RAN S CAM P # 2 6 5

ROUGH
AND

READYS

RANKIN

November 2016

CAMP
265

RANKIN DISPATCH
N E W S LE TT E R O F T H E RAN K I N R O U G H & R EADY’S

COMMANDER’S QUOTE: “If it’s important to you, you’ll find a way. If not- you’ll find an excuse.”

COMMANDER’S REPORT
Our November 5th meeting will be the best this year! We will have an election for camp officers, we will be
giving away an original Confederate Bond valued at $650, and if that isn't enough, Mr. Grady Howell will be
our speaker! His topic will be The Battle of Shiloh. Remember the drawing for the confederate bond will
only be for members who are current on their dues. If you pay your dues or join the camp at the November
5th meeting, your name will be included in the drawing! So, come early, bring someone with you, and as
sure as the next president of the United States will be elected on November 8th, I'll probably see you at our
next meeting on November 5th at Penn's in Brandon at 7:00pm.

-Tim Cupit

October Guest Speaker
Mississippi author Jim Woodrick was our guest speaker at
the October 1st meeting. He spoke about his book titled
“The Civil War Siege of Jackson Mississippi”. A very
interesting history lesson about places and landmarks we
see everyday that are hidden in plain view. From the old
insane asylum on the grounds of the University Medical
Center, to the few remaining trenches and earthworks in
Battlefield Park. A history lesson that has been
misunderstood for years is now explained. Pick up your
copy of Mr. Woodrick’s book locally or online today!

MEETING AGENDA FOR NOVEMBER 5, 2016
Agenda for November 5, 2016
- Open with prayer at 7pm sharp
- Pledge of Allegiance to the US Flag and salutes
- Trivia
- Guest speaker; Grady Howell - The Battle of Shiloh – Q&A

New Business
- New Members
-Election of Officers
- Did everyone sign in?
- Does everyone have a door prize ticket?
- Door Prizes
- Open Floor
- Drawing for Confederate bond valued at $600.
Only paid members are eligible for the drawing!
- Close with prayer at approximately 8:20pm

Unfinished Business
- Camp T-Shirts are $20 – proceeds go to fund the Relic Show
- www.scv265.com and Camp Facebook stats
- First Thursday Coin Club meeting at Brandon library 6:30pm
- Last call for dues- letter was sent to unpaid members on Oct 11
- Fall Muster report
Please leave $1.00 tip for the crew that cleans up!
- Set a date for our Adopt a Highway trash pick up
*STAYAND HELPPUT UPTABLES*

CHAPLAIN’S REPORT
by Tom Fortenberry
Muster the Troops
Joshua 1:9 Have not I commanded thee? Be strong and of a
good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for
the Lord thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest.
KJV
Last week as I traveled to the 2016 October Fall Muster in
Biloxi. I am always strengthened in my resolve to find a
renewed spirit for the cause for Southern freedom. It was
refreshing to see so many young children, families,
Mississippi Division Camps, Division Leadership, and the
staff at Beauvoir each a part of the muster. They are the ones
who make the muster happen and continue the spirit and
vision of who we are, Southern by the grace of God. After
three days of activities I had already begun to look forward
to the next fall muster and maybe even a future Spring
muster in Corinth. Just to put an idea in the air.
A muster by definition is by its own a means by which a
military group of men and women are assembled for
inspection and testing. While the Sons of Confederate
Veterans are not a military group we muster together each
year to honor the lives of those who fought during the War
for Southern Independence. We remember them today
because of who they were and for all that they gave, even
their lives for a just cause.
It is often said that when soldiers muster the enemy sees.
When soldiers are trained and ready the enemy is shaken.
And when soldiers act in the strength of God the enemy
flees.
Remember Joshua 1:9. “Be strong and of good courage”
May God bless each of you
Thomas Fortenberry, Chaplain, Camp 265

“You cannot be a true man
until you learn to obey.”
- Confederate General, Robert E. Lee

ADJUTANT’S REPORT
by Sid Boteler

WinterAt Valley Forge
After the American victory at Saratoga, British
General Howe struck back by driving the patriots
out of Philadelphia. While 11,000 Americans died
on British starving ships soldiers setup camp,
December 19, 1777, at Valley Forge, just 25 miles
from Philadelphia. Soldiers were from every state
in the new union. Ages 12 to 60, White, African
American and even American Indian. Over 2,500
died at teh rate of 12 per day from freezing
exposure, hunger and disease. A Committee from
Congress reported: "Feet and legs froze until they
became black, and it was often necessary to
amputate them."
Lutheran Pastor Henry Muhlenberg wrote in THE
NOTEBOOK OFACOLONIAL CLERGYMAN:
“I heard a fine example today, namely that his
excellency, General Washington rode around
among his army yesterday and admonished each
and every one to fear God, to put away the
wickedness... and to practice the Christian
virtues... God has... marvelously, preserved him
from harm in the midst of countless perils,
ambuscades, fatigues”
On December 24, 1983 President Ronald Reagan
stated in a RadioAddress:
“The image of George Washington kneeling in
prayer in the snow is one of the most famous in
American history.”

Hessian Major Carl Leopold Baurmeister noted the
only thing that kept the American army form
disintegrating was their "spirit of liberty". In
February 1778, Prussian Officer Baron von Stuben
arrived to train and drill the American Volunteers,
transforming them into an army. On April 21, 1778
Washington wrote to Lt. Col. John Banister:
“No history... can furnish an instance of an army's
suffering such uncommon hardships as ours has
done and bearing them with the same patience and
fortitude–
To see men without clothes to cover their nakedness,
without blankets to lay on, without shoes by which
their marches might be traced by the blood from
their feet, and almost as often without provisions...
marching through frost and snow, and at Christmas
taking up their winter quarters within a days march
of their enemy, without a house or a hut to cover
them... and submitting to it without a murmur, is a
mark of patience and obedience which in my
opinion cna scarce be paralleled.”
Taken from: Miracles in American History by Susie
Federer
Adapted from: American Minute by William J.
Federer

THE WIG WAG
The oldest flag system associated with the US Army Signal
Corps is called Wig-wag. The name reflects the concept of
back and forth movement as a means of signaling through
motion. (PLEASE NOTE: Often this system has been
misidentified as “Wig-wam.” A Wig-wam is a temporary
arched framework structure overlaid with bark or hides to
provide shelter used by Native Americans of the Algonquian
language group.) Wig-wag is the signaling system developed
for military field operations by Army surgeon Albert J. Myer
prior to the Civil War. He developed this system based on a
two element “tap-code” he created for the deaf. Myers’ Wigwag system uses one flag for signaling. The position of the
flags, left, right, front, represent the numerals 1, 2, 3
respectively and combinations of these numerals are used to
convey the message.
The one-flag Wig-wag system used a cotton flag of two, four,
or six feet square. The larger the flag, the greater distance it
could be seen. The flag pole could be extended to a length of
16 feet using 4-foot segments joined with brass fittings. It
took a strong soldier to wave a 16 foot pole with a 6-foot
square flag on it for an hour or more, especially in wind, heat
and probably under enemy fire. During night operations, the
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q

22
2112
121
222
12
2221
2211
122
1
1122
2121
221
1221
11
21
1212
1211

R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
&
-ing
-tion

211
212
2
112
1222
1121
2122
111
2222
1111
2212
1112

end of word
3
33 end of sentence
333 end of message

flag was replaced with a specially designed kerosene fueled
torch, but employed exactly as the flag would be during
daytime. During daytime operations, different sizes and colors
of flags were employed based upon atmospheric conditions,
such as clouds, haze, blue sky, etc. The signal soldier had these
varieties of flags as part of their kit, but at any one time, only
one flag or torch was used for signaling.
The Myer Wig-wag system and associated codes were used by
both Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. The
Union Navy also employed this system and it served as the
first Joint Signal Code between the Army and Navy until the
end of the nineteenth century.
To summarize, the Wig-wag system used one flag or one torch
for operations. If you are a Signal soldier, do not call it Wigwam as your branch founder Albert J. Myer would not be
happy with you.
Taken from “The Signal Corps Regimental History”
http://signal.army.mil/old/history/00_wig_wag.html

PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS - THEY SUPPORT US!

The Sons of Confederate Veterans
Camp #265

THE RANKIN DISPATCH
317 Lake Heather Road
Brandon, MS 39047

Our next meeting is November 5th
at Penn’s in Brandon at 7:00pm.
Come early!

NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
BRANDON, MS
PERMIT NO. 265