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PROJECT REPORT

ON

PROMOTION OF SURF EXCEL

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of the


degree of BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
To

GURU GOBIND SINGH INDRAPRASTHAUNIVERSITY

SUPERVISED BY: MRS.ANITA SHARMA


(FACULTY GUIDE)

SUBMITTED BY: ADITYA AGGARWAL


ROLL NO.:-1072120173

MAHARAJA SURAJMAL INSTITUTE


C-4, JANAKPURI NEW DELHI-58

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I have taken efforts in this project. However, it would not
have been possible without the kind support and help of
many individuals and organizations. I would like to extend
my sincere thanks to all of them.
I thank my God for providing me with everything that I
required in completing this project.
I am highly indebted to the Teacher in Charge Mr. ANITA
SHARMA for his guidance and constant supervision as well
as for providing necessary information regarding the project
& also for his support in completing the project.
I would like to express my gratitude towards my parents for
their kind co-operation and encouragement which helped me
in the completion of this project.
I would like to express my special gratitude and thanks to
industry persons for giving me such attention and time.
My thanks and appreciations also go to my classmates in
developing the project and to the people who have willingly
helped me out with their abilities.

CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the project titled SURVEY OF SURF
EXCEL submitted by ADITYA AGGARWAL to Maharaja
Surajmal Institute, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha
University, New Delhi in partial fulfillment of requirement
for the award of the Bachelor of Business Administration

degree is an original piece of work carried out under my


guidance
assistance

and

may

rendered

be

submitted

during

the

for

study

evaluation.

The

has

duly

been

acknowledged. No part of this work has been submitted for


any other degree.

Place: New Delhi

Faculty

Guide:
Dated:

Mrs. ANITA

SHARMA

CONTENTS
DECLARATION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
CHAPTER -1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
OBJECTIVE & SCOPE OF THE STUDY
ADVERTISING INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
COMPANY PROFILE
HINDUSTAN UNILEVER CO PROFILE
MAIL REPORT PAGE
SWOT ANALYSIS OF CAMPAIGN

CHAPTER - 2

2.1 MEANING OF RESEARCH


2.2 DATA COLLECTION
2.3 RESEARCH DESIGN
CHAPTER - 3
3.1 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETAION
CHAPTER 4
4.1 FINDINGS
4.2 CONCLUSION
4.3 RECOMMENDATIONS
4.4 LIMITAION
4. 5 QUESTIONNAIRE
BIBLIOGRAPHY

CHAPTER 1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
On summers what would be the worse problem? Obviously, the problem of
water i.e. waters scarcity. Water scarcity happens because of high
consumption and wastage of water. The research has said that the most
highly consumption of water goes in washing clothes. To solve this problem
HLL has launched Surf Excel Quick Wash, with a low foaming

formulation which reduces the amount of water rinsing by up to 2 buckets a


wash and to get the problem solved OGILVY took Surf Excel Quick Wash
to each and every individual of this country. The target audiences were the
people living in D class areas where the water scarcity problem is more than
other areas. Number of tools like a pictorial story in a flip chart format, the
demonstration and a quiz with attractive prizes to reinforce the message was
used to make the module interactive and gain involvement from children.
The demonstration is a unique tool to show the audiences that how Surf
Excel Quick Wash saves 2 buckets of Water and also get the clothes rid off
stain. The objective of this study is to bring about a change in the underlying
behaviors and attitudes of the target audience towards detergent and
effective communication, which reinforce the saving 2 buckets of water
message.
The report in brief comprises of the manner in which all the activities has
been carried out by me right from Selecting a location for demo, Selecting of
promoters, Briefing to promoters, Supervising location to location that
whether the communication, demo, Brand repetition, Brand message
repetition is going effectively and efficiently or not. I was handling work
force of 50 in West Delhi. I used to fill daily monitoring reports, if I would
found any problem in any team, I would get it rectified by their supervisor.
The project also includes the personal interaction with target audience and
analyzing consumer behavior towards detergents and their washing habits.
For the effective result I designed the Structured Questionnaire which got
filled by the target audience after completing of demonstration to see the
immediate effect of Demo.
Note: D class areas are those where the low income group.

OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE


OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
Brand promotion of SURF EXCEL QUICK WASH.
Brand positioning of surf excel in C, class areas.
Analyzing washing habits of the target market.

To know Consumer behavior towards detergent.


To know the awareness of surf excel quick wash.
Increasing market share by penetration in new markets.
.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY


This study will help to learn the work culture in and around the
organization.
Dwells on all the aspects of consumer behavior i.e.
1. consumer reaction
2. consumer satisfaction
3. consumer feedback
It helps to learn how the campaigns are carried out in C class areas.
This study will help to know about the consumer different reactions
towards campaign, how they react to different activities of campaign
that whether such kind of campaigns really makes them to change
their Brand.
This study will help to know about the likes and dislikes of the
consumer.
This study will help to know: what are the washing habits and
consumer behavior towards detergent.
This study can help any Detergent company to position the brand in
the C class areas.

ADVERTISING INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

Primary Functions of Advertising Agency

The primary functions of advertising agencies are planning and creating


advertising campaigns for clients and placing advertisements in various
media. Planning consists of researching the market for a given product
or service, assessing alternative methods of distribution and choosing the
most effective way to reach the market. The agency then creates the
advertising campaign and contracts for time and space with selected
media. The ultimate objectives of advertising agencies include helping
advertisers attain sales objectives, market share and long-term
profitability.
For every organization and every product or service, advertising tends to
fulfill a specific goal or objective. Nevertheless on the general front,
advertising is a mechanism that fulfils all, some or one of the three major
functions:
Firstly advertising has an informing nature about organizations, about
products and services, about the environment, the society, the trends in
society and many more aspects of life. This deals with the cognitive context
of the target audience in which they grasp the information and channelize it
according to their own comprehension and predilection.
Secondly advertising provides the incentives to viewers for them to engage
in action. This deals with the emotional dimension of the target audience,
which concentrates on touching and persuading the consumers rather than
informing and apprising them.
The third function of advertising is to provide constant reminders and
reinforcements to generate the desired behavior the advertiser wants from
them. This is a particularly effective function in the long run as reminders
and reinforcements register in the consumers' minds, becoming the base on
which they shape their future decisions.

Size of the Advertising Industry


At present, there are large numbers of advertising agencies in the world, of
which most are small businesses with less than six people. Nearly one-third
of them are one-person operations and still another third have fewer than
five employees. The remaining third is a number of large organizations,

some of which employ over 2,000 people. Advertising industry growth has
been, and is expected to continue, out pacing the gross national product
(GNP). Future expenditures for the advertising industry are expected to be
enhanced by the entry of new companies in to the marketplace and by the
introduction of new products by existing firms. Also because corporate
profits continue to be strong, the number of product introductions has
increased, and because deregulation of television has opened up airwaves to
commercial time in several European countries, advertising spending is
projected to exceed 1987 levels by 8-9 percent (Value Line, pp. 180-182). A
unique factor of the advertising industry is that all agencies are
independently owned and operated; there are no franchises.

Economic Performance of the Advertising Industry and future


Outlook
The historical performance of the industry over the past 16 years has shown
great increases in advertising expenditures, agency billings, agency revenue
and employment. Both expenditures and billings have tripled, revenue has
increased five times over and employment has nearly doubled. Using the
historical performance of the industry, an assumption can be made stating
that advertising expenditures, agency billings, agency revenue and number
of employees will continue to increase. Furthermore, industries sales were
predicted to peak for the 1988-89 year at $25.2 billion. Current trends in the
industry are important to future expectations. As of this last decade, a
smorgasbord of super agencies has emerged, offering a menu of services
ranging from the traditional ad creation and placement of advertisements, to
market research and total campaign development and execution. All of these
activities are being pursued on a national and global basis. In fact, many
advertising agencies are on their way to becoming primarily "marketing
agencies". Additionally, international (overseas) advertising has been
increasing over the years and is expected to continue doing so. For the 1988
fiscal year, spending was expected to increase by 10.3-12 percent, bringing
total sales to $223.4 billion.

Trends in Media Prices

Prices for buying advertising exposure in newspaper, magazines, network


TV, spot TV, network radio, outdoor advertising and direct mail fliers have
all increased over the past eight years. Newspapers make the largest jump,
up by 75 percent. Sport TV is close behind, up 60 percent (Industry
Surveys). Increased media rates and rising demand for advertising time and
space have driven this trend, which has even held true during sluggish
economic growth. Several factors have fueled the demand for time and
space: the entry of new companies into the marketplace, the introduction of
new products and services, greater affluence, the growing number of women
in the labor force and growth in numbers of people in their prime buying
Years (Industry Surveys). Television ad expenditures are expected to rise 11
percent, to $26.8 billion. Radio ad expenditures are expected to rise 13
percent, to a total of 38.4 billion. Additionally, magazine ad expenditures
should grow 6.5 percent, to $9 billion, and outdoor advertising should rise 5
percent to $1.4 billion.
Regulators of Advertising
The strict advertising controls are imposed by Federal and state laws. The
Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is the major regulator of national
advertising, and its efforts are largely directed toward protecting consumers
by policing the media. Federal regulation first developed with the passing of
the Sherman Antitrust Act in 1890 and has continued to grow from other acts
(Bovee, Appendix A). Many cities and countries also enforce laws regulating
local advertising practices through consumer protection
Agencies Moreover, self-regulation within the industry has increased. Today
regulation is widely conducted by industry trade associations, professional
organizations, advertising agencies, media trade organizations, business
organizations and the National Advertising Review Board. Ad agencies can
best regulate themselves by being responsible. They can research and verify
all product claims and comparative product data before using them in
advertising.
Furthermore, the agency and the advertiser are both separately and equally
responsible for advertising presented to the consumer. Each party is
considered knowledgeable in its own areas of expertise. The agency on its
part is responsible for truthful photography of the product, documentation of
demonstrations, and the substantiation of consumer testimonials (Gaedeke).

Many of the larger agencies now have legal departments. Other agencies
check advertising with outside legal counsel.

Advertising managers must remember to perform two functions:


(1) Judge what is effective, and
(2) Judge what is truthful and socially responsible.

The American Association of Advertising Agencies


A key source of information for an advertising agency is the American
Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA). This organization is a
membership, industry association that fosters standards of conduct and
competency. A basic qualification of membership in the AAAA is that the
agency must be an independent business organization; any advertising
medium or supplier cannot own it. The qualification is based on the premise
that only an independent agency can provide the unbiased and objective
counsel that the advertiser needs. AAAA member agencies handle
approximately 70-80 percent of all the agency-placed advertising in the
United States. More information on the AAAA, other industry associations,
and related professional organizations can be found in the Standard
Directory of Advertising Agencies available at most local libraries.

Advertising and Public Relations Services


Nature of the Industry
Goods and services. Firms in the advertising and public relations services
industry prepare advertisements for other companies and organizations and
design campaigns to promote the interests and image of their clients. This
industry also includes media representativesfirms that sell advertising
space for publications, radio, television, and the Internet; display advertisers

businesses engaged in creating and designing public display ads for use in
shopping malls, on billboards, or in similar media; and direct mail
advertisers. A firm that purchases advertising time (or space) from media
outlets, thereafter reselling it to advertising agencies or individual companies
directly, is considered a media buying agency. Divisions of companies that
produce and place their own advertising are not considered part of this
industry.
Industry organization. In 2008, there were about 50,100 advertising and
public relations services establishments in the United States. About 38
percent write copy and prepare artwork, graphics, and other creative work,
and then place the resulting ads on television, radio, or the Internet or in
periodicals, newspapers, or other advertising media. Within the industry,
only these full-service establishments are known as advertising agencies.
About 18 percent were public relations firms. Many of the largest agencies
are international, with a substantial proportion of their revenue coming from
abroad.
Most advertising firms specialize in a specific market niche. Some
companies produce and solicit outdoor advertising, such as billboards and
electric displays. Others place ads in buses, subways, taxis, airports, and bus
terminals. A small number of firms produce aerial advertising, while others
distribute circulars, handbills, and free samples.
Many agencies have created units to better serve their clients' electronic
advertising needs on the Internet. Online advertisements link users to a
company's or product's Website, where information such as new product
announcements, contests, and product catalogs appear, and from which
purchases may be made.
Some firms are not involved in the creation of ads at all; instead, they sell
advertising time or space on radio and television stations or in publications.
Because these firms do not produce advertising, their staffs are mostly
account executives.
Companies often look to advertising as a way of boosting sales by increasing
the public's exposure to a product or service. Most companies do not have
the staff with the necessary skills or experience to create effective
advertisements; furthermore, many advertising campaigns are temporary, so
employers would have difficulty maintaining their own advertising staff.
Instead, companies commonly solicit bids from ad agencies to develop
advertising for them. Ad agencies offering their services to the company

often make presentations. After winning an account, various departments


within an agencysuch as creative, production, media, research, and
planningwork together to meet the client's goal of increasing sales.
Widespread public relations services firms can influence how businesses,
governments, and institutions make decisions. Often working behind the
scenes, these firms have a variety of functions. In general, firms in public
relations services advise and implement public exposure strategies. For
example, a public relations firm might issue a press release that is printed in
newspapers across the country. Firms in public relations services offer one or
more resources that clients cannot provide themselves. Usually this resource
is expertise in the form of knowledge, experience, special skills, or
creativity; but sometimes the resource is time or personnel that the client
cannot spare. Clients of public relations firms include all types of
businesses, institutions, trades, and public interest groups, and even highprofile individuals. Clients are large and small for-profit firms in the private
sector; State, local, or Federal Governments; hospitals, universities, unions,
and trade groups; and foreign governments or businesses.
Public relations firms help secure favorable public exposure for their clients,
advise them in the case of a sudden public crisis, and design strategies to
help them attain a certain public image. Toward these ends, public relations
firms analyze public or internal sentiment about clients; establish
relationships with the media; write speeches and coach clients for
interviews; issue press releases; and organize client-sponsored publicity
events, such as contests, concerts, exhibits, symposia, and sporting and
charity events.
Lobbying firms, a special type of public relations firm, differ somewhat.
Instead of attempting to secure favorable public opinion about their clients,
they attempt to influence legislators in favor of their clients' special interests.
Lobbyists often work for large businesses, industry trade organizations,
unions, or public interest groups.
Recent developments. In an effort to attract and maintain clients, advertising
and public relations services agencies are diversifying their services,
offering advertising as well as public relations, sales, marketing, and
interactive media services. Additionally, many agencies are increasingly
focusing their effort and financial resources to Internet advertising,
reflecting, in large part, the growing number of Internet users. Advertising
and public relations services firms have found that highly creative work is

particularly suitable for their services, resulting in a better product and


increasing their clients' profitability.
Working Conditions
Work environment. Most employees in advertising and public relations
services work in comfortable offices operating in a teamwork environment;
however, long hours, including evenings and weekends, are common. There
are fewer opportunities for part-time work than in many other industries; in
2008, 12 percent of advertising and public relations employees worked part
time, compared with 16 percent of all workers.
Work in advertising and public relations is fast-paced and exciting, but it
also can be stressful. Being creative on a tight schedule can be emotionally
draining. Some workers, such as lobbyists, consultants, and public relations
writers, frequently must meet deadlines and, consequently, may work long
hours at times. Workers, whose services are billed hourly, such as
advertising consultants and public relations specialists, are often under
pressure to manage their time carefully. In addition, frequent meetings with
clients and media representatives may involve substantial travel.
Most firms encourage employees to attend employer-paid time-management
classes, which help reduce the stress sometimes associated with working
under strict time constraints. Also, with today's hectic lifestyle, many firms
in this industry offer or provide health facilities or clubs to help employees
maintain good health.

Employment
The advertising and public relations services industry employed 462,300
wage and salary workers in 2008.
Although advertising and public relations services firms are located
throughout the country, they are concentrated in the largest States and cities.
California and New York together account for about 19 percent of firms and
28 percent of the workers in the industry. Firms vary in size, ranging from
one-person shops to international agencies employing thousands of workers.

However, 68 percent of all advertising and public relations establishments


employ fewer than 5 employees.
The small size of the average advertising and public relations services firm
demonstrates the opportunities for self-employment. It is relatively easy to
open a small agency; in fact, many successful agencies began as one- or
two-person operations.
Most, 75 percent, of advertising and public relations employees are 25 to 54
years of age. Very few advertising and public relations services workers are
below the age of 20, which reflects the need for postsecondary training or
work experience.
Occupations in the Industry
Management, business, and financial occupations; professionals and related
occupations; and sales and related occupations account for about 66 percent
of all jobs in the industry (table 1). An additional 25 percent of jobs are in
office and administrative support occupations. Employees have varied
responsibilities in agencies with only a few workers, and the specific job
duties of each worker often are difficult to distinguish. On the other hand,
workers in relatively large firms specialize more, so distinctions among
occupations are more apparent.
Management and professional and related occupations. Within advertising
and public relations, the account management department links the agency
and the clientit represents the agency to the client, as well as the client to
the agency. Account management brings business to the agency and
ultimately is responsible for the quality of the advertisement or public
relations campaign. Account management workers carefully monitor the
activities of the other areas to ensure that everything runs smoothly. Account
managers, or advertising and promotions managers, and their assistants
analyze competitive activity and consumer trends, report client billing,
forecast agency income, and combine the talents of the creative, media, and
research areas. The creative director oversees the copy writer and art
director and their respective staffs. The media director oversees planning
groups that select the communication mediafor example, radio, television,
newspapers, magazines, Internet, or outdoor signsto be used to promote
the organization, issue, product, or service.

In public relations firms, public relations managers direct publicity


programs to a targeted public. They often specialize in a specific area, such
as crisis managementor in a specific industry, such as healthcare. They use
every available communication medium in their effort to maintain the
support of the specific group upon whom their organization's success
depends, such as consumers, stockholders, or the general public. For
example, public relations managers may clarify or justify the firm's point of
view on health or environmental issues to community or special interest
groups. Public relations specialists handle organizational functions such as
media, community, consumer, and governmental relations; political
campaigns; interest-group representation; conflict mediation; or employee
and investor relations. These specialists prepare press releases and contact
people in the media who might print or broadcast their material. Many radio
or television special reports, newspaper stories, and magazine articles start
on the desks of public relations specialists.
Working with an idea that account management obtains from the client, the
creative department brings the idea to life. For example, an ad agency's staff
works together to transform a blank piece of paper into an advertisement. As
the idea takes shape, copy writers and their assistants write the words of ads
both the written part of print ads, as well as the scripts of radio and
television spots. Art directors and their assistants develop the visual
concepts and designs of advertisements. They prepare pasteups and layouts
for print ads and television storyboards, cartoon-style summaries of how an
advertisement will appear. They also oversee the filming of television
commercials and photo sessions. Graphic designers use a variety of print,
electronic, and film media to create designs that meet clients' commercial
needs. Using computer software, these graphic designers develop the overall
layout and design of print ads for magazines, newspapers, journals,
corporate reports, and other publications. They also may produce
promotional displays and marketing brochures for products and services,
design distinctive company logos for products and businesses, and develop
signs and environmental graphicsaesthetically pleasing signs that deliver a
message, such as a sunset to advertise a beach resort. An increasing number
of graphic designers develop material to appear on the Internet.
Workers in the research department try to understand the desires,
motivations, and ideals of consumers, in order to produce and place the most
effective advertising or public relations campaign in the most effective
media. Research executives compile data, monitor the progress of internal
and external research, develop research tools, and interpret and provide

explanations of data gathered. Research executives often specialize in


specific research areas and perform supervisory duties. Market research
analysts are concerned with the potential sales of a product or service. They
analyze statistical data on past sales to predict future sales, and provide a
company's management with information needed to make decisions on the
promotion, distribution, design, and pricing of products or services.
Sales and related occupations. Media planners gather information on the
public's viewing and reading habits and evaluate editorial content and
programming to determine the potential use of media such as newspapers,
magazines, radio, television, or the Internet. The media staff calculates the
numbers and types of people reached by different media and how often these
people are reached. Media buyers track the media space and times available
for purchase, negotiate and purchase time and space for ads, and make sure
ads appear exactly as scheduled. Additionally, they calculate rates, usage,
and budgets. Advertising sales agents sell air time on radio and television,
and page space in print media. They generally work in firms representing
radio stations, television stations, and publications. Demonstrators promote
sales of a product to consumers, while product promoters try to induce retail
stores to sell particular products and market them effectively. Product
demonstration is an effective technique used by both to introduce new
products or promote sales of old products, because it allows face-to-face
interaction with potential customers.
Office and administrative support occupations. Office and administrative
support occupations accounted for 25 percent of jobs in 2008. Positions
ranged from secretaries and administrative assistants to financial clerks. The
occupational composition of this group varies widely among agencies. The
remaining jobs in the industry were in service, construction and extraction,
production, transportation, and installation, maintenance, and repair
occupations.
Training and Advancement
Most entry-level professional and managerial positions in advertising and
public relations services require a bachelor's degree, preferably with broad
liberal arts exposure.
Beginners in advertising usually enter the industry in the account
management or media department. Occasionally, entry-level positions are

available in the market research or creative departments of an agency, but


these positions usually require some experience. Completing an advertisingrelated internship while in school provides an advantage when applying for
an entry-level position; in fact, internships are becoming a necessary step to
obtaining permanent employment. In addition to an internship, courses in
marketing, psychology, accounting, statistics, and creative design can help
prepare potential entrants for careers in this field.
Assistant account executive positionsthe entry-level account management
occupation in most firmsrequires a bachelor's degree in marketing or
advertising, although some firms require a master's degree in business
administration.
Bachelor's degrees are not required for entry-level positions in the creative
department. Assistant art directors usually need at least a 2-year degree from
an art or design school. Although assistant copywriters do not need a degree,
obtaining one helps to develop the superior communication skills and
abilities required for this job.
Assistant media planner or assistant media buyer are also good entry-level
positions, but almost always require a bachelor's degree, preferably with a
major in marketing or advertising. Experienced applicants who possess at
least a master's degree usually fill research positions. Often, applicants have
a background in marketing or statistics and years of experience.
Requirements for support services and administrative positions depend on
the job and vary from firm to firm.
In public relations, employers prefer applicants with degrees in
communications, journalism, English, or business. Some 4-year colleges and
universities have begun to offer a concentration in public relations. Because
there is keen competition for entry-level public relations jobs, workers are
encouraged to gain experience through internships, co-op programs, or one
of the formal public relations programs offered across the country. However,
these programs are not available everywhere, so most public relations
workers get the bulk of their training on the job. At some firms, this training
consists of formal classroom education but, in most cases, workers train
under the guidance of senior account executives or other experienced
workers, gradually familiarizing themselves with public relations work.
Entry-level workers often start as research or account assistants and may be
promoted to account executive, account supervisor, vice president, and
executive vice president.

A voluntary accreditation program for public relations specialists is offered


by the Public Relations Society of America. The program is a recognized
mark of competency in the profession and requires that workers have been
employed in the field for several years.
Employees in advertising and public relations services should have good
people skills, common sense, creativity, communication skills, and problemsolving ability. Foreign language skills have always been important for those
wanting to work abroad for domestic firms or to represent foreign firms
domestically. However, these skills are increasingly vital to reach minorities
not fluent in English in U.S. cities, such as Los Angeles, New York, Miami,
Houston, and Phoenix. New media, such as the Internet, are creating
opportunities to market products, but also are increasing the need for
additional training for those already employed. Keeping pace with
technology is fundamental to success in the industry. In addition, advertisers
must keep in tune with the changing values, cultures, and fashions of the
Nation.
Success in increasingly responsible staff assignments usually leads to
advancement to supervisory positions. As workers advance on the job, broad
vision and planning skills become extremely important. Another way to get
to the top in this industry is to open one's own firm. In spite of the difficulty
and high failure rate, many find starting their own business to be personally
and financially rewarding. Advancement among the self-employed takes the
form of increasing the size and strength of their own company.

Outlook
Competition for many jobs will be keen because the glamour of the industry
traditionally attracts many more jobseekers than there are job openings.
Employment change. Employment in the advertising and public relations
services industry is projected to grow 8 percent over the 2008-18 period,
compared to 11 percent for all industries combined. New jobs will be created
as the economy expands and generates more products and services to

advertise. In a competitive economic climate, firms depend on advertisers to


reach consumers and steer them toward their products.
Job prospects. Competition for many jobs will be keen because the glamour
of the advertising and public relations services industry traditionally attracts
many more job seekers than there are job openings. However, employment
may be adversely affected if legislation, aimed at protecting public health
and safety, further restricts advertising for specific products, such as
alcoholic beverages and tobacco. The best job opportunities will be for job
seekers skilled in employing the increasing number and types of media
outlets used to reach an increasingly diverse customer base.
In addition to new jobs created over the 2008-18 period, job opportunities
also will arise from the need to replace workers who transfer to other
industries or leave the workforce.
Layoffs are common in advertising and public relations services firms when
accounts are lost, major clients cut budgets, or agencies merge. Downturns
in the economy also can result in significant layoffs.
Earnings
Industry earnings. In 2008, nonsupervisory workers in advertising and
public relations services earned an average of $747 a weeksignificantly
higher than the $608 a week for all nonsupervisory workers in private
industry.

RANKING OF AGENCIES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

O&M
JWT
LEO BURNETT
McCANN ERIKSON
LOWE

6. MUDRA
7. REDIFFUSION DY&R
8. CONTRACT
9. SAATCHI&SAATCHI
10. GREY WORLD WIDE

COMPANY PROFILE
Ogilvy India
Agency Head

Piyush Pandey, Executive Chairman & National


Creative Director (India & South Asia), Vice
Chairman (Asia Pacific)
S.N.Rane, Co-Executive Chairman & Chief
Operating Officer (India & South Asia)

Head Office

11-14 Commerz International Business Park


Oberoi Garden City, Off Western Express
Highway
Goregaon (East)
City
Mumbai - 400063
Maharashtra
Telephone
022 - 4436 0360;
Fax
022 - 44344370
Email
lorraine.martin@ogilvy.com
Website
www.ogilvyindia.com
Name of international part Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide, New York, USA
Branches
BANGALORE CHENNAI GURGAON
HYDERABAD KOLKATA MUMBAI

OGILVY WORLDWIDE
History
In 1948, David Ogilvy founded the agency that would become Ogilvy &
Mather. Starting with no clients and a staff of two, he built his company into
one of the eight largest advertising networks in the world. Today it has 359
offices in 100 countries.
From the very beginning, David Ogilvy intended to have a different kind of
company. He knew that if he was going to be successful as an expatriate
running an under-capitalized offshoot of an old British firm in the country
that invented modern advertising (in the city that was its epicenter), he
would need a strong agency brand: respectable, high-quality, highly creative
and intelligent. One that would engender great loyalty from its people and its
clients, and have first class principles of operation.
To that end, David worked relentlessly to instill the belief that Ogilvy job is
to make advertising that sells, and the advertising that sells best is
advertising that builds brands. Over the past 50 years, Ogilvy has helped to
build some of the most recognizable brands in the world: American Express,
Sears, Ford, Shell, Barbie, Pond's, Dove, and Maxwell House among them,
and more recently, IBM and Kodak.
Ogilvy history is the evolution of one man's thoughts, talents, and work ethic
translated into a company culture, a defining business strategy, a destiny.
19801986

The corporate history of Ogilvy PR dates to September 3, 1980, when the


advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather, founded by advertising legend David
Ogilvy created its subsidiary Ogilvy & Mather Public Relations Inc.
(O&MPR).
The following year, a Washington, DC, office was opened under the name of
Ogilvy & Mather Public Affairs. Current Ogilvy PR president Marcia
Silverman is one of the public affairs agencys four original employees.
O&MPR experienced steady growth throughout the 1980s, opening a
London office in 1982; offices in Mumbai and New Delhi, India, and
Indonesia in 1985; and a Taiwan office in 1986. In 1986, O&MPR, with
worldwide revenues of $31.7 million, was ranked third among all PR firms.
The 1980s also saw two acquisitions. In 1983, O&M Worldwide acquired
Dudley-Anderson-Yutzy Public Relations, Inc. (D-A-Y), the worlds oldest
continuously operating PR firm. In 1986, O&M Worldwide acquired the
independent public relations firm of Adams & Rinehart, whose 80
employees specialized in issues related to corporate mergers and
acquisitions.
Later that year, O&M Worldwide formally linked its PR operations, creating
the Ogilvy & Mather Public Relations Group, consisting of Adams &
Rinehart, D-A-Y and O&M Public Affairs, whose Washington, DC staff had
now grown to 25 employees.
19891991
In 1989, D-A-Y was formally folded into O&MPR. Also in 1989, the United
Kingdom-based holding company, The WPP Group, acquired the Ogilvy
companies, including the O&MPR Group, which was subsequently renamed
the (Ogilvy PR Group) Ogilvy Public Relations Group.
That same year, Jody Powell, former press secretary to US President Jimmy
Carter, was named head of the Washington, DC, public affairs office, which
was renamed Powell, Adams and Rinehart.
By 1990, Ogilvy PR Group, with $62 million in revenues and 759
employees, was the fourth largest company in the industry.

In 1991, Jody Powell left the Washington, DC office to open a rival public
affairs firm with Sheila Tate, former press secretary to First Lady Nancy
Reagan.
Then 10-year Ogilvy PR Group veteran Marcia Silverman took over as head
of the Washington, DC office, and the name was changed to Ogilvy, Adams
& Rinehart. O&MPR; Ogilvy, Adams & Rinehart; and Adams & Rinehart
were consolidated into a single company doing business as Ogilvy, Adams &
Rinehart.
19921998
The agency opened its first offices in China in 1995, in Shanghai and
Beijing.
In 1998, Ogilvy, Adams & Rinehart was renamed Ogilvy Public Relations
Worldwide (Ogilvy PR). The Ogilvy & Mather PR Asia/Pacific network of
17 offices also came under the Ogilvy PR umbrella.
The expanded Ogilvy PR opened offices in Taiwan (Republic of China); in
Korea; in Bangalore and Chennai, India; and in the United States in Silicon
Valley, Los Angeles, Dallas and Boston. The year 1998 also brought the
acquisition of the high-tech PR firm Alexander Communications, which was
renamed Alexander Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.
19992007
In 1999, David Ogilvy, founder of the Ogilvy companies, died at the age of
88.
That year, Ogilvy PR acquired Feinstein Kean Healthcare (FKH), the largest
U.S. independent biotechnology and health care specialist. The agency also
acquired B/W/R, the corporate and entertainment specialist PR firm, as well
as Sector Communications and Magellan Medical Communications. The
latter two UK companies were rolled into Ogilvy PR.
By 1999, Ogilvy PR was ranked ninth worldwide, with revenues of $125
million and a 1,100-member staff.

In 2000, Ogilvy PR expanded in Asia with the opening of offices in


Hyderabad, India, and Colombo, Sri Lanka. The Prague, Czech Republic,
company known as O&MFocus came under the Ogilvy PR name.
In 2001, the Sacramento, California, firm of Deen + Black, with offices in
San Diego, San Francisco and Los Angeles, was acquired by Ogilvy PR, and
Ogilvy PR opened its first office in Africa in Nairobi, Kenya. In the
Asia/Pacific region, a joint venture with The Singleton Group created the
biggest public relations operation in Australia, consisting of five firms.
In 2002, Marcia Silverman was named CEO of Ogilvy PR. Silvermans prior
position, as president of the Americas, was filled by Paul Hicks, who had
headed the New York office. That year, the agency also acquired H-Line,
creating Chinas largest PR enterprise.
In 2005, the agency acquired The Federalist Group, a premier government
affairs firm in Washington, DC. The company was subsequently renamed
Ogilvy Government Relations. That same year, a comprehensive digital
marketing team, 360 Digital Influence, is launched in the Washington, DC
office. Ogilvy PR also appointed Christopher Graves as president and CEO
of Ogilvy PR/Asia Pacific.
In 2006, Marcia Silverman, CEO of Ogilvy PR, joined the Ogilvy & Mather
India Board. Martin Liptrot was appointed as regional CEO for Europe,
Africa and the Middle East (EAME).
In 2007, Ogilvy PR hosted its first ever Bring Your Parents To Work Day.
In addition, Ogilvy PR expanded 360 Digital Influence to offer its services
globally and provide clients worldwide with digital communications
solutions aligned with the emergence of social media.

20082010
In 2008, Ogilvy PR made its groundbreaking 360 Digital Influence offering
an official practice.

That same year, the agency opened new offices in Buenos Aires, Kolkata,
Karachi, Milan and Tunis.
The following year, Ogilvy 360 Digital Influence (DI) launched Insider
Circle, a Influencer Relationship Management (IRM) influencer activation
platform allowing brands to build and scale relationships with key brand
influencers.
In addition, Ogilvy 360 Digital Influence (DI) launched a new business
objective-driven model that provides a measurement framework for social
media effectivenessConversation Impact.
Developed in 2009 by Ogilvy PR's 360 Digital Influence (DI) team in
partnership with Netvibes, The Daily Influence
(www.thedailyinfluence.com) serves as an RSS reader and widget platform
delivering Social Media, Word of Mouth, Public Relations and Marketing
news and information updates into a single interface.
In 2009, Ogilvy PR expanded with new offices in Denmark, Hanoi and Ho
Chi Minh City.
On January 2010, Christopher Graves was named Global CEO of Ogilvy
PR. Grave's prior position of President and Regional CEO of Ogilvy
PR/Asia Pacific was filled by Steve Dahllof, who previously served as
Managing Director of Ogilvy PR's Global Strategy+Planning Group.
Notable Campaigns & Assignements
1980: Ogilvy PR forerunner Adams & Rinehart supports British Petroleums
acquisition of Standard Oil.
1987: America Responds to AIDS, the largest US national public awareness
campaign is created for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC). In 2006, the industry publication PRWeek would cite the effort as
one of the most influential campaigns in history.
1988: The US Governments National AIDS Mailing, a direct prevention
and education message from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, is created. It
is the second largest mailing in history by the federal government (second
only to tax forms).

1996: The Ford Taurus is launched in China, one of the companys largest
mass-market campaigns to date.
1996: President Clintons AmeriCorps campaign is launched.
1999: On behalf of the European Union, the first environmental public
awareness campaign is created from 13 countries that were formerly part of
the Soviet Union.
2000: Four WPP companies, five Ogilvy PR practices and two outside niche
firms work together to launch Amoco, ARCO, BP Petroleum and Castrols
new global brand, BP p.l.c.
2001: CDCs Screen for Life campaign is launched via TV public service
announcements, print materials and nationwide news coverage. In
subsequent years, the campaign would feature Katie Couric and Diane
Keaton.
2002: The Heart Truth campaign, which informs women that their #1
disease threat is heart disease, is created for the National Heart, Lung and
Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The Red Dress icon
created for the campaign was embraced by fashion designers who have
featured Red Dress Collections at New Yorks spring Fashion Week since
2003. The campaign would also win Best in Show at the 2004 SABRE
Awards.
2007: Successfully launched BPs new Helios House in Los Angeles, the
most environmentally advanced gas station BP has ever built. The station
features sustainable water, light and landscaping systems, including a green
roof, solar panels and recycled materials. Helios House was designed to
explore ways to make the gas station greener and the consumer experience
better. This 360 Digital Influence endeavor involved Ogilvy PR,
OgilvyOne, Ogilvy, and Ogilvy/BIG.

Significant Awards
1999: Most Improved Major Agency, Inside PR

2001: Named Agency of the Year by both PRWeek & The Holmes
Report
2001: Alexander Ogilvy named Best PR Firm by Business 2.0
2002: Network of the Year award in the Asia/Pacific region from
PRWeek
2004: Named International Agency of the Year by The Holmes Report
2005: Honors in 12 of 22 categories in PR Week Awards for Asia Pacific
2006: Honored with three Cause Marketing Halo Awards, making it the
first agency to receive this recognition in multiple categories in the
Cause Marketing Forums four-year history
2007: Honored with two PR News Platinum PR Awards for Online
Communications and Public Service Announcement
2007: Honors in 17 of 26 categories in PR Magazines Award for Asia
Pacific.
2008: Named Large Agency of the Year by The Holmes Report
2008: Honored as PR Consultancy of the Year in the Asia Pacific PR
Awards
2008: Named Asia Pacific Consultancy of the Year by The Holmes
Report
2009: Named Asia Pacific Network of the Year in the Asia Pacific PR
Awards
2009: Honored as Large Agency of the Year in PRNews' Platinum PR
Awards
2009: Marcia Silverman honored as PR Professional of the Year

Introduction

OGILVY is one of the largest marketing communications networks in the


world. And it services more Fortune Global 500 companies in five or more
countries than any other agency.
As Brand Stewards, Ogilvy work to leverage the brands of its multinational
clients by combining local know-how with a worldwide network, creating
powerful campaigns that address local market needs while still reinforcing
the same universal brand identity.
The hallmark of Ogilvy brand-building capabilities is its balance of global
and local brands.

Network
Ogilvy is the largest, most awarded network in the world. Ogilvy
experience, global network, and commitment to the brands of its clients have
built a reputation for worldwide excellence. In 1984, Ogilvy was the first
global advertising agency with a dedicated interactive capability. Today,
Ogilvy has 42 offices across 39 countries. Ogilvy work in French, Hindi,
Portuguese and dozens of other languages. And Ogilvy employees from
Brussels to Bangkok, Toronto to Taipei, Sao Paolo to Seoul, consistently
deliver invention, ingenuityand most importantlyresults.
Ogilvy's clients include: BBC, BP, Coca-Cola Co., Glaxo SmithKline, IBM,
MasterCard International, Merck & Co. Merrill Lynch, Novartis, Pfizer,
Unilever, Xerox, Argos, Ariba (UK) Ltd., Deloitte & Touche, Dubai World
Cup, Intelsat, Kimberly-Clark Corp., Shell, Nestle, Pfizer, and Sun.

Ogilvy PR Worldwide division B/W/R is dealing with media relations for


celebrities such as Ben Affleck, Brat Pitt, Michael J. Fox, and Reese
Witherspoon.

Ogilvy performs his client work through four divisions:


1. OGIVY & MATHER ADVERTISING

2. OGILVYONE
3. OGILVY PR
4. OGILVY ACTIVATION
Through these four divisions Ogilvy is working very effectively and catering
to the needs of their clients. These four divisions work around a clock to
give their client a true picture of market and provide best solutions to it.
As pioneers of integrated communication initiatives in the country, They
consistently deliver on our overall promise of 360 Degree Stewardship
through our business units that encompass Ogilvy & Mather Advertising,
OgilvyOne, Ogilvy Activation and Ogilvy Public Relations.
One hallmark of Ogilvy's brand-building capability is the balance of global
and local brands. Our local clients keep us in tune with local market
nuances, which is integral to the success of our multinational accounts.
The numerous accolades that have come our way through the years are a
firm testimony to Ogilvy's performance and leadership position in the
country.

OGILVY AND MATHER ADVERTISING


Ogilvy and Mather Advertising is in the business of building strong and
enduring brands. It see them as the key factor to any company's success in
the marketplace. It believe in the power of brands and consider them to be
the largest asset a company can have.
It believes Ogilvy and Mather Advertising of greatest value to those clients
who share this understanding and our passion for brands. This is the reason
why it has enjoyed long-term partnerships with India's greatest brands.
Ogilvy is all about big ideas- consistent, enduring and distinct. Ideas born
from a deep understanding of consumer needs and behavior, and married to
a keen grasp of clients' business issues. Ideas that are flexible enough to

work across a variety of media. Above all, ideas that establish brand values
and benefits in the hearts and minds of today's demanding consumers.
Its job is to make advertising that sells, and the advertising that sells best is
advertising that builds brands.
CORPORATE CULTURE
WHAT WE BELIEVE AND HOW WE BEHAVE

AN ATMOSHPERE OF FERMENT AND INNOVATION


- this was David Ogilvy's ideal for Ogilvy & Mather. To accomplish it, he
behaved as he wanted his company to behave. Thus, a corporate culture was
born.
"Superior service to our clients depends on making the most of our people.
Give them challenging opportunities, recognition for achievement, job
enrichment and the maximum responsibility. Treat them as grown-ups - and
they will grow up. Help them in difficulty. Be affectionate and human."

THE CORPORATE CULTURE OF OGILY &MATHER AS


SET DOWN BY DAVID OGILVY
Some of our people spend their entire working lives in Ogilvy & Mather. We
try to make it a stimulating and happy experience. We put this first,
believing that superior service to our clients depends on the high morale of
our men and women.
We help them make the best of their talents. We invest an awful lot of time
and money in training perhaps more than any of our competitors.
We treat our people as human beings. We help them when they are in trouble
with their jobs, with illnesses, with emotional problems, with drugs or
alcohol.

GENTLE MANNER, HARD WORK

We are opposed to management by intimidation. We abhor ruthlessness. We


like people with gentle manners. We see no conflict between adherence to
high professional standards in our work and human kindness in our dealings
with each other.
We don't like rigid pecking orders. We give our executives an extraordinary
degree of independence, in the belief that freedom stimulates initiative. We
dislike issuing orders; the best results are produced by men and women who
don't have to be told what to do.
We like people who are honest. Honest in argument, honest with clients,
honest with suppliers, honest with the company and above all, honest
with consumers.

WHAT WE ADMIRE IN PEOPLE


We admire people who speak their minds. At the same time we admire
people who listen more than they talk, and make a real effort to understand
views that differ from their own. Candor is a virtue; arrogance is not.
We admire people who work hard, who are objective and thorough. Lazy
and superficial men and women do not produce superior work.
We are free of prejudice of any kind. The way up the ladder is open to
everybody, regardless of religion, race, gender, or sexual preference. We
detest nepotism and every other form of favoritism.
There are, however, limits to our tolerance. We have little time for:

office politicians

bullies

paper warriors

toadies

pompous asses

prima donnas

In promoting people at all levels, we are influenced as much by their


character as anything else.

EARNING THE REPECT OF CLIENTS

We exist to build the business of our clients. The recommendations we make


to them should be the recommendations we would make if we owned their
companies, without regard to our own short-term interest. This earns their
respect, which is the greatest asset we can have.
What most clients want most from us is great campaigns, with the spark to
ignite sales and the staying power to build enduring brands. We put the
creative function at the top of our priorities. The line between pride in our
work and neurotic obstinacy is a narrow one. We make our
recommendations clear. But we do not grudge our clients the right to the
final say. It is their money.
Many of our clients employ us in several countries. It is important for them
to know that they can expect the same standards of behavior in all our
offices. That is one reason why we want our culture to be more or less the
same everywhere.
We try to sell our clients' products without offending the mores of the
countries where we do business.
We try to create an atmosphere in which partnerships with our clients can
flourish. We attach importance to discretion clients don't appreciate
agencies that leak their secrets. We do not take credit for our clients'
successes. To get between a client and the footlights is bad manners.
We take new business seriously, especially new business from current
clients. We have a passion for winning, but we play fair vis-a-vis our
competitors.

Recent work that Ogilvy has done for local and global brands:

Bajaj Discover
Center Shock
Hutch
Titan
Fevicol
Happy Dent

OGILVYONE
OgilvyOne Worldwide is India's first and leading one-to-one marketing firm.
Its strength lies in building bonds between consumers and brands.
OgilvyOne offers integrated services across traditional and interactive
channels (including the Internet and mobile telephony spaces). With offices
in Mumbai, Delhi and Bangalore, the OgilvyOne team of 125 people work
on more than 50 leading international and local brands. As a consequence of
its effective and innovative work, the firm has won recognition in local the
Indian and global arena.
The OgilvyOne mission is simple: grow customer equity in volume, value
and goodwill.
OgilvyOne work to help his clients realize the fullest value and potential of
all their customers. It works to acquire new customers of a brand, increase
the loyalty of existing customers, and retain customers.
To achieve this OgilvyOne offers the following services:

CRM
Interactive Marketing
Database Consulting, design, Management
Telemarketing
Data Analytics

OGILVY PR
Established in 1985, Ogilvy Public Relations is India's truly international
public relations agency. Its true point of difference is its people and its
passion for excellence in client services. Its approach and philosophy fosters
an environment that enables strategic thinking and creativity. This allows it
to develop multi-disciplined programs that deliver measurable results.
Our communications programs differentiate the company and its offering
from the competition, build the brand, garner significant media coverage and
drive action.

Ogilvy offer clients a blend of domain knowledge and communication


expertise in the following practice areas:
Corporate & Finance
Strategic Marketing
Technology
Health and Medical
Public Affairs

OGILVY ACTIVATION
I have worked in Ogilvy Outreach department in Ogilvy Activation. Ogilvy,
over the years has pioneered out-of-home communications in the country
through its divisions;
Ogilvy Landscapes- which introduced Outdoor media as a specialist
discipline.
Ogilvy Outreach- the first and the largest rural communication unit in the
country.
Ogilvy Live- which creates ground level brand communication and more
recently.
Ogilvy Signscapes - the retail brand identity division.
Ogilvy offer a powerful convergence of Out of Home communication
solutions, with unmatched planning and buying expertise. These
communication solutions connect the brand with the customer at the last
mile, wherever she is- in cities or media-dark villages.
Effective activation is based on a clear understanding about how a
customer's decision-making process functions. As stimuli that create
preferences for brands vary and so do the media consumption habits, Ogilvy
seek to create both- the media and the message, which are relevant and
meaningful to the customer. This helps in triggering the desired response
from the customer at the point of purchase.

We are a complete Out of Home business unit, which helps clients to


develop and enhance relationships between consumers and their brands at
the last mile, beyond mass media.
Ogilvy, over the years has pioneered out-of-home communications in the
country through its divisions; Ogilvy Landscapes- which introduced Outdoor
media as a specialist discipline, Ogilvy Outreach- the first and the largest
rural communication unit in the country, Ogilvy Live- which creates ground
level brand communication and more recently Ogilvy Signscapes - the retail
brand identity division.
The integration of these OOH services as Ogilvy Activation- the first 360
OOH communication offering in the country, is a logical extension of
Ogilvy's 360 Degree Brand Stewardship programme. With full-service
offices in Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai, Bangalore, Kolkata & Hyderabad, the
Ogilvy Activation team of 125 people work on more than 40 leading brands
within and outside India.

Ogilvy Outreach
Set up in 1995, Ogilvy Outreach pioneered rural communications in India,
enabling clients reach out to the media dark markets. By making the shift
from static brand awareness to interactive brand communication, It has
revolutionized the way in which corporate India was perceived by its rural
and low-income audience. Widely acknowledged as the authority in rural
communications, There efforts have won us national and international
acclaim.
Ogilvy Outreach has redefined the communication process in media dark
areas. Supported by a nationwide network, specialist strategic planning team
and a dedicated creative team, we provide turnkey solutions to all
communication needs in rural and low income areas.
Ogilvy Outreach use proprietary tools like RADAR and Rural Media Indices
to develop cutting edge market specific plans.
Ogilvy Outreach journey so far...

Reach extends across 1,50,000 villages and 4000 towns in 13 states


with more than 50 brands.
Tin plates and shop fronts in over 2 million shops.
Shop signages in 100000 outlets in feeder towns
70% from media dark states (UP, Bihar, Orissa, West Bengal, Madhya
Pradesh & Rajasthan)
Implemented projects in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Morocco, Indonesia
and Latin America

Major Clients of Ogilvy Outreach


Over the last four years, the outfit has roped in about 70 clients, including
big players such as Hindustan Lever Ltd, ITC, Bharat Petroleum
Corporation Ltd, Asian Paints, Eveready Industries and the TTK group,
among others.
Stating this during an interface with newspersons here, Mr. Dalveer Singh,
Country Manager, Ogilvy Outreach, said the organization was focused on
reaching out to the estimated 240 million people in rural India who had no
access to mass media.
In the last four years, the organization has built a communication network
across 1.5 lakh villages and 4,000 small towns in 13 states. A force of 300
supervisors and 15,000 field operators supports this network.
"Most of There operational models veer round corporates' social
responsibility and cause-related marketing. It focus on communicating with
our constituents rather that talking to them," Mr. Singh said, even as he cited
instances of such "cause-related'' marketing involving FMCG and lubricants
companies.

Now most important thing that is:


3600 BRANDING

Imagine all communications reflecting the same deep insight. Imagine all
media contributing to the campaign as a whole. At Ogilvy They take a
holistic view of communications and use what's necessary to build a brand.

KEY PERSONS OF OGILVY IN INDIA


PIYUSH PANDEY
Executive Chairman & National Creative Director India & South Asia
Piyush redefined Indian advertising by curing its colonial hangover and
reaching out to the 1 billion strong Indian masses, by speaking to them in
their own language. Within the country, Piyush is acknowledged as an
industry leader.
JOHN GOODMAN
CEO of India & South Asia
S.N RANE
Chief Operating Officer of India & South Asia
He currently serves as Director on the Board of Ogilvy & Mather Pvt. Ltd.,

RMG David Communications Pvt. Ltd., Group M Media India Pvt. Ltd.,
Meridian Communications Pvt. Ltd. and Phoenix O&M (Pvt.) Ltd., Sri
Lanka.

KEY PERSONS OF OGILVY ACTIVATION


Pratap Bose
President Activation

JC Giri
Country Head
(Ogilvy Activation and New Initiatives)

Raj Kumar Jha


National Creative Director
Ogilvy Activation

Sandip Bansal
Country Head
Ogilvy Outreach

OGILVY IN NEWS
Indias Advertising Industry pronounces
Ogilvy & Mather No. 1 Agency In India
Lorraine Martin (Ogilvy & Mather, India, 11 May 2005)

Ogilvy & Mather hoists a flag in Nepal


(Mumbai, 6 Jan 2005)

Ogilvy & Mather India is 1st Runner Up for Office of the Year,
Asias Most Contested Award title
(Mumbai, 10 Dec 2004

Ogilvy PR India brings home a bronze at the PR Week Asia


Pacific Awards for Amaron Amaragaon Rural goes Digital
campaign
(Mumbai, 1 Dec 2004)
West Bengal State Government appoints Ogilvy & Mather
Kolkata to fight AIDS
(Kolkata, 1 Dec 2004)

Creative outsourcing: Is India the destination next?


Agencyfaqs.com (1 Nov 2004)

Ogilvy launches B2B practice group in India


(Bangalore, 26 Oct 2004)

Ogilvy & Mather bags Grand Effie Award


Financialexpress.com (21 Oct 2004)
Ogilvy & Mather India receives Asias Recognition for
Effectiveness on 3 Campaigns at The Asian Brand Marketing
Effectiveness Awards 2004

COMPETITORS OF OGILVY
JWT
LEO BURNETT
MCCANN ERICKSON
LOWE
MUDRA
REDIFFUSION DY &R

HINDUSTAN UNILEVER LIMITED


Our history
In the summer of 1888, visitors to the Kolkata harbour noticed crates full of
Sunlight soap bars, embossed with the words "Made in England by Lever
Brothers". With it, began an era of marketing branded Fast Moving
Consumer Goods (FMCG).
Soon after followed Lifebuoy in 1895 and other famous brands like Pears,
Lux and Vim. Vanaspati was launched in 1918 and the famous Dalda brand
came to the market in 1937.
In 1931, Unilever set up its first Indian subsidiary, Hindustan Vanaspati
Manufacturing Company, followed by Lever Brothers India Limited (1933)
and United Traders Limited (1935). These three companies merged to form
HUL in November 1956; HUL offered 10% of its equity to the Indian public,
being the first among the foreign subsidiaries to do so. Unilever now holds
52.10% equity in the company. The rest of the shareholding is distributed
among about 360,675 individual shareholders and financial institutions.
The erstwhile Brooke Bond's presence in India dates back to 1900. By 1903,
the company had launched Red Label tea in the country. In 1912, Brooke
Bond & Co. India Limited was formed. Brooke Bond joined the Unilever
fold in 1984 through an international acquisition. The erstwhile Lipton's
links with India were forged in 1898. Unilever acquired Lipton in 1972, and
in 1977 Lipton Tea (India) Limited was incorporated.
Pond's (India) Limited had been present in India since 1947. It joined the
Unilever fold through an international acquisition of Chesebrough Pond's
USA in 1986.
Since the very early years, HUL has vigorously responded to the stimulus of
economic growth. The growth process has been accompanied by judicious
diversification, always in line with Indian opinions and aspirations.

The liberalisation of the Indian economy, started in 1991, clearly marked an


inflexion in HUL's and the Group's growth curve. Removal of the regulatory
framework allowed the company to explore every single product and
opportunity segment, without any constraints on production capacity.
Simultaneously, deregulation permitted alliances, acquisitions and mergers.
In one of the most visible and talked about events of India's corporate
history, the erstwhile Tata Oil Mills Company (TOMCO) merged with HUL,
effective from April 1, 1993. In 1996, HUL and yet another Tata company,
Lakme Limited, formed a 50:50 joint venture, Lakme Unilever Limited, to
market Lakme's market-leading cosmetics and other appropriate products of
both the companies. Subsequently in 1998, Lakme Limited sold its brands to
HUL and divested its 50% stake in the joint venture to the company.
HUL formed a 50:50 joint venture with the US-based Kimberly Clark
Corporation in 1994, Kimberly-Clark Lever Ltd, which markets Huggies
Diapers and Kotex Sanitary Pads. HUL has also set up a subsidiary in Nepal,
Unilever Nepal Limited (UNL), and its factory represents the largest
manufacturing investment in the Himalayan kingdom. The UNL factory
manufactures HUL's products like Soaps, Detergents and Personal Products
both for the domestic market and exports to India.
The 1990s also witnessed a string of crucial mergers, acquisitions and
alliances on the Foods and Beverages front. In 1992, the erstwhile Brooke
Bond acquired Kothari General Foods, with significant interests in Instant
Coffee. In 1993, it acquired the Kissan business from the UB Group and the
Dollops Icecream business from Cadbury India.
As a measure of backward integration, Tea Estates and Doom Dooma, two
plantation companies of Unilever, were merged with Brooke Bond. Then in
1994, Brooke Bond India and Lipton India merged to form Brooke Bond
Lipton India Limited (BBLIL), enabling greater focus and ensuring synergy
in the traditional Beverages business. 1994 witnessed BBLIL launching the
Wall's range of Frozen Desserts. By the end of the year, the company entered
into a strategic alliance with the Kwality Icecream Group families and in
1995 the Milkfood 100% Icecream marketing and distribution rights too
were acquired.
Finally, BBLIL merged with HUL, with effect from January 1, 1996. The
internal restructuring culminated in the merger of Pond's (India) Limited
(PIL) with HUL in 1998. The two companies had significant overlaps in
Personal Products, Speciality Chemicals and Exports businesses, besides a

common distribution system since 1993 for Personal Products. The two also
had a common management pool and a technology base. The amalgamation
was done to ensure for the Group, benefits from scale economies both in
domestic and export markets and enable it to fund investments required for
aggressively building new categories.
In January 2000, in a historic step, the government decided to award 74 per
cent equity in Modern Foods to HUL, thereby beginning the divestment of
government equity in public sector undertakings (PSU) to private sector
partners. HUL's entry into Bread is a strategic extension of the company's
wheat business. In 2002, HUL acquired the government's remaining stake in
Modern Foods.
In 2003, HUL acquired the Cooked Shrimp and Pasteurized Crabmeat
business of the Amalgam Group of Companies, a leader in value added
Marine Products exports.
HUL launched a slew of new business initiatives in the early part of 2000s.
Project Shakti was started in 2001. It is a rural initiative that targets small
villages populated by less than 5000 individuals. It is a unique win-win
initiative that catalyses rural affluence even as it benefits business.
Currently, there are over 45,000 Shakti entrepreneurs covering over 100,000
villages across 15 states and reaching to over 3 million homes.
In 2002, HUL made its foray into Ayurvedic health & beauty centre category
with the Ayush product range and Ayush Therapy Centres. Hindustan
Unilever Network, Direct to home business was launched in 2003 and this
was followed by the launch of Pureit water purifier in 2004.
In 2007, the Company name was formally changed to Hindustan Unilever
Limited after receiving the approval of share holders during the 74th AGM
on 18 May 2007. Brooke Bond and Surf Excel breached the the Rs 1,000
crore sales mark the same year followed by Wheel which crossed the
Rs.2,000 crore sales milestone in 2008.
On 17th October 2008, HUL completed 75 years of corporate existence in
India.

Our vision
Unilever products touch the lives of over 2 billion people every day
whether that's through feeling great because they've got shiny hair and a

brilliant smile, keeping their homes fresh and clean, or by enjoying a great
cup of tea, satisfying meal or healthy snack.
A clear direction
The four pillars of our vision set out the long term direction for the company
where we want to go and how we are going to get there:

We work to create a better future every day

We help people feel good, look good and get more out of life with
brands and services that are good for them and good for others.

We will inspire people to take small everyday actions that can add up
to a big difference for the world.

We will develop new ways of doing business that will allow us to


double the size of our company while reducing our environmental
impact.

Company structure
Hindustan Unilever Limited is India's largest Fast Moving Consumer Goods
(FMCG) Company. It is present in Home & Personal Care and Foods &
Beverages categories. HUL has about 15,000 employees, including over
1400 managers
The fundamental principle determining the organization structure is to infuse
speed and flexibility in decision-making and implementation, with
empowered managers across the companys nationwide operations.

Board of Directors
The Board of Directors as repositories of the corporate powers act as a
guardian to the Company as also the protectors of shareholders interest.

Management Committee
The day-to-day management of affairs of the Company is vested with the
Management Committee which is subjected to the overall superintendence
and control of the Board.

We've always believed in the power of our brands to improve the quality of
peoples lives and in doing the right thing. As our business grows, so do our
responsibilities. We recognize that global challenges such as climate change
concern us all. Considering the wider impact of our actions is embedded in
our values and is a fundamental part of who we are.
Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL) is India's largest Fast Moving Consumer
Goods Company, touching the lives of two out of three Indians with over 20
distinct categories in Home & Personal Care Products and Foods &
Beverages. The companys Turnover is Rs. 20, 239 crores (for the 15 month
period January 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009).
HUL is a subsidiary of Unilever, one of the worlds leading suppliers of fast
moving consumer goods with strong local roots in more than 100 countries
across the globe with annual sales of 40.5 billion in 2008. Unilever has
about 52% shareholding in HUL.
Hindustan Unilever was recently rated among the top four companies
globally in the list of Global Top Companies for Leaders by a study
sponsored by Hewitt Associates, in partnership with Fortune magazine and
the RBL Group. The company was ranked number one in the Asia-Pacific
region and in India.
The mission that inspires HUL's more than 15,000 employees, including
over 1,400 managers, is to add vitality to life". The company meets
everyday needs for nutrition, hygiene, and personal care, with brands that
help people feel good, look good and get more out of life. It is a mission
HUL shares with its parent company, Unilever, which holds about 52 % of
the equity.

SURF EXCEL
When children go out to play and get dirty, they don't just collect stains.
They experience life, make friends, share with each other and learn from
each other. This helps them get stronger and get ready for the world outside.

A pioneer in the Indian detergent powder market, Surf Excel quick was has
constantly upgraded itself over the years, to answer the constantly changing
washing needs of the Indian homemaker. Today Surf Excel offers
outstanding stain removal ability on a wide range of stains. This means that
mothers now have the freedom to let their kids experience life without
worrying about stains.
Surf Excel quick wash is powered with a path-breaking technology- it
reduces water consumption and time taken for rinsing by 50%. It is a
significant benefit, given the acute water scarcity in most of India.

Features of Surf Excel Quick Wash Brand:


1. It penetrates into the layers of fabric and removes tough stains from
10 most stain prone areas like collars, cuffs, pockets, bottoms, waist
sleeves, stocks, underarms and trouser falls.
2. Ordinary detergents have excess lather that wastes water without
giving a complete wash.
3. Only Surf excel Quick wash has a special low lather formulation that
removes tough stains while saving two buckets of water daily.
Water that contains dissolved calcium and magnesium salts is called Hard
Water. While it's an enriched form of drinking water that keeps you healthy
and strong, clothes don't exactly feel the same way. Because of its inability
to dissolve soaps and detergents, washing with hard water can be a waste of
time - clothes simply refuse to clean and your frustration can grow. Only
Surf excel Quick wash smartly converts hard water to soft water and the best
part is, this happens as soon as the soap and water mix. So if you belong to
a part of India that predominantly has hard water, you would benefit greatly
by using Surf excel Quick wash. Go on! Give your clothes the softness they
deserve. Surf Excel Quick wash is available in the following pack:
4000 gm
3000gm
1500gm
750gm
500gm
200 gm-Cartons

200gm-refill
3300gm-Bucket

MAIN REPORT PAGE


It was the great opportunity to work with one of the best Advertising
Agencies in world. Ogilvy is ranked third in Advertising Agencies world
wide and ranked No.1 in India. Ogilvy is divided in four divisions which are
further divided into subdivisions to cater the needs of their clients.
I was working in Ogilvy Outreach which is the sub-division of Ogilvy
Activation. The main purpose of Ogilvy Outreach is to cater Rural Market.
The project assigned to me was the Brand Promotion of SURF EXCEL
QUICK WASH which involved the campaign. The main objective of this
campaign was repositioning and penetration of the product in C class areas
where the water scarcity problem exist. As SURF EXCEL QUICK WASH
is expensive detergent , so the company has launched low unit price packs
(sachets) whose price is Rs2 through which the can easily penetrate the
targeted market.
Note: C class areas are those where there is low income group.
For this campaign DELHI was divided into five zones i.e. North, East, West,
South and Central Delhi. All these five zones were allotted to Zonal Heads
who were responsible for the work in these areas. I was one of the zonal
heads and was heading West Zone. All the zones were having their route
plans. The West Delhi route plan was considering all the D class areas like
Nazafgarh, Sagarpur, Uttamnagar, JJ colony, Dabri, Kirbi palace, Rajnagar
etc.
In the beginning of my project I was briefed by my immediate Boss about
how to handle the whole campaign in West Zone. Each Zone was allotted
limited manpower that has to perform this campaign. The selection and the
training of the manpower of my zone was done by me with the support of
my immediate Boss. During the training we told them:
How to convey the Brand message. (do bucket pani ab rozana hai
bachana)
How to communicate about Brand attributes.
How to do Demo.

How to be more interactive with the target audience.


How to fill their daily Sales report.
Then this manpower was converted into teams. One team was consisting of
two members. I was heading 25 teams (25x2=50 members) with 5
supervisors and each supervisor was heading five teams. The work of
supervisor was to keep check on his teams that whether they are performing
their task properly or not and reporting to me.
MRO (Market Research Organization) and INTERFACE were two agencies
which were providing manpower for this campaign. In North, Interface was
providing the manpower.
After giving briefing and training to these teams and supervisors, I made
them to roll out according to the route plan. Each area was given the
particular time limit. Each area was consisting of all the galies and
blocks. Everyday I use to visit area to area in which I used to check atmost
8 locations and try to find out the problem that the team members are facing
and everyday in the evening I used to rebrief them for the next day so that
they cant face the same problems.
Sequence of campaign:
One Team member use to go in each home to invite the target
audience i.e. ladies to watch Demo and the other team member used to
do set up of the stall and this set up includes banners, backdrop,
buckets, Surf Excel Quick Wash Detergent, etc.
After the gathering of the ladies, the team used to tell the ladies to fill
the coupons that were to be used for the Lucky Draw.
Then, one team member used to read Flipchart, which used to
emphasize on water problem and how to deal with this problem. After
this the Demo starts in which the team members perform the activity
that shows how the stained cloth get free from stain with spending less
amount of water by using Surf Excel Quick Wash.
Then, quiz was done among the ladies in which questions based on
Surf Excel Quick Wash was asked. The lady who gives the answer
used to get small sachet of Surf Excel Quick Wash.
After this, lucky draw was done in which the winner used to get that
small sachet of Surf Excel Quick Wash.

And at the end team use to sell these sachets at offer price of 3 sachets
at the price 4 (the market price of each sachets is RS2 )
All these activities were told by me right from team making to teaching
them the skills of sale. I use to check there daily sales report and whether all
these activities are effectively performed and fill my daily monetary report.
and I was also having the authority of terminating any of the member if he
does not perform according to given schedule. And this monitoring report
was weekly submitted to the project head. Project head use to visit the area
every week. it was great pleasure to meet brand manager of surf excel quick
wash and country head of Ogilvy outreach who came to check the work in
my zone and even appreciated the work. During the period in which the
campaign was going on in these areas, the wall painting of SURF EXCEL
QUICK WASH started.
Campaign work completed in 45 days after that we decided to take
consumer insight in those areas where the campaign was performed and ask
them about surf excel quick wash and the effect that the campaign has made
in the buying behavior for this I with my colleagues prepared a questionnaire
and decided to personally visit these households and know there perceptions
and buying behavior. By taking there views we came to know what are the
things that affect that there buying behavior these are price, advertising,
friends and neighbors, retailers and many more

SWOT ANALYSIS OF CAMPAIGN


Strengths

Brand name
Efficient manpower
Well structured
Logistics
Customer oriented
Incentives like gifts and prizes to customers.
More interaction with customers.

Weakness
Illiterate target audience
No incentives for team members
More focus on gifts and prizes by customers rather than on product
attributes.
Hostile audience
Opportunities
Good relation with HLL and chances of getting more business from
the same client.
Good campaign will attract other clients.
There is large no. of FMCG companies that are untapped.
Threats

Although the campaign has been successfully and effectively


delivered but sales of the product remain the same can have negative
effect in client and agency relations.

CHAPTER - 2

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
MEANING OF RESEARCH & RESEARCH DESIGN
Everywhere, our knowledge is incomplete and problems are waiting to be
solved. We address the void in our knowledge and those unsolved problems
by asking relevant questions and seeking answers to them. The role of
research is to provide a method for obtaining those answers by inquiring
studying the evidence within the parameters of the scientific method.
Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired
information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an
hypothesis can be tested properly.

DATA COLLECTION
Data Sources: There are two types of data. They are: a) Primary Data
b) Secondary Data
Primary data are those, which are collected by direct interface with people
wand thus happens to be original in character. Primary data will not only be
relevant for the study but it is also reliable, accurate dependable.
Secondary data are those, which have already been collected by someone
else and which have already been passed though the statistical process.
I have used Primary Data.

RESEARCH DESIGN
Study Approach: There are two basic types of approaches to study. They are: a) Quantitative
b) Qualitative

Quantitative approach involves the generation of data in quantitative form,


which can be subjected to rigorous quantitative analysis in a formal and rigid
fashion. This approach can be further sub classified into inferential,
experimental and simulation approaches to the study. The purpose of
inferential approach to the study is to form a database from which to infer
characteristics or relationship of population.
Qualitative approach to the study is concerned with subjective assessment of
attitudes, opinions and behavior. Study in such a situation is a function of
researchers insights and impressions.
I have used quantitative approach in which I have collected data from the
people living in C class areas.

Instruments: The various instruments to this study are: a) Observation: Under this, the information is sought by way of
investigators own direct observation without asking the
respondent.
I have observed target audiences while demo that how they react to
the activity and brand.
b) Interview: It involves presentation oral-verbal stimuli reply in
terms of oral-verbal responses. This method can be used through
personal interviews.
I have taken the interviews while filling questionnaires.
c) Questionnaires: It consisted of a number of questions printed or
typed in a definite order on a form or a set of forms. The
respondents have to answer the questions themselves.
I designed the questionnaires myself and got filled by ladies living
in D class areas.

Types of Questionnaires: Questionnaires can be of two types: a) Structured: It is one in which all questions are specified and
comments in the respondents own words are held to the minimum.
b) Unstructured: It is one in which the answers to the question can be
framed in the respondents own words.
In my study, my questionnaire was a relatively structured one.

SAMPLE DESIGN
A sample is a definite plan for obtaining a sample from given population. It
refers to the technique or procedure the researcher would adopt in selecting
items for the sample. It includes the following.
Sample unit: People living in D class areas.
Sample size: This refers to the number of items to be selected from the
universe to constitute a sample.
For my study the sample size was 100.
Sampling Procedures: There are two main sampling procedures:
1. Probability sampling
2. Non-Probability sampling
Probability sampling is one under which every item of the universe has an
equal chance of inclusion in the sample. It is further divided into random
sampling and non-random sampling. Random sampling from a finite
population refers to that method of sample, which gives each possible
sample combination an equal probability of being picked up and each item
in the entire population to have an equal chance included in the sample.
The sample procedure followed in my study was random sampling in case of
people living in D class areas.
To study the sample the D class areas were allotted by Ogilvy only. In
these areas the Demo of Surf Excel Quick wash was already been taken
place. I have take sample of 5 from each different location.

CHAPTER - 3

DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETAION


1.

U
s
e
d
e
t
r
g
e
n
t
c
a
k
1
2
.
5
%
b
o
h
5
2
.%
3
5
.0
%
Use what to wash clothes.

Valid

detergent
cake
both
Total

Frequency
5
14
21
40

Percent
12.5
35.0
52.5
100.0

Valid
Percent
12.5
35.0
52.5
100.0

Cumulative
Percent
12.5
47.5
100.0

Q. What do you use to wash clothes?


Interpretation:
35% ladies say that they wash clothes with cake by rubbing it on clothes and
then rubbing with brush.
52.5% ladies wash clothes with both cake and detergent. They say that they
get the clothes remain dipped in detergent water for hr then they take out
the clothes and rub with cake and brush.
12.5% ladies wash clothes only with detergent. Most of these ladies are
having washing machines that put detergent in washing machine. Ladies
who wash clothes with hands get the clothes remain dipped in detergent
water for sometime then clean it with brush.

2.

.372..55%
U
s
e
d
t
e
r
g
n
t
.
B
r
a
n
d
d
o
n
'
t
u
s
e
s
u
r
f
.
x
c
l
.
.%
1
0
%
q
i
k
w
a
h
e
3
5
.0
%ftg
n
ie
rid
m
h
a
Use which detergent Brand

Valid don't use


surf.excel.quick.
wash
wheel
nirma
ghari
fena
tide
Total

Frequency
14

Percent
35.0

Valid
Percent
35.0

Cumulative
Percent
35.0

5.0

5.0

40.0

1
3
15
1
4
40

2.5
7.5
37.5
2.5
10.0
100.0

2.5
7.5
37.5
2.5
10.0
100.0

42.5
50.0
87.5
90.0
100.0

5
.
0
%
2
7
.5
%

Q. If you use washing powder, what brand do you use and why?

Interpretation:
35% ladies dont use washing powder.
37.5% ladies use Ghari detergent because they say:
It is very reasonable than any other brand.
It cleans all the stains.
It gives good lather.
It has good fragrance.
They have past experience.
All the neighbors and relatives use this detergent.
They like the advertisement on TV.
10% ladies use Tide detergent because they say:
It is a branded product which is also very reasonable than Ariel or Surf
Excel Quick Wash.
It cleans all the stains.
It has good fragrance.
They like its advertisement on TV.
It has good packing.
7.5% ladies use Nirma detergent because they say:
It is very old brand coming from last many years.
It is reasonable.
5% ladies use Surf Excel Quick Wash because they say:
It is a branded product.
They have seen demo.
They like the advertisement on TV.
They like the fragrance.
They loved the formula of do bucket pani ab rozana hai bachana.
Good Quality

3.
Brand Conscious?

Valid

yes
no
Total

Frequency
23
77

Percent
23
77

Valid
Percent
23
77

100

100.0

100.0

Cumulative
Percent
23
100.0

Q. Are you brand Conscious?


Interpretation:
23 out of 100 people said that yes they are brand conscious, they buy only
branded detergents, and 77 out of 100 people said that they are not brand
conscious, they do random shoping.

4.
Brand schemes attract you to buy products?

Valid Yes
No
Total

Frequency
90
10
100

Percent
90
10
100.0

Valid
Percent
90
10
100.0

Cumulative
Percent
90
100.0

Q. Different brand schemes attract you to buy their products?


Interpretation:
90 out of 100 people said that yes different different brand schemes attract
them to buy their products, and rest 10 out of 100 said that no different
brand schemes does not attract them to buy their products.

5.
What kind of water is their in your area

Valid

Frequency
salty
60
Normal 40
Total 100

Percent
60
40
100.0

Valid
Percent
60
40
100.0

Cumulative
Percent
60
100.0

Q. Is the water in your area salty?


Interpretation:
60 out of 100 said that yes the water which comes to their home is salty, and
rest 40 out of 100 said that no there water is not salty. This shows that now
also there are many areas in C class where people are still getting salty
water.

6.

M
e
d
iu
m
.fo
rw
i29.57%
a
..5%e
s
h
n
g
x
p
n
s
iv
e
.c
lw
thraynsh
o
e
s
d
c
le
a
n
Medium for washing expensive clothes
Valid
Percent

Cumulative
Percent

98

98

98

2
100.0

2
100.0

100.0

Frequency Percent

Valid

hand
98
wash
dry clean 2
Total
100

Q.How do you wash expensive clothes?


Interpretation:
97.5% ladies wash their expensive clothes through Hand wash and Dry
clean. They cant afford for dry clean. They wash these clothes separately
from regular clothes. For these clothes they use detergent sachet

7.
Who decide to buy which cake and detergent?

Valid

ladies
gents
others
Total

Frequency
92.5
2
1
100

Percent
92.5
5.0
2.5
100.0

Valid
Percent
92.5
5.0
2.5
100.0

Cumulative
Percent
92.5
97.5
100.0

Q. Who makes the decision to buy which detergent and cake?


Interpretation:
92.5% ladies make this decision. In this strata most of the Mother in Laws
take the decision of buying, 5% gents takes decision of deciding which cake
and detergent will they buy abd only 2.5% other member of family takes
decision of deciding which cake and detergent they will buy.

8.

.20.%80.w
W
h
o
.%c
a
s
h
lo
th
e
slbaodtihes
Who wash clothes?

Valid

ladies
both
Total

Frequency
32
8
40

Percent
80.0
20.0
100.0

Valid
Percent
80.0
20.0
100.0

Q. Who washes clothes in your family?


Interpretation:
80% ladies wash clothes and 20% both ladies and gents.

Cumulative
Percent
80.0
100.0

9.

W
t10.%
a
e
r.p
o
b
le
m
syes
Water problems

Valid

yes

Frequency
40

Percent
100.0

Valid
Percent
100.0

Cumulative
Percent
100.0

Q. Do you face water problems?


Interpretation:
100% ladies say that they face water problems.
The following problems they say:
They have to get up early in the morning near about 2:00 am or 4:00 am
The water comes for 3 hrs from 24 hrs.
Sometimes water come in evening near about 9:00 p.m. and then these
ladies wash clothes at this time.

10.
Often wash clothes

Valid

O
f
t
e
n
.
w
a
s
h
.
c
l
o
t
h
e
s
D
a
i
l
y
O
n
c
e
a
w
k
T
i
.1
2
5
0
%
h
r
c
e
a
5
0
.
%
w
k
7
.5
%
7
.5
%

Daily
Once a week
Twice
week
Thrice
week
Total

Frequency
20

Percent
50.0

Valid
Percent
50.0

7.5

7.5

57.5

17.5

17.5

75.0

10

25.0

25.0

100.0

40

100.0

100.0

Q. How often you wash clothes?

Cumulative
Percent
50.0

The 12th Pie Chart shows that 50% of the ladies wash clothes Daily, 25%
wash thrice a week, 17.5% wash twice a week, 7.5% wash once a week.

11.
Quantity of Detergent

Valid

1 kg
500 Gm

Frequency
68
22

Valid
Percent Percent
68
68
22
22

Cumulative
Percent
68
22

250 Gm

15

15

15

15

Pouch

5
100

5
100.0

5
100.0

100.0

Total

Q. How much quantity of detergent you often buy?


Interpretation:

68% people said that they buy 1 kg detergent,22% said that they buy 500
gm, 15 % said that they buy 250 gm and rest 5 % said that they buy pouches
of detergent.

12.
Awareness of Brands

Valid

Frequency
T.V
75
Radio
15
Newspapers 8
Magzines 2

Percent
75
15
8
2

Q. How you are aware of the brands?


Interpretation:

Valid
Percent
75
15
8
2

Cumulative
Percent
75
15
8
2

In this survey 75 out of 100 people said that they get to know about brands
through televisions, 15 said through Radio, 8 said that newspapers and 2 said
that through magzines.

13.
Purchasing of Detergent

Valid

From near
shop
From
branded
outlet
From
wholeseller
Total

Frequency Percent

Valid
Percent

Cumulative
Percent

70

70

70

70

20

20

20

20

10

10

10

100.0

100

100.0

100.0

Q. How you purchase detergent?


Interpretation:

In this, 70 out of 100 people said that they purchase detergent from the most
near shop, 20 said that they purchase detergent from branded oulet and 10
said that they purchase items from wholeseller and detergent is also included
in that.

14.

T
r60ie
..%
d
S
u
rf.e
x
c
l40..q
i%
u
c
k
.w
a
s
h
y
e
s
n
o
Tried Surf excel quick wash

Valid

Yes
No
Total

Frequency
16
24
100

Percent
40.0
60.0
100.0

Valid
Percent
40.0
60.0
100.0

Cumulative
Percent
40.0
100.0

Q. Will you try Surf Excel Quick Wash after having watched the demo?
Interpretation:
40% ladies tried SURF EXCEL QUICK WASH but didnt bring it into daily
life because they say:

It is expensive.
Still they believe that more lather means more cleaning.

CHAPTER 4

FINDINGS
Advertising industry is growing at a good pace as more and more
companies are investing in ads and promotions.
In the C class area very less people are Brand Conscious.
Ogilvy Outreach is fulfilling the requirements of clients effectively
and efficiently and is taking the products to rural India.
This campaign of SURF EXCEL QUICK WASH by Ogilvy for HLL
is very effective as there is direct interaction with the target audience
and can help the product to easily penetrate the market. This will
increase the sale of sachets which are of Rs2 in these areas and these
C class areas will also become a huge market for there product and
that will finally increase the revenue of company.
People use Cake more than Detergent to wash clothes in C class
area.
75 % people said that they get awareness of brands through T.V, and
therefore more and more companies are investing in Advertising.
This kind of campaign are very fruitful in C class areas as the
audience living in these areas are interested in watching these kind of
things and even actively participates.
These campaigns will have long brand resemblance and can help the
product to easily penetrate in the targeted market.

Most of the C class areas are having low income groups and have
water scarcity , so this product is easily acceptable in these areas with
the purchase of LUP(SACHETS)
Till date less people are using SURF EXCEL QUICK WASH in C
class areas .

CONCLUSION
It is very difficult to work in C class areas. It was the challenging job for
me but I did because I believe in hard work and determination. I used to
check at most 8 locations and try to find out the problem that the team
members are facing and everyday in the evening I used to re-brief them for
the next day so that they cant face the same problems.
On consumer behavior towards detergent, I think people living in C class
areas are not Brand sensitive, they even dont bother about the Brand
attributes, they just believe in purchasing cheap products. They purchase
detergents like Ghari, Fena, Nirma. They use Desi Saboon instead of
using any branded cake for washing clothes. During the campaigns people of
C class were more attracted towards gifts rather than brand attributes.
On supervision, I think its not so difficult to handle workforce because its
just a matter of motivating and inspiring them to work. I got the work done
very easily, yes I did get problems in the beginning but afterwards the ball
was in my court.

These kinds of campaigns are successful in these areas and can easily
penetrate the product.

RECOMMENDATIONS
While the campaign is going on, the target areas should also be
provided with water through a tanker on which there should be brand
name and brand message of the product, As every human wants there
benefit and this will have a positive effect on the brand and this will
create the perception in people mind that SURF EXCEL QUICK
WASH cares for them and seriously wants to remove the problem of
water scarcity.
MAID PROGRAMES- As we know that most of the maid are from
these are from C class areas, Through these maid we can focus on
people of upper class. As the detergent selection in this class is very
much dependent on maids.
Sequence of program
1. Small teams should be send to C class areas, where they will
find the maids and they should ask the maid to fill up small
form in which there will be general information regarding there
name, address, age, how many houses the work in.
2. Next day these teams should ask these maids to a camp, where
they are telling more effective ways of washing clothes, they
should also be told that incentives will be also given that will
become the motivational force to attract them.
3. In this camp effective technique of washing clothes should be
told and SURF EXCEL QUICK WASH should be used as a
detergent. And brand and brand message should be repeated
again and again.

This activity will help the product to easily penetrate upper market.
More visits should be done by project and state head to ensure that
the work is going according to schedule.

Women often use some of the traditional custom accessories


namely (sindoor, kajal, bangles, bindi) and C- CLASS women
wear these things of cheaper quality. The company can tap this
practice as a means of opportunity by building strong reenforcement in their mind. The company can come up with a new
handbag of its bearing company logo and company name. The bag
will contain small sachet of surf excel along with all the
accessories required by women to embellish themselves. These
schemes will surely create companys emotional bondage with
these prospective customers and give an impetus to its sales. It will
also enhance the goodwill of the company and will reflect the I
CARE FOR YOU attitude of the company making customers feel
important.
Most of the ladies in these areas usually visits Ration shop, So
these sachets can be also displayed there moreover other
promotion activities can be also done near ration shops.

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

Compare the market potential of New Delhi; the sample size of 100
target audience is relatively small. This doesnt represent the true
universe.
A population census couldnt be done which perhaps given approx. zero
deviation error from the actual.
Most of the targeted audiences were illiterate.
Some of the targeted audiences were not friendly.

QUESTIONNAIRE
I, Nitin Sharma student of MBA 2nd year ( 4th sem ) doing the project
on the topic brand promotion of surf excel quick wash. I ensure you
not to disclose this information elsewhere for any other purpose.
Name:..
City:.
Contact Number:
E mail id:.
Sex: m ( )
f()
Age:.
Occupation:.
Q 1. What do you use to wash clothes?
Detergent ( )

Cake ( )

Both ( )

Q 2. If you use washing powder, what brand do you use?


Surf Excel Quick Wash ( ) Wheel ( ) Nirma ( ) Ghari ( ) Fena ( )
Tide ( ) Dont Use ( )
Q 3. Are you brand conscious?
Yes ( )
No ( )
Q 4. Different brand schemes attract you to buy their products?
Yes ( )
No ( )
Q 5. Is the water in your area salty?
Yes ( )
No ( )

Q 6. How do you wash expensive clothes?


Hand wash ( )

Dry Clean ( )

Q 7. Who makes the decision to buy which detergent and cake?


Ladies ( )

Gents ( )

Other members of family ( )

Q 8. Who washes clothes in your family?


Ladies ( )

both {ladies and gents} ( )

Q 9. Do you face water problems?


Yes ( )

No ( )

Q10. How often you wash clothes?


Daily
()
Twice a week ( )

Once a week ( )
Thrice a week ( )

Q11. How much quantity of detergent you often buy?


1 Kg ( )
250 gm ( )

500 gm ( )
Pouch ( )

Q12. How you are aware of the brands?


T.V
()
Newspapers ( )

Radio ( )
Magzines ( )

Q13. How you purchase detergent?


From most near shop
From wholeseller

()
()

From branded outlet

()

Q14.Will you try Surf Excel Quick Wash after having watched the demo?
Yes ( )
No ( )

APPENDICES

BIBLIOGRAPHY
www.google.com
www.ogilvy.com
www.ogilvyindia.com
www.agencyfaqs.com
www.infoline.com
www.msn.com