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PHYS 25100/26100

Exam 3 Review Packet


YF Textbook Chs 28-33
Ch 28 (sections 5-7)
recognize that in many cases, the direction of a B-field can be determined via the
right-hand rule and we only need to worry about the magnitude of the B-field. For
example,
B=
B=

o I
distance r from a long straight wire
2r

o I
at center of a circular loop with radius a
2a
B = o nI inside a long solenoid

(NOT an exhaustive list)


realize that there some of the highly symmetric results can be determined from
Amperes law, which states that

~ = o Iencl
~ dl
B

It is safe to ignore 28.8. The list for Ch 28 is deceptively short. Theres a lot of good
conceptual material and examples packed in there. Dig it.
Ch 29
be able to use Faradays law and Lenzs law to relate a changing magnetic flux
through a conducting loop to the induced EMF around that loop and realize that the
above relation is for a single loop. For a set of multiple loops, multiply by the total
number of loops to get the total induced EMF

"=

dt

understand that from the general definition of magnetic flux, you can induce an EMF
either by changing the area (generating a motional EMF) or by changing the B-field
(inducing an E-field to generate the EMF) according to the following relations
"=

Its OK to ignore 29.6 - 29.8.

~ (motional EMF)
~ dl
(~v B)
I
~ (induced E-field)
~ dl
"= E

Ch 30
know all about inductance (symbol = M for mutual; = L for self-inductance; SI unit =
henry [H])
di
N B
" = L where L =
dt
i
know how to relate mutual inductance between 2 coils of wire

M=

N2 B2
N1 B1
=
i1
i2

also understand that a single coil will induce a back EMF on itself
realize that an inductor stores potential energy in its B-field
potential energy U = LI2/2
energy density = B2/2o
be able to describe how an inductor slows the rate of current decay/growth in a directcurrent RL circuit
"
i(t) = (1 e t/ ) (growth)
R
i(t) = Io e t/ (decay)
L
= time constant
=
R
realize that a simple direct-current LC circuit will exhibit simple harmonic oscillation
between the capacitor plates with angular frequency = (1/LC) and that the addition
of a resistor to make an RLC circuit slows the angular frequency to
!d =

1
LC

R 2
)
2L

giving an under-damped system


q(t) = Qo e

R
)t
2L cos(! 0 t)

also realize that d = 0 when R = 2(L/C), the charge will no longer oscillate and the
system is critically damped
and finally, if R > 2(L/C), then d will be imaginary and the system is overdamped.
Ch 31
be comfortable with the distinctions between frequency (f) & angular frequency ();
voltage amplitude (V), rms voltage (Vrms), and instantaneous voltage (v(t)); current
amplitude (I), rms current (Irms), and instantaneous current (i(t)) for simple series
alternating-current circuits.

know how to calculate the capacitive and inductive reactances and the impedance for
an a-c circuit
XL = !L
1
XC =
!C
p
2
Z = R + (XL XC )2

given those quantities, know how to compute the voltage across individual circuit
elements and the entire circuit
VR = IR
VL = IXL
VC = IXC
V = IZ
with the aid of a phasor diagram, know the phase angle between current and voltage
for individual circuit elements and how to calculate the overall phase
tan =

(XL

XC )
R

know the average power for an a-c circuit is


Pav = Irms Vrms cos
realize that resonance occurs an an RLC a-c circuit when capacitive and inductive
reactances are equal, giving a resonant angular frequency
!o =

1
LC

know how transformers can step a-c voltage either up or down via the ratio of coil
turns on the primary and secondary sides of the transformer
V2
N2
=
V1
N1

Ch 32
understand that Maxwell added a displacement current to Amperes law to allow for
the fact a magnetic field can be created by a time-variable electric field in addition to
being created by moving charges
realize that Maxwells equations show that both electric and magnetic fields are
solutions to the wave equation and both propagate at the same speed and are related
via
r

v=

1
o o
c= f
E
c=
B

EM radiation transmits energy per square meter at a rate given by the Poynting vector

~= 1E
~ B
~
S
o

the intensity of the radiation is the time-averaged value of the Poynting vector
2
~ >= E
I =< S
2o c
the energy density of EM radiation is shared equally between the electric and
magnetic fields

B2
o
2
1
B
= o E 2 =
2
2o

u = uE + uB = o E 2 =
uavg

the power delivered by a beam of radiation is equal to the intensity times the surface
area
as particles, photons will exert pressure and carry momentum where the momentum
of a single photon is p = E/c = h/ and the pressure exerted on a surface depends on
how reflective the surface is, where Prad = I/c for a perfectly absorbing surface and =
2I/c for a perfectly reflective surface
It is safe to ignore 32.5 for Exam 3.
Ch 33
be comfortable with the basic concept of an index of refraction for an optically
transparent material as being the ratio of the sped of light in vacuum (c) to the speed
of light in the material (n = c/v)
realize that since frequency is the conserved quantity as light moves form one
material to another, that = o/n, where o is the vacuum wavelength
be able to use the laws of reflection and refraction (a.k.a. Snells law) at an interface
for internal reflections (nt < ni), be able to determine the critical angle, beyond which
no light will refract into the new medium (i.e., Total Internal Reflection)

i = r
ni sini = nt sint
nt
c = sin 1 ( )
ni
understand linear polarization and how Malus law relates the intensity of light
transmitted through an ideal polarizer to the angle between the filters transmission
axis and the direction of the lights polarization

I = Imax cos2
also know that an ideal polarizer will allow 50% of the intensity of randomly polarized
light to pass through
realize that reflection will result in a least partial polarization of the reflected light and
that at the polarization angle (a.k.a. Brewsters angle), the only light reflected will be
that which is polarized parallel to the plane of the interface.

p = tan

nt
)
ni

Its safe to ignore 33.4, 33.6 and 33.7 for Exam 3