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Indiana Wesleyan University

Elementary Education Lesson Plan Template


Mathematics
2007 ACEI Standards
Day Teaching: Tuesday, October 25th, 11:10-11:40am
READINESS
I.
Goals/Objectives/Standard(s)
A. Goal(s)Students will see and understand a cross-curricular theme of how small components
make up bigger pictures
B. Objective(s) After participating in a whole-group lesson, students will create an accurate
tally graph to represent data about candy.
C.
Standard(s):
1.DA.1: Organize and interpret data with up to three choices (What is your favorite fruit?
apples, bananas, oranges); ask and answer questions about the total number of data points,
how many in each choice, and how many more or less in one choice compared to another.
PS.3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
PS.4: Model with mathematics.
II.

Management
Materials

Document camera on smartboard

Slip of paper- What color skittles of is there the most of?

Tally chart sheets for all students

Skittles (for demonstration and individual bags for students)

Papers to represent skittles for students who exhibit poor behavior

Students crayons
Time: About 25-30 minutes

Anticipatory Set and Purpose- 5 minutes

Explanation and Sorting- 5 minutes

Tally Marks Instruction- 5 minutes

Tally Marks Practice- 5 minutes

Discussion/Closure- 5 minutes
Space

Students sitting at their assigned seats, talking to partners when asked to do so


Behavior

Specific management system for candy (See scripting in lesson)

Planned student helpers in order to prevent behavior problems


III.
Anticipatory Set
Teach the students how to whisper scream. Have students stand up at their seats, since after
this they will be sitting for a while.

Today we are going to do a short activity. I hope that this activity will help us to answer the
question, What color of skittles is there the most of? (show visual). I am going to show you a
group of skittles on the document camera for 3 seconds. When I remove the skittles, I want
you to whisper scream what color skittles you see the most of. Show students a group of
skittles of varying colors arranged haphazardly.

Now I am going to show you another group of skittles that are organized in a different way.
When I remove the skittles after 3 seconds, I want you to whisper scream what color skittles
you see the most of. Show students a group of skittles in varying colors arranged in organized
rows by color.

Now remember that the question we are trying to answer is What color of skittles is there the
most of? (show visual, have the students repeat the question). Show me with your fingerswas it easier to answer our question when the skittles were organized like this first group
(show visual)? Or like this second group (show visual)? Okay, now someone please raise their
hand and tell me why you think that.
IV. Purpose: What I hear you all saying is that when we sort and organize things in a way that
makes sense, like in rows by color (show visual), it is a lot easier to answer questions we might have.

Today we are going to learn about some ways to organize information. You are going to use a tally
graph to answer the question What color of skittles is there the most of? (show visual) with your own
group of skittles.
PLAN FOR INSTRUCTION

(ACEI 1.0)
Adaptation to Diverse Students-a. There are two students who are currently being tested to receive special education
services. From working with both of them, I know that they do best with very
structured, straightforward tasks. Although many of the students could do this activity
without the organizer, I provided the organizer for all of the students primarily because
I know that it will help these students be more successful in these tasks.
b. Having students color over the color words will be helpful for my ELL student to learn
and understand the color vocabulary needed for this task.
(ACEI 3.2)
Lesson Presentation (Input/Output)
Explanation and Sorting
Pass out tally chart sheets. Tell students to write their names on their papers. Tell them to
place their pencils on their nametags, and not pick them up again until I ask them to.
Ask for some helpers to help me model the sorting and tallying process on the document
camera. (Ideally have the students with behavior struggles on the document camera, as
their teacher has found this to be an effective method of engaging them and preventing
behavior problems.)

Find the word red on your sheet. Point to it when you have found it. Now use a red
crayon to color the word red. Repeat this process for every color.

When I give out the bags of skittles, I want you to sort the skittles based on their colors.
Have the student helpers model this on the document camera. Thumbs up if you
understand what you will be doing.
o I am about to give you your skittles. You are not allowed to eat the skittles until I
tell you are allowed to. So shake your head yes or no- should you eat the skittles
right away?
o If you eat your skittles too early, your graph will be wrong. If one of your teachers
sees you eat a skittle, or if you show us that you are going to make bad choices
during this activity, we will take away all of the skittles and you will have to create
your graph using pieces of paper instead. I do not want that to happen, so please
make good choices.
o After you get your skittles, you may begin sorting your skittles by colors. Once you
are done sorting, give me a thumbs up so I know that you are ready to move on.
Pass out bags of skittles and allow students to begin sorting. Walk around to make
sure students are on task and they understand what to do.
Tally Marks Instruction

Help the student helpers model this step on the document camera. Now that we have our
skittles organized. We need to show how many skittles we have of each color on our tally
graph. A tally mark looks like this. It means I have one of something. If I have two tally
marks, show me on your fingers how many of something do you think I would have?
Now I am going to pick one of my colors of skittles. I am going to make tallies of my red
skittles. I am going to make one tally mark for each red skittle I have. Show how to create
a tally graph for red skittles. The number of red skittles will be more than 5, so I will teach
students the rhyme 1 2 3 4, Go across to add one more with hand motions to help them
remember how to tally a group more than 5.
o So when we make tally marks, we make them in groups of 5. But why do we do
that? Why dont we just make lots of little lines like this (show visual)? Here are two
pictures of the same number of tally marks. The right side is a bunch of tally marks
not in groups, and the left side is tally marks in groups.
o I am going to count the tally marks not in groups, and you all are going to use this
timer to see how long it takes me. Ready? Go (Count the tally marks and have the
students time you. Dramatize how long it takes to count, and how it is easy to lose
track.)
o Now I am going to count the tally marks in groups. Ready to time me?

Now that you saw that, I want us to try to figure out why we think we group tally
marks in groups. Talk to your partner and see if you can figure it out. (Allow time
for talk and then have 1-3 people share. Help them to understand that we group
tally marks in groups of 5 because it is easier to count quickly and keep track.).
Tally Mark Practice

Now do the other two colors of skittles, when you are done, raise your hand so that a
teacher can check your work. If you get done early, use the back of your paper to practice
making groups of tally marks and counting how many you can make.

Students will then do the other two colors themselves. Walk around and help students who
may be struggling and check student answers.
o

(ACEI 2.3)
(ACEI 3.3)
VII. Check for understanding.

I can observe students as they work to check for their understanding throughout the lesson. I
will be observing them as they sort their skittles and as they make tally mark charts to see if
they are able to do these things accurately.

I will listen to students as they talk about their tally charts with their partners and as we talk as
a whole group during closure. I will be able to tell if the class generally understands that each
tally mark represents one skittle.

I will check the students tally charts to see if they were able to meet the objective of the
lesson.
VIII. Review learning outcomes / Closure (Discussion)

The question we wanted to answer today was What color skittles are there the most of? I
think we are ready to answer that question. Were there the most red, green, or purple skittles?
Please whisper scream your answer.
Can everyone use their fingers to show me how many green skittles they had? Now use your
fingers to show me how many tally marks you had in the green part in your chart.
So it seems like everyone had 4 green tally marks. Explain to your partner why you had 4
green tally marks. Allow for discussion and then let 1-3 students share. Help students to
explain that the number of tally marks in each section correlates with the number of skittles.
Have students turn in the chart by placing it on the teacher table. We will be using this during
math stations.
PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT
Formative Assessment (See Check for understanding): Observation throughout lesson, accurate
description of tally graph
Summative Assessment: Students tally charts
(ACEI 4.0)
REFLECTION AND POST-LESSON ANALYSIS
1. How many students achieved the lesson objective(s)? For those who did not, why not?
a. Students did achieve the object of creating an accurate tally chart. The students who
made mistakes were mistakes from lack of counting accuracy/misunderstanding
directions as opposed to lack of understanding/ability.
2. What were my strengths and weaknesses?
a. Strengths- Management of students going through the lesson
b. Weaknesses- Assuming that students would be able to talk to their neighbors/tables
without any guidance
3. How should I alter this lesson?
a. Give a real-world example to show students a more clear picture of why we use tally
marks in groups of fives.
4. How would I pace it differently?
a. This lesson takes less time than I approximated. Use extra time for a brain break, as
students will be sitting for a long time by the end of this lesson.
5. Were all students actively participating? If not, why not?
a. Students were engaged and participating throughout the lesson. The only times
students were not participating was if they finished a step early.
6. What adjustments did I make to reach varied learning styles and ability levels?

a.
b.

7.

Blooms Taxonomy- Students apply their understanding to create a tally chart


Gardners Multiple Intelligences- Logical/Mathematical, Bodily-Kinesthetic, Spatial,
Interpersonal
Is this lesson too easy for first grade students, or is it developmentally appropriate based on
the abilities of my class?
a. This lesson is not too easy. The students were able to do this very well, but needed
guidance through it. Therefore, I know that this content was in the students zone of
proximal development.

Indiana Wesleyan University


Elementary Education Lesson Plan Design and Assessment Rubric
Mathematics

Goals
Objectives
Standards

Anticipatory
Set

Purpose

Needs Improvement
1
Lesson objectives are
poorly written and/or
have little or no
connection to learning
goals or standards.
Little connection
exists between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments.
The anticipatory set is
missing or has little or
no connection to the
goal or content of the
lesson.

Emerging
Competence 2
Lesson objectives are
correlated with
learning goals and
standards. The
connection between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments is weak
or unclear.

Competent 3

The connection
between the
anticipatory set and
lesson objectives and
content is weak or
unclear.

The anticipatory set is


clear and direct and
focuses students
attention on the
lesson.

The statement of
purpose is ambiguous
or worded so
generally that the
connection with the
content of the lesson
is not apparent.

A statement of
purpose is included in
the lesson, but has
little power to
motivate students and
capture their
imaginations.

The statement of
purpose is clearly
connected to the
content of the lesson
and is presented in
terms that are easily
understood by
students.

The lesson plan


contains objectives
that connect goals
and standards with
lesson activities and
assessments.

Outstanding 4
The lesson plan
contains clearly stated
content objectives.
Objectives are
logically connected to
appropriate goals and
standards and are
consistent with lesson
activities and
assessments.
The anticipatory set
connects the current
lesson with previous
and future learning
and focuses students
minds and attention
on the days lesson.
The statement of
purpose has the
power to capture the
imaginations of
students and motivate
them to accomplish
the expected learning.

Readiness
Instructional Technology
The candidate seeks appropriate ways to evaluate and employ technological tools, resources, and
skills as they apply to specific content and pedagogical knowledge, assessment practices, and
student achievement. The selection of appropriate technological tools reflects the candidates
ability to make sound instructional decisions that enable all students to achieve the expected
outcomes. INTASC 6.i, 8.g, 8.o
Plan for Instruction
Adaptation
to Diverse
Students

Needs Improvement
1
Few or no instructional
opportunities are
included. Any
instructional

Emerging
Competence 2
Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson; however, they

Competent 3
Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson. The

Outstanding 4
Specific instructional
opportunities are
provided in this lesson
that demonstrate the

ACEI
Standard
3.2

Lesson
Presentatio
n
Mathematic
s
ACEI
Standard
2.3

Lesson
Presentatio
n
ACEI
Standard
3.3

Check for
Understand
-ing

Review
Learning

opportunities are not


developmentally
appropriate or
adapted to diverse
students.

are not adapted to


diverse students.

opportunities are
developmentally
appropriate and/or are
adapted to diverse
students.

The candidates
lesson plan suggests
his or her lack of
number sense and
background and
proficiency in the
major concepts and
procedures that define
number and
operations, algebra,
geometry, and
measurement.

The candidates
lesson plan suggests
an emerging number
sense and background
and proficiency in the
major concepts and
procedures that define
number and
operations, algebra,
geometry, and
measurement.

The candidates
lesson plan
demonstrates his or
her number sense and
proficiency in the
major concepts and
computational
procedures that define
number and
operations involving
algebra, geometry,
and measurement.

The candidates
lesson plan suggests
that he or she cannot
problem solve, or
lacks the ability to
provide reasoning and
proof for
mathematical
computations; he or
she is unable to
communicate
effectively about,
make connections to,
and provide
representations of
mathematical
concepts.

The candidates
lesson plan suggests a
limited ability to
problem solve, or to
provide reasoning and
proof for
mathematical
computations; he or
she has limited ability
to communicate
effectively about,
make connections to,
and provide
representations of
mathematical
concepts.

The lesson
presentation does not
encourage elementary
students
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

The lesson
presentation includes
little provision for
students
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

Little or no provision is
included to check for
student understanding
or to reteach concepts
that elude students
during the initial
presentation.

A guided practice
section is included in
the lesson plan, but
the connection with
the lesson
presentation is weak
and/or unclear.

Lesson closure is not


included, or is not

Lesson closure is
weak and/or poorly

The candidates
lesson plan
demonstrates his or
her problem-solving
ability, the ability to
provide reasoning and
proof for
mathematical
computations, and the
ability to
communicate about,
make connections to,
and provide
representations of
mathematical
concepts.

The lesson
presentation includes
at least one teaching
strategy that
encourages
elementary students
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.
The lesson plan
includes a plan and
the means to check
for student
understanding of the
lesson. A provision is
included to reteach all
or part of the lesson
to all or part of the
class.
Lesson closure relates
directly to the lesson

candidates
understanding of how
students differ in their
development and
approaches to
learning. The
instructional
opportunities are
adapted to diverse
students.
The candidates
lesson plan
demonstrates a
variety of ways to
present number
concepts involving
algebra, geometry,
and measurement.
He or she balances
and links conceptual
understanding and is
operationally
proficient in algebra,
geometry,
measurement, and
data analysis and
probability.
The candidates
lesson plan
consistently engages
students in problem
solving, reasoning and
proof for
mathematical
computations. He or
she consistently
demonstrates the
ability to
communicate
effectively about,
make connections to,
and provide multiple
representations of
mathematical
concepts.
The lesson
presentation includes
a variety of teaching
strategies that
encourage elementary
students
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.
Plans to check for
student understanding
of the content are an
integral part of the
lesson, and include
frequent questions
and other actively
engaging forms of
formative assessment
during guided
practice.
Lesson closure is
clearly correlated to

Outcomes

related to the goals


and/or content of the
lesson.

written.

purpose and/or
objective.

Closure

the content of the


lesson and actively
engages students in
summarizing the
essential elements of
the lesson.

Plan for Assessment

Formal and
Informal
Assessment
ACEI 4.0

Reflection
and PostLesson
Analysis

Needs Improvement
1
The lesson plan does
not include
assessment activities,
or there is little or no
correlation between
planned assessment
activities and lesson
goals and objectives.
Any assessments
included are not
developmentally
appropriate for the
students.

Emerging
Competence 2
Assessment activities
are included in the
lesson, but they are
not well correlated to
and/or do not cover
the full range of LP
goals and objectives.
The assessment
strategies do not
promote development
of each student.

Self-answer questions
are not included in the
lesson plan.

Self-answer questions
are included, but do
not fit the content or
purposes of the
lesson.

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

A plan for formal and


informal assessment
throughout the lesson
is included. The
assessment strategies
are uniquely designed
for the students.

Formal and informal


assessments
strategies are a
seamless and
integrated part of the
lesson. The
assessments are
highly correlated to
the learning objectives
and promote
continuous
intellectual, social,
emotional, and
physical development
of each student.
Additional self-answer
questions are included
that specifically
address unique lesson
content and
methodology.

The lesson plan


includes all required
self-answer questions.

Lesson Plan Summative Assessment


Element
Goals Objectives Standards
Anticipatory Set
Purpose
Adaptation to Diverse Students
ACEI 3.2
Lesson Presentation
ACEI 2.3
Lesson Presentation
ACEI 3.3
Check for Understanding
Review Learning Outcomes Closure
Formal and Informal Assessment
ACEI 4.0
Reflection and Post-Lesson Analysis

Score

Total Score
Note to faculty
When used for submission in methods course, include data for ACEI
standards on collaborative site.
When used for student-teaching admission, all of the following apply.
Passing total score = 30/40
No individual element score < 2
Signed by faculty

Culminating Assessment
Needs Improvement

Emerging

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

Developmen
t
Learning
Motivation
ACEI 1.0

1
The candidates lesson
plan suggests he or
she does not
understand the major
concepts, principles,
theories, and research.

Competence 2
The candidates lesson
plan demonstrates a
limited understanding
of the major concepts,
principles, theories,
and research.

The candidates plan


does not provide
opportunities to
support students
development,
acquisition of
knowledge, and
motivation.

He or she designs
lessons with minimally
appropriate learning
opportunities.

The candidates lesson


plan demonstrates
understanding of the
major concepts,
principles, theories,
and research and uses
them in planning.
He or she designs
appropriate lessons
with adequate learning
opportunities that
acknowledge students
development,
acquisition of
knowledge, and
motivation.

The candidates lesson


plan demonstrates
that he or she fully
understands all of the
major concepts,
principles, theories,
and research and uses
them effectively in
planning.
He or she includes
learning opportunities
that support students
development,
acquisition of
knowledge, and
motivation.

Culminating Assessment Score:

_________