dhs 15

The Middle East’s interiors, design & property magazine
Dubai Technology and Media Free Zone Authority
Infinite design: compatible aesthetic contrasts
Borderless kitchens: the invisible take over
2010 Pritzker Prize: SANNA’s sensual simplicity
New world ownership: multiple destination choices
identity
IssUE EIghTyonE
yEar sEvEn
jUnE 2010
a MoTIvaTE PUBLICaTIon
Our Built-in Kitchen Appliances and Sinks are produced to meet the highest quality
standards found in Europe and are seamlessly designed to complement the best
kitchens in the world!
Purchasing our products means establishing a relationship direct with Teka, as
there is no middle man, allowing high quality at better prices. After sales service is
exclusively handled by our certified Teka Küchentechnik Technicians, ensuring the
perfect experience from the beginning and beyond.
Teka Küchentechnik Built-in Kitchen Appliances and Sinks - The complete kitchen solution.
Kitchen appliances
made with German precision
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Teka Küchentechnik, Bin Khedia Center, Al Garhoud, P.O. Box 35142, Dubai UAE. Office Tel.: +9714-2833047, Fax: +9714-2833048. Showroom Tel.: +9714-2822884, Fax: +9714-2833048. Teka appliances can be found through our exclusive network of Authorized Dealers in the UAE.
Ovens Mi cr owaves Hobs Cooker Hoods Refr i gerator s Di shwasher s Washi ng Machi nes Si nks and Mi xer s
Our Built-in Kitchen Appliances and Sinks are produced to meet the highest quality
standards found in Europe and are seamlessly designed to complement the best
kitchens in the world!
Purchasing our products means establishing a relationship direct with Teka, as
there is no middle man, allowing high quality at better prices. After sales service is
exclusively handled by our certified Teka Küchentechnik Technicians, ensuring the
perfect experience from the beginning and beyond.
Teka Küchentechnik Built-in Kitchen Appliances and Sinks - The complete kitchen solution.
Kitchen appliances
made with German precision
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Teka Küchentechnik, Bin Khedia Center, Al Garhoud, P.O. Box 35142, Dubai UAE. Office Tel.: +9714-2833047, Fax: +9714-2833048. Showroom Tel.: +9714-2822884, Fax: +9714-2833048. Teka appliances can be found through our exclusive network of Authorized Dealers in the UAE.
Ovens Mi cr owaves Hobs Cooker Hoods Refr i gerator s Di shwasher s Washi ng Machi nes Si nks and Mi xer s
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Scavolini S.p.A. 61025 Montelabbate (PU) - Italy Tel. +39 0721443333
Fax: +39 0721443413 contact@scavolini.com www.scavolini.com
Pls. download our general
catalog from www.scavolini.com
Kitchen Designs Llc
P.O.BOX 81553
Salahudeen Road
Deira - Dubai
Tel. 971 - 4 2691003
ayman@kitchendesigns.ae
Just for business use:
www.scavolini.biz
The “best seller” from Italy
System of Quality
Management
UNI EN ISO 9001
System of Environmental
Management
UNI EN ISO 14001
System of Health &
Safety Management
OHSAS 18001
For the carcase of the
kitchens Scavolini uses
only Idroleb: a water
repellent V100 panel with the
lowest formaldehyde emission,
lower than specified on the
Japanese standards F**** (4 stars).
Discover Scavolini’s commitment
for a cleaner world on
www.scavolinigreenmind.com
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Scavolini S.p.A. 61025 Montelabbate (PU) - Italy Tel. +39 0721443333
Fax: +39 0721443413 contact@scavolini.com www.scavolini.com
Pls. download our general
catalog from www.scavolini.com
Kitchen Designs Llc
P.O.BOX 81553
Salahudeen Road
Deira - Dubai
Tel. 971 - 4 2691003
ayman@kitchendesigns.ae
Just for business use:
www.scavolini.biz
The “best seller” from Italy
System of Quality
Management
UNI EN ISO 9001
System of Environmental
Management
UNI EN ISO 14001
System of Health &
Safety Management
OHSAS 18001
For the carcase of the
kitchens Scavolini uses
only Idroleb: a water
repellent V100 panel with the
lowest formaldehyde emission,
lower than specified on the
Japanese standards F**** (4 stars).
Discover Scavolini’s commitment
for a cleaner world on
www.scavolinigreenmind.com
purity.indd 1 4/27/10 3:37:01 PM
purity.indd 1 4/27/10 3:37:01 PM
I NSIDE
CMYK
17 June 2010
Cover: Cliffhanger.
Photography: Mads Mogensen
JUNE 2010
®
identity identity
FEATURES
26 Going for gold
Winning ways to create beauty from cast-offs, generate power
from heart-healthy exercise and reduce the ecological footprint
come from innovators from around the world.
32 Sheer genius
The talented dual winners of the 2010 Pritzker Prize for
Architecture who comprise SANAA create deceptively simple
designs with an ethereal transparency.
60 Cliffhanger
Perched atop a rugged cliff on a volcanic Greek island, a holiday
home features simple, subtle lines that contrast with the rugged
natural environment.
84 Awesome Ottomans
Istanbul’s creatively stylish hotels welcome guests with a blending
of Ottoman inspirations and tomorrow’s aesthetics, technology
and design.
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ID Contents.indd 17 5/27/10 5:41:40 PM
INSI DE
CMYK
19 June 2010
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Obaid Humaid Al Tayer
GROUP EDITOR & MANAGING PARTNER
Ian Fairservice
GROUP SENIOR EDITOR
Gina Johnson | gina@motivate.ae
GROUP EDITOR
Catherine Belbin | catherine@motivate.ae
FEATURES EDITOR
Dorothy Waldman | dorothy@motivate.ae
CHIEF SUB-EDITOR
Iain Smith | iains@motivate.ae
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Belinda Igaya | belinda@motivate.ae
ART DIRECTOR
Karen Evans | karene@motivate.ae
GENERAL MANAGER – PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION
S Sasidharan | sasidharan@motivate.ae
MANAGER – PRODUCTION
C Sudhakar | sudhakar@motivate.ae
GENERAL MANAGER – GROUP SALES
Anthony Milne | anthony@motivate.ae
SENIOR ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER
Seema Kansar | seema@motivate.ae
DEPUTY ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER
Shweta Praful | shwetap@motivate.ae
GENERAL MANAGER – ABU DHABI
Joe Marritt | Joe@motivate.ae
ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER – ABU DHABI
Darryl Wiley | Darryl@motivate.ae
CONTRIBUTORS:
Ashlee Beard | Steve Hill | Mads Mogensen |
Lena Semann | Lisa Vincenti | Richard Warren
REGULARS
21 Editorial
40 Subscription
88 Antennae
90 Forum
96 Books
98 Icon
PROPERTY
All prices quoted in identity are correct at the time of going to press.
IDENTITY NEXT ISSUE JULY 2010
Motivate Publishing FZ LLC
Office 508, 5th Floor, Building 8
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identity
®
ISSUE #81
+ Paint the town red
+ Paid vacations
+ Antennae
+ Portfolio
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+ Milan’s Expo makeover
+ Bathing spaces en tap
+ Uncovering design today
+ Pioneering eco cities
+ Checking out hip hotels
+ And much, much, more…
DESIGN FORMULA
Printed by Emirates Printing Press, Dubai
Member of
4,741 copies
Dec 2009
67 id Property
43 Menu Milanese


Kitchens, as seen at Eurocucina 2010 in Milan
recently, are breaking out of the box as they
become integrated into the family’s main living
areas, increasing the importance of design, colour
and materials, in addition to their primary function
as the home’s culinary epicentre.
ID Contents.indd 19 5/27/10 5:41:51 PM
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Nakkash_PACK MAN Ad_Emirates Homes Magazine FP.ai 5/27/10 2:23:13 PM
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Nakkash_PACK MAN Ad_Emirates Homes Magazine FP.ai 5/27/10 2:23:13 PM
21 June 2010
Design triumphs
EDITORIAL
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Group Editor Catherine Belbin.
The opening of the world’s first Armani Hotel brought a tear or two to
the eyes of fashion’s top designer, 75-year-old Giorgio Armani. The designer
who brought us the deconstructed jacket and who has dressed some of the
most elegant men and women of the past 30 years basked in the limelight as
his 160-room luxury hotel was opened in the world’s tallest building, the 882
metre-high Burj Khalifa.
There were no surprises, as the design is Armani through and through
– what was impressive was the standard of finishing and workmanship, the
perfection and attention to detail that has earned Armani his undisputed place
in the design world. The materials and textures used throughout ooze luxury
and richness. Even Armani himself quipped that the interiors are even more
luxurious than he expected, though some find them a little too understated.
The opening was a proud day for Dubai – the debut of the world’s newest
luxury hotel chain is housed in the SOM designed mega tower. Armani hotels
in Milan, Morocco and Egypt will follow. Without revealing any design secrets,
Armani stated that the Milan hotel will have more of a Milanese flavour.
Meanwhile, The Bonnington hotel in the Jumeirah Lakes Towers district was
inaugurated. Revealing interiors by LW Design, well known for their distinctive
and refined contemporary style, this was the last project of founder Lars
Waldenstrom before his recent retirement.
Without a doubt, architect Wajih Nakkash’s 200-plus square metre stand, was
the most impressive at the Dubai Hotel Show 2010. Over the years Nakkash
has been concentrating on building a portfolio of outdoor furniture brands that
includes Dedon, Gandia Blasco, Royal Botania and Gervasoni. The flamboyant
new collection from Fendi Outdoor took pride of place at the show along with
his other new brands including John Kelly, Chillsensaciones, De Castelli, Manutti
and Ivini.
Among his special guests was the renowned Spanish designer José Antonio
Gandia-Blasco, who was also one of the main speakers at the event.
Gandia-Blasco’s family’s company has been setting design standards for some
of the most minimalist and ultra cool outdoor furniture and outdoor living
concepts for over two decades. He revealed his plans for the exciting new
Passion Resort Project. The designer has been associated with numerous cutting
edge hip hotel projects including the Adam and Eve in Turkey, the Gansevoort
South in Florida and the Farol in Portugal.
Nakkash is planning to open the UAE’s first furniture gallery dedicated
exclusively to designer outdoor furniture and accessories later this year.
Congratulations to Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, partners at the
Tokyo-based architecture firm SANAA, winners of the Pritzker Architecture
Prize 2010 who share their design philosophies with id this month.
Celebrate new additions to the Dubai furnishings and accessories scene
with the id team at the Crate and Barrel Design Events, June 8 and 9 at the
Mall of the Emirates and Mirdiff City Centre, and discover this season’s bright
new trends.
Clockwise from top left: Kazuyo Sejima and
Ryue Nishizawa; José Antonio Gandía-Blasco;
Giorgio Armani.
ID Editorial.indd 21 5/27/10 5:43:07 PM
22 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
With the lazy, hazy days of summer just a few calendar pages
away, the liveliest trends for outdoor living by Crate and Barrel
are bright and green.
Outdoor style
ID C&B 3page.indd 22 5/27/10 2:03:53 PM
22 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
With the lazy, hazy days of summer just a few calendar pages
away, the liveliest trends for outdoor living by Crate and Barrel
are bright and green.
Outdoor style
ID C&B 3page.indd 22 5/27/10 2:03:53 PM
23 June 2010
CMYK CMYK
Bringing the latest trends for the out-of-doors to the UAE is Crate and
Barrel, a newcomer to this area. Their two stores are filled with hot colours
such as ultra-sunny yellow, succulent orange and shimmering turquoise which
are the epitome of cool this season, while vibrant botanical prints bloom
in stylised graphics on everything from textiles to plates. This is not a retro
rendition of a 1970’s fad, rather it is definitely a 21
st
century take on a bright
idea, reinterpreted with textural weaves and bold combinations. Regardless
of the hue, green is the watchword of the moment with sustainability and
recycling at the forefront of everyone’s consciousness.
Their fresh offerings for the new season make it imminently obvious
that taking care of the planet can also be stylish. The woods used in the
company’s products are all certified sustainable, with the teak, as in the
Trovata collection, being supported by The Forest Trust. Other materials
are also of the green variety such as the all-weather UV-resistant wicker,
which is hand-woven of 100 per cent recyclable and non-toxic resin and
the eco-conscious fabrics for umbrellas, cushions and pillow are made at
a facility that sends no waste to landfills.
CRATE AND BARREL TRENDS
ID C&B 3page.indd 23 5/27/10 2:04:16 PM
24 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
CRATE AND BARREL TRENDS
A path of zippy stripes on umbrellas and cushions that repeat the linear
pattern of either real wood or the look of wooden slats – but actually made
of an innovative Polystyrene faux wood treated with UV and anti-oxidant
protection - on an outdoor dining scheme, is the perfect setting for fun fabrics
or sophisticated neutrals that create an ideal platform for accenting with
colourful accessories ranging from graphic tableware to Middle Eastern-inspired
sheet metal lanterns with a soft, soothing zinc coating.
The end result is a zinging green that will cause the summer to sizzle with
lively al fresco excitement.
Furniture and accessories from the Crate and Barrel
2010 Spring Summer collection.
ID C&B 3page.indd 24 5/27/10 2:04:36 PM
24 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
CRATE AND BARREL TRENDS
A path of zippy stripes on umbrellas and cushions that repeat the linear
pattern of either real wood or the look of wooden slats – but actually made
of an innovative Polystyrene faux wood treated with UV and anti-oxidant
protection - on an outdoor dining scheme, is the perfect setting for fun fabrics
or sophisticated neutrals that create an ideal platform for accenting with
colourful accessories ranging from graphic tableware to Middle Eastern-inspired
sheet metal lanterns with a soft, soothing zinc coating.
The end result is a zinging green that will cause the summer to sizzle with
lively al fresco excitement.
Furniture and accessories from the Crate and Barrel
2010 Spring Summer collection.
ID C&B 3page.indd 24 5/27/10 2:04:36 PM
26 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property] 26
The spotlight is on conceptual plans for a Solar City Tower
in 2016 Olympic Games host city Rio de Janeiro, Johnny
Swing’s innovative Coin Chair and the sustainable credentials
of the Melbourne Convention Centre.TEXT: STEVE HILL
SUSTAINABLE OLYMPICS
Zurich-based RAFAA Architecture & Design has unveiled a spectacular concept project to
showcase Rio de Janeiro’s sustainability credentials in time for the 2016 Olympic Games.
Solar City Tower, located on Cotonduba Island, would feature a solar power system to
generate power during the day, ostensibly for the Olympic village. Any excess power would
be used to pump seawater into a storage tank within the tower, which would then be
released at night to power turbines and provide power for the city.
On special occasions, what RAFAA describes as a “machine building” could be converted
into an urban waterfall, symbolising the force of nature.
An urban plaza located 60 metres above sea level would ensure access to the tower while
the plans also make provision for a cafeteria, shop, an observation deck offering panoramic
views of the ocean and city plus a retractable bungee jumping platform.
Going for gold
ID Eco.indd 26 5/27/10 2:06:55 PM
26 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property] 26
The spotlight is on conceptual plans for a Solar City Tower
in 2016 Olympic Games host city Rio de Janeiro, Johnny
Swing’s innovative Coin Chair and the sustainable credentials
of the Melbourne Convention Centre.TEXT: STEVE HILL
SUSTAINABLE OLYMPICS
Zurich-based RAFAA Architecture & Design has unveiled a spectacular concept project to
showcase Rio de Janeiro’s sustainability credentials in time for the 2016 Olympic Games.
Solar City Tower, located on Cotonduba Island, would feature a solar power system to
generate power during the day, ostensibly for the Olympic village. Any excess power would
be used to pump seawater into a storage tank within the tower, which would then be
released at night to power turbines and provide power for the city.
On special occasions, what RAFAA describes as a “machine building” could be converted
into an urban waterfall, symbolising the force of nature.
An urban plaza located 60 metres above sea level would ensure access to the tower while
the plans also make provision for a cafeteria, shop, an observation deck offering panoramic
views of the ocean and city plus a retractable bungee jumping platform.
Going for gold
ID Eco.indd 26 5/27/10 2:06:55 PM
March 2009 June 2010 27
ECO
Solar City Tower.
ID Eco.indd 27 5/27/10 2:07:09 PM
28 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
28 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
ECO
LOOSE CHANGE
Verrmont-based Johnny Swing “repurposes” everyday items into functional
sculpted furniture, such as his unique Butterfly Chair. Forming part of his Coin
Furniture series, it features some 1,500 hand-welded half-dollars which are
polished to produce a stunning finish that is as stylish as it is comfortable.
Swing, who completed his studies at Skidmore College and the Skowhegan
School of Painting and Sculpture, has also fashioned work from recycled baby
food jars and the remnants of Italian leather floor tiles. But it is his furniture
that has turned most heads, including a couch fashioned from 7,000 nickels.
Swing’s Coin Chair weighs 26 kilograms and is available from vivre.com, price
on request. His work is displayed in the Robert Crowell Museum in Newfane,
Vermont, and the Storm King Arts centre in New York.
BAGS OF POTENTIAL
Ashley Watson is a Vancouver-based designer who has been hand-crafting
one-of-a-kind leather products using recycled materials since 2005.
She was inspired by the originality of soft and gently worn jackets she
purchased from charity shops, and incorporates these features, such as pockets
and seams, into her bags and wallets.
Watson, who created her first bag from one of her father’s old leather
jackets, holds a degree in Fine Arts from the Nova Scotia College of Art and
Design, and also worked in New York before establishing her own company.
No leather is dyed in the production process, making her bags, wallets, card
holders and belts totally unique. Watson’s recycled leather products are now
sold in stores across North America and are also available in select outlets in
Europe, Asia and Australia.
FILM CLASSICS
Sisters Guylaine and Isabelle Martineau have established Tomate d’Épingles, a
Quebec City-based company that produces quirky handmade jewellery and
accessories from recycled or repurposed materials.
Particularly eye-catching are their earrings and necklaces featuring vintage
recycled film negatives, while they have also used recycled paper to create
origami star earrings and taken scraps of leather and turned them into
flower-style rings.
The sisters have also created what they term faux heirloom vintage necklaces,
featuring a cork-stopped vintage glass vial containing small curios they have
collected, including vintage or antique Swiss watch parts and rhinestones
salvaged from damaged jewellery.
POWERFUL STATEMENT
Powerkiss Corporation, founded in Finland in 2008 by CEO Maija Itkonen,
utilises the principles of electromagnetic induction to create wireless charging
solutions for handheld devices.
Clockwise from left: Johnny Swing’s Butterfly Chair
from his Coin Furniture series; Ashley Watson’s bag
made from recycled materials; Tomate d’Épingles’s
earrings made from film negatives.
ID Eco.indd 28 5/27/10 2:07:24 PM
28 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
28 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
ECO
LOOSE CHANGE
Verrmont-based Johnny Swing “repurposes” everyday items into functional
sculpted furniture, such as his unique Butterfly Chair. Forming part of his Coin
Furniture series, it features some 1,500 hand-welded half-dollars which are
polished to produce a stunning finish that is as stylish as it is comfortable.
Swing, who completed his studies at Skidmore College and the Skowhegan
School of Painting and Sculpture, has also fashioned work from recycled baby
food jars and the remnants of Italian leather floor tiles. But it is his furniture
that has turned most heads, including a couch fashioned from 7,000 nickels.
Swing’s Coin Chair weighs 26 kilograms and is available from vivre.com, price
on request. His work is displayed in the Robert Crowell Museum in Newfane,
Vermont, and the Storm King Arts centre in New York.
BAGS OF POTENTIAL
Ashley Watson is a Vancouver-based designer who has been hand-crafting
one-of-a-kind leather products using recycled materials since 2005.
She was inspired by the originality of soft and gently worn jackets she
purchased from charity shops, and incorporates these features, such as pockets
and seams, into her bags and wallets.
Watson, who created her first bag from one of her father’s old leather
jackets, holds a degree in Fine Arts from the Nova Scotia College of Art and
Design, and also worked in New York before establishing her own company.
No leather is dyed in the production process, making her bags, wallets, card
holders and belts totally unique. Watson’s recycled leather products are now
sold in stores across North America and are also available in select outlets in
Europe, Asia and Australia.
FILM CLASSICS
Sisters Guylaine and Isabelle Martineau have established Tomate d’Épingles, a
Quebec City-based company that produces quirky handmade jewellery and
accessories from recycled or repurposed materials.
Particularly eye-catching are their earrings and necklaces featuring vintage
recycled film negatives, while they have also used recycled paper to create
origami star earrings and taken scraps of leather and turned them into
flower-style rings.
The sisters have also created what they term faux heirloom vintage necklaces,
featuring a cork-stopped vintage glass vial containing small curios they have
collected, including vintage or antique Swiss watch parts and rhinestones
salvaged from damaged jewellery.
POWERFUL STATEMENT
Powerkiss Corporation, founded in Finland in 2008 by CEO Maija Itkonen,
utilises the principles of electromagnetic induction to create wireless charging
solutions for handheld devices.
Clockwise from left: Johnny Swing’s Butterfly Chair
from his Coin Furniture series; Ashley Watson’s bag
made from recycled materials; Tomate d’Épingles’s
earrings made from film negatives.
ID Eco.indd 28 5/27/10 2:07:24 PM
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identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property] 30
ECO
Users simply place their mobile phone on the top of a furniture surface for it
to be recharged, safely and conveniently without the need for cables, wires or
adaptors, making the world more user friendly and environmentally sound.
The concept of wireless charging is based on an inductive coupling: whenever
two components of wireless charging are next to each other, an energy transfer
starts through an invisible electromagnetic field. The components are a Wireless
Charging Transmitter, which is installed into the furniture, and a Wireless
Charging Receiver, which is plugged into the handheld device.
Powerkiss hopes to develop technology in the near future to also recharge
MP3 players and laptops in the same way.
CENTRE OF ATTENTION
The Melbourne Convention Centre has achieved a Six-Star Green Star
environmental rating from the Green Building Council of Australia.
It has a long list of sustainable features, including solar hot water systems that
can offset more than 40 per cent of general hot water requirements and also
provide 100 per cent of public amenity hot water needs.
Energy efficient lighting has daylight and motion detection control features
while a black water treatment plant collects building waste water and some
storm water to provide treated water for toilet flushing, irrigation and
cooling towers.
Displacement ventilation – low level air delivery and high level air exhaust in
the plenary hall and foyer areas – provides effective air flow with high indoor air
quality at low energy consumption.
And an expansive glass facade allows natural light to flood the foyer and
pre-function spaces, reducing the need for artificial light and providing good
thermal qualities in the winter months.
Inside, the centre makes use of FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) timber,
which is environmentally friendly, rather than non-renewable timber, and
sustainable furnishings and floor coverings.
DECREASING FOOTPRINT
Architectural company HOK is reducing its environmental footprint by linking 14
of its offices around the world through Advanced Collaboration Rooms (ACRs).
These combine Cisco’s TelePresence high-resolution, interoperable
videoconferencing technology with PolyVision’s Thunder Virtual Flipchart
System, enabling project teams to conduct meetings while designers sketch
ideas and collaborate in real time.
The firm’s meeting scheduling process requires users to record potential
flights saved through use of the ACRs. And in February this year alone, an
estimated 259,276 kilograms of CO
2
– or 204 flights – were saved by avoiding
travel between HOK offices.
The company is aiming to reduce carbon emissions in its projects and
practice by 50 per cent by the end of 2010, and last year it achieved a 27 per
cent reduction in carbon emissions within its operations.
“Our use of enhanced virtual technology is a high-impact strategy to help
us shrink our carbon footprint,” said Mary Ann Lazarus, HOK’s sustainable
design director.
GREEN HOTEL
The Crowne Plaza Copenhagen Towers recently opened with the stated aim
of becoming carbon neutral and one of the world’s greenest hotels.
It has a host of sustainable design features, including Denmark’s first
groundwater-based cooling and heating system, using water drawn from 100
metres below the hotel, which reduces energy demands by around 90 per cent.
More visible are the building’s solar panels on its exterior and roof which
generate significant amounts of power, while the hotel also uses low energy
lighting as well as eco-friendly computer and kitchen equipment.
Guests, can play their part in helping power the 366-room hotel. Anyone
visiting the gym and using special energy-producing fitness bikes can earn locally
produced complimentary meals.
Users are able to monitor how much electricity they are producing via
iPhones mounted on the handle bars. Avid fitness fans can also race against the
hotel’s solar panel system in a bid to produce the most electricity.
ID
Left to right: One of HOK’s Advanced collaboration rooms; the Melbourne
Convention Centre.
ID Eco.indd 30 5/27/10 2:07:39 PM
identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property] 30
ECO
Users simply place their mobile phone on the top of a furniture surface for it
to be recharged, safely and conveniently without the need for cables, wires or
adaptors, making the world more user friendly and environmentally sound.
The concept of wireless charging is based on an inductive coupling: whenever
two components of wireless charging are next to each other, an energy transfer
starts through an invisible electromagnetic field. The components are a Wireless
Charging Transmitter, which is installed into the furniture, and a Wireless
Charging Receiver, which is plugged into the handheld device.
Powerkiss hopes to develop technology in the near future to also recharge
MP3 players and laptops in the same way.
CENTRE OF ATTENTION
The Melbourne Convention Centre has achieved a Six-Star Green Star
environmental rating from the Green Building Council of Australia.
It has a long list of sustainable features, including solar hot water systems that
can offset more than 40 per cent of general hot water requirements and also
provide 100 per cent of public amenity hot water needs.
Energy efficient lighting has daylight and motion detection control features
while a black water treatment plant collects building waste water and some
storm water to provide treated water for toilet flushing, irrigation and
cooling towers.
Displacement ventilation – low level air delivery and high level air exhaust in
the plenary hall and foyer areas – provides effective air flow with high indoor air
quality at low energy consumption.
And an expansive glass facade allows natural light to flood the foyer and
pre-function spaces, reducing the need for artificial light and providing good
thermal qualities in the winter months.
Inside, the centre makes use of FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) timber,
which is environmentally friendly, rather than non-renewable timber, and
sustainable furnishings and floor coverings.
DECREASING FOOTPRINT
Architectural company HOK is reducing its environmental footprint by linking 14
of its offices around the world through Advanced Collaboration Rooms (ACRs).
These combine Cisco’s TelePresence high-resolution, interoperable
videoconferencing technology with PolyVision’s Thunder Virtual Flipchart
System, enabling project teams to conduct meetings while designers sketch
ideas and collaborate in real time.
The firm’s meeting scheduling process requires users to record potential
flights saved through use of the ACRs. And in February this year alone, an
estimated 259,276 kilograms of CO
2
– or 204 flights – were saved by avoiding
travel between HOK offices.
The company is aiming to reduce carbon emissions in its projects and
practice by 50 per cent by the end of 2010, and last year it achieved a 27 per
cent reduction in carbon emissions within its operations.
“Our use of enhanced virtual technology is a high-impact strategy to help
us shrink our carbon footprint,” said Mary Ann Lazarus, HOK’s sustainable
design director.
GREEN HOTEL
The Crowne Plaza Copenhagen Towers recently opened with the stated aim
of becoming carbon neutral and one of the world’s greenest hotels.
It has a host of sustainable design features, including Denmark’s first
groundwater-based cooling and heating system, using water drawn from 100
metres below the hotel, which reduces energy demands by around 90 per cent.
More visible are the building’s solar panels on its exterior and roof which
generate significant amounts of power, while the hotel also uses low energy
lighting as well as eco-friendly computer and kitchen equipment.
Guests, can play their part in helping power the 366-room hotel. Anyone
visiting the gym and using special energy-producing fitness bikes can earn locally
produced complimentary meals.
Users are able to monitor how much electricity they are producing via
iPhones mounted on the handle bars. Avid fitness fans can also race against the
hotel’s solar panel system in a bid to produce the most electricity.
ID
Left to right: One of HOK’s Advanced collaboration rooms; the Melbourne
Convention Centre.
ID Eco.indd 30 5/27/10 2:07:39 PM
SYSTEMS FOR THE INSTALLATION OF
RESILIENT, TEXTILE, WOOD FLOORING
AND WALL COVERINGS
Our commitment to the environment.
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and Contractors create innovative LEED (Leadership in
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LOVERE LIBRARY – ITALY
Installation of rubber flooring
Ultraplan ECO, Ultrabond ECO V4 SP
FP_Idnty_Lovere_JUNE_OL.pdf 1 5/20/10 10:18 AM
32 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Interior of the O-Museum in Nagano, Japan.
Sheer genius
Ryue Nishizawa, one half of Pritzker Prize-winning SANAA
architects, discusses the deceptive simplicity of the studio’s
acclaimed work. TEXT: ASHLEE BEARD
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32 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Interior of the O-Museum in Nagano, Japan.
Sheer genius
Ryue Nishizawa, one half of Pritzker Prize-winning SANAA
architects, discusses the deceptive simplicity of the studio’s
acclaimed work. TEXT: ASHLEE BEARD
P
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Sanaa2.indd 32 5/27/10 4:51:05 PM
33
CMYK
June 2010
CMYK
PROFILE
CMYK CMYK
With a product launch in Milan and a major architectural project underway
in France, the last thing that Ryue Nishizawa, co-principal of Tokyo-based
architectural studio SANAA, needed was to be stuck in Southern Sweden,
but as Nishizawa calmly spoke to moderator and architecture and design
critic, Mark Isitt, in front of a packed auditorium at this year’s Plåt 10 event in
Malmö, the eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano wreaked havoc around
Europe. The most obvious question was asked; “How does it feel to be this
year’s co-recipient of the most prestigious architectural award?” to which the
architect jocosely responded, “On the day of the announcement I was in Beirut
attending a competition, so I wasn’t really involved. A few of my friends sent
emails saying congratulations, so I was happy to receive so many emails from
them!” However, the more pressing query was possibly how he would make
his escape as flights came to a halt.
Over the past 15 plus years, since Ryue Nishizawa and his business partner
Kazuyo Sejima began a collaborative working partnership under the name
SANAA, they have created one of the most exciting architectural practices in
the world, as the announcement last March that they were the recipients of
architecture’s highest accolade, the Pritzker Prize Award, attests.
Standout projects, from their early Ogasawara Museum in Nagano,
completed in 1999, to the New Museum of Contemporary Art, which opened
in Manhattan last year, illustrate a unique architectural approach that catches
one’s attention not for its imposing presence, as in the case of former winners
Gehry, Koolhaas or Hadid. SANAA’s style is much more understated “We
always try to make things simple, we never like to make things complicated.
Maybe this is the Japanese way” says Nishizawa. However, in a time when
status architecture has become the ultimate trophy, the architect suggests that
their simplistic style is not so sought after, particularly in Europe, or possibly
even in the UAE where they have yet to secure a commission. When asked
how many competitions the studio wins, it is surprising to hear that SANAA’s
success rate is as low as one competition out of around every 30 entries “In
Europe competitions are done in a very precise way, but we create very simple
drawings that cannot compete against the detailed presentations of European
Sanaa2.indd 33 5/27/10 4:51:12 PM
34 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
PROFILE
architects. They are too simple, too diagramatic and maybe too easy I think,”
he surmises. There is a sense of irony to this as the practice’s past misfortune
has no doubt been something of an advantage to the architects, who prefer
the hands-on, involved approach to each project as an alternative to certain
previous winners, whose studios have grown into architectural production lines.
Through the use of concrete, aluminium, steel and glass – the studio’s
materials of choice – the architects create ethereal structures that possess a
lucid, illusionary quality. Take the glass pavilion created for the Toledo Museum
of Art in Ohio, USA, in 2006, for example. The transparent facade has no
bones, just a slim, lightweight structural system to support the roof and within
the low-level space, glass walls create invisible partitions, creating a feeling of
luminousity that highlights the works on show.
Even larger scale projects, such as the New Museum of Contemporary Art,
a shrouded six story stacked gallery complex in Manhattan, seem to posess a
stealth-like quality thanks to an expanded aluminium mesh facade that conceals
windows, allowing visitors to look out, while passers-by cannot see in (although
the effect has been slightly muted by the addition of Ugo Rondinone’s “Hell,
Yes!”, a huge rainbow sign that has been affixed to the frontage).
The levels all differ in dimension and are stacked like bento boxes, creating
gaps that allow for connection with the outdoors “One of the big issues for us
was that the clients had a very small property, yet so many programmes, so we
began to study how we could arrange these things. One of the ideas was to
stack each congruence, so that each one was shifted to create a gap, to create
skylights to bring sunlight into the skyscraper, or sometimes a gap that becomes
a terrace so that visitors can go outside of the building to enjoy the New York
view,” recalls the architect.
SANAA’s acclaim is built largely on its cultural spaces as its current project,
the building of the Musée du Louvre’s Lens outpost, proves. In September
2005 SANAA’s plan was selected out of 120 entries - beating Zaha Hadid
and Steven Holl – to transform a twenty-hectare industrial wasteland, into a
major cultural centre. Working in collaboration with co-designers American
museum architects, Celia Imrey and Tim Culbert and French landscape designer
Catherine Mosbach, ground breaking finally began last year on the eagerly
awaited project, which is due to be completed in 2012 - the same time as the
Louvre Abu Dhabi. “The site is in the middle of the town. It used to be a mining
area for coal, so they have so much archaeology from the 19
th
century, such as
transportation routes, so we thought it would be nice to preserve this, together
with the existing landscape,” explains Nishizawa. “The plot is quite big, like
40,000 square metres or something, so we broke the plot into several pieces
to have a smaller scale volume to avoid disturbing the beautiful landscape. The
idea was to regiment each unit to position it to define the natural flow of the
topography of the area. They look like a group of boats floating in the river.”
A cluster of low level steel and metal units with shiny, curved aluminium
facades reflect a distorted image of Mosbach’s verdant landscaped surroundings,
much like SANAA’s cloud-like temporary structure created for London’s
Serpentine Gallery in 2007. The centre pavilion is a large transparent glass
Clockwise from above: Rendering of the proposed Museé du Louvre-Lens, due for completion in 2012; New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art; the glass
pavilion of the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, US.
P
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Sanaa2.indd 34 5/27/10 4:51:25 PM
34 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
PROFILE
architects. They are too simple, too diagramatic and maybe too easy I think,”
he surmises. There is a sense of irony to this as the practice’s past misfortune
has no doubt been something of an advantage to the architects, who prefer
the hands-on, involved approach to each project as an alternative to certain
previous winners, whose studios have grown into architectural production lines.
Through the use of concrete, aluminium, steel and glass – the studio’s
materials of choice – the architects create ethereal structures that possess a
lucid, illusionary quality. Take the glass pavilion created for the Toledo Museum
of Art in Ohio, USA, in 2006, for example. The transparent facade has no
bones, just a slim, lightweight structural system to support the roof and within
the low-level space, glass walls create invisible partitions, creating a feeling of
luminousity that highlights the works on show.
Even larger scale projects, such as the New Museum of Contemporary Art,
a shrouded six story stacked gallery complex in Manhattan, seem to posess a
stealth-like quality thanks to an expanded aluminium mesh facade that conceals
windows, allowing visitors to look out, while passers-by cannot see in (although
the effect has been slightly muted by the addition of Ugo Rondinone’s “Hell,
Yes!”, a huge rainbow sign that has been affixed to the frontage).
The levels all differ in dimension and are stacked like bento boxes, creating
gaps that allow for connection with the outdoors “One of the big issues for us
was that the clients had a very small property, yet so many programmes, so we
began to study how we could arrange these things. One of the ideas was to
stack each congruence, so that each one was shifted to create a gap, to create
skylights to bring sunlight into the skyscraper, or sometimes a gap that becomes
a terrace so that visitors can go outside of the building to enjoy the New York
view,” recalls the architect.
SANAA’s acclaim is built largely on its cultural spaces as its current project,
the building of the Musée du Louvre’s Lens outpost, proves. In September
2005 SANAA’s plan was selected out of 120 entries - beating Zaha Hadid
and Steven Holl – to transform a twenty-hectare industrial wasteland, into a
major cultural centre. Working in collaboration with co-designers American
museum architects, Celia Imrey and Tim Culbert and French landscape designer
Catherine Mosbach, ground breaking finally began last year on the eagerly
awaited project, which is due to be completed in 2012 - the same time as the
Louvre Abu Dhabi. “The site is in the middle of the town. It used to be a mining
area for coal, so they have so much archaeology from the 19
th
century, such as
transportation routes, so we thought it would be nice to preserve this, together
with the existing landscape,” explains Nishizawa. “The plot is quite big, like
40,000 square metres or something, so we broke the plot into several pieces
to have a smaller scale volume to avoid disturbing the beautiful landscape. The
idea was to regiment each unit to position it to define the natural flow of the
topography of the area. They look like a group of boats floating in the river.”
A cluster of low level steel and metal units with shiny, curved aluminium
facades reflect a distorted image of Mosbach’s verdant landscaped surroundings,
much like SANAA’s cloud-like temporary structure created for London’s
Serpentine Gallery in 2007. The centre pavilion is a large transparent glass
Clockwise from above: Rendering of the proposed Museé du Louvre-Lens, due for completion in 2012; New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art; the glass
pavilion of the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, US.
P
H
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Sanaa2.indd 34 5/27/10 4:51:25 PM
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36 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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“We have been exploring how we can make architecture feel open.”
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Ryue Nishizawa and Kazuyo Sejima of SANAA,
recipients of the 2010 Pritzker Prize for architecture.
Sanaa2.indd 36 5/27/10 4:51:33 PM
36 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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“We have been exploring how we can make architecture feel open.”
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Ryue Nishizawa and Kazuyo Sejima of SANAA,
recipients of the 2010 Pritzker Prize for architecture.
Sanaa2.indd 36 5/27/10 4:51:33 PM
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rubelli.pdf 5/26/10 9:20:18 AM
38 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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PROFILE
volume, while the second main space, the ‘Galerie du Temps’, is opaque on the
outside. The design is reported to be reminiscent of two outstretched wings,
inspired by its stately Parisian headquarters, but the resemblence stops there.
While both Lens and Abu Dhabi will run under the auspice of the Musée du
Louvre, the new Northern French annex will be an actual extension of the
illustrious Paris institution, unlike the Abu Dhabi location, which is the result of a
deal between the French and Emirates government that will enable the Middle
Eastern museum to loan artworks from the Louvre over a 15 year period,
enabling it to build up its own collection.
Up until now SANAA Architects has remained small in scale, allowing both
Nishizawa and Sejima to pursue separate projects through their own studios,
which are all housed together. While SANAA employs around 30 architects,
Ryue Nishizawa’s studio employs around 10 and Kazuyo Sejima around five.
As Sejima’s staff currently prepare for this year’s Venice Biennale of which she
is the director, Nishizawa’s studio is working closer to home on the island of
Teshima to create an addition to the acclaimed Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum
Foundation, founded by the late publishing tycoon, Tetsuhiko Fukutake. In
2006 SANAA completed the Marine Station Naoshima connecting the island to
Takamatsu and Uno via ferry and Nishizawa also designed the Honmura Lounge
as part of the famed Benesse Art Site Naoshima. Nishizawa’s latest proposal is
the Teshima art museum, a windowless concrete space, created in collaboration
with artist Rei Naito. The museum could not be further from the weightless
structures with which SANAA have become associated. “It’s very natural, it’s
not a square, it’s a more organic shape. One of the concepts was that the space
would look like a water drop. This kind of shape fits very well with the organic
nature of the topography,” he explains. Instead of using a steel supporting
structure, or even a plywood frame, typically used when casting concrete, the
2,000 square metre form was created by pouring concrete over a soil mound,
which was then dug out, creating a hollow. “Inside the building you can see the
edge of the floor, the wall and the ceiling all go together, so there is no definition
between the walls and the ceiling. I cut a section from the left to the right so
you can see how the curvature changes at each different point.”
Like many architects, for more than ten years Sejima and Nishizawa have
created furniture and accessories that complement their spaces, from tea and
coffee sets for Alessi, to their latest design, Flower, a bench produced by Vitra,
which was launched at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair. The clover shaped design
coincides with the completion of a far grander project for the Swiss furniture
company, the near completion of a new factory building within the firm’s
campus. Vitra’s chairman, Rolf Fehlbaum has always had an eye for architectural
talent spotting. In 1986 he commissioned Portuguese architect Alvaro Siza to
design one of the factory’s production buildings six years prior to winning the
Pritzker Prize and fellow recipient Zaha Hadid’s breakthrough came in 1993
with her premier completed project, the Vitra fire station. Maybe the project
was an omen? It’s hard to say, but as Nishizawa explains, it seems like SANAA
were the only ones who were unaware of the anticipated announcement “I was
not so sure that we would win, but whenever I was in the United States with
clients, they would often say to us ‘Next year must be your turn’.” How right
they were.
ID
Clockwise from above: Zollverein School of Management and Design in
Essen, Germany; Teshima Museum, a new addition to the Benesse Art Site
Naoshima; Vitra’s Flower bench.
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38 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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volume, while the second main space, the ‘Galerie du Temps’, is opaque on the
outside. The design is reported to be reminiscent of two outstretched wings,
inspired by its stately Parisian headquarters, but the resemblence stops there.
While both Lens and Abu Dhabi will run under the auspice of the Musée du
Louvre, the new Northern French annex will be an actual extension of the
illustrious Paris institution, unlike the Abu Dhabi location, which is the result of a
deal between the French and Emirates government that will enable the Middle
Eastern museum to loan artworks from the Louvre over a 15 year period,
enabling it to build up its own collection.
Up until now SANAA Architects has remained small in scale, allowing both
Nishizawa and Sejima to pursue separate projects through their own studios,
which are all housed together. While SANAA employs around 30 architects,
Ryue Nishizawa’s studio employs around 10 and Kazuyo Sejima around five.
As Sejima’s staff currently prepare for this year’s Venice Biennale of which she
is the director, Nishizawa’s studio is working closer to home on the island of
Teshima to create an addition to the acclaimed Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum
Foundation, founded by the late publishing tycoon, Tetsuhiko Fukutake. In
2006 SANAA completed the Marine Station Naoshima connecting the island to
Takamatsu and Uno via ferry and Nishizawa also designed the Honmura Lounge
as part of the famed Benesse Art Site Naoshima. Nishizawa’s latest proposal is
the Teshima art museum, a windowless concrete space, created in collaboration
with artist Rei Naito. The museum could not be further from the weightless
structures with which SANAA have become associated. “It’s very natural, it’s
not a square, it’s a more organic shape. One of the concepts was that the space
would look like a water drop. This kind of shape fits very well with the organic
nature of the topography,” he explains. Instead of using a steel supporting
structure, or even a plywood frame, typically used when casting concrete, the
2,000 square metre form was created by pouring concrete over a soil mound,
which was then dug out, creating a hollow. “Inside the building you can see the
edge of the floor, the wall and the ceiling all go together, so there is no definition
between the walls and the ceiling. I cut a section from the left to the right so
you can see how the curvature changes at each different point.”
Like many architects, for more than ten years Sejima and Nishizawa have
created furniture and accessories that complement their spaces, from tea and
coffee sets for Alessi, to their latest design, Flower, a bench produced by Vitra,
which was launched at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair. The clover shaped design
coincides with the completion of a far grander project for the Swiss furniture
company, the near completion of a new factory building within the firm’s
campus. Vitra’s chairman, Rolf Fehlbaum has always had an eye for architectural
talent spotting. In 1986 he commissioned Portuguese architect Alvaro Siza to
design one of the factory’s production buildings six years prior to winning the
Pritzker Prize and fellow recipient Zaha Hadid’s breakthrough came in 1993
with her premier completed project, the Vitra fire station. Maybe the project
was an omen? It’s hard to say, but as Nishizawa explains, it seems like SANAA
were the only ones who were unaware of the anticipated announcement “I was
not so sure that we would win, but whenever I was in the United States with
clients, they would often say to us ‘Next year must be your turn’.” How right
they were.
ID
Clockwise from above: Zollverein School of Management and Design in
Essen, Germany; Teshima Museum, a new addition to the Benesse Art Site
Naoshima; Vitra’s Flower bench.
P
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Identity Mgz-Print 280 x 200mm Bleed 326 x 246mm Trim 320 x 240mm
43 June 2010
KITCHENS | DESI GN FORMULA
43
DESIGN FORMULA
CONTENTS:
48 Come together
50 Material world
52 Heart of glass
53 Savvy storage
54 Home entertainment
54 Hide away
54 Can you handle it?
57 Fashion focus
Menu Milanese
The very best of the kitchen world converged on
Milan for Eurocucina 2010. identity spent time in
the city of style to track down the hottest trends
shaping contemporary interiors. TEXT: RUBY ROGERS
Create a customised kitchen solution
with this modular InDada kitchen from Dada.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 43 5/27/10 4:33:59 PM
44 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESIGN FORMULA | KITCHENS
With the average homeowner spending more time entertaining at home,
stamping one’s individuality on a space has never been more important. Colour
is the ultimate mode of expression and while white is always popular, sales of
on-trend coloured kitchens have soared.
Lucente by Record Cucine is a new design that lends itself well to this trend.
Produced in bold glossy violet, it boasts equally slick features such as a LED TV
built into the wall unit door, an extractor hood with matching coloured glass
panels and wall units with Blum overhead opening doors.
Quick to cash in on colour is Italian manufacturer Zucchetti, which presented
new and exclusive finishes for its kitchen mixers. White lacquer was predictably
included in its line-up of new launches in Milan, but a departure from the norm
included spicy madras red and calming sky blue to strike a playful vibe.
Leading appliance manufacturers are equally keen to exploit the success of
colour, used to make a space come alive and therefore add new value to it. Hot
on the trail of the latest colour trends is Whirpool who has recently unveiled
its Glamour collection of refrigerators, ovens and hobs in a palette of explosive
hues – yellow saffron, lime sorbet, parsley green, orange, pink watermelon and
blue sugar candy – designed to transform the kitchen into a “lively, cheerful and
positive experience.”
For homeowners who shy away from bright colours, Whirlpool has
recognised the trend towards metallics with the inclusion of stunning satin
anthracite and satin bronze. “Chrome has been the metallic of choice in kitchen
trends for years but finally there is a shift towards warmer metals,” says trend
forecaster Victoria Redshaw of Scarlet Opus. “While the world of fashion has
been embracing all things gold, this has largely been ignored by the kitchen
sector. But now that the fashion industry is moving in the direction of bronze
and coppers it seems that kitchen companies are prepared to follow suit.
“The introduction of bronze and coppers [and even rose gold] into kitchens
creates a highly sophisticated styling that is luxurious and glamorous. These
metals work well with amethyst tones, rich purples, slate grey and black-on-black
to create dark alluring kitchen schemes that perfectly suit the developing trend
for dark wood finishes and cooking/dining experiences with an added sense
of drama.”
Contrary to its adventurous use of colour, Whirlpool has adopted a “less
is more” approach to aesthetics. Designs have been pared down to the bare
essentials and consequently clear, pure lines are among the leading looks.
“Nothing juts out; no superfluous shapes can be found,” says Whirlpool of its
chosen aesthetic. “This gives the impression of extreme simplicity although in
Ernestomeda has collaborated with French designer Marc Sadler to create the Carré fitted kitchen.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 44 5/27/10 4:34:17 PM
44 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESI GN FORMULA | KI TCHENS
With the average homeowner spending more time entertaining at home,
stamping one’s individuality on a space has never been more important. Colour
is the ultimate mode of expression and while white is always popular, sales of
on-trend coloured kitchens have soared.
Lucente by Record Cucine is a new design that lends itself well to this trend.
Produced in bold glossy violet, it boasts equally slick features such as a LED TV
built into the wall unit door, an extractor hood with matching coloured glass
panels and wall units with Blum overhead opening doors.
Quick to cash in on colour is Italian manufacturer Zucchetti, which presented
new and exclusive finishes for its kitchen mixers. White lacquer was predictably
included in its line-up of new launches in Milan, but a departure from the norm
included spicy madras red and calming sky blue to strike a playful vibe.
Leading appliance manufacturers are equally keen to exploit the success of
colour, used to make a space come alive and therefore add new value to it. Hot
on the trail of the latest colour trends is Whirpool who has recently unveiled
its Glamour collection of refrigerators, ovens and hobs in a palette of explosive
hues – yellow saffron, lime sorbet, parsley green, orange, pink watermelon and
blue sugar candy – designed to transform the kitchen into a “lively, cheerful and
positive experience.”
For homeowners who shy away from bright colours, Whirlpool has
recognised the trend towards metallics with the inclusion of stunning satin
anthracite and satin bronze. “Chrome has been the metallic of choice in kitchen
trends for years but finally there is a shift towards warmer metals,” says trend
forecaster Victoria Redshaw of Scarlet Opus. “While the world of fashion has
been embracing all things gold, this has largely been ignored by the kitchen
sector. But now that the fashion industry is moving in the direction of bronze
and coppers it seems that kitchen companies are prepared to follow suit.
“The introduction of bronze and coppers [and even rose gold] into kitchens
creates a highly sophisticated styling that is luxurious and glamorous. These
metals work well with amethyst tones, rich purples, slate grey and black-on-black
to create dark alluring kitchen schemes that perfectly suit the developing trend
for dark wood finishes and cooking/dining experiences with an added sense
of drama.”
Contrary to its adventurous use of colour, Whirlpool has adopted a “less
is more” approach to aesthetics. Designs have been pared down to the bare
essentials and consequently clear, pure lines are among the leading looks.
“Nothing juts out; no superfluous shapes can be found,” says Whirlpool of its
chosen aesthetic. “This gives the impression of extreme simplicity although in
Ernestomeda has collaborated with French designer Marc Sadler to create the Carré fitted kitchen.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 44 5/27/10 4:34:17 PM
46 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
Architect and designer Hadi Teherani has
teamed up with Poggenpohl to produce
its +Artesio kitchen.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 46 5/27/10 4:34:21 PM
46 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
Architect and designer Hadi Teherani has
teamed up with Poggenpohl to produce
its +Artesio kitchen.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 46 5/27/10 4:34:21 PM
47 June 2010
KITCHENS | DESI GN FORMULA
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 47 5/27/10 4:34:25 PM
48 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESIGN FORMULA | KITCHENS
actual fact every element and detail serves multiple visual and functional purposes.”
Pattern is another way to express personal style and has been made available
by a number of leading kitchen manufacturers. Check out Opal Pura by
Lineaquattro, available with the option of a bold floral design, or the Q2 System
by Pedini, which comes with decorated lacquered glass doors on request.
“Of course you need to select wisely and choose a pattern or colour that
you love and will enjoy living with for years to come,” Redshaw advises. “But by
adding a bold splash of colour or a more subtle pattern you can express your
personality and add real character to your kitchen.”
COME TOGETHER
The well-defined line that once separated the kitchen and living room has all but
disappeared along with the conventions that dictated their layout and design.
The kitchen has been transformed from a solely functional space into the hub of
the home and the industry has responded with a host of exciting solutions.
Architect and designer Hadi Teherani believes that the trend towards
“individualised living” – freedom from fixed structures and specific functions
– is set to continue. “Whether sleeping, working, cooking, receiving guests,
exercising or taking a shower, the focus will remain on a home liberated from
all constraints,” he explains. “The more this flexibility is made available through
easy-to-change furniture systems the less it will be necessary to define subliminal
functional boundaries through architectural means.”
Iran-born Teherani, who is known for seeking out the best possible practical
solution while staying true to his ambition to turn sensible architecture into a
sensuous experience, has recently teamed up with Poggenpohl to produce
+Artesio, his debut design for the kitchen. Together they wanted to liberate
the kitchen from its traditional, spatial barriers and integrate it into the overall
structure of the home.
“Right from the very beginning our vision was not only to create a kitchen,
but an all-embracing spatial concept that no longer draws a line between
cooking and living,” Poggenphol managing director Elmar Duffner says. “When
searching for a designer it seemed obvious to go one step further and find
someone who thinks in terms of rooms rather than just furniture design.”
The designer’s concept embraces every aspect of the space including
the floor, walls and ceiling. This is primarily achieved thanks to a “function
Clockwise from top left: Express yourself with Record Cucine’s Lucente kitchen in bold violet; Zucchetti launches its kitchen mixers in new finishes including Madras
Red; the trend for florals continues with Lineaquattro’s Opal Pura kitchen.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 48 5/27/10 4:34:33 PM
48 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESI GN FORMULA | KI TCHENS
actual fact every element and detail serves multiple visual and functional purposes.”
Pattern is another way to express personal style and has been made available
by a number of leading kitchen manufacturers. Check out Opal Pura by
Lineaquattro, available with the option of a bold floral design, or the Q2 System
by Pedini, which comes with decorated lacquered glass doors on request.
“Of course you need to select wisely and choose a pattern or colour that
you love and will enjoy living with for years to come,” Redshaw advises. “But by
adding a bold splash of colour or a more subtle pattern you can express your
personality and add real character to your kitchen.”
COME TOGETHER
The well-defined line that once separated the kitchen and living room has all but
disappeared along with the conventions that dictated their layout and design.
The kitchen has been transformed from a solely functional space into the hub of
the home and the industry has responded with a host of exciting solutions.
Architect and designer Hadi Teherani believes that the trend towards
“individualised living” – freedom from fixed structures and specific functions
– is set to continue. “Whether sleeping, working, cooking, receiving guests,
exercising or taking a shower, the focus will remain on a home liberated from
all constraints,” he explains. “The more this flexibility is made available through
easy-to-change furniture systems the less it will be necessary to define subliminal
functional boundaries through architectural means.”
Iran-born Teherani, who is known for seeking out the best possible practical
solution while staying true to his ambition to turn sensible architecture into a
sensuous experience, has recently teamed up with Poggenpohl to produce
+Artesio, his debut design for the kitchen. Together they wanted to liberate
the kitchen from its traditional, spatial barriers and integrate it into the overall
structure of the home.
“Right from the very beginning our vision was not only to create a kitchen,
but an all-embracing spatial concept that no longer draws a line between
cooking and living,” Poggenphol managing director Elmar Duffner says. “When
searching for a designer it seemed obvious to go one step further and find
someone who thinks in terms of rooms rather than just furniture design.”
The designer’s concept embraces every aspect of the space including
the floor, walls and ceiling. This is primarily achieved thanks to a “function
Clockwise from top left: Express yourself with Record Cucine’s Lucente kitchen in bold violet; Zucchetti launches its kitchen mixers in new finishes including Madras
Red; the trend for florals continues with Lineaquattro’s Opal Pura kitchen.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 48 5/27/10 4:34:33 PM
50 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESIGN FORMULA | KITCHENS
arch” that integrates all the elements necessary for lighting, ventilation and
sound. Other defining features include horizontal wall and base units based
on a newly developed type of carcass where the front and side sections are
identical. A dining table and matching chairs have also been added to the
collection, another nod to his ambition to create a kitchen where cooking and
eating blend seamlessly.
“For me, the kitchen is a living space within the home environment – not a
workshop, not a laboratory and certainly not an ancillary room,” Teherani says
of his design. “This kitchen creates an exciting living space where boundaries can
be defined by the individual.”
Italian heavyweight Dada agrees that the modern home
has become more flexible with the rise of
multipurpose living areas that must constantly
adjust to changing needs. Its solution is InDada,
an innovative kitchen concept that not only
responds to this changing contemporary
domestic landscape but also recognises the
growing trend for unstructured kitchens,
targeting a younger clientele who enjoy a
dynamic lifestyle.
‘Unstructured’ refers to modular units that
can be assembled to create a customised
kitchen solution. To this end InDada comprises
a large, laminated washing-cooking-storage unit
featuring a built-in sink, hob and storage options (including extractable drawers
and hanging cabinets), a tall unit designed to house built-in appliances and a wall-
mounted storage module available in a choice of three widths. A large island
unit featuring the same fixtures and fittings as the washing-cooking-storage unit is
also included, enabling customers to create a customised kitchen.
MATERIAL WORLD
With consumers hot on the trail of products that merge good design with high
performance, manufacturers have risen to the challenge by turning to science.
“With potentially limitless applications, science allows materials to be
engineered to obtain exceptional performance in quality and aesthetics.
Innovative materials become the crux of the products’ design and
lifecycle, helping to improve its value,” Whirlpool says.
Its latest creation is iXelium, a range of stainless-steel hobs that use
nanotechnology to preserve the quality and natural shine of
the metal over time. Described as “anti-ageing”, iXelium
prevents surface stains and yellowing as well as reduces the
sign of scratches, corrosion and marks commonly
found on older models.
Other innovations shown in Milan include
Arrital Cucine’s new Etherna kitchen, which is
covered in a thin layer of Ceramic Gres produced
using cutting edge technology to make it resistant
Top to bottom: Antonio Citterio’s new Spatia kitchen for ArcLinea; Siemens coffee machine.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 50 5/27/10 4:34:43 PM
50 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESI GN FORMULA | KI TCHENS
arch” that integrates all the elements necessary for lighting, ventilation and
sound. Other defining features include horizontal wall and base units based
on a newly developed type of carcass where the front and side sections are
identical. A dining table and matching chairs have also been added to the
collection, another nod to his ambition to create a kitchen where cooking and
eating blend seamlessly.
“For me, the kitchen is a living space within the home environment – not a
workshop, not a laboratory and certainly not an ancillary room,” Teherani says
of his design. “This kitchen creates an exciting living space where boundaries can
be defined by the individual.”
Italian heavyweight Dada agrees that the modern home
has become more flexible with the rise of
multipurpose living areas that must constantly
adjust to changing needs. Its solution is InDada,
an innovative kitchen concept that not only
responds to this changing contemporary
domestic landscape but also recognises the
growing trend for unstructured kitchens,
targeting a younger clientele who enjoy a
dynamic lifestyle.
‘Unstructured’ refers to modular units that
can be assembled to create a customised
kitchen solution. To this end InDada comprises
a large, laminated washing-cooking-storage unit
featuring a built-in sink, hob and storage options (including extractable drawers
and hanging cabinets), a tall unit designed to house built-in appliances and a wall-
mounted storage module available in a choice of three widths. A large island
unit featuring the same fixtures and fittings as the washing-cooking-storage unit is
also included, enabling customers to create a customised kitchen.
MATERIAL WORLD
With consumers hot on the trail of products that merge good design with high
performance, manufacturers have risen to the challenge by turning to science.
“With potentially limitless applications, science allows materials to be
engineered to obtain exceptional performance in quality and aesthetics.
Innovative materials become the crux of the products’ design and
lifecycle, helping to improve its value,” Whirlpool says.
Its latest creation is iXelium, a range of stainless-steel hobs that use
nanotechnology to preserve the quality and natural shine of
the metal over time. Described as “anti-ageing”, iXelium
prevents surface stains and yellowing as well as reduces the
sign of scratches, corrosion and marks commonly
found on older models.
Other innovations shown in Milan include
Arrital Cucine’s new Etherna kitchen, which is
covered in a thin layer of Ceramic Gres produced
using cutting edge technology to make it resistant
Top to bottom: Antonio Citterio’s new Spatia kitchen for ArcLinea; Siemens coffee machine.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 50 5/27/10 4:34:43 PM
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
arte casa.pdf 5/27/10 5:52:10 PM
52 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
to abrasions, stains and sudden changes in temperature. Ceramic Gres is
therefore high functioning and performing, satisfying the needs of customers
who seek both aesthetic value and practical features in their kitchen.
Concrete has moved into the kitchen and is ideal because it is hard wearing,
heat resistant, hygienic and easy to maintain. Austrian company Steininger
launched its Concrete Kitchen at Eurocucina, having developed a process that
enables the concrete to be made thinner than ever before – just 8 milimetres
– without compromising its strength. The procedure, which took more than
a year to develop, means that the surface retains the natural look and feel that
you would expect of concrete while the interior of the unit is handmade using
stainless steel and wood.
The Concrete Kitchen caught the attention because it effortlessly blends
nature with man-made components. In particular the inclusion of two built-in
herb boxes that establish a connection between the natural solid wood and the
practical hard-working concrete is a winner.
HEART OF GLASS
Glass has always played an important part in the kitchen, but more recently it
has adopted a starring role thanks to the rise of glass furniture fronts. “Glass is
booming, there is no question about it,” says Berthold Müller of Alno. “Basically
you can use it almost anywhere from the floor and stairs to furniture fronts.
Today special glass is so robust that its area of use has multiplied.”
Müller believe the success of glass comes down to a universal craving
for open spaces defined by freedom and lots of light. “As a building material
Top to bottom: Whirlpool splashes out on colour with its Glamour collection of
ovens and hobs; SieMatic’s S2 features a tall multimedia cabinet designed to
transform your kitchen into a living space.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 52 5/27/10 4:34:55 PM
52 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
to abrasions, stains and sudden changes in temperature. Ceramic Gres is
therefore high functioning and performing, satisfying the needs of customers
who seek both aesthetic value and practical features in their kitchen.
Concrete has moved into the kitchen and is ideal because it is hard wearing,
heat resistant, hygienic and easy to maintain. Austrian company Steininger
launched its Concrete Kitchen at Eurocucina, having developed a process that
enables the concrete to be made thinner than ever before – just 8 milimetres
– without compromising its strength. The procedure, which took more than
a year to develop, means that the surface retains the natural look and feel that
you would expect of concrete while the interior of the unit is handmade using
stainless steel and wood.
The Concrete Kitchen caught the attention because it effortlessly blends
nature with man-made components. In particular the inclusion of two built-in
herb boxes that establish a connection between the natural solid wood and the
practical hard-working concrete is a winner.
HEART OF GLASS
Glass has always played an important part in the kitchen, but more recently it
has adopted a starring role thanks to the rise of glass furniture fronts. “Glass is
booming, there is no question about it,” says Berthold Müller of Alno. “Basically
you can use it almost anywhere from the floor and stairs to furniture fronts.
Today special glass is so robust that its area of use has multiplied.”
Müller believe the success of glass comes down to a universal craving
for open spaces defined by freedom and lots of light. “As a building material
Top to bottom: Whirlpool splashes out on colour with its Glamour collection of
ovens and hobs; SieMatic’s S2 features a tall multimedia cabinet designed to
transform your kitchen into a living space.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 52 5/27/10 4:34:55 PM
53 June 2010
KITCHENS | DESI GN FORMULA
in modern architecture, glass is getting more popular because it gives you
this openness in your house without – in the case of large window fronts –
technical requirements such as heat insulation being neglected,” he explains.
“In the kitchen, its transparency means it can blend with various styles from the
country kitchen to the purist kitchen. Glass fronts generally create a ‘soft’ crossover
between the living room and kitchen, between comfort and functionality. Therefore
they correspond ideally to the trend of open living concepts.”
Working with appliance brands Schott and Bosch, Alno has recently launched
its Alnostar Satina kitchen featuring sanitised matt glass fronts designed for spaces
in which living and eating come together. In order to create a soft, flowing
transition between the two, Bosch has introduced a solution for its oven doors
whereby the glass inserts are only partially sand blasted, which allows a clear
view of the displays and the cooking food without spoiling the overall aesthetic
of the kitchen.
Alnostar Satina recently went into production and is now offered in white,
magnolia and platinum blue as well as the prototype terracotta colour
showcased at Eurocucina.
SAVVY STORAGE
Wall systems found in living rooms where elongated horizontal units are still a
popular choice have influenced the current crop of solutions for the kitchen.
Among them is the 36e8 by Lago; a system based on 36.8 centimetre x 36.8
centimetre modules intended to be used like building blocks to create an endless
number of combinations according to individual kitchen storage requirements.
The reason for the system, Lago says, is that homes are increasingly versatile
and contemporary storage solutions should acknowledge this. Consequently
the 36e8 system can be adapted to the needs of the kitchen as well as the living
room, more evidence of our ongoing romance with open-plan living.
Working on a similar premise, British born designer Michael Young created
Tetrix for Scavolini. “This new project sprang from the desire to create a
horizon-free aesthetic, playing with elements on horizontal axes and discovering
all the possible layouts,” he explains. Inspired by one of the world’s most famous
video games, Tetrix comprises rectangular modules measuring 36 centimetre
x 60 centimetre that are combined on a horizontal axes – again according to
individual needs – allowing for a creative approach to kitchen design.
The system is defined by freedom of colour as well as composition, with
doors designed using sheets of glossy or matt tempered glass, flush-fitted to
a panel and available in a palette of bold colours. Fashioned without visible
handles to satisfy the latest looks in interior design, the range is completed by
tables and chairs specifically designed to match the style of the units.
A final word must go to the trend for combining open and closed kitchen
units exemplified by Kalea, the star of Cesar’s Eurocucina proposal for 2010
comprising units with doors of different widths and heights (allowing them to be
arranged according to the needs of the homeowner) as well as a set of open
units – 12 milimetre thick and in various sizes – designed to fit into base units,
larders and wall units. These units are available in wood laminate but also in a
range of lacquers to create bold colour contrasts.
Top to bottom: Steininger’s Concrete Kitchen effortlessly blends elements of
nature with man-made components; fashion’s leading man Giorgio Armani
has collaborated with Dada to create Checkers.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 53 5/27/10 4:34:58 PM
54 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Multimedia technology is now crossing over the breakfast bar into the kitchen
where it has become a crucial part of the planning process. According to lifestyle
researcher Harry Gatterer, “the traditional family home is going through a
transition towards an entertainment centre.”
SieMatic’s S2 has been designed to accommodate this lifestyle trend and
features a tall multimedia cabinet designed to integrate all the elements needed
to transform your kitchen into a living space. Highlights include a stylish flat
screen television-cum-computer that can be pulled out and swivelled for ease
of use with storage space behind the screen for an air mouse and keyboard
to ensure a clutter-free environment. The cabinet also houses an iPod docking
station, great for those who love to listen to music while cooking.
Ulrike Siekmann of SieMatic is keen to stress that the technical advancements
of S2 are intended to do one thing – “and one thing only” – to enhance and
improve the life of the user. “That is what has always guided us and always will
when we develop and improve our kitchens,” he says. “That is also what makes
for good design and good design is – as we know – timeless.” The S2 is also
on-trend in terms of aesthetics, available in increasingly popular gold-bronze.
HIDE AWAY
Investing in show-stopping appliances does not necessarily mean people want
them on display. Sliding and shutter-style doors are two ways in which to keep
appliances well hidden where simplicity is the defining characteristic. This trend
goes hand-in-hand with the desire for a kitchen-cum-living space whereby
homeowners can hideaway kitchen clutter while they entertain or relax.
Antonio Citterio’s new Spatia kitchen for ArcLinea is an excellent example
comprising a series of sliding doors that open-up to reveal a laundry-cum-ironing
zone with space for appliances and storage; a kitchen and washing zone featuring
all the usual suspects (hob, sink, storage); plus a tall unit to house a standard
sized fridge. When the doors are closed the kitchen disappears from view (along
with the washing up) and the space is transformed into a clutter-free oasis.
An alternative solution is from Lineaquattro whose Ambra Arca kitchen
includes a contemporary cupboard unit equipped with electronically automated
sliding doors that neatly conceal the domestic appliances stored within
(refrigerator, slide-in oven and warming drawer). An island unit comprising a
cooking zone serviced by a down draught hood, which is also hidden when not
in use, completes the project.
CAN YOU HANDLE IT?
The inventor of the handleless kitchen, SieMatic, is celebrating 50 years of
kitchen innovation. Working according to the design philosophy “something is
perfect not because there is nothing to add but because there is nothing more
to reduce,” SieMatic has frequently reinvented its handle free kitchen since its
inception in the 60s. According to managing partner Ulrich Siekmann, it has
reached a degree of visual and ergonomic perfection that stands alone. “Just as
the button does not make a coat, the handle does not define the design of a
kitchen,” he says.
Appliances are now following in its footsteps, wanting to achieve the same
must-have minimalist look together with practical benefits, making the user’s
life easier. Take a busy chef who wants to check on dinner in the oven but has
his hands full. With Baumatic’s new handleless touch opening oven from its
minimalist Studio Solari collection this becomes an effortless task.
The growing trend for appliances with soft-close doors also takes its cue from
kitchen furniture. AEG-Electrolux has introduced Velvet Closing, designed to
remove the slam-bang noise normally associated with oven doors and replace
Michael Young’s Tetrix kitchen for Scavolini comprises a series of rectangular modules.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 54 5/27/10 4:35:00 PM
54 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Multimedia technology is now crossing over the breakfast bar into the kitchen
where it has become a crucial part of the planning process. According to lifestyle
researcher Harry Gatterer, “the traditional family home is going through a
transition towards an entertainment centre.”
SieMatic’s S2 has been designed to accommodate this lifestyle trend and
features a tall multimedia cabinet designed to integrate all the elements needed
to transform your kitchen into a living space. Highlights include a stylish flat
screen television-cum-computer that can be pulled out and swivelled for ease
of use with storage space behind the screen for an air mouse and keyboard
to ensure a clutter-free environment. The cabinet also houses an iPod docking
station, great for those who love to listen to music while cooking.
Ulrike Siekmann of SieMatic is keen to stress that the technical advancements
of S2 are intended to do one thing – “and one thing only” – to enhance and
improve the life of the user. “That is what has always guided us and always will
when we develop and improve our kitchens,” he says. “That is also what makes
for good design and good design is – as we know – timeless.” The S2 is also
on-trend in terms of aesthetics, available in increasingly popular gold-bronze.
HIDE AWAY
Investing in show-stopping appliances does not necessarily mean people want
them on display. Sliding and shutter-style doors are two ways in which to keep
appliances well hidden where simplicity is the defining characteristic. This trend
goes hand-in-hand with the desire for a kitchen-cum-living space whereby
homeowners can hideaway kitchen clutter while they entertain or relax.
Antonio Citterio’s new Spatia kitchen for ArcLinea is an excellent example
comprising a series of sliding doors that open-up to reveal a laundry-cum-ironing
zone with space for appliances and storage; a kitchen and washing zone featuring
all the usual suspects (hob, sink, storage); plus a tall unit to house a standard
sized fridge. When the doors are closed the kitchen disappears from view (along
with the washing up) and the space is transformed into a clutter-free oasis.
An alternative solution is from Lineaquattro whose Ambra Arca kitchen
includes a contemporary cupboard unit equipped with electronically automated
sliding doors that neatly conceal the domestic appliances stored within
(refrigerator, slide-in oven and warming drawer). An island unit comprising a
cooking zone serviced by a down draught hood, which is also hidden when not
in use, completes the project.
CAN YOU HANDLE IT?
The inventor of the handleless kitchen, SieMatic, is celebrating 50 years of
kitchen innovation. Working according to the design philosophy “something is
perfect not because there is nothing to add but because there is nothing more
to reduce,” SieMatic has frequently reinvented its handle free kitchen since its
inception in the 60s. According to managing partner Ulrich Siekmann, it has
reached a degree of visual and ergonomic perfection that stands alone. “Just as
the button does not make a coat, the handle does not define the design of a
kitchen,” he says.
Appliances are now following in its footsteps, wanting to achieve the same
must-have minimalist look together with practical benefits, making the user’s
life easier. Take a busy chef who wants to check on dinner in the oven but has
his hands full. With Baumatic’s new handleless touch opening oven from its
minimalist Studio Solari collection this becomes an effortless task.
The growing trend for appliances with soft-close doors also takes its cue from
kitchen furniture. AEG-Electrolux has introduced Velvet Closing, designed to
remove the slam-bang noise normally associated with oven doors and replace
Michael Young’s Tetrix kitchen for Scavolini comprises a series of rectangular modules.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 54 5/27/10 4:35:00 PM
55 June 2010
CMYK
KITCHENS | DESI GN FORMULA
Kitchen by Varenna-Poliform available at Obegi.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 55 5/27/10 4:35:04 PM
56 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 56 5/27/10 4:35:15 PM
56 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 56 5/27/10 4:35:15 PM
57 June 2010
KITCHENS | DESI GN FORMULA
it with a system that uses a hydraulic damper to close the door silently and
gently. AEG argues that the innovation not only aligns its products with the rest
of the kitchen furniture but also communicates a feeling of “high quality” and
“robustness” to consumers.
When kitchen handles come into play they are usually pared down to an
absolute minimum. German manufacturer Schüller has recently received a
honourable mention from red dot for its NX830, a hidden recessed grip that
creates the look of a sleek handleless kitchen. Italian manufacturer Ernestomeda
has collaborated with French designer Marc Sadler to create the Carré fitted
kitchen defined by a “non-handle handle” whereby the conventional fixture has
been transformed into a convenient recess in the door.
“A lot of people say they detest the rigid structure of the many minimalist
kitchens on the market,” Sadler says of his design. “And everyone agrees that
the kitchen is also the room that best reflects the taste of the people who live in
the home, who personalise it with their favourite symbols, family heirlooms or
holiday souvenirs. This is the starting-point for Carré: if I had to choose just one
word to describe it, that word would be ‘multifaceted’ reflecting its ability to be
all things to all persons.”
Final mentions must go to Record Cucine whose Miami kitchen features
a bright white door with a recessed handle that can be lacquered in various
colours upon request or the Cube collection by Bravo Cucine comprising a
matt white lacquered island unit featuring a recessed ‘line’ handle that draws a
continuous line along its length.
FASHION FOCUS
Fashion’s leading man Giorgio Armani has once again collaborated with Dada,
this time to create Checkers, which recently debuted at Eurocucina in Milan.
“Checkers interprets the home workspace through a sensorial approach
that develops from a refined and exclusive research of materials, finishes and
colours,” Dada says. “At the same time, from a formal viewpoint, the project
is based on an extremely simple, sober and linear language that completely
reflects the expressive elements that distinguish the work of Giorgio Armani.”
Designed for large spaces and available in a wide range of materials, finishes
and colours that allow customers to personalise components, standout
features include a workbench with a stunning black granite counter and wall
units in back-painted glass with a chessboard design. These are equipped with
an innovative system of LED lights arranged horizontally along the wooden
crosspieces that divide the doors, illuminating the workspace but also allowing
for atmospheric lighting.
Fashion is the focus for Stefano Spessotto and Lorella Agnoletto’s Attitude
kitchen for Scavolini. “The first step was to ask ourselves exactly what values,
sensations and emotions we wanted to transmit and if, in order to do so,
we needed to explore new aesthetic languages. The answer came from the
fashion industry… hence we have the exclusive design handles inspired by the
accessories from the female wardrobe,” the design duo explain.
The doors are the true protagonists of Attitùde, available in wood, lacquer,
laminate and glass, each with its own personality. Lacquers are available in a
range of glossy and matt colours including new Alaska blue; laminates come in a
fabric-effect finish, another nod to the fashion industry; and glass is proposed in
matt black, featuring a contrast metallic silk-screen print.
ID
Clockwise from left: Arrital Cucine’s new Etherna kitchen is covered in a thin
layer of Ceramic Gres; Scavolini’s Attitude kitchen; Karbon by Kohler; Lago’s
36e8 system is based on 36.8 x 36.8 centimetre modules intended to create an
endless number of kitchen combinations.
ID DF Kitchens2.indd 57 5/27/10 4:35:23 PM
58 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESIGN FORMULA | KITCHENS
Aprile kitchen from Boffi available at Purity.
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ID DF Kitchens2.indd 58 5/27/10 4:35:33 PM
58 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
DESI GN FORMULA | KI TCHENS
Aprile kitchen from Boffi available at Purity.
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ID DF Kitchens2.indd 58 5/27/10 4:35:33 PM
60 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Deca Architecure opted for style and subtlety
when designing this Greek holiday home.
Cliffhanger
Holiday home on the Greek island of Antipáros has been designed
to sit gracefully and respectfully in the rugged volcanic landscape,
sheltered from the offshore breezes but still offering magnificent views
of the Agean Sea. TEXT: LENA SEMANN PHOTOGRAPHY: MADS MOGENSEN
Cliffhanger.indd 60 5/27/10 2:12:54 PM
60 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
Deca Architecure opted for style and subtlety
when designing this Greek holiday home.
Cliffhanger
Holiday home on the Greek island of Antipáros has been designed
to sit gracefully and respectfully in the rugged volcanic landscape,
sheltered from the offshore breezes but still offering magnificent views
of the Agean Sea. TEXT: LENA SEMANN PHOTOGRAPHY: MADS MOGENSEN
Cliffhanger.indd 60 5/27/10 2:12:54 PM
61
CMYK
June 2010
CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
CMYK CMYK
Cliffhanger.indd 61 5/27/10 2:13:02 PM
62 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK CMYK
Dramatic cliff top sites often encourage dramatic design statements, but
Deca Architecture has taken an extremely subtle approach to a holiday home
on the Greek island of Antipáros. This popular tourist destination, set in the
heart of the Cyclades Islands cluster and just a 35-minute flight from Athens,
boasts a raw, natural beauty inextricably linked with its volcanic origins. Deca
Architecture has carefully and respectfully appreciated these factors in conjuring
up a stylish property that instantly commands attention in this rugged landscape.
It is set on a steep slope which provides unrivalled and unbroken views of the
shimmering Aegean Sea but which is simultaneously exposed to the elements.
The first challenge for Deca was to create a buffer from the formidable
offshore winds for the external living areas. And the second was to immerse
the house itself in the landscape, ensuring an arresting presence but without
diminishing any of the impact of the proposed structure itself. The decision was
taken to build a stone wall that responds organically to the slope with constant
variations in height and inclination.
On the front edge, the infinity-style swimming pool appears to hang on the
slope, complemented by a sequence of exterior living areas that enhance the
landscape’s natural qualities and create a relaxed feeling.
The outdoor barbecue area is covered by a wooden screen, providing
much-needed shade for cooks and diners, while the walls here have been
specifically designed to hold back the wind but still retain side views of the
horizon, ensuring that sunsets can be fully appreciated in all their glory.
Sunbathers have been provided with their own cushion-lined rooftop
area, and the white exterior walls and shutters as well as a low-maintenance
Mediterranean garden further underline a design commitment to simple,
uncluttered lines.
Clockwise from top left: Outdoor BBQ area covered by a wooden screen. The
high wall has been designed to stop the wind, while on the side looking to the
horizon and the sea the wall has been kept low to preserve the view of the
sunset; part of the outdoor living area; part of the house with white walls and
shutters surrounded by the Mediterranean garden.
Cliffhanger.indd 62 5/27/10 2:13:24 PM
63
CMYK
June 2010
CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
Outside seating area.
Simple, uncluttered lines accentuate the magnificent views.
Cliffhanger.indd 63 5/27/10 2:13:39 PM
64 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESIGN@LARGE
The interiors of the home, an Antipáros Design properties Project, developed
by Oliaros, also maintain harmony with the raw, delicate landscape.
Natural materials and colours are strongly favoured throughout with the
owners making a determined effort to avoid anything that might remotely
resemble the feeling of a beach house.
It has been furnished sparingly with strong yet simple design pieces that
further enhance and underline the property’s striking ambience.
Clockwise from top: In the living area, the red sofa is by Piero Lissoni, two
mirrors by Philippe Starck, table by Isamu Noguchi; black Trois Bras lamp by
Serge Mouille; the kitchen and dining area. Kitchen block by Boffi, red rubber
chairs by Komplot design for Kallemo. Background painting by Anna Malagrida.
The living area, for example, boasts two unusually shaped Philippe Starck
mirrors, a red sofa by Piero Lissoni and an Isamu Noguchi table. A dramatic
square window, which sits at floor level, ensures the owners and visitors can sit
in comfort, staring out to sea and enjoying the brilliant light of the Cyclades.
At night, a black Trois Bras lamp by Serge Mouille provides plenty of light for
reading. The Boffi kitchen, meanwhile, is also open and light filled, with an Anna
Malagrida painting, and red rubber chairs by Komplot design bringing important
added points of visual interest.
Other highlights include a Bambu dining table by Artek Studio and a white
Pipistrella lamp by Gae Aulenti.
Deca, an Athens-based creative platform of international architects established
four years ago, has compiled an interesting portfolio that includes two hotels, a
park and a housing development. And its Antipáros home further enhances its
growing reputation for bespoke design.
ID
Cliffhanger.indd 64 5/27/10 2:14:02 PM
64 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
The interiors of the home, an Antipáros Design properties Project, developed
by Oliaros, also maintain harmony with the raw, delicate landscape.
Natural materials and colours are strongly favoured throughout with the
owners making a determined effort to avoid anything that might remotely
resemble the feeling of a beach house.
It has been furnished sparingly with strong yet simple design pieces that
further enhance and underline the property’s striking ambience.
Clockwise from top: In the living area, the red sofa is by Piero Lissoni, two
mirrors by Philippe Starck, table by Isamu Noguchi; black Trois Bras lamp by
Serge Mouille; the kitchen and dining area. Kitchen block by Boffi, red rubber
chairs by Komplot design for Kallemo. Background painting by Anna Malagrida.
The living area, for example, boasts two unusually shaped Philippe Starck
mirrors, a red sofa by Piero Lissoni and an Isamu Noguchi table. A dramatic
square window, which sits at floor level, ensures the owners and visitors can sit
in comfort, staring out to sea and enjoying the brilliant light of the Cyclades.
At night, a black Trois Bras lamp by Serge Mouille provides plenty of light for
reading. The Boffi kitchen, meanwhile, is also open and light filled, with an Anna
Malagrida painting, and red rubber chairs by Komplot design bringing important
added points of visual interest.
Other highlights include a Bambu dining table by Artek Studio and a white
Pipistrella lamp by Gae Aulenti.
Deca, an Athens-based creative platform of international architects established
four years ago, has compiled an interesting portfolio that includes two hotels, a
park and a housing development. And its Antipáros home further enhances its
growing reputation for bespoke design.
ID
Cliffhanger.indd 64 5/27/10 2:14:02 PM
The Emirates Woman of the Year Awards 2010 will be the most prestigious and inspiring event held this year. Now is the time to
put forward your entrants – women from the UAE who inspire and achieve in all that they do. We aim to recognise and honour
mothers, sisters, daughters, friends, colleagues... women who break down barriers, shatter stereotypes and stride forward in a
quest to do remarkable things. Nominate today for your chance to win a Philips beauty hamper, including a SalonDry
Pro hairdryer, SalonStraight Active Ion Straightener and a Salon SuperStylist multi-styler.
NOMINATE YOUR EMIRATES WOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARDS 2010 CANDIDATE
Sponsor of the
Achievers Category
FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.EMIRATESWOMANAWARDS.COM
Official car sponsor
NOMINATE TODAY!
Official venue Official beverage partner
in association with
_ew awards 2010 advert id.indd 1 5/24/10 5:21:02 PM
The Emirates Woman of the Year Awards 2010 will be the most prestigious and inspiring event held this year. Now is the time to
put forward your entrants – women from the UAE who inspire and achieve in all that they do. We aim to recognise and honour
mothers, sisters, daughters, friends, colleagues... women who break down barriers, shatter stereotypes and stride forward in a
quest to do remarkable things. Nominate today for your chance to win a Philips beauty hamper, including a SalonDry
Pro hairdryer, SalonStraight Active Ion Straightener and a Salon SuperStylist multi-styler.
NOMINATE YOUR EMIRATES WOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARDS 2010 CANDIDATE
Sponsor of the
Achievers Category
FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.EMIRATESWOMANAWARDS.COM
Official car sponsor
NOMINATE TODAY!
Official venue Official beverage partner
in association with
_ew awards 2010 advert id.indd 1 5/24/10 5:21:02 PM
67 June 2010
C
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O
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idProperty
CONTENTS:
68 Paint the town red
72 Paid vacations
78 Antennae
80 Portfolio
IDP Cover.indd 67 5/27/10 5:38:57 PM
68 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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Entrance hall in the ground floor apartment.
Trevor.indd 68 5/27/10 2:20:20 PM
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Entrance hall in the ground floor apartment.
Trevor.indd 68 5/27/10 2:20:20 PM
69 June 2010
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INTERNATI ONAL | idProperty
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Paint the
town red
Overcoming some wide-ranging
opposition, designer Carolyn
Trevor has injected colour into a
couple of London flats, a small
victory against a prevailing public
preference for neutral decor.
TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
Trevor.indd 69 5/27/10 2:20:28 PM
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Why do so many people fear colour these days? The Georgians
didn’t have a problem with it, they had loads of colour within their beautifully
proportioned houses and their large windows allowed plenty of light into
rooms, which meant hues could be seen at their brightest. Red was their
preference for dining rooms – the colour of their dietary staples, port and beef,
if Dickens is to be believed. But today, we are told, the dining room is “dead”
and when it comes to designing interiors many people wish that was true for
the colour red and other bright shades.
Many contemporary designers and their clients are in the better-red-
was-dead camp. They prefer to decorate a home in neutrals, sometimes
emphasising texture rather than colour because it is a more subtle decorative
option, less likely to offend sensitive eyes. Many estate agents have no qualms in
bringing design down to a lower common denominator, believing homes ought
to be decorated according to the so-called “BMW mantra” of beige, magnolia
and white. The seriously reductive among them want magnolia dumped,
because it “looks cheap”. To be fair, some beautiful, Zen-like homes have been
created by minimalists using bucket-loads of white and this trend has caught the
imagination of many people.
Of the bright colours, red rouses the greatest hostility. Those designers who
do like it sometimes struggle to find a client who feels the same way, possibly
because this colour can have a strong negative impact on people psychologically.
Studies show that red and other colours from that part of the spectrum,
including brown, orange and pink, are people’s least favourite and red can
provoke a strong physiological reaction – when a person sees this colour their
heart rate increases. It is associated with anger and danger. Drivers are more
likely to want to overtake a red car than any other coloured car. The Liverpool
Football Club manager Bill Shankly had his team play in an all-red kit from 1964
because he felt it made them look bigger and more imposing.
Bearing all that in mind, it is no wonder interior designer Carolyn Trevor
found herself having to fight hard to persuade one of her clients to accept
floor-to-ceiling-length scarlet curtains for an entrance hall at his central London
apartment. But persuade him she did and she also managed to get more red
and other bright hues into this Belgravia residence. Ironically, Trevor doesn’t
have much red in her own home, preferring blue, which fills people with a
sense of calmness and serenity. As a side-point, wealthy Georgians may have
been less gluttoness and prone to gout if they had decorated their dining rooms
in blue, because psychologists have found that this colour suppresses appetite.
Back to the present day, reds, browns and bronzes appear throughout the
Trevor-designed ground and lower ground floor duplex conversion, giving
warmth to this family home. To distance herself from today’s fashionable fear of
bright colours, she declares: “I am not afraid of colour. I would use more colour
if given a free reign, but many clients take a lot of persuading, such as with the
red curtains in the Belgravia flat. I like monochromes with some bright colours,
but not so that they are splashed all over the walls.”
There is a bright yellow bedspread in the youngest daughter’s bedroom at
the duplex and there is a bright red headboard, lamps and accessories in the
other daughter’s bedroom. The expansive lounge has bright red chairs at one
end while bronze cushions and lampshades complement blue curtains at the
Clockwise from above: Penthouse lounge; stairwell and skylight; ground floor apartment entrance hall.
Trevor.indd 70 5/27/10 2:20:52 PM
70 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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Why do so many people fear colour these days? The Georgians
didn’t have a problem with it, they had loads of colour within their beautifully
proportioned houses and their large windows allowed plenty of light into
rooms, which meant hues could be seen at their brightest. Red was their
preference for dining rooms – the colour of their dietary staples, port and beef,
if Dickens is to be believed. But today, we are told, the dining room is “dead”
and when it comes to designing interiors many people wish that was true for
the colour red and other bright shades.
Many contemporary designers and their clients are in the better-red-
was-dead camp. They prefer to decorate a home in neutrals, sometimes
emphasising texture rather than colour because it is a more subtle decorative
option, less likely to offend sensitive eyes. Many estate agents have no qualms in
bringing design down to a lower common denominator, believing homes ought
to be decorated according to the so-called “BMW mantra” of beige, magnolia
and white. The seriously reductive among them want magnolia dumped,
because it “looks cheap”. To be fair, some beautiful, Zen-like homes have been
created by minimalists using bucket-loads of white and this trend has caught the
imagination of many people.
Of the bright colours, red rouses the greatest hostility. Those designers who
do like it sometimes struggle to find a client who feels the same way, possibly
because this colour can have a strong negative impact on people psychologically.
Studies show that red and other colours from that part of the spectrum,
including brown, orange and pink, are people’s least favourite and red can
provoke a strong physiological reaction – when a person sees this colour their
heart rate increases. It is associated with anger and danger. Drivers are more
likely to want to overtake a red car than any other coloured car. The Liverpool
Football Club manager Bill Shankly had his team play in an all-red kit from 1964
because he felt it made them look bigger and more imposing.
Bearing all that in mind, it is no wonder interior designer Carolyn Trevor
found herself having to fight hard to persuade one of her clients to accept
floor-to-ceiling-length scarlet curtains for an entrance hall at his central London
apartment. But persuade him she did and she also managed to get more red
and other bright hues into this Belgravia residence. Ironically, Trevor doesn’t
have much red in her own home, preferring blue, which fills people with a
sense of calmness and serenity. As a side-point, wealthy Georgians may have
been less gluttoness and prone to gout if they had decorated their dining rooms
in blue, because psychologists have found that this colour suppresses appetite.
Back to the present day, reds, browns and bronzes appear throughout the
Trevor-designed ground and lower ground floor duplex conversion, giving
warmth to this family home. To distance herself from today’s fashionable fear of
bright colours, she declares: “I am not afraid of colour. I would use more colour
if given a free reign, but many clients take a lot of persuading, such as with the
red curtains in the Belgravia flat. I like monochromes with some bright colours,
but not so that they are splashed all over the walls.”
There is a bright yellow bedspread in the youngest daughter’s bedroom at
the duplex and there is a bright red headboard, lamps and accessories in the
other daughter’s bedroom. The expansive lounge has bright red chairs at one
end while bronze cushions and lampshades complement blue curtains at the
Clockwise from above: Penthouse lounge; stairwell and skylight; ground floor apartment entrance hall.
Trevor.indd 70 5/27/10 2:20:52 PM
71 June 2010
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INTERNATI ONAL | idProperty
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other end. The lounge’s brown carpet and grey upholstered sofas hold the
colour scheme together but the walls are mainly white throughout, so colour
combinations are not overpowering.
One set of walls that are not white are those in the master bedroom
downstairs. Here they are brown. These combine with the dark brown bed,
and grey carpet and bedspread to make for a warm, calm environment. The
glossiness of the silk carpet complements the matt walls, one of several similar
textural combinations in the apartment. Unusually, part of the wall in the
neighbouring ensuite bathroom slides open, so that natural light coming into the
bedroom through large windows can filter across.
Deep in the heart of London’s diplomatic quarter, the apartment is in a
former embassy residence – a five-storey, white stucco Regency block that
houses several other embassies. National flags adorn many buildings in the area,
their bright patterns bringing their own bit of colour to this part of the city.
Upstairs from the apartment is the multi-million dirham penthouse duplex
designed by Trevor. The penthouse’s two floors have distinct roles. The open
plan top floor is designed for entertaining, and has a lounge and kitchen/dining
room either side of an entrance hall and stairwell, with noise from the kitchen/
dining area kept out of the lounge by closing glazed, sliding doors. Daylight filters
down through a large skylight above the stairwell into the apartment and more
light enters the lounge through French doors that open out onto one of the
apartment’s two terraces. The second terrace is on the roof above, from where
expansive views can be enjoyed that take in landmarks like The London Eye and
the Swiss Re Tower, more popularly known as “The Gherkin”.
The penthouse’s lower floor has a more private feel, symbolised by secret
doors leading to a bathroom and wardrobe in one of its three bedrooms. This
floor has its own entrance, so occupants can come and go without having to
pass through the reception rooms upstairs.
Colour usage also helps differentiate the two floors. The top floor is
predominantly grey, white and brown with a couple of pieces of red furniture.
Its stained oak floor, dark enough to look like wenge, is complemented by a
grey silk carpet in the lounge. Downstairs the walls are predominantly brown
and floors mainly grey. Textural features focus on glossy, smooth elements, like
the grey silk carpets and gold and silver-coloured cushions, complementing
coarse, matt, beige seagrass wallpaper. This apartment was styled for a bachelor.
“The penthouse is designed for a man about town,” Trevor says. “It’s very slick,
very James Bondish.”
Both apartments are filled with bespoke furnishings created by the designer’s
company or by specifically hired crafts people, such as chairs, tables, light fittings
and kitchen work surfaces.
“I prefer bespoke, because as soon as you put in something ready-made it
devalues the interior design immediately,” says the designer who finds much of
her inspiration in hand-crafted objects made by others.
Trevor takes an architectural approach to interior design, because it is
more holistic than simply focusing on decoration. “It is essential that functional
requirements are recognised and integrated fully within the aesthetic,” she says.
The designer may find it easy to convince clients to think about the structure
of their home and not just its decorative elements, but she is likely to continue
to encounter resistance to using bright colours during this neutrals-obsessed,
late-New Elizabethan age. It is like showing a red rag to a bull.
ID
Clockwise from top left: Lounge of the ground floor apartment; penthouse, with
lounge in the background, glazed stairwell and skylight in foreground, as seen
from the dining room/kitchen; daughter’s bedroom in ground floor apartment.
Trevor.indd 71 5/27/10 2:21:18 PM
72 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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Paid vacations
Holiday homes are available, provided you are happy
to share them with others, and the ways and means
of doing so are widening. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
K Club, Ireland.
Holiday Homes2.indd 72 5/27/10 5:35:57 PM
72 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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Paid vacations
Holiday homes are available, provided you are happy
to share them with others, and the ways and means
of doing so are widening. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
K Club, Ireland.
Holiday Homes2.indd 72 5/27/10 5:35:57 PM
73 June 2010
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INTERNATI ONAL | idProperty
CMYK CMYK CMYK
Holiday Homes2.indd 73 5/27/10 5:36:03 PM
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idProperty | INTERNATI ONAL
Feeling more optimistic following the recent economic maelstrom, and still
dreaming of having your own holiday home? Well, you can rest assured; the
world’s property developers are becoming more innovative. To boost sluggish
sales, some developers are offering alternatives to conventional property
ownership that make holiday homes less expensive to buy.
That’s the good news. Now here’s the bad – these alternatives take a bit of
understanding and can be less reliable investments than conventional property
ownership. However, if you are looking for an affordable holiday home or even
a bolthole in a place where you often do business, and are not too bothered
about the long-term fiscal consequences, then read on.
Condo-hotels, timeshare, leaseback, fractional ownership and destination club
membership are five alternatives to conventional residential property ownership.
Furnished and maintained by management companies, they are mostly found at
purpose-built resort communities and city centres.
Destination clubs have a portfolio of properties in various locations for
members to use and jointly own, with beachside villas, ski chalets and city
apartments generally available. They are flourishing in the United States, where
they were invented, but are struggling to take hold in Europe because high
annual service charges put off potential members.
The newest destination club, London-based Safe Haven, hopes to get
around the service charge problem by not having it. Rather ingeniously, the cost
of maintaining its portfolio of holiday homes is paid for by investment in high
yielding rental properties. Most of the club’s holiday homes are in Europe, with
some others in New York, Kenya, Morocco, the Caribbean and Thailand. For a
minimum Dhs295,000 investment, a member enjoys at least a couple of weeks
in a city centre apartment or a week in a large, seaside villa or ski chalet each year.
If you’re happy to settle for something smaller than a villa or apartment, then
a hotel room could be the answer. Guest rooms can be purchased at condo-
hotels, which are also sometimes known as apart-hotels. A guest room or suite
owned by an investor is let out to visitors, and cleaned and maintained by the
hotel company in the same way as a guest room at a conventional hotel. This
option produces an income, because it is let to other visitors, with proceeds
shared between investor and condo-hotel operator. In some cases, rental
returns are guaranteed for a limited period. Condo-hotels are found in cities
and holiday resorts across the world.
Lucy Russell, managing director of buyer agency Quintessentially Estates, says
condo-hotel investment is strongest in financial centres like London, Hong Kong
and New York, where it appeals to visiting businessmen.
“If you are in a city on a regular basis and you would normally be in a hotel
room I think it works out quite well and is financially viable,” she says. “If you are
looking at it as a long-term investment, then I am not sure if it is the best route
to take. You may be better off buying an individual unit somewhere.”
However, hotel rooms and apartments could be less expensive to buy than
a one-bedroom flat, so they attract some investors. “I think also people are
much more transient than they used to be,” Russell says, “so things like hotel
investments are more popular than they would have been five years ago.”
Buyers ought to take professional advice before investing in condo-hotels
advises Charles Weston-Baker, director at estate agency Savills. “The model can
be good,” he says, “but like all property it is dependent on location. It needs to
be somewhere with high occupancy rates.”
On the popular Philippines holiday island of Boracay, 56 guest apartments
are being offered at the Continent Fairways condo-hotel at prices starting from
Dhs404,000 and the developer, Paradisya Land, guarantees investors a 14.2
per cent rental return for at least one year. The condo-hotel is being built in the
grounds of the Fairways and Bluewater Golf and Country Club, which has an
18-hole golf course for investors and hotel guests to use.
Dating from the 1960s, timeshare is the oldest alternative to conventional
property ownership and in these schemes the right to use a holiday home for a
specified length of time is offered. Timeshare is not a property purchase and has
been abused by fraudsters over the years, but it is very affordable.
Clockwise from above: Banyan Tree Ungasan Resort, Bali; Palheiro Village,
Madeira; Pracondu Il Nendaz, Switzerland ski apartments.
Holiday Homes2.indd 74 5/27/10 5:36:13 PM
74 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
idProperty | I NTERNATI ONAL
Feeling more optimistic following the recent economic maelstrom, and still
dreaming of having your own holiday home? Well, you can rest assured; the
world’s property developers are becoming more innovative. To boost sluggish
sales, some developers are offering alternatives to conventional property
ownership that make holiday homes less expensive to buy.
That’s the good news. Now here’s the bad – these alternatives take a bit of
understanding and can be less reliable investments than conventional property
ownership. However, if you are looking for an affordable holiday home or even
a bolthole in a place where you often do business, and are not too bothered
about the long-term fiscal consequences, then read on.
Condo-hotels, timeshare, leaseback, fractional ownership and destination club
membership are five alternatives to conventional residential property ownership.
Furnished and maintained by management companies, they are mostly found at
purpose-built resort communities and city centres.
Destination clubs have a portfolio of properties in various locations for
members to use and jointly own, with beachside villas, ski chalets and city
apartments generally available. They are flourishing in the United States, where
they were invented, but are struggling to take hold in Europe because high
annual service charges put off potential members.
The newest destination club, London-based Safe Haven, hopes to get
around the service charge problem by not having it. Rather ingeniously, the cost
of maintaining its portfolio of holiday homes is paid for by investment in high
yielding rental properties. Most of the club’s holiday homes are in Europe, with
some others in New York, Kenya, Morocco, the Caribbean and Thailand. For a
minimum Dhs295,000 investment, a member enjoys at least a couple of weeks
in a city centre apartment or a week in a large, seaside villa or ski chalet each year.
If you’re happy to settle for something smaller than a villa or apartment, then
a hotel room could be the answer. Guest rooms can be purchased at condo-
hotels, which are also sometimes known as apart-hotels. A guest room or suite
owned by an investor is let out to visitors, and cleaned and maintained by the
hotel company in the same way as a guest room at a conventional hotel. This
option produces an income, because it is let to other visitors, with proceeds
shared between investor and condo-hotel operator. In some cases, rental
returns are guaranteed for a limited period. Condo-hotels are found in cities
and holiday resorts across the world.
Lucy Russell, managing director of buyer agency Quintessentially Estates, says
condo-hotel investment is strongest in financial centres like London, Hong Kong
and New York, where it appeals to visiting businessmen.
“If you are in a city on a regular basis and you would normally be in a hotel
room I think it works out quite well and is financially viable,” she says. “If you are
looking at it as a long-term investment, then I am not sure if it is the best route
to take. You may be better off buying an individual unit somewhere.”
However, hotel rooms and apartments could be less expensive to buy than
a one-bedroom flat, so they attract some investors. “I think also people are
much more transient than they used to be,” Russell says, “so things like hotel
investments are more popular than they would have been five years ago.”
Buyers ought to take professional advice before investing in condo-hotels
advises Charles Weston-Baker, director at estate agency Savills. “The model can
be good,” he says, “but like all property it is dependent on location. It needs to
be somewhere with high occupancy rates.”
On the popular Philippines holiday island of Boracay, 56 guest apartments
are being offered at the Continent Fairways condo-hotel at prices starting from
Dhs404,000 and the developer, Paradisya Land, guarantees investors a 14.2
per cent rental return for at least one year. The condo-hotel is being built in the
grounds of the Fairways and Bluewater Golf and Country Club, which has an
18-hole golf course for investors and hotel guests to use.
Dating from the 1960s, timeshare is the oldest alternative to conventional
property ownership and in these schemes the right to use a holiday home for a
specified length of time is offered. Timeshare is not a property purchase and has
been abused by fraudsters over the years, but it is very affordable.
Clockwise from above: Banyan Tree Ungasan Resort, Bali; Palheiro Village,
Madeira; Pracondu Il Nendaz, Switzerland ski apartments.
Holiday Homes2.indd 74 5/27/10 5:36:13 PM
DUBAI: Mazaya Centre • Arabian Center
76 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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idProperty | INTERNATI ONAL
On the Atlantic holiday island of Madeira, Pestana Promenade Ocean
Hotel has timeshare apartments available, with prices starting at Dhs32,000
for a studio that can be used for one week a year for 15 years. Pestana’s
timeshare users can exchange their weeks with it to spend time at other resorts
worldwide in a programme run by Group RCI.
Fractional ownership is sometimes confused with timeshare, but is quite
different. In a fractional ownership scheme, a share of the property is purchased
and this entitles the buyer to use it for some of the year. Normally, a fractional
property has between four and eight owners, with each owner having an equal
share of the property and time that can be spent there.
Russell says fractional options have been popular with buyers during the
recession. “People are being more careful with their money,” she says.
“However wealthy you are, in the last year you will have cut back slightly.”
However, the recession killed off some high profile schemes, so buyers need
to exercise caution when investing off-plan and Russell says they must ensure a
developer can afford to finish a project and that a brand-name hotel group will
run its facilities.
Charles Weston-Baker says buyers are better off purchasing a whole
property than fractions of it when doing so for investment. “Buyers are paying
considerably more for their fractions than the divided price, so owners will
make less on capital appreciation, and they can be hard to sell,” he warns.
In Ireland, 33 fractional homes are on offer at the K Club, which counts golf,
archery and fly fishing among its attractions. Prices start at Dhs730,000 for a
completed, two-bedroom duplex apartment that buyers can use for at least
six weeks each year. Fractional owners can swap their time at this estate with
weeks at other resorts around the world in an exchange programme run by
Interval International.
Leaseback can sometimes be the best option for buyers with one eye on
making a profit. This allows an investor to buy a villa or apartment from a
developer and then lease it to the scheme’s management company to rent
to visitors in return for a guaranteed rental income. Investors can stay at the
property for a few weeks each year or increase their rental return by not using it.
Leaseback originated in France, where a government-backed scheme
provides investors with a guaranteed rental return for up to 11 years. Most
non-French schemes guarantee rental returns for shorter periods, often only
two years.
But leaseback properties with short guaranteed rental periods can be
problematic Weston-Baker warns. “Leaseback is often guaranteed for a period,
but that level of return is not always realistic after the scheme ends,” he says.
“You need to be sure there is a very professional system driving visitors there.
You also need to be realistic about the split between what the operator and the
owner gets. Quality always wins.”
Banyan Tree Holdings has a leaseback scheme for investors in Bali. Investors
are guaranteed an eight per cent gross return for two years and can use their
property for 21 days each year at the Banyan Tree Ungasan Resort. Prices start
at Dhs3.6 million for the 73 villas at this completed project.
ID
Clockwise from top left: Pestana Promenade Ocean Hotel resort, Madeira;
Continent Fairways, Varacay, Philippines; yooPhuket, Thailand; Regency
Country Club, Tenerife, Spain.
Holiday Homes2.indd 76 5/27/10 5:36:30 PM
76 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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idProperty | I NTERNATI ONAL
On the Atlantic holiday island of Madeira, Pestana Promenade Ocean
Hotel has timeshare apartments available, with prices starting at Dhs32,000
for a studio that can be used for one week a year for 15 years. Pestana’s
timeshare users can exchange their weeks with it to spend time at other resorts
worldwide in a programme run by Group RCI.
Fractional ownership is sometimes confused with timeshare, but is quite
different. In a fractional ownership scheme, a share of the property is purchased
and this entitles the buyer to use it for some of the year. Normally, a fractional
property has between four and eight owners, with each owner having an equal
share of the property and time that can be spent there.
Russell says fractional options have been popular with buyers during the
recession. “People are being more careful with their money,” she says.
“However wealthy you are, in the last year you will have cut back slightly.”
However, the recession killed off some high profile schemes, so buyers need
to exercise caution when investing off-plan and Russell says they must ensure a
developer can afford to finish a project and that a brand-name hotel group will
run its facilities.
Charles Weston-Baker says buyers are better off purchasing a whole
property than fractions of it when doing so for investment. “Buyers are paying
considerably more for their fractions than the divided price, so owners will
make less on capital appreciation, and they can be hard to sell,” he warns.
In Ireland, 33 fractional homes are on offer at the K Club, which counts golf,
archery and fly fishing among its attractions. Prices start at Dhs730,000 for a
completed, two-bedroom duplex apartment that buyers can use for at least
six weeks each year. Fractional owners can swap their time at this estate with
weeks at other resorts around the world in an exchange programme run by
Interval International.
Leaseback can sometimes be the best option for buyers with one eye on
making a profit. This allows an investor to buy a villa or apartment from a
developer and then lease it to the scheme’s management company to rent
to visitors in return for a guaranteed rental income. Investors can stay at the
property for a few weeks each year or increase their rental return by not using it.
Leaseback originated in France, where a government-backed scheme
provides investors with a guaranteed rental return for up to 11 years. Most
non-French schemes guarantee rental returns for shorter periods, often only
two years.
But leaseback properties with short guaranteed rental periods can be
problematic Weston-Baker warns. “Leaseback is often guaranteed for a period,
but that level of return is not always realistic after the scheme ends,” he says.
“You need to be sure there is a very professional system driving visitors there.
You also need to be realistic about the split between what the operator and the
owner gets. Quality always wins.”
Banyan Tree Holdings has a leaseback scheme for investors in Bali. Investors
are guaranteed an eight per cent gross return for two years and can use their
property for 21 days each year at the Banyan Tree Ungasan Resort. Prices start
at Dhs3.6 million for the 73 villas at this completed project.
ID
Clockwise from top left: Pestana Promenade Ocean Hotel resort, Madeira;
Continent Fairways, Varacay, Philippines; yooPhuket, Thailand; Regency
Country Club, Tenerife, Spain.
Holiday Homes2.indd 76 5/27/10 5:36:30 PM
365 days of ideas and passion
Feria Hábitat Valencia / Spain
Trade Fair for Interiors: furniture / decor / home textiles / lighting
the contract sector / nude (young talent) / kitchen R, D & i workshops
lagranja
design
GREAT BRITAIN?
So is Britain a safe haven or a banana republic?
Britain’s budget deficit is heading towards a huge
12 per cent, just one percentage point short of
the Greek total, and this scares Britain’s bankers,
currency traders and tabloid newspaper editors
– but has not fazed the Greeks. The number
of Greeks buying central London homes has
doubled over the past 12 months, estate agency
Knight Frank says, with six per cent of buyers
of London homes valued at Dhs11 million-plus
being Greeks trying to get their money out of
their own imploding economy. Germans, Italians
and others from the troubled Euro-zone are
piling in behind them, while wealthy Chinese
families are making their presence felt at London
estate agents for the first time. They are buying
homes so their children can be educated in
British schools and “enjoy a better life”, estate
agents reveal. Somebody should tell London’s
sterling-bashing currency traders.
Singapore is booming and hopefully things are not be as bad as they seem in Greece, Spain, Britain,
Thailand and the United States. But who cares, June is all about the World Cup and that means South
African homes are in vogue. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
VOLCANIC DOWNTURN
That pesky Icelandic volcano, the name of which
nobody can pronounce, is not only bad for
airlines, travel agents and their customers, but
also for estate agents selling European holiday
homes and investment properties. ProVenture
Property, a company that sources German
homes for investors had sales delayed when
buyers could not fly over from Britain because
of the air flight ban. It expects property viewings
by overseas investors to drop by one-third until
the volcanic eruptions are safely over. Still, it has
found a way around the problem of completing
sales, by carrying out formalities at German
embassies in investors’ home countries. Other
estate agents think sales to overseas buyers could
be down by half until everyone is sure they can
fly normally. European train passenger numbers
are booming, so homes close to train stations
may become popular with buyers now.
BACK TO BLACK
In theory, Greek property prices ought to
plummet thanks to austerity measures introduced
to erode the country’s debt mountain – higher
taxes, lower wages, smaller pensions and fewer
jobs mean less money to spend on flats and
houses. But this is Greece, so things are not
that simple. The Greek government says the
“black economy” accounts for one quarter of the
nation’s GDP. You can be sure people employed
in this sector pay little tax and rarely cut their
own wages, so their money could support
property prices. Indeed, they may be the only
Greeks who can afford to buy. So who are these
people that beaver away so productively in the
black economy? According to the government,
which has included its output in official GDP
figures since 2006 to make the nation’s budget
deficit seem smaller, they are prostitutes, money
launderers and cigarette smugglers. Estate agents
won’t care one jot.
78 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
idProperty | ANTENNAE
ID PR Antennae.indd 78 5/27/10 2:22:20 PM
GREAT BRITAIN?
So is Britain a safe haven or a banana republic?
Britain’s budget deficit is heading towards a huge
12 per cent, just one percentage point short of
the Greek total, and this scares Britain’s bankers,
currency traders and tabloid newspaper editors
– but has not fazed the Greeks. The number
of Greeks buying central London homes has
doubled over the past 12 months, estate agency
Knight Frank says, with six per cent of buyers
of London homes valued at Dhs11 million-plus
being Greeks trying to get their money out of
their own imploding economy. Germans, Italians
and others from the troubled Euro-zone are
piling in behind them, while wealthy Chinese
families are making their presence felt at London
estate agents for the first time. They are buying
homes so their children can be educated in
British schools and “enjoy a better life”, estate
agents reveal. Somebody should tell London’s
sterling-bashing currency traders.
Singapore is booming and hopefully things are not be as bad as they seem in Greece, Spain, Britain,
Thailand and the United States. But who cares, June is all about the World Cup and that means South
African homes are in vogue. TEXT: RICHARD WARREN
VOLCANIC DOWNTURN
That pesky Icelandic volcano, the name of which
nobody can pronounce, is not only bad for
airlines, travel agents and their customers, but
also for estate agents selling European holiday
homes and investment properties. ProVenture
Property, a company that sources German
homes for investors had sales delayed when
buyers could not fly over from Britain because
of the air flight ban. It expects property viewings
by overseas investors to drop by one-third until
the volcanic eruptions are safely over. Still, it has
found a way around the problem of completing
sales, by carrying out formalities at German
embassies in investors’ home countries. Other
estate agents think sales to overseas buyers could
be down by half until everyone is sure they can
fly normally. European train passenger numbers
are booming, so homes close to train stations
may become popular with buyers now.
BACK TO BLACK
In theory, Greek property prices ought to
plummet thanks to austerity measures introduced
to erode the country’s debt mountain – higher
taxes, lower wages, smaller pensions and fewer
jobs mean less money to spend on flats and
houses. But this is Greece, so things are not
that simple. The Greek government says the
“black economy” accounts for one quarter of the
nation’s GDP. You can be sure people employed
in this sector pay little tax and rarely cut their
own wages, so their money could support
property prices. Indeed, they may be the only
Greeks who can afford to buy. So who are these
people that beaver away so productively in the
black economy? According to the government,
which has included its output in official GDP
figures since 2006 to make the nation’s budget
deficit seem smaller, they are prostitutes, money
launderers and cigarette smugglers. Estate agents
won’t care one jot.
78 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
idProperty | ANTENNAE
ID PR Antennae.indd 78 5/27/10 2:22:20 PM
THAI-ED MARKET
Thailand’s political turmoil is bad for its property
market. Estate agency Savills says its property
management arm is receiving requests from
residents to beef up security at premises in
central Bangkok, where anti-government
protesters, the Red Shirts, have fought running
battles with the police in recent months. The
estate agency says images of political street
violence broadcast around the world have put
off potential holiday home buyers from overseas
from coming to popular resorts like Pattaya,
Phuket and Koh Samui. Savills insists the political
situation is better than the media makes out,
that violence is localised and it says the market
for homes bought by Thais is “performing
exceedingly well”. However, it concedes hotel
occupancy levels are likely to fall. This means
anybody looking to let out their holiday home
will find tenants tougher to find. Oh well, at least
there will be more room on the beach.
THE SAGE HAS SPOKEN
US mortgage company Fannie Mae may want
an additional Dhs30.8 billion government loan
as its losses grow and home loans continue to
go bad, but some powerful figures consider the
worst is over for the housing market. The Sage
of Omaha, Warren Buffett, the world’s most
successful investor, says that “within a year or so,
residential housing problems should be largely
behind us”. Others feel the same. Hedge fund
manager John Paulson says property prices in
battered California will begin to rise this year,
setting the stage for a wider recovery. Following
the Buffet dictum that investors ought to get
greedy when others are fearful, the dearth
of homebuyers in the market means bargains
are available for those who look hard enough.
Property marketers Experience International
says homes can be bought for up to 72 per cent
below recent selling prices in Florida.
SCORING A HOME
It’s June, it’s the World Cup, it’s the month all eyes (except the eyes of those who hate football) are
focused on South Africa. Making the most of this opportunity, estate agents there are urging us to spare
a glance for all the juicy properties they have for sale. The boldest among them tell us hosting the World
Cup will give a boost to South African property values, partly because of the euphoria surrounding it, but
mainly because of new infrastructure, such as better roads, that have been created to make it possible.
The hype probably exceeds the reality, but South Africa does have some lovely homes in stunning
locations. Aylesford International is marketing homes on the Erinvale Golf Estate in the Cape village of
Somerset West. Prices start from Dhs10.6 million for a four-bedroom home, which has views of the sea,
vineyards and mountains. The 150-hectare estate also has an 18-hole golf course.
SMALL IS SUCCESSFUL
Spain’s big property developers are struggling,
with the country’s biggest holiday home
developer, Polaris World, narrowly avoiding
bankruptcy in the spring while other large
developers have already gone bust. However,
some smaller developers remain in the game.
In Andalucia, Surmarly Promociones, a developer
that specialises in small renovation projects
and building individual villas, has completed its
conversion of a 19
th
century “senorial home,”
Palacete Thebussem, into four two-bedroom
apartments and one three-bedroom townhouse,
in the “oldest town of Europe” Medina Sidonia,
near Cadiz. Prices for the apartments start at
Dhs1.4 million. Prices started to rise month-on-
month at the start of this year, but the number of
sales completed is half what it was at the height
of the market in 2007 and purchases made by
foreigners are at their lowest levels for a decade.
Deutsche Bank considers a sustained recovery
unlikely until 2012 at the earliest.
LION CITY ROARS
Singapore’s residential property prices will be
22 per cent higher by the end of 2010, bringing
them back to 2008 peak levels, according to
pundits. Values were already up 7.4 per cent
in the last quarter of 2009 before this year’s
surge began. Government attempts to cool
the market and a doubling in the number
of uncompleted homes offered for sale by
developers are doing little to dampen price rises.
Fuelling all this euphoria in the property market
is a mind-boggling expansion of the island state’s
economy – up 32 per cent in the first quarter
of 2010 – its biggest leap since the government
started recording quarterly figures 35 years ago.
Few people fear a bubble is forming, because
Singapore’s resurgence is supported by rapid
growth elsewhere in East Asia. The West must
just look on and weep.
79 June 2010
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Haute spots
The optimism created by ecologically-conscious
projects continues to light up the region as completions
and handovers continue apace. TEXT: LYNN DAVIS
HIGH HOSPITALITY
A new stratum in hospitality has been
achieved with the opening of the world’s
first Armani Hotel in Burj Khalifa, the world’s
tallest building. Giorgio Armani himself
attended the gala grand opening, which,
like his fashion collections, emanated the
timeless, refined elegance of the hotel.
Characterised by high technology and
furnishings by Armani/Casa the 160-room
hotel will be joined by 10 additional Armani
hotels and resorts, which are scheduled to
open over the next decade.
Armani Hotel Dubai.
ID Portfolio.indd 80 5/27/10 5:40:06 PM
80 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
Haute spots
The optimism created by ecologically-conscious
projects continues to light up the region as completions
and handovers continue apace. TEXT: LYNN DAVIS
HIGH HOSPITALITY
A new stratum in hospitality has been
achieved with the opening of the world’s
first Armani Hotel in Burj Khalifa, the world’s
tallest building. Giorgio Armani himself
attended the gala grand opening, which,
like his fashion collections, emanated the
timeless, refined elegance of the hotel.
Characterised by high technology and
furnishings by Armani/Casa the 160-room
hotel will be joined by 10 additional Armani
hotels and resorts, which are scheduled to
open over the next decade.
Armani Hotel Dubai.
ID Portfolio.indd 80 5/27/10 5:40:06 PM
81 June 2010
CMYK
PORTFOLI O | idProperty
we anticipate similar success for these modern spacious apartments when they
are available for leasing in mid 2011.”
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY
Godwin Austen Johnson (GAJ), which is celebrating its 21
st
anniversary in the
region this year, is opening a new office in Abu Dhabi, its third in the region.
The award-winning UK architectural and design practice has been responsible
for such projects as Zayed Cricket Stadium in Abu Dhabi, the Bab Al Shams
Resort and the Dubai Creek Golf Club.
FRENCH FLAIR
The WA International-designed Sofitel, located at Jumeirah Beach Residences,
officially launched recently. With additional properties under construction in
Doha, Bahrain and Abu Dhabi, the company’s French flair merges with local
design elements to create unique, site-specific environments. The Dubai
property incorporates important water elements as well as accenting the brilliant
stars of the desert night sky.
NEW HOMES
Handover of the 555 apartments in the MAG 218 residential tower in Dubai
Marina has commenced, with more than 70 per cent of the owners moving in
themselves. The apartments have appreciated at least 10 per cent a year since
the project’s inception in 2006, despite falling prices elsewhere, according to the
Dubai-based Moafaq Al Gaddah Group of Companies (the MAG Group), which
was established in 1978 and now has 18 offices in eight countries throughout
Europe, the Middle East and Asia.
NURTURING ENVIRONMENT
At the opening of the expansive Mediterranean Garden, the first of six
uniquely themed garden venues in the multi-billion-dirham Al Barari
residential project, Mohammed bin Zaal, CEO of Al Barari, said: “The gardens
that form such an integral part of our development encourage outdoor living
and enable Al Barari residents to enjoy unique landscapes within their own
residential environment.” With more than 80 per cent of the development
reserved for botanical gardens, lakes, waterways and other open spaces,
the property, whose name means “the wilderness,” has one of the lowest
densities of any development in the region and is the region’s first luxury
eco-conscious development designed according to water management and
sustainability principles.
More than a business proposition, Al Barari is the passion of the Zaals, an
Emirati family that has combined its talents in the creation of the only private,
family owned residential development in Dubai. Zaal bin Zaal is the visionary
and chairman, his wife Lesley is the interior designer, his son Mohammed is the
CEO and his daughter Kamelia is the Landscape Director.
Handovers have begun with a number of families already in residence, while the
remaining villas of the 275-strong first phase are on track for a 2010 completion.
LIFE’S A BEACH
Leading US architects JZMK and AN Design have designed the Saadiyat Beach
Apartments to be built near the Cultural District and Saadiyat Beach Marina
Village, which is due to open in the latter part of 2012. Lee Tabler, CEO of the
Tourism Development & Investment Company (TDIC), the master developer
of cultural, residential and tourism destinations in Abu Dhabi, commented:
“Following the success of the sale of phase one of Saadiyat Beach Villas last year,
Clockwise from above: Al Barari; Mohammed Bin Zaal; Kamelia Zaal.
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idProperty | PORTFOLI O
STAR-CROSSED
The St Regis Abu Dhabi, the fifth of the Starwood brand’s projects under
development in the Middle East (along with Doha, Bahrain, Dubai and Saadiyat
Island) will be located on the top of The Corniche Nation Towers, a mixed-use
development by the waterfront in downtown Abu Dhabi. Starwood Hotels
and Resorts Worldwide currently operates more than 45 hotels throughout the
Middle East with more than 20 projects in development.
Also scheduled to debut in the UAE capital is another of the Starwood
brands. The design-led W Abu Dhabi will be located on the waterfront of
Al Bateen Wharf. “Abu Dhabi is an important market for Starwood as we
continue a strong growth pace in this booming, vibrant capital of the UAE,”
said Roeland Vos, president of Starwood Hotels & Resorts, Europe, Africa and
Middle East.
ECO-SEEKERS
The first GCC project by Sparch Designs, Rihan Heights, a 250,000 square
metre luxury residential development, is on track for completion in the first
quarter of 2011. Solar gain is reduced in the environmentally friendly design by
wrapping the residential towers with horizontal fixed brise soleils, which add
shade and provide architectural interest to the facades. Sky garden pods and a
serpentine swimming pool add refreshing touches.
SHOPPER’S HAVEN
With between 16,000 and 20,000 new hotel rooms entering the Dubai market
by the end of the year, and even more available on line when Abu Dhabi and
other emirates are included, the challenge to attract more visitors to the UAE
becomes all the more evident. One major draw is the country’s reputation
as a retail destination. The UAE is ranked second, behind the UK and ahead
of the USA, in the availability of international brands, with London being the
first-place city and Dubai ranking next, above Paris and New York, according
to CB Richard Ellis’ How Global is the Business of Retail? 2010 report.
Among the new offerings for shoppers and tourists is the renowned Italian
café Brunetti, which is considered one of the most popular restaurants in
Melbourne, Australia, known for its gelateria, cioccolateria, pasticceria and more,
opened in Dubai Mall.
ID
Clockwise from top: Exterior and interior of Rihan Gardens; Nation Towers;
Fabio Angele, owner, with barista at Italian café Brunetti.
ID Portfolio.indd 82 5/27/10 5:40:17 PM
82 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
idProperty | PORTFOLI O
STAR-CROSSED
The St Regis Abu Dhabi, the fifth of the Starwood brand’s projects under
development in the Middle East (along with Doha, Bahrain, Dubai and Saadiyat
Island) will be located on the top of The Corniche Nation Towers, a mixed-use
development by the waterfront in downtown Abu Dhabi. Starwood Hotels
and Resorts Worldwide currently operates more than 45 hotels throughout the
Middle East with more than 20 projects in development.
Also scheduled to debut in the UAE capital is another of the Starwood
brands. The design-led W Abu Dhabi will be located on the waterfront of
Al Bateen Wharf. “Abu Dhabi is an important market for Starwood as we
continue a strong growth pace in this booming, vibrant capital of the UAE,”
said Roeland Vos, president of Starwood Hotels & Resorts, Europe, Africa and
Middle East.
ECO-SEEKERS
The first GCC project by Sparch Designs, Rihan Heights, a 250,000 square
metre luxury residential development, is on track for completion in the first
quarter of 2011. Solar gain is reduced in the environmentally friendly design by
wrapping the residential towers with horizontal fixed brise soleils, which add
shade and provide architectural interest to the facades. Sky garden pods and a
serpentine swimming pool add refreshing touches.
SHOPPER’S HAVEN
With between 16,000 and 20,000 new hotel rooms entering the Dubai market
by the end of the year, and even more available on line when Abu Dhabi and
other emirates are included, the challenge to attract more visitors to the UAE
becomes all the more evident. One major draw is the country’s reputation
as a retail destination. The UAE is ranked second, behind the UK and ahead
of the USA, in the availability of international brands, with London being the
first-place city and Dubai ranking next, above Paris and New York, according
to CB Richard Ellis’ How Global is the Business of Retail? 2010 report.
Among the new offerings for shoppers and tourists is the renowned Italian
café Brunetti, which is considered one of the most popular restaurants in
Melbourne, Australia, known for its gelateria, cioccolateria, pasticceria and more,
opened in Dubai Mall.
ID
Clockwise from top: Exterior and interior of Rihan Gardens; Nation Towers;
Fabio Angele, owner, with barista at Italian café Brunetti.
ID Portfolio.indd 82 5/27/10 5:40:17 PM
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The Question Company id.pdf 5/26/10 3:20:47 PM
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Bosphorus Terrace Suite, Radisson Blu.
Awesome Ottomans
With a long history of innovation and a well-deserved pride in
its rich history, today’s Turkish designers have created a new
strand of contemporary hotel design. TEXT: DOROTHY WALDMAN
Istanbul.indd 84 5/27/10 4:52:43 PM
84 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
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Bosphorus Terrace Suite, Radisson Blu.
Awesome Ottomans
With a long history of innovation and a well-deserved pride in
its rich history, today’s Turkish designers have created a new
strand of contemporary hotel design. TEXT: DOROTHY WALDMAN
Istanbul.indd 84 5/27/10 4:52:43 PM
85
CMYK
June 2010
CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
From the days of Sinan, a famous Ottoman architect who designed a
number of grand buildings 500 years ago, to the award-winning Turkish
architects of today, Istanbul has been an eclectic blend of the cutting-edge fused
with tradition.
Europe’s first W Hotel, a US import that is part of the Starwood family, is an
excellent example of how different centuries and cultures can merge to make a
21
st
century statement. Originally built in the 1870s as living quarters for officers
of the Dolmabahce Palace, the Akaretler Row Houses in the Besiktas section
of the city had fallen into disrepair. “We started with trying to figure out how to
marry an American with an Ottoman,” says Mahmut Anlar, the hotel’s designer.
“Our expressions were Ottoman and we combined it with the contemporary.”
Keeping only the façade, the inside was recreated into a jewellery box of
a bygone era. The black Marmora marble floors of the entrance lead to the
reception desk, whose concept was based on the ornate back of a ladies’ silver
hand mirror. Crystals backlit with colourful LED lighting reference displays of
precious gems at Topkapi Palace, with an emerald-green cut glass tree stretching
across the ceiling.
Passing through billowing, transparent silver curtains evokes the sensation of
entering an exotic world, a sensation that continues into the corridors of black,
back-lit mirrored glass and squared archways illuminated with Ottoman-inspired
calligraphy, which is lit in fuchsia LEDs on the way to the 134 guest rooms.
Above an open wooden staircase leading to the restaurant level, the ceiling is a
typical Turkish pattern.
Wall panels based on eight traditional patterns, some from the 17
th
century
and some that date back to before the Ottoman Empire, feature on the walls,
while other walls feature contemporary, almost abstract versions of the letter
“W” – an important symbol in the local culture, in addition to being the name
of the hotel. With lighting by Tom Dixon and furniture from Moroso and B & B,
as well as custom-designed pieces such as stools where the seats are set like a
gem in a ring, the result is most definitely very 21
st
century.
Across the Bosphorus, on the quieter Asian side of the city, is the Sumahan,
a boutique hotel that has successfully managed to combine its historic roots
with contemporary aesthetics and, in the process, been named as one of the
world’s best hotels by the editors of Luxury Travel Magazine and won the 2010
Reader’s Award by Condé Nast Johansens and the 2009 Istanbul Tourism
Award – Creative Project.
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DESIGN@LARGE
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This spectacular family heirloom has been given new life as a small, 20-room
hotel. During the transformation of the mid-19
th
century structure, which was
originally built as a distillery, the Turkish-American architect/owners, Mark and
Nedret Butler, mixed different eras and design elements while accentuating the
spectacular views of the Bosphorus from every room.
Stone walls from the original structure, which had been in Nedret’s family
for generations, provide a sense of history and add texture, while the clear
glass elevator and exposed steel structural beams present a contemporary
counterpoint, accented by hot red seating from B & B in the street-level lounge/
reading room. The smooth grey Mamara marble in the traditional hamam on a
lower level features taps by award-winning industrial designer Ross Lovegrove
and relaxing neutrals are injected with cool turquoise in the form of cushions and
the custom-designed place settings in the restaurant on the Bosphorous level.
Everything from the handmade ceramic pieces in the restaurant and lobby to
the bedside tables with a low rim (because Mark frequently knocked his glasses
on the floor during the night) was created with a purpose. Even the shower
amenities are in custom-designed packaging printed with a mini English-Turkish
dictionary aimed at teaching basic words in a rather non-traditional way.
Near the Bosphorus Bridge linking the continents of Europe and Asia, on the
European side, in the trendy Ortaköy section of the city, is the Radisson Blu
Bosphorus Hotel. Though often considered a business hotel, it is located just
metres from the some of Istabul’s hottest nightspots, such as Zuma and
Clockwise from above left: Lounge and hamam at the Sumahan hotel;
cabanas for individual rooms at the W Hotel.
the über chic Angelique, which was recently redesigned by the Wallpaper
award-winning duo Seyhan Ozdemir and Sefer Caglar, otherwise known
as Autoban, who have gained recognition for creating awareness of great
contemporary Turkish design.
Included in their vast portfolio is the design of the Vakko luxury department
stores, a brand encompassing fashion, interior design and fine chocolate, further
expounding today’s Turkish design ethos – a blend of the contemporary with
a sprinkling of Ottoman inspiration. An outstanding example of this style is
the Vakko Suite of the hotel, a comfortable, contemporary interpretation of
traditional Turkish design. Decorated by interior designer and Ottoman art
expert Serdar Gulgun, it features fabrics and designs custom tailored by the
renowned Vakko, creating a timeless, yet regal experience.
Interior architect Sinan Kafadar, the designer of the hotel’s interior, injected
unexpected dashes of colour, such as the glowing yellow in the entrance,
vibrant accents like the lime green chairs and mirrored panels that reflect the
honeyed woods on the floors and walls of even the standard rooms, providing
a fresh, very contemporary yet elegant aesthetic. Celebrating the local affinity
for enjoying the outdoors, the StarBoard Terrace offers waterside dining
beneath a flowing white canopy, where the predominate design feature is the
ever-changing view of boats and ferries.
Istanbul offers a plethora of choices that reflect and interpret its four millenia
of history in a thoroughly modern way.
ID
Istanbul.indd 86 5/27/10 4:53:10 PM
86 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
DESI GN@LARGE
CMYK CMYK
This spectacular family heirloom has been given new life as a small, 20-room
hotel. During the transformation of the mid-19
th
century structure, which was
originally built as a distillery, the Turkish-American architect/owners, Mark and
Nedret Butler, mixed different eras and design elements while accentuating the
spectacular views of the Bosphorus from every room.
Stone walls from the original structure, which had been in Nedret’s family
for generations, provide a sense of history and add texture, while the clear
glass elevator and exposed steel structural beams present a contemporary
counterpoint, accented by hot red seating from B & B in the street-level lounge/
reading room. The smooth grey Mamara marble in the traditional hamam on a
lower level features taps by award-winning industrial designer Ross Lovegrove
and relaxing neutrals are injected with cool turquoise in the form of cushions and
the custom-designed place settings in the restaurant on the Bosphorous level.
Everything from the handmade ceramic pieces in the restaurant and lobby to
the bedside tables with a low rim (because Mark frequently knocked his glasses
on the floor during the night) was created with a purpose. Even the shower
amenities are in custom-designed packaging printed with a mini English-Turkish
dictionary aimed at teaching basic words in a rather non-traditional way.
Near the Bosphorus Bridge linking the continents of Europe and Asia, on the
European side, in the trendy Ortaköy section of the city, is the Radisson Blu
Bosphorus Hotel. Though often considered a business hotel, it is located just
metres from the some of Istabul’s hottest nightspots, such as Zuma and
Clockwise from above left: Lounge and hamam at the Sumahan hotel;
cabanas for individual rooms at the W Hotel.
the über chic Angelique, which was recently redesigned by the Wallpaper
award-winning duo Seyhan Ozdemir and Sefer Caglar, otherwise known
as Autoban, who have gained recognition for creating awareness of great
contemporary Turkish design.
Included in their vast portfolio is the design of the Vakko luxury department
stores, a brand encompassing fashion, interior design and fine chocolate, further
expounding today’s Turkish design ethos – a blend of the contemporary with
a sprinkling of Ottoman inspiration. An outstanding example of this style is
the Vakko Suite of the hotel, a comfortable, contemporary interpretation of
traditional Turkish design. Decorated by interior designer and Ottoman art
expert Serdar Gulgun, it features fabrics and designs custom tailored by the
renowned Vakko, creating a timeless, yet regal experience.
Interior architect Sinan Kafadar, the designer of the hotel’s interior, injected
unexpected dashes of colour, such as the glowing yellow in the entrance,
vibrant accents like the lime green chairs and mirrored panels that reflect the
honeyed woods on the floors and walls of even the standard rooms, providing
a fresh, very contemporary yet elegant aesthetic. Celebrating the local affinity
for enjoying the outdoors, the StarBoard Terrace offers waterside dining
beneath a flowing white canopy, where the predominate design feature is the
ever-changing view of boats and ferries.
Istanbul offers a plethora of choices that reflect and interpret its four millenia
of history in a thoroughly modern way.
ID
Istanbul.indd 86 5/27/10 4:53:10 PM
87 June 2010
Trend-setting design by
identity
®
;<J@>E<M<EKALE</0#)'('
Join identity at Crate and Barrel for two festive design events filled with inspiring ideas for adding a fresh dash of excitement
to your home. Attend one or both events to increase your chances of winning a Dhs5,000 Crate and Barrel voucher to be
awarded each evening.
In addition, every id reader will receive a fabulous design discount to use during the event. For your personal invitation,
please go to: winwithmotivate.com/crateandbarrel
Crate and Barrel
Mall of the Emirates
June 8, 2010
19:00 – 21:00
Crate and Barrel
Mirdif City Centre
June 9, 2010
19:00 – 21:00
ID C&B Event.indd 87 5/27/10 2:25:01 PM
88 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ANTENNAE
7
6
5
4
8
1
3
2
1. ADDIS ABABA
GREEN FOR GO
The British Council, the UK’s leading institution
for cultural relations, has recently moved into
new offices in the Ethiopian capital which
showcase a commitment to environmental
design. The 550 square metre resource centre
is naturally ventilated using wind-catchers set into
the roof structure and the mass of the building’s
envelope, while the way the windows have
been positioned in the façade minimises the solar
heat gain and the amount of energy required
to heat and cool the building. Sun pipes have
been installed in the roof, bringing natural light to
the heart of the centre and saving the need for
electrical lighting for most of the day.
2. KAOHSIUNG
CULTURAL COMPLEX
Mecanoo’s Wei-Wu-Ying Centre for the Arts has
broken ground in this southern Taiwanese city.
The new cultural complex will be the largest
in Asia at 141,000 square metres, housing a
2,000-seat concert hall, 2,250-seat opera house,
a playhouse capable of accommodating an
audience of 1,250 as well as a recital hall, public
library and studios for music and dance.
A huge roof provides shade and protection from
Taiwan’s tropical climate and forms an informal
public space where city residents can stroll,
practise Tai Chi, meditate or relax, while a park
features light slopes, valleys and water pools
creating intimate public spaces. It is due to open
in 2013.
3. LAUSANNE
TIME IS RIGHT
The awarding of the Pritzker Prize to Kazuyo
Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, who together
founded Tokyo-based architectural company
SANAA, has focused even more attention
on their most recently completed work, the
Dhs364 million Rolex Learning Centre. It houses
the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and is
essentially one continuous structure spread over
a site of 88,000 square metres. The building
is rectangular in plan, but appears to be more
organic in shape because of the way that its roof
and floor undulate gently, always in parallel. The
main library contains 500,000 printed works
while there is also a 600-seat amphitheatre.
Sparch’s spectacular Shanghai International Cruise Terminal, a new cultural complex for the Southern
Taiwanese city of Kaohsiung and Pritzker Prize-winning SANAA’s acclaimed Rolex Learning Centre in
Lausanne share the spotlight in this month’s global architectural journey. TEXT: STEVE HILL
ID Antennae.indd 88 5/27/10 2:26:32 PM
88 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ANTENNAE
7
6
5
4
8
1
3
2
1. ADDIS ABABA
GREEN FOR GO
The British Council, the UK’s leading institution
for cultural relations, has recently moved into
new offices in the Ethiopian capital which
showcase a commitment to environmental
design. The 550 square metre resource centre
is naturally ventilated using wind-catchers set into
the roof structure and the mass of the building’s
envelope, while the way the windows have
been positioned in the façade minimises the solar
heat gain and the amount of energy required
to heat and cool the building. Sun pipes have
been installed in the roof, bringing natural light to
the heart of the centre and saving the need for
electrical lighting for most of the day.
2. KAOHSIUNG
CULTURAL COMPLEX
Mecanoo’s Wei-Wu-Ying Centre for the Arts has
broken ground in this southern Taiwanese city.
The new cultural complex will be the largest
in Asia at 141,000 square metres, housing a
2,000-seat concert hall, 2,250-seat opera house,
a playhouse capable of accommodating an
audience of 1,250 as well as a recital hall, public
library and studios for music and dance.
A huge roof provides shade and protection from
Taiwan’s tropical climate and forms an informal
public space where city residents can stroll,
practise Tai Chi, meditate or relax, while a park
features light slopes, valleys and water pools
creating intimate public spaces. It is due to open
in 2013.
3. LAUSANNE
TIME IS RIGHT
The awarding of the Pritzker Prize to Kazuyo
Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, who together
founded Tokyo-based architectural company
SANAA, has focused even more attention
on their most recently completed work, the
Dhs364 million Rolex Learning Centre. It houses
the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and is
essentially one continuous structure spread over
a site of 88,000 square metres. The building
is rectangular in plan, but appears to be more
organic in shape because of the way that its roof
and floor undulate gently, always in parallel. The
main library contains 500,000 printed works
while there is also a 600-seat amphitheatre.
Sparch’s spectacular Shanghai International Cruise Terminal, a new cultural complex for the Southern
Taiwanese city of Kaohsiung and Pritzker Prize-winning SANAA’s acclaimed Rolex Learning Centre in
Lausanne share the spotlight in this month’s global architectural journey. TEXT: STEVE HILL
ID Antennae.indd 88 5/27/10 2:26:32 PM
89
CMYK
June 2010
5. LONDON
CREATIVE SOLUTION
Studio Seilern was forced to think in an
extremely creative manner when devising
the best way to proceed with this mixed use
development in fashionable Mayfair. A relatively
small street frontage exists with the majority of
land situated on an inner site with no natural light
at ground or lower levels. The response was to
place a garden on the complete first floor and
to divide the complex into two volumes, with
apartment balconies and windows being covered
in vegetation which will eventually cover the
glass-fronted apartments. Building work is due
to begin in November and be completed in
May 2012.
4. SHANGHAI
GOING UNDERGROUND
English architectural company Sparch master-planned the site for Shanghai’s new International Cruise
Terminal. The 800 metre riverfront site recently became a new gateway to the city and, when fully
complete, will deal with an expected passenger flow of more than 1.5 million people per year. The
project covers a total area of 260,000 square metres and features six low-rise buildings with 50 per cent
of the development below ground. The focal point is the Shanghai Chandelier and its four architectural
‘eggs’ – each weighing 750 tonnes – while sustainable features include an innovative river water cooling
system which, in tandem with photovoltaic membranes on the roof, will reduce energy consumption.
7. SYDNEY
NEW TECHNOLOGY
Denton Corker Marshall has won a two-
stage international competition to design the
Broadway Building for the Faculty of Engineering
and Information Technology, which will form the
gateway to a revitalised University of Technology
Sydney city campus. Enveloping the building
are four tilted and skewed plates which form a
series of triangular corner openings extending
to ground level and marking the building’s
entrances. Screens of aluminium sheets are
perforated with binary code digits and this
shading will help secure a 10-15 per cent
operational energy saving. Concealed within are
12 floor levels above ground, with another four
levels below, for research laboratories, lecture
theatres and offices.
6. QUEBEC
CASCADING GALLERIES
Due to be completed in the autumn of 2013
is an expansion of the Musée national des
beaux-arts du Québec. OMA won an
international competition for a new 12,000
square metre structure linked underground
with the museum’s three existing buildings. It
features a cascade of three stacked galleries
of decreasing size, capable of housing
contemporary exhibitions (1,500 square metres),
the permanent contemporary collection (950
square metres) plus design and Inuit Galleries
(550 square metres). The new galleries ascend
from a park towards the city, forming a dramatic
cantilever towards a 14 metre-high grand hall,
welcoming the public into the new building.
8. TAMPA
BLANK CANVAS
San Francisco architect Stanley Saitowitz has
designed the new Tampa Museum of Art, which
recently opened to critical praise. The 6,100
square metre building features a shimmering
pierced aluminium exterior and state-of-the-art
gallery spaces with innovative translucent ceilings
and polished concrete floors. Seven expansive
interior galleries, one exterior sculpture gallery,
and educational classrooms equipped with the
latest technology offer visitors a wide variety of
visual art experiences. The south facade features
1,100 square metres of LED lights, enabling it to
become a blank canvas for public art installations
by digital light artist Leo Villareal of New York.
IM
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CMYK
Fun, funky and fantastic
Everything from African tales, honeybees and even deep-sea fish
are among the quirky sources of inspiration for designers to create
new products and improve existing models. TEXT: ANNA HANSEN
Like a little girl’s twirly dress, the Skirt lamp by
Axo is inspired by fashion and the shape of
a full skirt. Made of a single layer in a vast
selection of colours or with a black
net outer skirt, almost like a reverse
petticoat, the lamp projects a light
on dressing.
DRESSING UP
ID Forum.indd 90 5/27/10 4:44:11 PM
90 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
Fun, funky and fantastic
Everything from African tales, honeybees and even deep-sea fish
are among the quirky sources of inspiration for designers to create
new products and improve existing models. TEXT: ANNA HANSEN
Like a little girl’s twirly dress, the Skirt lamp by
Axo is inspired by fashion and the shape of
a full skirt. Made of a single layer in a vast
selection of colours or with a black
net outer skirt, almost like a reverse
petticoat, the lamp projects a light
on dressing.
DRESSING UP
ID Forum.indd 90 5/27/10 4:44:11 PM
91 June 2010
CMYK
FORUM
FAST FORWARD
The red dot Award for Product Design for 2010 was recently presented to
Puma for three of its innovative PowerCat football products: 1.10 football, 1.10
iFG football boot and Italy home shirt for the FIFA games. Springtech foam in the
shark-like gills on the side of the boot is engineered to enhance each kick, while the
bladed studs ensure maneuverability and smooth ground penetration.
FUNKY AND FUN
For something entirely different, Desert River has launched Filini.com, a fresh,
funky design web shop offering the GCC cool, contemporary and sometimes
rather whacky designs. Whether you pine for the illuminated Konkord stool from
the Italian SLIDE Design, eggshell-shaped Blos inflatable seating, a Freek beach
carpet or an Edison grand lamp, the growing selection of European and American
brands will truly stand out from the design crowd.
ORANGE TEA
Blending the tradition of the French tea salon
with today’s aesthetics, Salontea mixes its teas
with herbs and botanicals to create refreshing
brews and then offers them up with a line
of contemporary accessories. The vibrant
Orange Lacquer Tray is sharply square in the
signature colour contrasting with the central
graceful silhouette, which lends a zany note
to grandmother’s cuppa.
CLEAN AIR
Jean-Marie Massaud has expanded his extensive design
portfolio with the addition of the sleek Airwake air purifier for Air
Sur. Known for his clean lines and visual weightlessness, he used
ash wood casing harvested from sustainably managed forests and
finished with soap to avoid chemical varnish. With a depth of only
141 millimetres, it will be available in the UAE at Squisito after its
official launch.
ID Forum.indd 91 5/27/10 4:44:30 PM
92 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
FORUM
Design agenda
Cityscape Saudi Arabia; Jeddah, June 7-9
American Institute of Architects; Miami, June 10-12
Expo World Middle East; Abu Dhabi, June 14-16
Neocon World’s Trade Fair 2010; Chicago, June 14-16
Light & Design Days Conference; Abu Dhabi, June 16-17
Office Furniture Japan 2010; Tokyo, July 7-9
Trendset; Munich, July 10-12
Furnitex 2010; Melbourne, July 15-18
Manchester Furniture Show; Manchester, July 18-21
TAKE OFF
Plane, a new bench by Hector Diego for DeLaOliva of Madrid, Spain,
is an aeronautical-inspired design that elevates laser cut sheet steel to a
more refined level. The soft angular lines curve to create a comfortable
timeless elegance while new technology creates strength and durability.
TIME TO DESIGN
A bookcase by the winners of the 2009 Normann Copenhagen’s new
talent design competition, Wai & Lanzavecchia was shown at Salone de
Mobile in Milan recently. The bookcase from the Spaziale Series, which
also includes a commode and chair, secures books, allowing them to
leave their impressions on the colourful skin, creating interplay between
the structure and content. And whenever the outer skin warrants
freshening or a change, it can be easily washed or replaced. Entries for
the 2010 competition must be in by June 16.
LIGHT IN AFRICA
Inspired by the African children’s tale Kirikou and the Sorceress,
Karaba for Bernardaud, a large votive candle designed by India
Mahdavi is engraved with a relief pattern derived from tribal
themes. The candle glowing inside accentuates the translucency
of the bisque porcelain.
ID Forum.indd 92 5/27/10 4:44:40 PM
92 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK CMYK
FORUM
Design agenda
Cityscape Saudi Arabia; Jeddah, June 7-9
American Institute of Architects; Miami, June 10-12
Expo World Middle East; Abu Dhabi, June 14-16
Neocon World’s Trade Fair 2010; Chicago, June 14-16
Light & Design Days Conference; Abu Dhabi, June 16-17
Office Furniture Japan 2010; Tokyo, July 7-9
Trendset; Munich, July 10-12
Furnitex 2010; Melbourne, July 15-18
Manchester Furniture Show; Manchester, July 18-21
TAKE OFF
Plane, a new bench by Hector Diego for DeLaOliva of Madrid, Spain,
is an aeronautical-inspired design that elevates laser cut sheet steel to a
more refined level. The soft angular lines curve to create a comfortable
timeless elegance while new technology creates strength and durability.
TIME TO DESIGN
A bookcase by the winners of the 2009 Normann Copenhagen’s new
talent design competition, Wai & Lanzavecchia was shown at Salone de
Mobile in Milan recently. The bookcase from the Spaziale Series, which
also includes a commode and chair, secures books, allowing them to
leave their impressions on the colourful skin, creating interplay between
the structure and content. And whenever the outer skin warrants
freshening or a change, it can be easily washed or replaced. Entries for
the 2010 competition must be in by June 16.
LIGHT IN AFRICA
Inspired by the African children’s tale Kirikou and the Sorceress,
Karaba for Bernardaud, a large votive candle designed by India
Mahdavi is engraved with a relief pattern derived from tribal
themes. The candle glowing inside accentuates the translucency
of the bisque porcelain.
ID Forum.indd 92 5/27/10 4:44:40 PM
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id inspirations 2010 june.indd 95 5/27/10 5:30:48 PM
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CMYK
BOOKS
INTERIORS NOW!
ANGELIKA TASCHEN
TASCHEN
DHS163
A collection of intriguing interior
designs from around the world, this
volume offers a peek into the homes
of some of the most renowned
names in the industry. This includes
the editor’s, Angelika Taschen, whose
white Berlin apartment has a
dual-personality – half in the original
1865 style, half filled with straight lines
and cubic built-ins linked by a black
stucco corridor. Proving that size is
not a criterion for good design is the
38 square metre flat of two Belgium
designers, which utilises every
centimetre with multifunctional curved
furniture, lighting and a sense of
humour. Contrasting the old and the
new, and the glossy with the raw, the
home of architect Seyhan Ozdemir
took inspiration from his native
Istanbul, while an architect in Mexico
lives in a ferro-cement house shaped
like a shark. The Milan apartment
of designer Roberto Cavalli, the 26
rooms belonging to architects Doriana
and Massimiliano Fuksas and a former
Berlin air-raid bunker that has been
converted into a light-filled home for
an art collector are also featured in
the book.
CLIMATE DESIGN
PETER BROEGE
ORO EDITIONS
DHS172
Addressing the various aspects of
climate change and the depletion
of non-renewable resources, a panel
of international experts in fields such
as architecture, urban planning,
hydrology and energy discuss the
design issues relating to sustainability.
These involve building design
and orientation, transportation,
urbanisation, carbon emissions,
water and food production, and
maintaining delicate eco-systems.
Recognising that many of our current
problems are the direct result of
actions during the previous century,
the panel agrees that a shift towards
sustainability is needed to influence
the necessary change, hopefully
by allowing these challenges to be
viewed as opportunities to improve
the quality of life. Specific suggestions
are given, such as integrating
agriculture into urban landscapes,
not only for food production but
also because such projects make
residential areas more pleasant
places to live. To implement
change, the interests of consumers,
policy-makers and the private sector
must all be considered.
STORE & RETAIL SPACES
RETAIL DESIGN INSTITUTE
MEDIA GROUP INTERNATIONAL
DHS161
Among the wide variety of winners
of the 2009 Retail Design Institute
and VMSD magazine annual awards
featured here is Kira Plastinina, an
opulent pink store in New York
aimed at teenage girls, the brainchild
of an innovative Russian socialite,
which provokes a completely
different atmosphere from the Brown
University Bookstore in Providence,
Rhode Island, which won for its
effective renovation. The 44 retail
spaces in this book, all beautifully
photographed, span the globe from
Jakarta, Indonesia, where Harvey
Nichols incorporates local artisanship
and motifs, to the Olympic Shop at
The Bay, a store-within-a-store in
Vancouver, Canada, where a flowing
tree made of blue and white stretched
fabric was one of seven original organic
designs incorporated into this space.
Travellers may recognise World Duty
Free at London’s Heathrow Airport
Terminal 5, where colour-changing
chandeliers and stacked video screens
generate buying excitement. The
Middle East is also featured, with the
pilot Mobility store in Jeddah winning
first place in the service retailer sector.
OBJECTIVITY
DAVID USBORNE
THAMES & HUDSON
DHS98
The subtitle of this book: A designer’s
book of curious tools, explains the
premise behind the beautifully
designed objects featured. Dividing
tools by their function – hitting,
cutting, gripping, holding, rubbing,
shielding, moulding, spreading
and testing – the author presents
colourful illustrations and explanations
of everyday as well as specialised
objects from across the continents
and centuries. The earliest tools,
probably rocks, were used for
hitting, while the opposite end of the
spectrum involves testing, whether
it is a plywood apple gauge with
holes of various sizes once used by
markets to ensure standardisation,
or builders’ callipers, which are used
to record measurements. Once
used to ensure beautiful vegetables,
the glass cucumber forcer itself
is a long, elegant cylinder, while
pharmacists pill moulds address not
only how to form the pill, but also
how to release them from the form.
Shields take many forms including a
leather baseball catcher’s mask and a
Chinese bamboo sun hat.
ID

BOOKS AVAILABLE FROM MAJOR UAE BOOKSTORES
B
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identity’s reading list this month focuses on good design, which affects all areas of our lives including the
stores we shop in, the tools we use, the homes we live in and even the future of our planet.
ID Books.indd 96 5/27/10 4:43:18 PM
96 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
BOOKS
INTERIORS NOW!
ANGELIKA TASCHEN
TASCHEN
DHS163
A collection of intriguing interior
designs from around the world, this
volume offers a peek into the homes
of some of the most renowned
names in the industry. This includes
the editor’s, Angelika Taschen, whose
white Berlin apartment has a
dual-personality – half in the original
1865 style, half filled with straight lines
and cubic built-ins linked by a black
stucco corridor. Proving that size is
not a criterion for good design is the
38 square metre flat of two Belgium
designers, which utilises every
centimetre with multifunctional curved
furniture, lighting and a sense of
humour. Contrasting the old and the
new, and the glossy with the raw, the
home of architect Seyhan Ozdemir
took inspiration from his native
Istanbul, while an architect in Mexico
lives in a ferro-cement house shaped
like a shark. The Milan apartment
of designer Roberto Cavalli, the 26
rooms belonging to architects Doriana
and Massimiliano Fuksas and a former
Berlin air-raid bunker that has been
converted into a light-filled home for
an art collector are also featured in
the book.
CLIMATE DESIGN
PETER BROEGE
ORO EDITIONS
DHS172
Addressing the various aspects of
climate change and the depletion
of non-renewable resources, a panel
of international experts in fields such
as architecture, urban planning,
hydrology and energy discuss the
design issues relating to sustainability.
These involve building design
and orientation, transportation,
urbanisation, carbon emissions,
water and food production, and
maintaining delicate eco-systems.
Recognising that many of our current
problems are the direct result of
actions during the previous century,
the panel agrees that a shift towards
sustainability is needed to influence
the necessary change, hopefully
by allowing these challenges to be
viewed as opportunities to improve
the quality of life. Specific suggestions
are given, such as integrating
agriculture into urban landscapes,
not only for food production but
also because such projects make
residential areas more pleasant
places to live. To implement
change, the interests of consumers,
policy-makers and the private sector
must all be considered.
STORE & RETAIL SPACES
RETAIL DESIGN INSTITUTE
MEDIA GROUP INTERNATIONAL
DHS161
Among the wide variety of winners
of the 2009 Retail Design Institute
and VMSD magazine annual awards
featured here is Kira Plastinina, an
opulent pink store in New York
aimed at teenage girls, the brainchild
of an innovative Russian socialite,
which provokes a completely
different atmosphere from the Brown
University Bookstore in Providence,
Rhode Island, which won for its
effective renovation. The 44 retail
spaces in this book, all beautifully
photographed, span the globe from
Jakarta, Indonesia, where Harvey
Nichols incorporates local artisanship
and motifs, to the Olympic Shop at
The Bay, a store-within-a-store in
Vancouver, Canada, where a flowing
tree made of blue and white stretched
fabric was one of seven original organic
designs incorporated into this space.
Travellers may recognise World Duty
Free at London’s Heathrow Airport
Terminal 5, where colour-changing
chandeliers and stacked video screens
generate buying excitement. The
Middle East is also featured, with the
pilot Mobility store in Jeddah winning
first place in the service retailer sector.
OBJECTIVITY
DAVID USBORNE
THAMES & HUDSON
DHS98
The subtitle of this book: A designer’s
book of curious tools, explains the
premise behind the beautifully
designed objects featured. Dividing
tools by their function – hitting,
cutting, gripping, holding, rubbing,
shielding, moulding, spreading
and testing – the author presents
colourful illustrations and explanations
of everyday as well as specialised
objects from across the continents
and centuries. The earliest tools,
probably rocks, were used for
hitting, while the opposite end of the
spectrum involves testing, whether
it is a plywood apple gauge with
holes of various sizes once used by
markets to ensure standardisation,
or builders’ callipers, which are used
to record measurements. Once
used to ensure beautiful vegetables,
the glass cucumber forcer itself
is a long, elegant cylinder, while
pharmacists pill moulds address not
only how to form the pill, but also
how to release them from the form.
Shields take many forms including a
leather baseball catcher’s mask and a
Chinese bamboo sun hat.
ID

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identity’s reading list this month focuses on good design, which affects all areas of our lives including the
stores we shop in, the tools we use, the homes we live in and even the future of our planet.
ID Books.indd 96 5/27/10 4:43:18 PM
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Inspiration takes many shapes and forms, and for Sir Norman Foster and
Richard Rogers – two of Britain’s most celebrated architects – hours spent
playing as children with sets of Meccano proved crucial in deciding their
eventual choice of careers.
Hundreds of engineers and designers around the world also had their
imagination fired as youngsters by a toy that Frank Hornby wanted to
be educational and representative of “engineering in miniature”. The
British inventor was clearly a man of vision because decades later Alex
Issigonis used Meccano to help figure out the transmission design of the
original Mini.
Hornby’s first construction sets appeared in 1901 under the name
Mechanics Made Easy, but six years later the new moniker of Meccano was
adopted, drawn from the phrase “make and know”. In the United States, it
has been sold for almost 100 years under the Erector Set brand name.
CMYK
98 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ICON
98 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
TEXT: STEVE HILL
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Hornby’s invention of re-usable metal strips, plates, angle girders,
wheels, axles and gears, complete with nuts and bolts, very quickly became
hugely successful as children constructed everything from cranes and planes
to ocean liners and trains.
Meccano also soon had its own magazine – a cross-marketing device
that today is taken for granted in any promotional campaign but which at
the time was visionary and innovative.
The parent company went bust in 1964 and fortunes dipped, but
Meccano, now fully owned by a French company, is enjoying something
of a resurgence. Meccano and Erector sets are now sold in more than 80
countries while new ranges – still designed to Hornby’s original Imperial
measurements but now featuring Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technologies – appeal
to modern youngsters while plans were recently announced for the toy to
star in an animated Hollywood 3D movie.
ID
Meccano
Icon.indd 98 5/27/10 2:27:44 PM

Inspiration takes many shapes and forms, and for Sir Norman Foster and
Richard Rogers – two of Britain’s most celebrated architects – hours spent
playing as children with sets of Meccano proved crucial in deciding their
eventual choice of careers.
Hundreds of engineers and designers around the world also had their
imagination fired as youngsters by a toy that Frank Hornby wanted to
be educational and representative of “engineering in miniature”. The
British inventor was clearly a man of vision because decades later Alex
Issigonis used Meccano to help figure out the transmission design of the
original Mini.
Hornby’s first construction sets appeared in 1901 under the name
Mechanics Made Easy, but six years later the new moniker of Meccano was
adopted, drawn from the phrase “make and know”. In the United States, it
has been sold for almost 100 years under the Erector Set brand name.
CMYK
98 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
CMYK
ICON
98 identi ty [i nteri or/desi gn/property]
TEXT: STEVE HILL
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Hornby’s invention of re-usable metal strips, plates, angle girders,
wheels, axles and gears, complete with nuts and bolts, very quickly became
hugely successful as children constructed everything from cranes and planes
to ocean liners and trains.
Meccano also soon had its own magazine – a cross-marketing device
that today is taken for granted in any promotional campaign but which at
the time was visionary and innovative.
The parent company went bust in 1964 and fortunes dipped, but
Meccano, now fully owned by a French company, is enjoying something
of a resurgence. Meccano and Erector sets are now sold in more than 80
countries while new ranges – still designed to Hornby’s original Imperial
measurements but now featuring Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technologies – appeal
to modern youngsters while plans were recently announced for the toy to
star in an animated Hollywood 3D movie.
ID
Meccano
Icon.indd 98 5/27/10 2:27:44 PM

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