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2014 Bored of Studies Trial Examination

Notes & Comments from the Markers


Mathematics Extension 1
Contents
Question 11 ............................................................................................................................................. 2
Question 12 ............................................................................................................................................. 3
Question 13 ............................................................................................................................................. 4
Question 14 ............................................................................................................................................. 5

Question 11
(a)

The majority of candidates correctly multiplied both sides of the inequality by

1 e

x 2

and acquired a factorised expression. In better responses, candidates

recognised that they had obtained a quadratic factor in terms of e x that was
positive definite. Some candidates attempted to solve the quadratic factor and
obtained an incorrect inequality. Many candidates did not check their solution to
ensure it was within the domain of the question.
(b)

The majority of candidates provided the correct solution. Candidates are reminded
that LHopitals rule is not an accepted method for solving limits in HSC
examinations, as it is out of the scope of the syllabus.

(c)

This question was done poorly. Candidates are reminded that in external division
problems, the ratio is negative and that they may also assume the ratio to be in the
form r :1 , not necessarily in the form m : n . In better responses, candidates
correctly obtained expressions for x0 and y0 , then rearranged to find an
expression for the ratio r :1 . In weaker responses, candidates struggled to begin
the question or correctly use the ratio division of a line formula.

(d)

This question was done well. The majority of candidates managed to obtain the
correct asymptote and identified the correct domain and range, and graphed the
given function. In weaker responses, candidates showed working that indicated
some understanding of the features of the graph, but failed to produce a sketch of
the graph.

(e)

(i)

The majority of candidates correctly utilised the given substitution and proceeded
to use the double angle for the cosine function to manipulate the integral.
However, quite a few candidates forgot to convert their primitive function from
being in terms of back to being in terms of x. Candidates are reminded that is it
essential that they always leave their answer in terms of the same variable that is
given in the original integral.

(ii) The majority of candidates who obtained the correct expression for part (i) also
obtained the correct answer here. In weaker responses, candidates incorrectly
manipulated the integral and thus integrated an incorrect expression. A common
error was to forget a minus sign when performing the algebraic manipulation of
the numerator. Candidates who attempted an or otherwise approach were
generally unsuccessful in finding the correct primitive.

Question 12
(a)

(b)

This was generally well done by most candidates. A common error was acquiring
3 2
3
the answer
instead of
.
8
8
(i)

Some candidates used the t-formula to obtain the result. Others decomposed
sin sin
using compound angles and were often successful. Some
cos cos
sin sin

candidates incorrectly expressed tan
as cos cos .
2

(ii) Most candidates used the sine rule to successfully prove the result.
(c)

(i)

A common error was getting the incorrect sign of the square root where
candidates expressed the velocity equation as v 2 kx 1 which does not
satisfy the initial conditions. Candidates who obtained the primitive of 1 kx as

1 kx

2k

rather than x

kx 2
were generally more successful.
2

(ii) This was generally well done by most candidates, particularly those who were
successful in part (i).
(d)

(i)

Some candidates used an appropriate approach to find the area but were unable to
successfully acquire the answer. Few candidates used the fact that PQ was a focal
chord, which led to the result pq 1 , to help obtain the answer solely in terms
of p.

(ii) A common error was to conclude that p2 1 from the inequality

1
1 . Some
p2

responses found that p2 1 and then wrote p 1 or p 1 as the solution.

1
Another common error involved the omission of the factor 1 2 from the
p

chain rule when differentiating the expression for the area.

Question 13
(a)

(b)

(i)

Very few candidates made the connection between the given expression and the
n k
explicit expansion of
. Some candidates provided an invalid argument of
k
the result being true due to the given expression being the product of n consective
integers.

(ii)

Some candidates failed to read the question properly, and instead attempted to
perform induction on m. Of those who performed induction on n, many were
successful in evaluating the base case. During the inductive step, many candidates
expanded mk m ! incorrectly. Few candidates were able to recognise the use of
part (i) to assist in them in the proof for n k 1 .

(i)

This part was generally done well by most candidates.

(ii)

Many candidates were successful in identifying that they were required to solve
the inequality P k P k 1 . Some candidates instead solved P k 1 P k
and whilst this is a valid method, many failed to realise that this leads to the most
likely outcome being the solution for k 1 rather than k.

(iii) Few candidates realised that m 1 being divisible by n implied that equality
occurs in P k P k 1 .
(c)

This question was done poorly by many candidates, who simplified the problem
to a large extent by assuming various properties. For example, a common
assumption was that O is the centre of both circles. Many candidates who
assumed this were able to demonstrate the result very quickly, but were not
awarded any marks. Another common assumption was that AOM is a straight line.
Whilst this is true, very few candidates proved this, which was required to gain
full marks. Many candidates proved the required result without first proving
collinearity of A, O and M.

(d)

Very few candidates attempted this question. Some candidates attempted to


rearrange the given sum, but were generally unsuccessful in identifying a pattern.
n
n
In better responses, candidates realised the significance of the result 2 n
r 0 r
and were generally successful in proving the result.

Question 14
(a)

(b)

This question was generally done poorly. Less successful responses often had 10k
as part of their result without explanation. Few candidates acquired part of the
answer, but were generally unsuccessful in acquiring the rest of the answer.
(i)

Many candidates who acquired the result did not verify that it was a maximum.
Of those who did, many candidates simply used the table of values method and
wrote down plus and minus signs. Candidates are reminded that unless they have
actual values to substitute in or a proper algebraic argument, this is not sufficient
to prove a maximim. Very few candidates used the given condition 0 nt

to

demonstrate that the second derivative is negative.

(c)

(ii)

Candidates who were successful in (i) were almost always successful in acquiring
the result in this part. However, there were many non-attempts from candidates
who had failed to obtain the relevant equations of motion.

(i)

Many candidates attempted to directly solve the differential equation by


integration, which required the use of partial fractions. Almost all candidates who
attempted this method were unsuccessful.

(ii)

This question was generally done well. Some candidates proved the result
successfully by solving the differential equation directly via integration. However,
candidates attempting this method had a significantly increased amount of
working involved compared to those who differentiated the given expression to
show that it satisfies the equation.

(iii) Very few candidates attempted this part. Candidates who did generally abandoned
their attempt when they acquired the expression eat 2ebt 1 .