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Case Map for

Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson


Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
This map was prepared by an editor at HBS Publishing, not by a teaching professor. Faculty at Harvard
Business School was not involved in analyzing the textbook or selecting the cases and articles.
Every case map provides only a partial list of relevant items from HBS Publishing. To explore
alternatives, or to get more information on the cases listed below, visit our web site at
www.hbsp.harvard.edu/educators and use the searching functions.
PART I: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT INPUTS
Chapter 1: Strategic
Management and Strategic
Abstract
Competitiveness
Wal-Mart, 2007
In 2007, Wal-Mart faced challenges to its historically high growth rate.
David B. Yoffie, Michael Slind
Lagging same-store sales and setbacks overseas led the company to
Type: HBS case
consider strategic shifts. Wal-Mart was the world's largest retailer, but
Pub. Date: 03/01/2007
competition had become particularly acute as the company expanded
Product #: 707517
from rural markets, which it had long dominated, into urban and
Length: 12p
suburban areas. Covers developments in Wal-Mart's merchandising
Teaching Note: 707570
strategy and its approach to store formats; its sometimes controversial
human resources practices; its efforts to improve its image through a
public relations campaign; its aggressive, though occasionally
problematic, move into international markets; and its leading
competitors, especially Target. Exhibits provide data (current as of
February 2007) on Wal-Mart's financial performance, its stock-price
performance, its international operations, and its store formats, as well
as on Target's financial performance.
Apple Computer, 2006
Apple has reaped the benefits of its innovative music player, the iPod.
David B. Yoffie, Michael Slind
However, its PC and server business continue to hold small market
Type: HBS case
share relative to the worldwide computer over the past few years. Will
Pub. Date: 04/12/2006
the iPod lure new users to the Mac? Will Apple be able to produce
Product #: 706496
another cutting-edge device quickly?
Length: 32p
Teaching Note: 706513

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Cola Wars Continue: Coke vs.
Pepsi in the Twenty-First
Century
David B. Yoffie, Yusi Wang
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 01/11/2002
Product #: 391179
Length: 24p
Teaching Note: 703403

Chapter 2: The External


Environment: Opportunities,
Threats, Industry Competition
and Competitor Analysis
Note on the Structural Analysis
of Industries
Michael E. Porter
Type: HBS note
Pub. Date: 09/01/1975
Product #: 376054
Length: 19p
Teaching Note: 300019
Edward Jones
Michael E. Porter, Gregory C.
Bond
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 07/20/1999
Product #: 700009
Length: 23p
Teaching Note: 300019

Examines the industry structure and competitive strategy of Coca-cola


and Pepsi over 100 years of rivalry. New challenges of the 21st
century included boosting flagging domestic cola sales and finding
new revenue streams. Both firms also began to modify their bottling,
pricing, and brand strategies. They looked to emerging international
markets to fuel growth and broaden their brand portfolios to include
noncarbonated beverages like tea, juice, sports drinks, and bottled
water. For over a century, Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola had vied for the
"throat share" of the world's beverage market. The most intense
battles of the cola wars were fought over the $60 billion industry in the
United States, where the average American consumes 53 gallons of
carbonated soft drinks (CSD) per year. In a "carefully waged
competitive struggle," from 1975 to 1995 both Coke and Pepsi had
achieved average annual growth of around 10% as both U.S. and
worldwide CSD consumption consistently rose. This cozy situation
was threatened in the late 1990s, however, when U.S. CSD
consumption dropped for two consecutive years and worldwide
shipments slowed for both Coke and Pepsi. The case considers
whether Coke's and Pepsi's era of sustained growth and profitability
was coming to a close or whether this apparent slowdown was just
another blip in the course of a century of enviable performance. A
rewritten version of an earlier case by Michael E. Porter and David B.
Yoffie. Learning Objective: To analyze an industry and its competitor
specifically, Coca-cola and Pepsi during the past 100 years.
Abstract
Provides a framework for the analysis of industry structure. Identifies
the major structural features that influence the profit potential in
industries and some illustrative implications of these for strategy
formulation. Can be used as a reference note for business policy
courses and/or as the background for a lecture on industry analysis.

Edward Jones is a leading, highly profitable retail brokerage firm with


a unique strategy very different from those of its rivals. The case
describes Jones's activities and allows a rich discussion of its
positioning choices, supporting activities, and tradeoffs. Jones must
cope with a rapidly evolving industry, which, at least on the surface, is
a threat to its strategy. Learning Objective: To discuss strategic
positioning and strategy in changing industries.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
The Chinese Fireworks Industry
Paul W. Beamish, Ruihua Jiang
Type: Richard Ivey School of
Business/UWO case
Pub. Date: 01/01/1999
Product #: 99M031
Length: 23p
Teaching Note: 899M31

Edward Jones
Michael E. Porter Gregory C.
Bond
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 07/20/1999
Product #: 700009
Length: 23p
Teaching Note: N/A
The Offshore Drilling Industry
Kenneth S. Corts
Type: HBS note
Pub. Date: 04/28/1999
Product #: 799111
Length: 22p
Teaching Note: 700016

Chapter 3: The Internal


Organization: Resources,
Capabilities, Core
Competencies, and Competitive
Advantages
Southwest Airlines 1993 (A)
James L. Heskett, Roger
Hallowell
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 08/01/1993
Product #: 694023
Length: 29p
Teaching Note: N/A

Illustrates an industry that is experiencing intensifying competition and


regulation. The Chinese fireworks industry thrived after China adopted
the "open door policy" in the late 1970s and grew to make up 90% of
the world's fireworks export sales. However, starting from the mid1990s, safety concerns led governments both in China and abroad to
set up stricter regulations. At the same time, there was rapid growth in
the number of small family-run fireworks workshops, whose relentless
price cutting drove down profit margins. Learning Objective: To
analyze the fireworks an industry, estimate the industry's
attractiveness, and propose possible ways to improve the industry
attractiveness from an individual investor's point of view.
Edward Jones is a leading, highly profitable retail brokerage firm with
a unique strategy very different from those of its rivals. The case
describes Jones's activities and allows a rich discussion of its
positioning choices, supporting activities, and tradeoffs. Jones must
cope with a rapidly evolving industry, which, at least on the surface, is
a threat to its strategy. Learning Objective: To discuss strategic
positioning and strategy in changing industries.
After booming in 1997 and early 1998, the offshore drilling industry
slumps in late 1998 and early 1999. Lower oil prices lead oil
companies to reduce drilling budgets, and rig utilization falls from
essentially 100% to 70% in some markets. Day rates--the prices paid
for a rig's services--fall by as much as 75%. The case illustrates how
supply and demand work together to determine prices and utilization
in the short run, as well as how long-run supply is determined in an
industry where capacity additions take several years. Also describes
the industry's move toward "turnkey" contracts, in which drilling
contractors provide a complete bundle of drilling services, and how
advances in deep-water drilling technology are changing industry
structure. Learning Objective: Illustrates how supply and demand
determine prices and utilization in a fragmented industry.

Abstract

Southwest Airlines, the only major U.S. airline to be profitable in 1992,


makes a decision as to which of two new cities to open, or to add a
new long-haul route. Provides windows into Southwest's strategy,
operations, marketing, and culture. Learning Objective: Illustrates
how an airline can simultaneously be low-cost leader, service leader,
and profit leader.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
GE's Two-Decade
Transformation: Jack Welch's
Leadership
Christopher A. Bartlett
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 4/28/1999
Product #: 399150
Length: 24p
Teaching Note: 300019

Levi's "Personal Pair" Jeans (A)


William Lawler, John K. Shank,
Lawrence Carr
Type: Babson College case
Pub. Date: 04/01/2003
Product #: BAB020
Length: 6p
Teaching Note: 5703496
Robert Mondavi and the Wine
Industry
Michael A. Roberto
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 04/01/2003
Product #: 302102
Length: 32p
Teaching Note: 304047
Polycom, Inc.: Visualizing
Culture
Clayton M. Christensen
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/17/2000
Product #: 601073
Length: 16p
Teaching Note: N/A
Microsoft in 2005
David B. Yoffie, Dharmesh M.
Mehta, Rudina I. Seseri
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/29/2005
Product #: 705505
Length: 29p
Teaching Note: 706467

GE is faced with Jack Welch's impending retirement and whether


anyone can sustain the blistering pace of change and growth
characteristic of the Welch era. After briefly describing GE's heritage
and Welch's transformation of the company's business portfolio of the
1980s, the case chronicles Welch's revitalization initiatives through
the late 1980s and 1990s. It focuses on six of Welch's major change
programs: The "Software" Initiatives, Globalization, Redefining
Leadership, Stretch Objectives, Service Business Development, and
Six Sigma Quality. Learning Objective: To expose students to GE's
revitalization efforts, including corporate strategy development,
transformational change, management and leadership, and corporate
renewal.
DeAs Levi-Strauss implemented its custom-fitted jeans offering, the
traditional value chain for clothing manufacturing and retailing was
transformed. This case allows students to explore the subtleties of this
transformation and the management implications. Learning
Objective: To introduce students to value-chain analysis within the
context of management accounting.

Examines the competitive challenges facing Robert Mondavi as the


wine industry begins to consolidate globally. Mondavi faces
challenges from foreign competitors entering the U.S. market as well
as diversified global alcoholic beverage companies entering the wine
business. Learning Objective: Designed to examine a domestic
firm's competitive strategy in an industry undergoing global
consolidation.
Polycom is a rapidly growing maker of video conferencing and
teleconferencing equipment. Management is attempting to use
"natural work groups" as an organizing mechanism, and to build into
the culture implicit rules that will cause desired behaviors to be selfpolicing. Learning Objective: To explore organizational forms that
might robustly handle continued growth

Focuses on Microsoft's strategy for sustaining competitive advantage


in the global software industry. Also, explores Microsoft's history and
its current position, as it tries to diversify its product and service
revenue streams. Learning Objective: To learn the strategic aspects
of technology, bundling, and sustainability.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)

PART II: STRATEGIC ACTIONS: STRATEGY FORMULATION


Chapter 4: BusinessLevel Strategy
Note on the Structural
Analysis of Industries
Michael E. Porter
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 09/01/1975
Product #: 376054
Length: 19p
Teaching Note: N/A
Customer Profitability
and Lifetime Value
Elie Ofek
Type: HBS note
Pub. Date: 08/07/2002
Product #: 503019
Length: 9p
Teaching Note:
395225
Costco Companies,
Inc.
David E. Bell, Ann
Leamon
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 09/14/1998
Product #: 599041
Length: 21p
Teaching Note:
599088

Abstract
Provides a framework for the analysis of industry structure. Identifies the major
structural features that influence the profit potential in industries and some
illustrative implications of these for strategy formulation. Can be used as a
reference note for business policy courses and/or as the background for a
lecture on industry analysis.

Introduces the central concepts involved in determining customer lifetime value,


with detailed analysis and examples from the realm of direct marketing.
Implications for marketing strategy and customer relationship management are
briefly discussed. Learning Objective: Provides students with a basic
understanding of the analytic tools necessary for calculating customer
acquisition costs and customer lifetime value.

Costco Companies, one of the major players in the wholesale club industry, has
developed a new class of membership that offers discounted services--auto,
health, and home insurance, business credit card processing, real estate
services--in exchange for a higher annual fee ($100 vs. $40). The case poses
two questions: 1) how should the new membership be marketed, to whom, and
how much should be spent on the effort? And 2) what are the potential risks and
benefits for Costco, which generated $22 billion in 1997 selling products in bulk,
in offering services? Which question is emphasized depends on whether the
case is taught in a marketing or a retailing course. Learning Objective: In a
marketing course, the case is used to understand to what extent a retail brand
name can be extended beyond its roots. What is it about a brand that allows it to
be extended? In a retailing course, the case can be used to understand the
economics of the Costco model and see whether services are a viable addition
to a membership-based product retailer.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Husky Injection
Molding Systems
Jan W. Rivkin
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 05/14/1999
Product #: 799157
Length: 23p
Teaching Note:
5700087

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.


Stephen P. Bradley,
Pankaj Ghemawat,
Sharon Foley
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 01/20/1994
Product #: 794024
Length: 22p
Teaching Note:
395225
GE's Imagination
Breakthroughs: The
Evo Project
Christopher A. Bartlett,
Brian J. Hall, Nicole
Bennett
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/19/2007
Product #: 9907048
Length: 24p
Teaching Note:
908413

Husky, a Canadian maker of injection molding systems has established an


enviable position in the market for plastics processing equipment. The company
builds the highest performance systems in the business and charges a hefty
premium for them. Husky is enjoying robust growth and record profits in 1996
when competitors attack its core markets. As financial results deteriorate rapidly,
founder and CEO Robert Schad must decide how to defend Husky's traditional
markets and whether to expand beyond those markets. Learning Objective: 1)
To exemplify a highly focused competitor who earns superior returns by
commanding a price premium; 2) To illustrate how tailoring of and tight fit among
a firm's activities both strengthen its position and influence its assessment of
options; 3) To show how one can analyze buyer value numerically in order to
calculate the premium that a firm can command; 4) To demonstrate the intimate
connection of a firm's strategy to its values, culture, organization, and
leadership; and 5) To discuss repositioning in the face of competitive and
environmental change.
Focuses on the evolution of Wal-Mart's remarkably successful discount
operations and describes the company's more recent attempts to diversify into
other businesses. The company has entered the warehouse club industry with
its Sam's Clubs and the grocery business with its Supercenters, a combination
supermarket and discount store. Wal-Mart experienced a drop in the value of its
stock price in early 1993, which it still has not made up. Wal-Mart has
advantages over its competitors in areas such as distribution, information
technology, and merchandising, to name a few. Learning Objective: To explore
the issue of sustaining competitive advantage. To discuss how sustainable WalMart's advantages, and potential threats to Wal-Mart's continued success.
In September 2003, Jeff Immelt challenged the business leaders at GE to come
up with "Imagination Breakthroughs," innovative new projects that would serve
as the centerpiece of GE's organic growth initiative. Follows the company as
these changes are driven through the business units, focusing on GE
Transportation as it launches a series of groundbreaking, green products--from
the Evolution Locomotive to the Hybrid Locomotive. The growth process
transforms the culture within GE Transportation, leading to a redefinition of the
marketing role, the implementation of a "growth leader" profile and new decisionmaking processes to encourage innovation and risk. Finally, presents a critical
decision point, as Transportation executives must decide whether or not to
support the high-risk Hybrid Locomotive project. Learning Objective: To focus
on growth strategy and the implementation of process changes driven from the
corporate level down to individual business units.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Chapter 5:
Competitive Rivalry
and Competitive
Dynamics
Robert Mondavi:
Competitive Strategy
Michael E. Porter,
Gregory C. Bond
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/22/1999
Product #: 799125
Length: 23p
Teaching Note:
700084
Matching Dell
Jan W. Rivkin, Michael
E. Porter
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/06/1999
Product #: 799158
Length: 31p
Teaching Note:
700084

Eckerd Corp.
Michael E. Porter,
John C. Kelleher
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/10/1999
Product #: 799141
Length: 23p
Teaching Note: N/A
Progressive Corp.
Michael E. Porter,
Nicolaj Siggelkow
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 05/19/1997
Product #: 797109
Length: 25p
Teaching Note: N/A

Abstract
Describes the competitive situation facing Robert Mondavi, the leading premium
California winery. Mondavi has been an industry innovator and has recently
taken steps to become more international. Mondavi has to cope with growing
domestic competition as well as market share growth by wineries from Chile and
Australia. Learning Objective: Designed to explore competitive strategy in an
evolving industry with a special focus on international strategy.

After years of success with its vaunted "Direct Model" for computer
manufacturing, marketing, and distribution, Dell Computer Corp. faces efforts by
competitors to match its strategy. This case describes the evolution of the
personal computer industry, Dell's strategy, and efforts by Compaq, IBM,
Hewlett-Packard, and Gateway 2000 to capture the benefits of Dell's approach.
Students are called on to formulate strategic plans of action for Dell and its
various rivals. Learning Objective: Permits an especially detailed examination
of imitation; illustrates how fit among activities and incompatibilities between
competitive positions can pose particularly high barriers to imitation. To illustrate
competitor analysis, the evolution of industry structure, and relative cost
analysis.
Describes the history and current situation in the retail pharmacy industry,
including competition from new merchants and Internet drugstores. Eckerd, one
of the top four drug chains, must decide how to position itself for the future.
Learning Objective: To support a discussion on the evolution of competition
and competitive dynamics among rivals.

Progressive is a leader in providing nonstandard (high-risk) automobile


insurance to drivers across America, with a long record of extraordinary
profitability. Progressive is facing a challenge in its segment from Allstate, the
industry leader, and must decide how to respond. Learning Objective:
Designed to explore competitive positioning, using the concepts of activities,
activity systems, and tradeoffs between positions.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
British Satellite
Broadcasting vs. Sky
Television
Pankaj Ghemawat
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 09/01/1993
Product #: 794031
Length: 17p
Teaching Note:
5799078
Cola Wars Continue:
Coke and Pepsi in
2006
David B. Yoffie,
Michael Slind
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 05/09/2006
Product #: 706447
Length: 28p
Teaching Note:
5706514

Chapter 6: CorporateLevel Strategy


The Walt Disney Co.:
The Entertainment
King
Michael G. Rukstad,
David J. Collis, Tyrrell
Levine
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 03/09/2001
Product #: 701035
Length: 27p
Teaching Note:
5705495

Describes the rivalry between two competitors who have attempted to become
the dominant force in the emerging British satellite television industry. Can be
used to examine issues of competitive positioning, technology adoption, and
scenario analysis. Helps students make decisions given competitive challenges
and industry uncertainties.

Examines the industry structure and competitive strategy of Coca-Cola and


Pepsi over 100 years of rivalry. New challenges in 2006 include boosting
flagging carbonated soft drink (CSD) sales and finding new revenue streams.
Both firms also began to modify their bottling, pricing, and brand strategies. They
looked to emerging international markets to fuel growth and broaden their
portfolios of alternate beverages like tea, juice, sports drinks, energy drinks, and
bottled water. Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola had vied for the "throat share" of the
world's beverage market. The most intense battles of the cola wars were fought
over the $66 billion CSD industry in the United States, where the average
American consumes 52 gallons of CSD per year. In a "carefully waged
competitive struggle," from 1975 to 1995, both Coke and Pepsi had achieved
average annual growth of around 10%, as both U.S. and worldwide CSD
consumption consistently rose. This cozy situation was threatened in the late
1990s, however, when U.S. CSD consumption declined slightly before reaching
what appeared to be a plateau. Considers whether Coke's and Pepsi's era of
sustained growth and profitability was coming to a close or whether this apparent
slowdown was just another blip in the course of a century of enviable
performance. A rewritten version of an earlier case. Learning Objective: To
analyze an industry and its competitors, specifically, Coca-cola and Pepsi during
the past 100 years.

Abstract
The first ten pages of this case are comprised of the company's history, from
1923 to 2001. The Walt years are described, as is the company's decline after
his death and its resurgence under Eisner. The last five pages are devoted to
Eisner's strategic challenges in 2001: managing synergy, managing the brand,
and managing creativity. Students are asked to think about the keys to Disney's
mid-1980s turnaround, about the proper boundaries of the firm, and about what
Disney's strategy should be beyond 2001.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Intel Corp.--1997-2000
Ramon CasadesusMasanell, Michael G.
Rukstad
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 11/01/2001
Product #: 702420
Length: 11p
Teaching Note:
5705495
Newell Rubbermaid:
Strategy in Transition
Cynthia A.
Montgomery, Rhonda
Kaufman, Carole A.
Winkler
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 03/23/2004
Product #: 704491
Length: 34p
Teaching Note: N/A

Hermes Systems
Michael L. Tushman,
Daniel B. Radov
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 12/20/1999
Product #: 400056
Length: 17p
Teaching Note: N/A
Viacom, Inc.: Carpe
Diem
Joseph L. Bower,
Thomas R. Eisenmann
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 02/26/1996
Product #: 396250
Length: 30p
Teaching Note: N/A

Describes Intel's diversification strategy initiated in 1998 by CEO Craig Barrett.


Initially, Barrett's strategy worked well, as market value reached $510 billion in
September 2000. Just three months later, however, investor pessimism over a
slowing economy and recent problems at Intel resulted in market valuation
plummeting by more than 55%. Learning Objective: To analyze the reasons for
the drop in market value.

Describes the transformation of a company's corporate-level strategy. Begins by


laying out the strategy that brought the Newell Co. stunning success for nearly
three decades. The highly integrated, internally consistent strategy was tailored
for manufacturing and selling a particular genre of products to a particular kind of
customer. In the mid-1990s, Newell encountered some shifts in its competitive
environment and subtle erosion in profits. In 1999, the $3.5 billion company paid
a 49% premium to acquire the $2.5 billion Rubbermaid Co., in part for its product
development process and strong consumer brands. After the acquisition, the
profits of the combined enterprise deteriorated at an accelerated rate and the
CEO was replaced. In less than a year, a fundamentally new strategy was
announced, profits improved, and both Wall Street and major retailers were
encouraged. Some setbacks followed, leading to reduced earnings and revised
expectations. Exposes students to the pains and struggles of changing a deeply
ingrained and long-lived strategy. Also forces them to confront the question of
whether the new strategy is the right one and the markers one should seek to
prove the case.
Learning Objective: To illustrate the analytical and organizational challenges of
transforming a long-lived, corporate-level strategy.
Covers the history of Hermes, a large telecommunications and network
equipment company, as it grows from a single business firm to a diversified firm
from 1980-95. Examines the use of entrepreneurial subsidiaries for product
development and fast growth. Other issues include the challenges of managing
ambidextrous organizations and the problems a CEO faces in keeping control of
fast growing divisions. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

Viacom has reached a powerful position in the global entertainment industry


through skillful and very bold acquisitions. Now its further expansion is
challenged by the moves of Rupert Murdock's News Corp. Different businesses
within Viacom have contradictory positions on how to deal with major
opportunities and how Viacom top management should manage the decisionmaking process. Learning Objective: To help students understand the costs
and benefits of alternate approaches to strategic management in the tumultuous
global entertainment industry.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Chapter 7: Acquisition
and Restructuring
Strategies
House of Tata:
Acquiring a Global
Footprint
Tarun Khanna, Krishna
G. Palepu, Richard J.
Bullock
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 05/21/2008
Product #: 708446
Length: 33p
Teaching Note: N/A
Kraft General Foods:
The Merger (A)
David J. Collis, Toby
Stuart
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 05/31/1995
Product #: 391139
Length: 22p
Teaching Note: 391279
Strategic
Countermoves: CocaCola vs. Pepsi
Anita McGahan, Julia
Kou
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/19/1995
Product #: 795133
Length: 6p
Teaching Note: 799076
WPP--Integrating Icons
to Leverage
Knowledge
Joseph L. Bower
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 02/09/1996
Product #: 396249
Length: 23p
Teaching Note: 398169
Chapter 8:
International Strategy

Abstract
Chronicles the globalization of the Tata Group, one of India's largest business
groups. Since 2000, many Tata Group operating companies have aggressively
built international businesses, particularly through overseas acquisitions. After
describing the globalization rationales and approaches of the major Tata Group
companies, the case asks students to consider whether Tata Motors should
pursue the acquisition of the Jaguar and Land Rover brands owned by USbased Ford Motor company. Learning Objective: To consider the use of
acquisitions as a tool for emerging market-based companies to globalize their
businesses.

Describes Philip Morris' acquisitions of General Foods in 1985 and Kraft, Inc. in
1989, focusing on the integration of Kraft and General Foods that forms a $30
billion food subsidiary. Details the steps required to merge these two large
companies, emphasizing the managerial, organizational, administrative, and
strategic issues engendered by the integration of Kraft and General Foods.

Describes strategic acquisitions by Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola in the late


1980s. The context allows students to evaluate the implications of the mergers
for the competitiveness of the industry.

Martin Sorrell has used WPP to acquire a large portfolio of marketing service
firms including J. Walter Thompson and Ogilvy & Mather. How did he make this
minnow-swallows-many-whales trick work, and can he make the whole into
something bigger than the parts?

Abstract

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Tricon Restaurants
International:
Globalization Reexamined
Pankaj Ghemawat,
Tarun Khanna
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 09/12/1999
Product #: 700030
Length: 24p
Teaching Note: N/A
The De-Globalization
of Marks & Spencer in
2001, An Update
Robert A. Burgelman,
Philip Meza
Type: Stanford
University case
Pub. Date: 06/19/2001
Product #: SM87
Length: 11p
Teaching Note: N/A
The Globalization of
CEMEX
Pankaj Ghemawat,
Jamie L. Matthews
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 09/08/2000
Product #: 701017
Length: 22p
Teaching Note: 907410
Philips versus
Matsushita: A New
Century, a New Round
Christopher A. Bartlett
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 09/21/2001
Product #: 302049
Length: 20p
Teaching Note: 302063

Describes a leading fast food operator/franchiser trying to consolidate and


standardize its operations worldwide and focus its efforts on a few key markets.
Lends itself to a discussion of how global the fast food industry is, whether
Tricon's new international strategy is consistent with industry structure and its
competitive position, and, if so, which country markets to focus on.

The venerable British retailer Marks & Spencer suffered a series of setbacks in
the late 1990s. The company's performance, which had been solid for decades,
quickly deteriorated, forcing the rapid turnover of chief executives and many
restructurings. Perhaps the largest change the retailer made was the
abandonment of its global expansion plans, withdrawing from continental
Europe and trying to sell off assets in the United States, including the wellknown clothiers Brooks Brothers. This case examines the changes Marks &
Spencer made between 1998 and 2001, as the company tries to shore up its
ailing core business, U.K. retail, while deciding on an appropriate global
strategy.
CEMEX is a Mexican company that has become a major international
competitor in cement while maintaining a higher level of profitability than other,
longer-established majors. CEMEX's superior profitability supplies a basis for
discussing the sources of superior performance in a global context. In addition,
the wide array of benefits that CEMEX derives from its operations in different
countries broadens conventional notions of why firms globalize.

Describes the development of the international strategies and organizations of


two major competitors in the global consumer electronics industry. The history
of both companies is traced and their changing strategic postures and
organizational capabilities are documented. Particular attention is given to the
major restructuring each company is forced to undertake as its competitive
position is eroded. A rewritten version of an earlier case. Learning Objective:
Illustrates how global competitiveness depends on organizational capability,
the difficulty of overcoming deeply embedded administrative heritage, and the
limitations of both classic "multinational" and "global" models.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Acer, Inc.: Taiwan's
Rampaging Dragon
Christopher A. Bartlett,
Anthony St. George
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 12/30/1998
Product #: 399010
Length: 20p
Teaching Note: 399147

Chapter 9: Cooperative
Strategy
Swissairs Alliances
(A)
David B. Yoffie, Eric J.
Vayle
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 06/28/1994
Product #: 794152
Length: 20p
Teaching Note: 794012
Daewoos
Globalization: UzDaewoo Auto Project
John A. Quelch, Chanhi
Park
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/20/1997
Product #: 598065
Length: 35p
Teaching Note: N/A
Pandesic: The
Challenges of a New
Business Venture (A)
Joseph L. Bower, Clark
Gilbert
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 03/08/1999
Product #: 399129
Length: 18p
Teaching Note: N/A

Describes the strategic, organizational, and management changes that led


Acer from its 1976 startup to become the world's second-largest computer
manufacturer. Outlines the birth of the company, the painful
"professionalization" of its management, the plunge into losses, and the
transformation under founder Stan Shih's radical "fast food" business concept
and his "client server" organization model, which are put to the test when a
young product manager in Acer America develops a radically new multimedia
home PC with global potential. Shih must decide whether to give an
inexperienced manager in a loss-generating subsidiary the green light.
Learning Objective: To explore the links between global strategy and
structure, to evaluate leadership of transformational change, and to examine
development of global competitive advantage.
Abstract
Swissair established two alliance networks in 1989 in order to improve its
competitiveness. In order to evaluate the benefits of the alliances, Swissair's
history, products, and cost structure are described, as is the international airline
industry and the major players. The challenge for Swissair is how to gain
further economies of scale in an increasingly competitive global marketplace. A
rewritten version of an earlier case.

The top management at Daewoo is reviewing its close relationship with the
Uzbekistan government, focusing especially on the performance of Uz-Daewoo
Auto, a strategic alliance to manufacture and market passenger cars. Learning
Objective: Shows the challenges of organizing strategic alliances in
transitional economies.

Pandesic is a joint venture of SAP and Intel designed to develop turnkey


information architectures for market space companies. The case explores the
problems of developing the joint venture from the perspective of its general
management. Describes the development of its strategy and organization. At
the end of the case, performance is poor and Harold Hughes (Intel) steps in
from his position as part-time chairman to run Pandesic. Learning Objective:
To understand how the strategic and structural context of a joint venture can
lead to an inadequate strategy and poor pattern of resource commitments.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Corning, Inc.: A
Network of Alliances
Christopher A. Bartlett,
Ashish Nanda
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 11/16/1990
Product #: 391102
Length: 26p
Teaching Note: 394018
Starbucks and
Conservation
International
James E. Austin, Cate
Reavis
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/02/2002
Product #: 303055
Length: 28p
Teaching Note: 304100

Describes James Houghton's actions in assuming the role of CEO at Corning in


the midst of a recession. Not only must he turn around operating performance,
he must also revitalize a demoralized organization and set a new, clear
strategic direction. In doing so, the case focuses on the changing role of
alliances and partnerships in Corning operations. Increasingly, they are moving
from a peripheral role in providing market access interchange for technology, to
a more central role at the core of Corning's business. The strategic and
organizational challenges this presents are highlighted through some specific
decision issues facing Houghton.
Starbucks, the world's leading specialty coffee company, developed a strategic
alliance with Conservation International, a major international environmental
nonprofit organization. The purpose of the alliance was to promote coffeegrowing practices of small farms that would protect endangered habitats. The
collaboration emerged from the company's corporate social responsibility
policies and its coffee procurement strategy. The initial project was in the
southern Mexican state of Chiapas and resulted in the incorporation of shadegrown coffee into the Starbucks product line, providing an attractive alternative
market for the farmer cooperatives at a time when coffee producers were in
economic crisis due to plummeting world prices. Simultaneously, the company
had to deal with growing pressures from nonprofit organizations in the Fair
Trade movement, demanding higher prices for farmers. Starbucks was
reviewing the future of its alliance with Conservation International and its new
coffee procurement guidelines aimed at promoting environmentally, socially,
and economically sustainable coffee production. The nature of the industry puts
the case in the global context from both the supply and demand sides.
Learning Objective: To examine the corporate social responsibility strategy of
a company as an integral part of its business strategy and the critical factors in
managing a company's interface with nonprofit organizations and vice versa.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)

PART III: STRATEGIC ACTIONS: STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION


Chapter 10: Corporate
Governance
Royal Dutch/Shell in
Transition (A)
Lynn Sharp Paine
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/04/1999
Product #: 300039
Length: 31p
Teaching Note: N/A

Al Dunlap at Sunbeam
Brian J. Hall, Rakesh Khurana,
Carleen Madigan
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 04/12/1999
Product #: 899218
Length: 21p
Teaching Note: N/A

Abstract
After the Brent Spar episode and the 1995 events in Nigeria, Shell
undertakes an intensive review of its values and business principles. At
the same time, it conducts the largest multi-stakeholder consultation in
its history in an effort to better understand society's evolving
expectations for companies like Shell. Based on its findings, the
company launches an effort to change its culture and embed in the
organization a revised set of business principles. The company is
considering whether as part of the transformation effort to begin public
reporting on its environmental and social as well as its financial
performance. The issue is sharpened when Shell receives a challenge
from a small group of shareholders in the form of an unusual (for a
British company) shareholder resolution. Learning Objective: Allows
students to explore society's changing expectations for reporting the
non-financial performance of these companies.
Al Dunlap was one of the best-known corporate turnaround artists of the
1990s. In 1996, he was hired at Sunbeam to effect a restructuring, but
was fired almost two years later when the company's financial
performance and stock price began to decline. Many of the
controversies that had surrounded him at his previous job, Scott Paper,
followed him to Sunbeam: his rejection of the multiple stakeholder view
of corporate governance, his aggressive managerial style, his shaky
relations with the media, and his high level of pay. The case describes
Dunlap's compensation package at Sunbeam and addresses the issue
of how U.S. companies compensate "superstar" CEO's. Learning
Objective: To discuss the debate about multiple stakeholders versus
shareholder primacy; to analyze the incentives and compensation
packages of highly sought-after CEOs, the amount and form of their pay
packages (cash, bonus, options, etc.), and stock price as a measure of
performance.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Attention Shoppers:
Executive Compensation at
Kroger, Safeway, Costco,
and Whole Foods
David F. Larcker, Brian Tayan
Type: Stanford University case
Pub. Date: 02/15/2008
Product #: CG13
Length: 27p
Teaching Note: N/A

Retail grocery sales represent a significant portion of the U.S. economy.


The industry was highly competitive, with companies operating on low
gross and net margins. As a result, grocery stores were generally under
significant pressure to reduce their operating costs in order to maintain
profitability. For the last several decades, the grocery industry grew
roughly in line with gross domestic product and was considered a
mature industry. In order for companies to succeed, they needed to find
effective strategies to steal customers from competitors. Many sought to
differentiate themselves through store format, store location, product
mix, ancillary services, or quality of customer service. Strategies,
however, could easily be imitated by competitors, putting grocery store
chains under constant pressure to innovate and remain efficient. In
general, growth also required the expansion into new store locations.
Companies that failed to grow often went bankrupt or were acquired.
This case explores executive compensation at four retail grocery stores:
Safeway, Kroger, Costco, and Whole Foods. Consideration is given to
each company's strategy and market position and corporate governance
structure. Readers of the case are asked to evaluate in a critical manner
the appropriateness of each company's compensation strategy and
compensation levels, given company performance. Learning Objective:
To understand in detail the components of executive compensation
programs and to learn to evaluate which policies, structures and pay
levels are appropriate, given company performance.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Fogdog
John W. Glynn Jr., Christopher
S. Flanagan
Type: Stanford University case
Pub. Date: 08/29/2001
Product #: E100
Length: 21p
Teaching Note: N/A

Chapter 11: Organizational


Structure and Controls
Kenan Systems
Joseph L. Bower, James B.
Weber, Sonja E. Hout
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 02/15/2001
Product #: 301101
Length: 15p
Teaching Note: N/A
Polycom, Inc.: Visualizing
Culture
Clayton M. Christensen
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/17/2000
Product #: 601073
Length: 16p
Teaching Note: N/A

This case examines the growth and development of Fogdog, an online


sporting goods retailer, from its founding through multiple rounds of
venture capital financing to an IPO and, ultimately, to its sale to Global
Sports--one of its publicly traded competitors. The Fogdog story is set in
the late 1990s, when the Internet economy was virtually exploding with
new opportunities. Built to capitalize on the new Internet medium,
Fogdog faced a number of issues specific to the unique economic
climate surrounding the company at the time. However, the company
also faced a number of timeless issues that many emerging companies
experience, such as board composition and development,
communication between a company and its board, and the respective
positions and responsibilities of both management and a company's
investors when tough company decisions have to be made. Woven
throughout the case are additional themes of hiring management, raising
capital, and forming strategic alliances. It ends with the "forced" sale of
Fogdog by the company's board at a time when the near-term outlook
for Internet-related companies was uncertain. This sale took place
despite management's stated desire to continue running the company.
Learning Objective: Focuses on the relationship between a company
and its board of directors through different stages of the corporate life
cycle. Students are able to put themselves in the shoes of several
Fogdog stakeholders. Students consider many issues, including Who is
in control of the company at any given time? Who is represented on the
company's board of directors? What is the best way for communication
to take place between and among the board and senior management
members? And What other outside responsibilities do directors and
other senior management team members have?
Abstract
Kenan Sahin has built a very successful company using a unique
business model and a unique organization and culture. Success has
brought important risks, but logical options such as sale, partnering, or
going public threaten the culture and hence the business. Learning
Objective: Uses a very powerful business problem to motivate a deep
examination of a counterintuitive organization and culture.

Polycom is a rapidly growing maker of video conferencing and


teleconferencing equipment. Management is attempting to use "natural
work groups" as an organizing mechanism, and to build into the culture
implicit rules that will cause desired behaviors to be self-policing.
Learning Objective: To explore organizational forms that might robustly
handle continued growth

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Novartis Pharma: The
Business Unit Model
Srikant M. Datar, Carin-Isabel
Knoop, Cate Reavis
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 01/23/2001
Product #: 101030
Length: 21p
Teaching Note: N/A

USA TODAY: Pursuing the


Network Strategy (A)
Michael L. Tushman, Michael J.
Roberts, David Kiron
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 07/11/2001
Product #: 402010
Length: 18p
Teaching Note: 802229

Polycom, Inc.: Visualizing


Culture
Clayton M. Christensen
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/17/2001
Product #: 601073
Length: 16p
Teaching Note: N/A
Chapter 12: Strategic
Leadership
Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc.
John P. Kotter, John M.
Stengrevics
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 01/19/1981
Product #: 481126
Length: 13p
Teaching Note: N/A

In June 2000, Novartis reorganized its pharmaceutical business to form


global business units in oncology, transplantation, ophthalmology, and
mature products. The remaining primary care products continued to be
managed within global functions (e.g., R&D and marketing). The new
organization created a matrix structure and new roles and
responsibilities for heads of business functions, CEOs of new business
units, and country managers operating in over 100 countries. Learning
Objective: To explore the reasons for Novartis's reorganizing into a new
matrix structure, the tensions and challenges the new structure creates,
and the culture and accountability needed to make the new structure
work.
Describes the evolution of USA TODAY Online, the electronic version of
the newspaper, within the organizational structure of the newspaper.
Describes the tensions and issues that develop and the pressure from
the Online division to be spun off. At the same time, CEO Tom Curley
sees a greater strategic need for integration. Poses the question of what
degree or type of strategic integration is required, what degree of
organizational integration this implies, and how it can be achieved.
Learning Objective: To expose students to difficult issues surrounding
integration when two organizational units are different and explores the
challenges of building an "ambidextrous" organization that is an
organization that executes the existing business well and innovates at
the same time.
Polycom is a rapidly growing maker of video conferencing and
teleconferencing equipment. Management is attempting to use "natural
work groups" as an organizing mechanism, and to build into the culture
implicit rules that will cause desired behaviors to be self-policing.
Learning Objective: To explore organizational forms that might robustly
handle continued growth.

Abstract
Introduces the student to Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc., its business, its
strategy, and its organization. Provides the necessary background for
understanding the contributions of Mary Kay Ash, the company's
founder and chairman.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Bill Gates and the
Management of Microsoft
Philip M. Rosenzweig
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/10/1991
Product #: 392019
Length: 19p
Teaching Note: 394028
GE's Two-Decade
Transformation: Jack
Welch's Leadership
Christopher A. Bartlett
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 04/28/1999
Product #: 399150
Length: 24p
Teaching Note: 300019

Meg Whitman at eBay, Inc.


(A)
Linda A. Hill, Maria T. Farkas
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 11/17/2000
Product #: 401024
Length: 32p
Teaching Note: N/A
Chapter 13: Strategic
Entrepreneurship
Enspire Learning
Roger Hallowell, Bjorn Billhardt,
Frank Andrasco, Hans ten Cate
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 04/28/1999
Product #: 802001
Length: 23p
Teaching Note: 5802153

In July 1991, Microsoft has achieved record growth and profitability in


the PC software industry. The case focuses on Microsoft's founder and
CEO, Bill Gates, and his top management team, as they seek to retain
the innovation and spirit of a small company in a rapidly growing and
changing environment. Specific issues include the management of
organizational complexity, cultural change, CEO and COO interaction,
compensation, and leadership.
GE is faced with Jack Welch's impending retirement and whether
anyone can sustain the blistering pace of change and growth
characteristic of the Welch era. After briefly describing GE's heritage and
Welch's transformation of the company's business portfolio of the 1980s,
the case chronicles Welch's revitalization initiatives through the late
1980s and 1990s. It focuses on six of Welch's major change programs:
The "Software" Initiatives, Globalization, Redefining Leadership, Stretch
Objectives, Service Business Development, and Six Sigma Quality.
Learning Objective: To expose students to GE's revitalization efforts,
including corporate strategy development, transformational change,
management and leadership, and corporate renewal.
Meg Whitman takes over as CEO of eBay from the founder. She must
figure out how to lead the company through a stage of phenomenal
growth without compromising eBay's unique external customer culture
and internal culture--its key success factors. A rewritten version of an
earlier case. Learning Objective: Leadership, managing change,
managing growth, and organizational culture.

Abstract
An MBA student founds an e-education business and must decide which
customers to target and which products/services to produce.
Learning Objective: Examines the online education marketplace and
encourages students to develop action plans to succeed in it. Designed
to place the student in a situation he or she can empathize with and in
which he or she can make recommendations that will create alignment
among targeted customers, customer value propositions, and service
delivery systems. Also illustrates the importance of a simple and intuitive
customer interface for an Internet-based service and the approach
successful firms have adopted to deliver such an interface.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Zipcar
Myra M. Hart, Wendy Carter
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 10/01/2001
Product #: 802085
Length: 17p
Teaching Note: N/A

OXO International
H. Kent Bowen, Marilyn E.
Matis, Sylvie Ryckebusch
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 01/13/1997
Product #: 697007
Length: 19p
Teaching Note: 601161

Iggy's Bread of the World


Alexis Gendron, Kathleen
McGinn
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 11/13/2000
Product #: 801282
Length: 14p
Teaching Note: 801283

Provides a detailed description of the processes and tasks associated


with creating a new venture in an emerging industry (subscription carsharing for urban dwellers). Chronicles the entrepreneur's concept
development, industry analysis, market research, identity definition, and
brand building. Also provides background on writing the business plan,
creating a budget and building financials, developing a management
team, creating business partnerships, and financing the businesses.
Learning Objective: Raises several issues including how to manage
the "chicken and the egg" process of building and testing the concept,
getting resources, and engaging customers when starting a new
venture. Provides examples of "bootstrapping" and creative fundraising
and concludes with the question of how to grow the business
strategically.
OXO, a kitchen tools and gadgets company, was started by a
businessman who had 30 years of experience in the house wares
industry. With his wife and son as founders, he creates a new niche in
the gadgets industry for high-end gourmet stores. The company has
headquarters in New York City, but it outsources product design to a
NYC industrial design firm, manufacturing to Asia, and warehousing to a
site in Connecticut in order to manage start-up costs and growth.
Because of the veteran businessman's reputation and industry sense,
the company grows quickly and in 1992 is sold for $6.2 million to a large
house wares distributor, General House wares. The original owners stay
on as consultants to the parent company and decide to turn over
management of the company to a Harvard MBA who also has extensive
industrial design experience. Innovative product design is the key to
OXO's success, and the company has worked exclusively with one
design firm based on royalties of sold products. The new managing
director initiates new product category programs for the bathroom, the
garden, and home baking. He must coordinate the outsourcing of the
design and development function.
In January 1994, Igor and Ludmilla Ivanovic opened the doors of their
bakery, Iggy's Bread of the World. This case describes their unusual
mission statement and the way in which they try to bring a social
consciousness mentality to a for-profit business. Six years later, they
have grown beyond their physical and administrative capacity. The
Ivanovics must decide how to reconfigure the leadership structure of the
company without losing their control over the fundamentals. Learning
Objective: Explores direct vs. indirect influence, focusing on the
difficulties inherent in learning effective indirect influence tactics where
one is accustomed to using direct influence. Also explores issues in
corporate culture and corporate reorganization.

Case Map for


Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson
Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts and Cases
8th Edition
(Cengage, 2009)
Howard Schultz and
Starbucks Coffee Co.
Nancy F. Koehn
Type: HBS case
Pub. Date: 02/13/2001
Product #: 801361
Length: 43p
Teaching Note: 5801374

Investigates the entrepreneur's strategic initiatives to develop a mass


market for specialty coffee in the 1980s and 1990s. These initiatives
included the development of premium products, rapid expansion of
company-owned stores--each with attractive retail environments and
responsive customer service--and, especially, the creation of a strong
brand. Also devotes considerable attention to how Schultz built the
Starbucks organization, examining the consistent emphasis that he and
his colleagues placed on the company's relationship with its employees,
how Schultz financed Starbucks' early expansion, how vertical
integration ensured quality control, and how--strategically and
operationally--the company managed its phenomenal domestic and
international growth after 1993. Learning Objective: To examine how,
in the midst of widespread socioeconomic change, an entrepreneur and
his company influenced millions of consumers' tastes, behavior, and
daily lives, Also, to understand why Schultz and Starbucks came to lead
the intensely competitive specialty coffee industry, and to analyze the
relationship between entrepreneurial brand creation and institution
building.