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ZXR10 M6000-S

Carrier-Class Router

Configuration Guide (Interface Configuration)


Version: 3.00.10

ZTE CORPORATION
No. 55, Hi-tech Road South, ShenZhen, P.R.China
Postcode: 518057
Tel: +86-755-26771900
Fax: +86-755-26770801
URL: http://support.zte.com.cn
E-mail: support@zte.com.cn

LEGAL INFORMATION
Copyright 2014 ZTE CORPORATION.
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The ultimate right to interpret this product resides in ZTE CORPORATION.

Revision History
Revision No.

Revision Date

Revision Reason

R1.0

2014-10-20

First edition.

Serial Number: SJ-20140731105308-008


Publishing Date: 2014-10-20 (R1.0)

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Contents
About This Manual ......................................................................................... I
Chapter 1 Interface Information Displaying ............................................. 1-1
1.1 Interface Types .................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2 Interface Naming Rule ........................................................................................ 1-1
1.3 Viewing Interface Information .............................................................................. 1-3

Chapter 2 Basic Interface Configuration.................................................. 2-1


2.1 IP Address Configuration .................................................................................... 2-1
2.1.1 IP Address Overview ................................................................................ 2-1
2.1.2 Configuring an IP Address ........................................................................ 2-2
2.1.3 Configuring a Byname and Description for an Interface............................... 2-3
2.1.4 Binding an Interface to a VRF Instance ...................................................... 2-4
2.1.5 IP Address Configuration Example ............................................................ 2-5
2.2 IP MTU Configuration ......................................................................................... 2-7
2.2.1 IP MTU Overview ..................................................................................... 2-7
2.2.2 Configuring an IP MTU ............................................................................. 2-8
2.2.3 IP MTU Configuration Example ................................................................. 2-9
2.3 Interface MTU Configuration ............................................................................. 2-10
2.3.1 Interface MTU Overview ......................................................................... 2-10
2.3.2 Configuring an Interface MTU ................................................................. 2-10
2.3.3 Configuring the MPLS MTU for an Interface ..............................................2-11
2.3.4 Enabling or Disabling an Interface ........................................................... 2-12
2.3.5 Interface MTU Configuration Example ..................................................... 2-13
2.4 MAC Address Configuration.............................................................................. 2-15
2.4.1 MAC Address Overview.......................................................................... 2-15
2.4.2 Configuring a MAC Address.................................................................... 2-15

Chapter 3 Ethernet Interface Configuration............................................. 3-1


3.1 Ethernet Interface Overview................................................................................ 3-1
3.2 Ethernet Interface Configuration .......................................................................... 3-2
3.3 Ethernet Interface Configuration Example ............................................................ 3-4

Chapter 4 VLAN Configuration.................................................................. 4-1


4.1 Basic VLAN Configuration................................................................................... 4-1
4.1.1 VLAN Overview........................................................................................ 4-1
4.1.2 Configuring a VLAN Sub-Interface............................................................. 4-2
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4.1.3 VLAN Sub-Interface Configuration Example............................................... 4-3


4.2 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration ............................................................ 4-5
4.2.1 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Overview ........................................................ 4-5
4.2.2 Configuring a VLAN Range Sub-Interface .................................................. 4-5
4.2.3 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example .................................... 4-6
4.3 VLAN TPID Configuration ................................................................................... 4-8
4.3.1 VLAN TPID Overview ............................................................................... 4-8
4.3.2 Configuring the VLAN TPID ...................................................................... 4-8
4.3.3 VLAN TPID Configuration Example ........................................................... 4-9

Chapter 5 QinQ Configuration................................................................... 5-1


5.1 Basic QinQ Configuration.................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.1 QinQ Sub-Interface Overview.................................................................... 5-1
5.1.2 Configuring a QinQ Sub-Interface.............................................................. 5-1
5.1.3 QinQ Sub-Interface Configuration Example................................................ 5-2
5.2 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration ............................................................. 5-4
5.2.1 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Overview ......................................................... 5-4
5.2.2 Configuring a QinQ Range Sub-Interface ................................................... 5-4
5.2.3 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example ..................................... 5-5

Chapter 6 SuperVLAN Configuration ....................................................... 6-1


6.1 SuperVLAN Overview......................................................................................... 6-1
6.2 Configuring a SuperVLAN .................................................................................. 6-2
6.3 SuperVLAN Configuration Example ..................................................................... 6-4
6.3.1 Integrated SuperVLAN Configuration Example ........................................... 6-4
6.3.2 VLAN-Bound-to-IP-Address Configuration Example.................................... 6-6
6.3.3 IP-MAC Address Binding Example ............................................................ 6-7

Chapter 7 SmartGroup Configuration ...................................................... 7-1


7.1 SmartGroup Overview ........................................................................................ 7-1
7.2 Configuring a SmartGroup .................................................................................. 7-2
7.3 SmartGroup Configuration Example .................................................................... 7-7
7.3.1 SmartGroup 802.3ad Mode Configuration Example .................................... 7-7
7.3.2 SmartGroup On Mode Configuration Example ......................................... 7-10

Chapter 8 POS Interface Configuration.................................................... 8-1


8.1 POS Interface Overview ..................................................................................... 8-1
8.2 Configuring a POS Interface ............................................................................... 8-1
8.3 POS Interface Configuration Example.................................................................. 8-4
8.3.1 POS Interface Basic Configuration Example .............................................. 8-4
8.3.2 POS Interface Delay Down/Up Configuration Example ............................... 8-5
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Chapter 9 CPOS Interface Configuration ................................................. 9-1


9.1 CPOS Overview ................................................................................................. 9-1
9.2 Configuring CPOS Interface Attributes................................................................. 9-3
9.3 Configuring the Attributes of a CPOS Interface Section......................................... 9-4
9.4 Configuring the Lower-Order Channel of the CPOS Interface ................................ 9-5
9.5 Configuring the Higher-Order Channel of the CPOS Interface ............................... 9-7
9.6 Verifying CPOS Configurations............................................................................ 9-8
9.7 CPOS Configuration Example ............................................................................. 9-8

Chapter 10 CE1 Configuration ................................................................ 10-1


10.1 CE1 Overview ................................................................................................ 10-1
10.2 Configuring CE1............................................................................................. 10-2
10.3 CE1 Configuration Example ............................................................................ 10-4

Chapter 11 PPP Configuration ................................................................ 11-1


11.1 PPP Overview .................................................................................................11-1
11.2 Configuring PPP ..............................................................................................11-3
11.3 PPP Configuration Example .............................................................................11-5

Chapter 12 HDLC Configuration ............................................................. 12-1


12.1 HDLC Overview ............................................................................................. 12-1
12.2 Configuring HDLC .......................................................................................... 12-3
12.3 HDLC Configuration Examples ........................................................................ 12-4
12.3.1 Basic HDLC Configuration Example ...................................................... 12-4
12.3.2 POSgroup Configuration Example ......................................................... 12-6

Chapter 13 ICBG Configuration .............................................................. 13-1


13.1 ICBG Overview .............................................................................................. 13-1
13.2 Configuring an ICBG....................................................................................... 13-1
13.3 ICBG Configuration Example .......................................................................... 13-2

Chapter 14 Multilink Configuration......................................................... 14-1


14.1 Multilink Overview .......................................................................................... 14-1
14.2 Configuring Multilink ....................................................................................... 14-2
14.3 Multilink Configuration Example....................................................................... 14-4

Chapter 15 Interface Handover Configuration....................................... 15-1


15.1 LAN/WAN Handover Overview ........................................................................ 15-1
15.2 Configuring Interface Handover ....................................................................... 15-2
15.3 Interface Handover Configuration Example ...................................................... 15-2

Chapter 16 Port Damping Configuration................................................ 16-1


16.1 Port Damping Overview .................................................................................. 16-1
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16.2 Configuring the Port Damping Function............................................................ 16-1


16.3 Port Damping Configuration Example .............................................................. 16-3

Chapter 17 Other Interfaces Configuration............................................ 17-1


17.1 Configuring a Loopback Interface .................................................................... 17-1
17.2 Configuring a NULL Interface .......................................................................... 17-4
17.3 Configuring a ULEI Interface ........................................................................... 17-6
17.4 Configuring a Tunnel ...................................................................................... 17-8

Figures............................................................................................................. I
Glossary ........................................................................................................ III

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About This Manual


Purpose
This manual describes the principle, configuration commands, maintenance commands
and configuration examples about interfaces of ZXR10 M6000-S.

Intended Audience
This manual is intended for the following engineers:
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Network planning engineers


Commissioning engineers
Maintaining engineers

What Is in This Manual


This manual contains the following contents:
Chapter

Summary

1, Interface Information

Describes the commands to view interface information.

Displaying
2, Basic Interface

Describes the configurations on an interface, including an IP

Configuration

address, an IP MTU and an MTU.

3, Ethernet Interface

Describes the commands to configure an Ethernet interface.

Configuration
4, VLAN Configuration

Describes the VLAN principle, configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

5, QinQ Configuration

Describes the QinQ principle, configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

6, SuperVLAN Configuration

Describes the SuperVLAN principle, configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

7, SmartGroup Configuration

Describes the SmartGroup principle, configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

8, POS Interface Configuration

Describes the POS Interface configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

9, CPOS Interface

Describes the CPOS Interface configuration commands, and

Configuration

configuration examples.

10, CE1 Configuration

Describes the CE1 configuration commands, and configuration


examples.

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Chapter

Summary

11, PPP Configuration

Describes the PPP principle, configuration commands, and


configuration example.

12, HDLC Configuration

Describes the HDLC principle, configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

13, ICBG Configuration

Describes the ICBG principle, configuration commands, and


configuration example.

14, Multilink Configuration

Describes the Multilink principle, configuration commands, and


configuration examples.

15, Interface Handover

Describes the LAN/WAN Handover principle, configuration

Configuration

commands, and configuration examples.

16, Port Damping

Describes the Port Damping principle, configuration commands, and

Configuration

configuration examples.

17, Other Interfaces

Describes functions, configuration commands, maintenance

Configuration

commands and configuration examples of the Lookback interface,


the NULL interface, the ULEI interface and the tunnel.

Conventions
This manual uses the following conventions:
Typeface

Meaning

Italics

Variables in commands. It may also refer to other related manuals


and documents.

Bold

Menus, menu options, function names, input fields, option button


names, check boxes, drop-down lists, dialog box names, window
names, parameters, and commands.

Constant width

Text that you type, program codes, filenames, directory names, and
function names.

[]

Optional parameters.

Separates individual parameter in series of parameters.


Caution: indicates a potentially hazardous situation. Failure to
comply can result in moderate injury, equipment damage, or
interruption of minor services.

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Chapter 1

Interface Information
Displaying
Table of Contents
Interface Types...........................................................................................................1-1
Interface Naming Rule................................................................................................1-1
Viewing Interface Information .....................................................................................1-3

1.1 Interface Types


The Interfaces of the ZXR10 M6000-S can be categorized into the following types:
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Physical interfaces
Physical interfaces refer to physically existing interfaces, such as Ethernet interfaces
of the LAN and POS interfaces of the WAN.

Logical interfaces
Logical interfaces refer to virtually existing interfaces that are created in configuration,
such as loopback and SuperVLAN interfaces.

1.2 Interface Naming Rule


Physical Interfaces
The physical interfaces of the ZXR10 M6000-S are named in accordance with the following
rule: <Interface type>_<shelf ID>/<Slot ID>/<Sub-card ID>/<Port ID>.<Sub-interface ID>
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For a description of interface types and their corresponding physical interfaces, refer
to Table 1-1.
Table 1-1 Interface Types and Corresponding Physical Interfaces
Interface Type

Physical Interface

gei

Gigabit Ethernet interface (1000 Mbit/s)

xgei

10 Gigabit Ethernet interface (1000 Mbit/s)

xlgei

40 Gigabit Ethernet interface

cgei

100 Gigabit Ethernet interface

pos

POS interface
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Interface Type

Physical Interface

cpos

CPOS interface

<shelf ID>: ID of a shelf.


<Slot ID>: ID of the physical slot in which the line interface module is installed.
<Sub-card ID>: determined by the subcard installing on the line card.
<Port ID>: ID of the line interface module connector. The value range and assignment
of port IDs vary with the line interface modules.
<Sub-interface ID>: ID of a sub-interface.

Logical Interfaces
The Logical interfaces of the ZXR10 M6000-S are named in accordance with the following
rule: <Interface type> <Port ID>.
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For a description of interface types and their corresponding logical interfaces, refer to
Table 1-2.
Table 1-2 Interface Types and Corresponding Logical Interfaces

Interface Type

Logical Interface

bvi

Bvi interface

cip

CIP interface

loopback

loopback interface

gre_tunnel

GRE_TUNNEL interface

smartgroup

Smartgroup interface

supervlan

SuperVLAN interface

null

Null interface

te_tunnel

TE_TUNNEL interface

mte_tunnel

MTE_TUNNEL interface

multilink

Multilink interface

mgmt_eth

Management interface

qx

Qx logical management interface

ulei

Ulei interface

v6_tunnel

V6_TUNNEL interface

virtual_template

Virtual_template interface

posgroup

Posgroup interface

vbui

Vbui interface

ipsec_tunnel

Ipsec_tunnel interface

<Port ID> refers to the ID of a port.


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Chapter 1 Interface Information Displaying

The following examples show some interface names:

gei0/1/0/1: No.1 port on No.0 Gigabit Ethernet subcard in No.1 slot in No.0 shelf

pos30/4/0/1: No.1 port on No.0 POS card in No.4 slot in No.0 shelf

loopback2: No.2 loopback interface

smartgroup6: No.6 Smartgroup interface

vbui9: No.9 Vbui interface

1.3 Viewing Interface Information


Viewing IP-Related State and Configuration
To view interface IP-related state and configuration information on ZXR10 M6000-S, use
the following commands.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface

This shows the information of all interfaces.

ZXR10#show ip interface [<interface-name>]

This shows the information of a specified


interface.
This shows the information of all interfaces

ZXR10#show ip interface brief

in brief.
ZXR10#show ip interface brief [<interface-name>]

This shows the information of a specified


interface in brief.
This shows the information of physical

ZXR10# show ip interface brief phy

interfaces in brief.
ZXR10# show ip interface brief include <line>

This shows the information of the interface


which interface name matches <line> in
brief.

ZXR10# show ip interface brief exclude <line>

This shows the information of the interface


which interface name does not match
<line> in brief.

Viewing the Description Information of an Interface


To view the description information of an interface, use the following command.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface description [<interface-name>]

This displays the status and description


of an interface.

Viewing the Configuration Information of an Interface


ZXR10 M6000-STo view the configuration information of an interface, use the following
command.
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Command

Function

ZXR10#show running-config-interface <interface-name>[a

This displays the configuration information

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of an interface.

Viewing Other Related Information of an Interface


To view other related information of an interface on ZXR10 M6000-S, use the following
commands.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface [<interface-name>]

This views other related information of


an interface, such as IP address, MAC
address, interface counter, bandwidth,
utilization rate, and MTU.

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Chapter 2

Basic Interface Configuration


Table of Contents
IP Address Configuration............................................................................................2-1
IP MTU Configuration .................................................................................................2-7
Interface MTU Configuration.....................................................................................2-10
MAC Address Configuration .....................................................................................2-15

2.1 IP Address Configuration


2.1.1 IP Address Overview
IP Address Introduction
Internet Protocol (IP) address is an unique 32 bit identifies, which is allocated to the host
or router indirectly connecting to Internet. IP address is graduated. An IP address is
composed of network ID (the first grade) and host ID (the second grade) that is convenient
for people to manage IP addresses. IP address is used to help people do addressing in
Internet.
IP addresses are divided into five classes: A, B and C, D and E, as shown in Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-1 Five Classes of IP Addresses

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Among class A, B and C addresses, some addresses are reserved for private networks.
This is recommended that private network addresses must be used for establishing internal
networks. These addresses refer to:
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Private addresses in class A: 10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255


Private addresses in class B: 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
Private addresses in class C: 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255

IP Subnet Classification
Address division is originally intended to facilitate design of routing protocols, so that
header feature bit of an IP address is enough for judging type of a network. However,
classification method restricts utilization of address space to greatest extent. With rapid
expansion of Internet, problem of insufficient addresses becomes more and more serious.
To utilize IP addresses to greater extent, a network can be divided into multiple subnets.
The "bit borrowing" mode can be used: highest bits of host bits are borrowed to serve
as subnet bits and left host bits still serve as host bits. Thus structure of an IP address
consists of three parts: Network bits, subnet bits and host bits.
Network bits and subnet bits are used to uniquely identify a network. Use subnet mask to
find which part in IP address indicates network bits and subnet bits, which part stands for
host bits. The part with subnet mask of "1" corresponds to network bits and subnet bits of
IP address, while the part with subnet mask of "0" corresponds to host bits.
Division of subnets greatly improves utilization of IP addresses, which relieves the problem
of insufficient IP addresses to some extent.
Regulations on IP addresses are shown below.
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(0.0.0.0) is used when a host without an IP address is started. Reverse Address


Resolution Protocol (RARP), BOOTstrap Protocol (BOOTP) and Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP) are used to obtain IP address. The address serves
as default route in routing table.
255.255.255.255 is a destination address used for broadcast and cannot serve as a
source address.
127. X.X.X is called loopback address. Even if actual IP address of host is unknown,
address still can be used to stand for the "local host".
Only IP addresses with host bits being all "0" indicate network itself. An IP address
with host bits being all "1" serves as broadcast address of the network.
For a legal host IP address, the network part or the host part must not be all "0" or all
"1".

2.1.2 Configuring an IP Address


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the IP address of an
interface.

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Chapter 2 Basic Interface Configuration

Steps
1. Configure an IP address.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#ip address {<ip-

Configures an IP address.

address><net-mask>|<A.B.C.D/X>}[<broadcast-address>|
secondary]

Note:
secondary refers to the secondary address of the interface.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface [ brief [phy |<interface-name

Displays the IP address

>|[{exclude | include}<line>]]]

information of the current


interface.

brief: shows the brief information of the interface.


phy: shows the status of the physical interface.
exclude| include<line>is a regular expression.
End of Steps

2.1.3 Configuring a Byname and Description for an Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a byname and
description for an interface.

Steps
1. Configure a byname and description for an interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface < interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#byname

Configures the byname for the

<WORD>

interface. The byname is a string


consisting of 131 characters.
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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#description

Configures a description for the

<line>

interface. The byname is a string


consisting of 1104 characters.

A byname uniquely identifies an interface. After a byname is configured for an


interface, you can enter interface configuration mode through the byname.
2. Verify the configuration.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface [brief |[|<interface-name >|[{

Displays the byname of the

exclude | include}<line>]]]

specified interface.

ZXR10#show interface description |<interface-name >]

Displays the description of the

specified interface.

brief : displays brief information.


phy : displays the physical state.
exclude | include: regular expressions.
End of Steps

2.1.4 Binding an Interface to a VRF Instance


This procedure describes the commands and steps for binding an interface to a VRF
instance.

Steps
1. Bind an interface to a VRF instance.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#ip vrf <vrf-name>

Creates a VRF instance. The


VRF name is a string consisting
of 132 characters.

ZXR10(config-vrf-vrf-name)#rd {<0-65535>:<0-4

Configures a router distinguisher.

294967295>|A.B.C.D:<0-65535>|<1-65535>.<0-6553
5>:<0-65535>}
3

ZXR10(config-vrf-vrf-name)#address family ipv4

Enables the IPv4 address family


for the VRF instance.

ZXR10(config-vrf-vrf-name)#address family ipv6

Enables the IPv6 address family


for the VRF instance.

ZXR10(config-vrf-vrf-name)#exit

Returns to the global


configuration mode.

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Chapter 2 Basic Interface Configuration

Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface < interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#ip vrf

Binds the interface to the VRF

forwarding <vrf-name>

instance.

2. Verify the configuration.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show running-config-interface <interface-name>

Displays the configuration for the


specified interface.

End of Steps

2.1.5 IP Address Configuration Example


2.1.5.1 Main IP Address Configuration Example
Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 2-2, the interfaces gei-0/1/0/1 of R1 and gei-0/1/0/2 of R2 are
connected directly. It is required that the main IP addresses of R1 and R2 can ping each
other successfully.
Figure 2-2 Main IP Address Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure main IP addresses of R1 and R2.
2. Test the configuration result to confirm that R1 and R2 can ping each other.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#exit

Configuration on R2:
R2(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/2

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R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#exit

Configuration Verification
Verify the configuration on R1:
R1#ping 10.1.1.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 10.1.1.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max = 129/185/200ms.

Verify the configuration on R2:


R2#ping 10.1.1.1
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 10.1.1.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max = 129/185/200ms.

The result suggests that the addresses are configured correctly and R1 and R2 can
communicate normally.

2.1.5.2 Auxiliary IP Address Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 2-3, the interfaces gei-0/1/0/1 of R1 and gei-0/1/0/2 of R2 are
connected directly. It is required that the auxiliary addresses of R1 and R2 can ping each
other successfully.
Figure 2-3 Auxiliary IP Address Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure the auxiliary IP addresses of R1 and R2 (Before the configuration, ensure
that the main IP addresses have been configured for R1 and R2).
2. Test the configuration result to confirm that R1 and R2 can ping each other.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#ip address 11.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 secondary

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R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#exit

Configuration on R2:
R2(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/2
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#ip address 11.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0 secondary
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#exit

Configuration Verification
Verify the configuration on R1:
R1#ping 10.1.1.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 10.1.1.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

Verify the configuration on R2:


R2#ping 10.1.1.1
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 10.1.1.2,timeout is 2 seconds.

!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

The result suggests that the addresses are configured correctly and R1 and R2 can
communicate normally.

2.2 IP MTU Configuration


2.2.1 IP MTU Overview
Both Ethernet and 802.3 have a restriction in the data frame length, which the maximum
values are 1500 bytes and 1476 bytes respectively. This feature is called IP Maximum
Transmission Unit (MTU). Most of networks have their own restriction.
When a data packet is transmitted in IP layer but its length is more than MTU, IP layer
will do fragmentation. That is to say, the data packet is divided into many fragments, and
every fragment is smaller than IP MTU.
IP MTU values are different in the different networks. In order to avoid fragmentation and
improve network performance, use ip mtu command to modify the size of IP MTU.
l

An important problem is that the larger the IP MTU value is set, the more packets are
saved in cache. Thus, the client sends packets with lower rate that causes the time
delay for sending packets is bigger. When a large packet is transmitted from a PC to
another PC, it will pass through many network connections which have smaller IP MTU
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values. In this way, the large packet will be disassembled, sent and reassembled. The
packet transmission time is increased a lot.
However, IP MTU value cannot be set too small because each packet has a 40 bytes
header containing important control information. The header occupies lots of available
bandwidth if IP MTU value is smaller.
For example, a 56k modem can upload data at 4200bytes/second. If IP MTU value is
set to 90 bytes, and the header occupies 40 bytes (44% of the size of the whole data
packet). The utilization rate of bandwidth is very low.

Therefore, it is necessary to configure an appropriate IP MTU value.

2.2.2 Configuring an IP MTU


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the IP MTU of an
interface.

Steps
1. Configure an IP MTU.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)# interface {<interface-name>| byname

Enters the interface whose IP

<byname>}

MTU needs to be configured.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)# ip mtu <bytes>

Configures the IP MTU of the

interface. Unit: Bytes.

For an ATM interface, ATM sub-interface, and atm_dslgroup interface, the range of
the IP MTU is 68 to 9588, and the default value is 1500.
For an Ethernet interface, ulei interface, smartgroup interface, eth_dslgroup interface,
qx interface, and bvi interface, the range of the IP MTU is 68 to 9586, and the
default value is 1500. For an Ethernet sub-interface, ulei sub-interface, smartgroup
sub-interface, eth_dslgroup sub-interface, and supervlan interface, the range of the
IP MTU is 68 to 9578, and the default value is 1500.
For a POS interface, a POS sub-interface, and posgroup interface, the range of the IP
MTU is 68 to 9596, and the default value is 4470.
For a multilink interface, the range of the IP MTU is 68 to 9590, and the default value
is 4470.
For a channelized cpos_e1 interface, channelized cpos_e1 sub-interface, channelized
ce1 interface, dialer interface, and serial interface, the range of the IP MTU is 68 to
9596, and the default value is 1500.
For a loopback interface, virtual_template interface, IPv6 tunnel, TE tunnel, vbui
interface, L3 VLAN interface, vbui sub-interface, and IPsec tunnel, the range of the IP
MTU is 68 to 9600, and the default value is 1500.
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For a GRE tunnel, the range of the IP MTU is from 68 to 9600, and the default value
is 1476.
2. Verify the configurations.
Command

Function

ZXR10# show ip interface <interface-name>

Displays the IP MTU value of the interface.

End of Steps

2.2.3 IP MTU Configuration Example


Configuration Description
This example describes how to control the maximum packet length of forwarding flow by
setting IP MTU value. As shown in Figure 2-4, the interface gei-0/7/1/4 of R1 connects to
gei-0/1/0/1 of R2. The L2 packet can be forwarded properly if the length of packet is less
than the MTU value preset in gei-0/7/1/4. Otherwise, the packet will be discarded directly.
Figure 2-4 MTU Configuration Example Topology

Configuration Flow
1. Enter interface configuration mode.
2. Configure IP MTU value of the interface.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
ZXR10(config)#interface gei-0/7/1/4
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/7/1/4)#ip mtu 1300
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/7/1/4)#no shutdown
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/7/1/4)#exit

Configuration Verification
View the configuration of the IP MTU on gei-0/7/1/4.
ZXR10(config)#show running-config-interface gei-0/7/1/4
!<if-intf>
interface gei-0/7/0/4
no shutdown
ip mtu 1300

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$
!</if-intf>

Here, the IP MTU on gei-0/7/1/4 is modified to 1300 bytes.

2.3 Interface MTU Configuration


2.3.1 Interface MTU Overview
A Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) is the size (byte) of the maximum data packet
passing on a layer of a communication protocol.
Each interface of a router must has the L2 MTU attribute. This attribute affects the packets
sent from the interface during the packet forwarding process. During the packet forwarding
process, the router cannot directly send a packet whose length is more than the L2 MTU of
the interface. The router needs to fragment the packet to make the lengths of the packets
forwarded by the interface not exceed the interface MTU.
When forwarding a tagged packet, the device checks the length of this packet through
MPLS MTU that is similar to L2 MTU in the aspect of working mechanism.
By allowing a user to configure the MTUs related to the specified interface, the device
uses the MTUs on the interface based on the user's requirements. Thus the requirements
on checking the segments and their lengths when the device sends or forwards a local
packet are met. In case of default configuration, the device implements the same functions
according to the default values set by the system.

2.3.2 Configuring an Interface MTU


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the MTU of an interface.

Steps
1. Configure the interface MTU.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>| byname

Enters interface configuration

<byname>}

mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#mtu <bytes>

Configures the MTU value of


the interface.

For an ATM interface, ATM sub-interface, and atm_dslgroup interface, the range of
the MTU is 1512 to 9600, and the default value is 1600.
For an Ethernet interface, ulei interface, smartgroup interface, eth_dslgroup interface,
bvi interface, and qx interface, the range of the MTU is 1514 to 9600, and the default
value is 1600.
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For a pos interface, pos sub-interface, and dialer interface, the range of the MTU is
1504 to 9600, and the default value is 4600.
For a multilink interface, the range of the MTU is 1510 to 9600, and the default value
is 1600.
For an Ethernet sub-interface, ulei sub-interface, smartgroup sub-interface,
eth_dslgroup sub-interface, and supervlan interface, the range of the MTU is 1522 to
9600, and the default value is 1600.
For a channelized ce1 interface, posgroup interface, channelized cpos_e1 interface,
channelized cpos_e1 sub-interface, and serial interface, the range of the MTU is 1504
to 9600, and the default value is 1600.
2. Verify the configurations.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface [<interface-name>]

Displays the basic information of an interface.

<interface-name> is the name of a specified interface. This command displays the


basic information of the specified interface. If this parameter is not entered, the basic
information of all interfaces is displayed.
End of Steps

2.3.3 Configuring the MPLS MTU for an Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the MPLS MTU for an
interface.

Steps
1. Configure the MPLS MTU for an interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>| byname

Enters interface configuration

<byname>}

mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#mpls mtu

Configure the MPLS MTU for the

<bytes>

interface.

For an ATM interface, ATM sub-interface, and atm_dslgroup interface, the range of
the MPLS MTU is 689588, and the default value is 1550.
For an Ethernet interface, ulei interface, and smartgroup interface, the range of the
MPLS MTU is 689586, and the default value is 1550.
For an Ethernet sub-interface, ulei sub-interface, smartgroup sub-interface, and
supervlan interface, the range of the MPLS MTU is 689578, and the default value
is 1550.
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For a pos interface, pos sub-interface, posgroup interface, and serial interface, the
range of the MPLS MTU is 689596, and the default value is 4820.
For a channelized ce1 interface and channelized cpos_e1 interface, the range of the
MPLS MTU is 689596, and the default value is 1550.
For a multilink interface, the range of the MPLS MTU is 689590, and the default value
is 1550.
For a loopback interface, virtual_template interface, te tunnel interface, and L3 VLAN
interface, the range of the MPLS MTU is 689600, and the default value is 1550.
2. Verify the configuration.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface [<interface-name>]

Displays basic information about


interfaces.

<interface-name>: name of the specified interface. If this parameter is not set, basic
information about all interfaces is displayed. If this parameter is set, basic information
about the specified interface is displayed.
End of Steps

2.3.4 Enabling or Disabling an Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for enabling and disabling an interface.

Steps
1. Enable an interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>| byname

Enters interface configuration

<byname>}

mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#no shutdown

Enables the interface.

2. Disable an interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>| byname

Enters interface configuration

<byname>}

mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#shutdown

Disables the interface.

3. Verify the configuration.

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Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface [ brief [ phy |<interface-name >|[{

Displays the management status of

exclude | include}<line>]]]

the specified interface.

brief : displays brief information.


phy : displays the physical state.
exclude | include: regular expressions.
<interface-name>: name of the specified interface. If this parameter is not set, basic
information about all interfaces is displayed. If this parameter is set, basic information
about the specified interface is displayed.
End of Steps

2.3.5 Interface MTU Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 2-5, during the packet forwarding process, if the length of a packet
exceeds the out interface MTU, it is fragmented or discarded.
Figure 2-5 Interface MTU Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure the MTU of an interface.
2. Send traffic. ZXR10 forwards traffic.

Configuration Command
Set the MTU value of the gei-0/1/0/1 interface to 2000, and the IP MTU value of the
interface to 1982.
ZXR10(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/1
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#mtu 2000
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#ip mtu 1982
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#no shutdown
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#exit

Configuration Verification
View the configuration result.
ZXR10(config)#show interface gei-0/1/0/1

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gei-0/1/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is Gigabit Ethernet, address is 0012.1254.3254
Internet address is unassigned
BW 1000000 Kbits
IP MTU 1982 bytes
MTU 2000 bytes
IPv6 MTU 1500 bytes
MPLS MTU 1500 bytes
Holdtime is 120 sec(s)
The port is optical
The MDIMode of the port is not supported
Loopback cancel
Duplex full
Negotiation auto
ARP type ARP
ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last Clear Time : 2013-04-26 09:42:01 Last Refresh Time: 2013-04-26 08:35:57
120s input rate : 0Bps 0Pps
120s output rate: 0Bps 0Pps
Peak rate:
input 0Bps peak time N/A
output 0Bps peak time N/A
Intf utilization: input 0% output 0%
HardWareCounters:
In_Bytes 0 In_Packets 0
In_CRC_ERROR 0 In_Unicasts 0
In_Broadcasts 0 In_Multicasts 0
In_Undersize 0 In_Oversize 0
In_64B 0 In_65_127B 0
In_128_255B 0 In_256_511B 0
In_512_1023B 0 In_1024_1518B 0
In_1519_MaxB 0
E_Bytes 0 E_Packets 0
E_CRC_ERROR N/A E_Unicasts 0
E_Broadcasts 0 E_Multicasts 0
E_Undersize 0 E_Oversize N/A
E_64B 0 E_65_127B 0
E_128_255B 0 E_256_511B 0
E_512_1023B 0 E_1024_1518B 0
E_1519_MaxB 0 E_SingCollision N/A
E_MultCollision N/A E_LateCollision N/A
E_ExceCollision N/A
StreamCounters :
In_Bytes 0 In_Packets 0
In_Discards 0 In_V4Bytes 0

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In_V4Pkts 0 In_V6Bytes 0
In_V6Pkts 0 In_UpsendCar_Drop 0
E_Bytes 0 E_Packets 0
E_Discards 0 E_V4Bytes 0
E_V4Pkts 0 E_V6Bytes 0
E_V6Pkts 0
ZXR10(config)#

Packets whose lengths exceed 2000 bytes are discarded.

2.4 MAC Address Configuration


2.4.1 MAC Address Overview
A MAC address is the hardware identifier of a network device. Network devices forward
packets in accordance with MAC addresses. Each MAC address is unique, which ensures
the correct packet forwarding.
Each device maintains a MAC address table. When a device receives a data frame, it
determines whether to filter out the frame or forward the frame to the corresponding port
of the device based on the MAC address table. The MAC address table is the basics and
prerequisite for a device to implement fast forwarding.

2.4.2 Configuring a MAC Address


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring MAC attributes.

Steps
1. Configure MAC attributes.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#mac

Enters MAC configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-mac)#add permanent <mac-address>

Adds a permanent MAC address.

interface < interface-name>{ all-owner-vlan | vlan<


vlan-id>}

ZXR10(config-mac)#delete{[mac ]| [interface

Deletes a MAC address.

<interface_name>]|[vlan <1-4094>]}
ZXR10(config-mac)#aging-time <seconds>

Sets the aging time of MAC


addresses. Use the no

aging-time command to restore


the default value.

ZXR10(config-mac)#filter {source | both | destination}

Filters a MAC address.

mac vlan <1-4094>


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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-mac)#limit-maximum

Sets the maximum number

<num>[interface <interface-name>]

of MAC addresses that can

be learned. Use the no


limit-maximum command to
restore the default value.
ZXR10(config-mac)#limit-policy {drop|forward }

Configures the policy used when

the number of learned MAC


addresses reaches the limit.

ZXR10(config-mac)#learn-priority move default

Sets whether MAC address

{enable|disable}

moving is allowed between


interfaces whose moving
priorities are default.

ZXR10(config-mac)#learn-priority move higher

Sets whether MAC address

{enable|disable}

moving is allowed between


interfaces whose moving
priorities are higher.

10

ZXR10(config-mac)#learn-priority move lower

Sets whether MAC address

{enable|disable}

moving is allowed between


interfaces whose moving
priorities are lower.

11

ZXR10(config-mac)#learn-priority move normal

Sets whether MAC address

{enable|disable}

moving is allowed between


interfaces whose moving
priorities are normal.

12

13
14
15

16

ZXR10(config-mac)#learn-priority interface

Sets the priority of MAC address

<interface-name>{default|lower|normal|higher}

moving for an interface.

ZXR10(config)#mpls l2vpn enable

Enables the L2VPN function


globally.

ZXR10(config)#vpls <vpls-name><multi-mac-spaces>

Creates a VPLS instance.

ZXR10(config-vpls-name)#mac

Enters MAC-VFI configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#move-dampening

Enables or disables the function

{enable|disable}

of dampening MAC address


moving.

17

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#move-dampening-fr

Sets the upper limit of the MAC

equency <move-frequency>

address moving rate.

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Step

18

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#move-dam

Sets the blocking state and

pening-interface <interface-name> mac-move

priority after the MAC address

{unblockable|blockable level {primary|secondary}}

moving rate exceeds the limit for


an interface.

19

20

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#move-dampening-

Sets the interval of calculating

interval <count-interval>

the MAC address moving rate.

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#move-dampening-ti

Sets the automatic-recovery

meout <retry-timeout>

interval after an interface is


blocked.

21

22

23

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#learn-dampening

Enables or disables the MAC

{enable|disable}

address learning function.

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#learn-dampening-

Sets the interval of calculating

interval <count-interval>

the MAC address learning rate.

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#learn-dampening-ti

Sets the automatic-recovery

meout <retry-timeout>

interval after an instance is


blocked.

ZXR10(config-vpls-name-mac)#filter

24

Filters a VPLS MAC address.

{source|destination|both}<mac-address>[to
<mac-address-end>][ vlan <vlan-id>]

For a description of the parameters in Step 2, refer to the following table.


Parameter

Description

permanent

Indicates that a permanent MAC address is to be added. A


permanent MAC address never ages out, and it is valid after
the device is restarted.

mac

MAC address.

interface <interface-name>

Interface name.

all-owner-vlan

Specifies all VLANs configured on the interface. The


combination of the MAC address and each VLAN is written in
the MAC table.

vlan <vlan-id>

VLAN ID.

For a description of the parameters in Step 3, refer to the following table.


Parameter

Description

mac

MAC address.

interface <interface-name>

Interface name.

vlan <vlan-id>

VLAN ID.
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For a description of the parameter in Step 4, refer to the following table.


Parameter

Description

<60-630>

Aging time (in seconds), range: 6065535.

<0>

The maximum aging time is determined by performance


parameters. The value 0 indicates that MAC addresses never
age out.

For a description of the parameters in Step 5, refer to the following table.


Parameter

Description

source

Indicates that packets with the specified source MAC address


are to be filtered out.

both

Indicates that packets with the specified source MAC address


and destination MAC address are to be filtered out.

destination

Indicates that packets with the specified destination MAC


address are to be filtered out.

mac

MAC address.

vlan <1-4094>

VLAN ID.

For a description of the parameters in Step 6, refer to the following table.


Parameter

Description

interface <interface-name>

Interface name.

<num>

Maximum number of MAC addresses that can be learned.

For a description of the parameters in Step 7, refer to the following table.


Parameter

Description

drop

Indicates that data frames are dropped after the number of


learned MAC addresses reaches the limit.

forward

Indicates that data frames are forwarded after the number of


learned MAC addresses reaches the limit.

For a description of the parameters in Steps 811, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

enable

Indicates that MAC address moving is allowed between


interfaces with the same priority.

disable

Indicates that MAC address moving is disallowed between


interfaces with the same priority.

For a description of the parameters in Step 12, refer to the following table.
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Parameter

Description

interface<interface-name>

Interface name.

default

Indicates that the priority is set to default.

lower

Indicates that the priority is set to lower.

normal

Indicates that the priority is set to normal.

higher

Indicates that the priority is set to higher.

For a description of the parameter in Step 16, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

{enable|disable}

Whether to enable the MAC address moving function.

For a description of the parameter in Step 17, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

<move-frequency>

Upper limit of the MAC address moving rate.

For a description of the parameters in Step 18, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

interface<interface-name>

Interface name.

{unblockable|blockable level

Blocking status and priority.

{primary|secondary}}

For a description of the parameter in Step 19, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

<count-interval>

Interval of calculating the MAC address moving rate.

For a description of the parameter in Step 20, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

<retry-timeout>

Automatic-recovery interval after an interface is blocked.

For a description of the parameter in Step 21, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

{enable|disable}

Whether to dampen the MAC address learning function.

For a description of the parameter in Step 22, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

<count-interval>

Interval of calculating the MAC address learning rate.


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For a description of the parameter in Step 23, refer to the following table.
Parameter

Description

<retry-timeout>

Automatic-recovery interval after an instance is blocked.

For a description of the parameter in Step 24, refer to the following table.
Parameter
source

Description
Indicates that packets with the specified source MAC address
are to be filtered out.

destination

Indicates that packets with the specified destination MAC


address are to be filtered out.

both

Indicates that packets with the specified source MAC address


and destination MAC address are to be filtered out.

<mac-address>

MAC address in dotted notation.

<vlan-id>

VLAN ID.

to

Indicates that a MAC address range is used.

<mac-address-end>

End MAC address in the range of MAC addresses to be filtered.

End of Steps

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Chapter 3

Ethernet Interface
Configuration
Table of Contents
Ethernet Interface Overview .......................................................................................3-1
Ethernet Interface Configuration .................................................................................3-2
Ethernet Interface Configuration Example ..................................................................3-4

3.1 Ethernet Interface Overview


The LAN interfaces supported by ZXR10 M6000-S are Ethernet interfaces, including Fast
Ethernet (FE) interface and Gigabit Ethernet (GE) interface.
l
l

Fast Ethernet interface is accord with 100Base-TX physical standard, it is compatible


with 10Base-T physical layer standard.
Gigabit Ethernet interface is accord with 1000Base-TX physical layer standard, it is
compatible with 10Base-T and 100Base-TX physical layer standards.

There are two working modes on Ethernet electrical interface, half-duplex and full-duplex
mode. Ethernet electrical interface has self-negotiation mode, it can negotiate working
mode and speed with other network devices. Ethernet electrical selects the appropriate
working mode and speed automatically, thus simplifying system configuration and
management.
In Open System Interconnection (OSI) seven layer model defined by International
Organization for Standardization (ISO), physical layer defines the physical interfaces
between two devices and their electrical, procedural and mechanical characteristics and
so on. The functions of Ethernet physical layer is similar to that defined by ISO. Ethernet
physical layer provides a standard. The network devices can communicate with each
other if manufactories produce them according to the same standard.
Ethernet physical layer has two working modes, full-duplex and half-duplex mode. The
different medium access modes are provided for them,
l
l

Use Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect (CSMA/CD) access mode in


half-duplex mode.
The packets can be sent and received in full-duplex mode directly.

Full-duplex and half-duplex are physical layer concepts, and provide different access
modes for duplex modes in physical layer that is data link layer concept. In this way, an
important Ethernet feature is formed, data link layer and physical layer are related.
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3.2 Ethernet Interface Configuration


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring an Ethernet interface.

Steps
1. Configure the IP address of the Ethernet interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>|

Enters interface configuration

byname <byname>}

mode or logical interface


configuration mode.
If the logical interface does not
exist, the command creates
the logical interface and enters
logical interface configuration
mode.

Configures the IP address

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#ip address

{<ip-address><net-mask>|<A.B.C.D/X>}[<broadcast-a

and subnetwork mask of the

ddress>| secondary]

interface.

<byname>: alias of the interface.


secondary: secondary address of the interface.

Note:
Before entering configuration mode of the interface by using the byname parameter,
you must set the alias of the interface.

2. Set an interface to a gateway interface.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>|

Enters interface configuration

byname <byname>}

mode or logical interface


configuration mode. If the logical
interface does not exist, this
command creates the logical
interface and enters logical
interface configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#gateway

Sets the interface to a gateway

interface

interface. By default, an interface


is not a gateway interface.
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3. Configure the MAC flap.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#interface

Configures the MAC flap of the

mac-address|offset <mac-offset>

interface. The range is 164, and


the default value is 0. The range of
the MAC flap can be modified when
the device is started. The default
range is prompted dynamically in
accordance with the set value.

4. Configure the MAC address of the interface.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#interface

Configures the MAC address of

mac-address <xxxx.xxxx.xxxx>

the interface. The MAC address


and offset cannot be configured
at the same time. By default, the
MAC interface of the interface
is the system MAC address. A
sub-interface inherits the MAC
address of its parent interface.

5. (Optional) Configure operating mode and working rate of the interface.


Step
1

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#duplex

Sets the operating mode of the

{duplex-full |duplex-half}

interface, including duplex-full


and duplex-half .

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#negotiation

Configures the negotiation

{negotiation-auto | negotiation-force}

mode of the interface,


including negotiation-auto
and negotiation-force.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#speed

Configures the working rate of

{speed-100M | speed-10G | speed-10M | speed-1G}

the interface.

6. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface [<interface-name>]

Displays the basic information of the


interface.

ZXR10#show ip interface [brief [phy |<interface-name>|[{excl

Displays the three-layer information

ude | include}<line>]]]

of an IP interface.
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Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface brief

Displays brief information about


interfaces.

ZXR10#show running-config-interface <interface-name>

Displays the configuration


information of the interface.

End of Steps

3.3 Ethernet Interface Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 3-1, two routers connect each other through Ethernet interfaces.
Figure 3-1 Ethernet Interface Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Enter global configuration mode.
2. Enter interface configuration mode.
3. Perform the required configuration.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2
R1(config-if-gei0/2/0/2)#ip address 168.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei0/2/0/2)#mtu 1700
R1(config-if-gei0/2/0/2)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-gei0/2/0/2)#ip mtu 1000
R1(config-if-gei0/2/0/2)#exit

Configuration Verification
Use the show command to check the configuration.
R1(config)#show running-config-interface gei-0/2/0/2
! <if-intf>
interface gei-0/2/0/2
mtu 1700
ip mtu 1000
ip address 168.2.1.1 255.255.255.0

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no shutdown$
!</ if-intf>

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Chapter 4

VLAN Configuration
Table of Contents
Basic VLAN Configuration ..........................................................................................4-1
VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration ..................................................................4-5
VLAN TPID Configuration...........................................................................................4-8

4.1 Basic VLAN Configuration


4.1.1 VLAN Overview
On Ethernet network, CSMA/CD technology is used. A Layer 2 network is a broadcast
domain. To reduce the cost of bandwidth resources, 802.1Q introduces Virtual Local
Area Network (VLAN) technology. VLAN technology divides a physical LAN into several
broadcast domains in logic. VLAN supports 8bit sub-interfaces.
To ensure that some specific users be designated into a logical group, it is necessary to
use VLAN.
VLAN complies with 802.1Q standard, that is, the Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks
protocol. VLAN realizes logical broadcast domain. The users of one VLAN are restricted to
access another VLAN. Meanwhile, broadcast packets are restricted in the logical broadcast
domain.
The structure of a packet with VLAN ID is shown in Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-1 Structure of L2 Packet With VLAN ID

On the base of conventional Ethernet packet, a 4byte 802.1Q packet header is added.
l

The first two bytes are TAG Protocol Identifier (TPID). The TPID identifies the packet
type. By default, the packet is a 802.1Q packet, and the TPID is 0x8100, 88a8.
Common TPID values include 0x9100.
The last two bytes are Tag Control Information (TCI).

Priority (3 bits): The priority is decided by flow control information (such as QoS,
and so on).
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Canonical Format Indicator (CFI) (1 bit): CFI is used to identify whether there is
a canonical MAC address. When CFI is set, it means that the Data field of the
frame carries the Token Ring frame that is not translated or encapsulated.

The last 12 bits in TCI are VLAN ID (VID). The largest VID is 4094.

Detailed descriptions of TCI field in 802.1Q header are shown in Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-2 802.1Q VLAN Packet Header Structure

Many sub-interfaces may be configured on a route attribute port. Each sub-interface can
encapsulate VLAN ID and VLAN Range. The packet is designated according to its VLAN
TAG. A packet without a VLAN TAG will be designated to a physical interface. After the
physical interface is designated, the packet is forwarded according to the forwarding table.

4.1.2 Configuring a VLAN Sub-Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a VLAN sub-interface.

Steps
1. Configure a VLAN sub-interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#vlan-configuration

Enters VLAN configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-vlan)#interface <interface-name>

Enters VLAN sub-interface


service configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-vlan-if-interface-name)#encapsula

Encapsulates VLAN-ID for the

tion-dot1q <vlan-id>

new created sub-interface.


The VLAN-ID ranges from 1
to 4094.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show interface-vlan dot1q [<interface-name>]

Displays DoT1Q configuration of


a specific port or all ports.

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Command

Function

ZXR10#show vlan-conflict-interface <IfName>{dot1q

VLANs configured on the

vlan-range <ExVlanId>|qinq internal-vlan-range <InVlanId>

sub-interfaces of the same

external-vlan-range <ExVlanId>}

parent interface cannot be


the same. If multiple VLANs
have been configured on
sub-interfaces of a parent
interface, when a VLAN
is configured on a new
sub-interface, there may be
conflict. This command searches
for a conflict sub-interface.
<IfName>: parent interface
name.

End of Steps

4.1.3 VLAN Sub-Interface Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 4-3, it is required to realize the accessing and routing of users in
different VLANs on the same physical Ethernet interface by using VLAN sub-interfaces.
Figure 4-3 VLAN Sub-Interface Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1.
2.
3.
4.

Create a sub-interface.
Enter sub-interface VLAN configuration mode.
Configure a VLAN-ID.
Configure an IP address for the sub-interface. R1 and R2 can successfully ping each
other.

Configuration Command
Configuration for R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config)#vlan-configuration
R1(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1

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R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 100
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config-vlan)#exit
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#ip address 192.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit

Configuration for R2:


R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config)#vlan-configuration
R2(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 100
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config-vlan)#exit
R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit

Configuration Verification
Use the show command to check the configuration for R1, as shown below.
R1#show running-config vlan
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
encapsulation-dot1q 100
$
$
! </vlan>

Use the show command to check the configuration for R2, as shown below.
R2#show running-config-interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
! <if-intf>
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
$
! </if-intf>
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
encapsulation-dot1q 100
$
$
! </vlan>

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The result is that R1 and R2 can successfully ping each other, as shown below.
R2#ping 192.2.1.1
sending5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.1,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max=157/190/199 ms.
R1#ping 192.2.1.2
sending5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max=157/190/199 ms.

4.2 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration


4.2.1 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Overview
A VLAN complies with the 802.1Q protocol, that is, the Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks
protocol. A VLAN implements a logical broadcast domain. A user in one VLAN cannot
access another VLAN. The broadcast packets in one broadcast domain can be broadcast
only in this broadcast domain.
To realize VLAN termination, a router has to partition VLAN sub-interfaces on a physical
port. VLAN can be configured on each VLAN sub-interface to terminate VLAN-ID
contained in packets. As the number of sub-interface is limited, it is allowed to configure
several VLANs on a sub-interface. This is called VLAN Range. The VLAN Range
supports 8bit sub-interfaces.

4.2.2 Configuring a VLAN Range Sub-Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a VLAN Range
sub-interface.

Steps
1. Configure a VLAN Range sub-interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#vlan-configuration

Enters VLAN configuration


mode.

ZXR10(vlan-config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters VLAN sub-interface


service configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-vlan-if-interface-name)#encapsula

Encapsulates several

tion-dot1q range<vlan-id>-<vlan-id>

VLAN-ID for the new created


sub-interface. The VLAN-ID
ranges from 1 to 4094.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-vlan-if-interface-name)#vlan-range-

Enables or disables vlan

broadcast {enable | disable | single-layer enable}

range broadcast.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show interface-vlan dot1q [<interface-name>]

Displays the VLAN configuration


of all/one interface.

End of Steps

4.2.3 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example


Configuration Description
It is required to configure VLAN Range in the topology shown in Figure 4-4. Encapsulate
VLANs (VLAN-ID ranges from 1 to 10) on sub-interface gei-0/2/0/2.1 on R1, enable
broadcasting, and encapsulate a VLAN (VLAN-ID is 5) on sub-interface gei-0/3/0/3.1 on
R2.
Figure 4-4 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure VLAN Range on R1, and enable broadcasting.
2. Configure a VLAN on R2.
3. Make sure that R1 and R2 can communicate with each other.

Configuration Command
Configuration for R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config)#vlan-configuration
R1(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#encapsulation-dot1q range 1-10
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#vlan-range-broadcast enable
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config-vlan)#exit
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1

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R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#ip address 192.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit

Configuration for R2:


R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config)#vlan-configuration
R2(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 5
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config-vlan)#exit
R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit

Configuration Verification
View the configuration result on R1, as shown below.
R1#show running-config-interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
! <if-intf>
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
ip address 192.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
$
! </if-intf>
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
encapsulation-dot1q range 1-10
vlan-range-broadcast enable
$
$
! </vlan>

View the configuration result on R2, as shown below.


R2#show running-config-interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
!<if-intf>
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
$
! </if-intf>
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
encapsulation-dot1q 5
$
$

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! </vlan>

Verify that R1 and R2 can successfully ping each other, as shown below.
R2#ping 192.2.1.1
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.1,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 157/190/199 ms.
R1#ping 192.2.1.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 157/190/199 ms.

4.3 VLAN TPID Configuration


4.3.1 VLAN TPID Overview
A VLAN complies with the 802.1Q protocol, that is, the Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks
protocol. A VLAN implements a logical broadcast domain. A user in one VLAN cannot
access another VLAN. The broadcast packets in one broadcast domain can be broadcast
only in this broadcast domain.
According to the structure of a VLAN packet, there are four fields in a VLAN tag, TPID,
priority, CFI and VLAN ID. TPID is used to identify whether a frame contains a VLAN tag.
The TPID field is 16 bits long.
Based on the traditional Ethernet packet, a 4-octet 802.1Q packet header is added. Where,
the first two octets are for Tag Protocol Identifier (TPID) indicating the type of this packet.
The default type is 802.1Q packet, and the default value is 0x8100. Common values
include 0x9100.
Some vendors may not be in accordance with RFC, so the TPIDs of different vendors
may be different. To ensure compatibility, ZXR10 M6000-S provides the feature of TPID
configurable.

4.3.2 Configuring the VLAN TPID


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the TPID field of a VLAN
sub-interface.

Steps
1. Configure the VLAN TPID.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#vlan-configuration

Enters VLAN configuration


mode.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(vlan-config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters VLAN sub-interface


configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-vlan-if-interface-name)#pid-tag

Encapsulates a TPID for the

external <tpid>[internal <tpid>]

newly created sub-interface.


<tpid>: TPID encapsulation

ZXR10(config-vlan-if-interface-name)#pid-tag

mode supported by a

internal <tpid>[external <tpid>]

sub-interface, including
88a8, 8100, 9100, 9200, and
9300.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show interface-vlan qinq [<interface-name>]

Displays TPID configuration information on


an interface on which dual-layer VLAN is
configured.

ZXR10#show interface-vlan dot1q [<interface-name>]

Displays TPID configuration information on


an interface on which single-layer VLAN is
configured.

End of Steps

4.3.3 VLAN TPID Configuration Example


Configuration Description
Figure 4-5 shows an example of VLAN TPID configuration. R1 and R2 are mutually
connected. In this procedure, VLAN TPIDs and VLAN IDs of gei-0/2/0/2.1 of R1 and
gei-0/3/0/3.1 of R2 are configured. Therefore, R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged.
Figure 4-5 VLAN TPID Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Enter VLAN sub-interface configuration mode.
2. Configure TPIDs and VLAN IDs.
3. Configure IP addresses for sub-interfaces, ensuring that R1 and R2 can be mutually
pinged. Ensure that R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged even if different VLAN TPIDs
are configured. The pid-tag parameter is used to control external messages.
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Configuration Command
The following shows the configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config)#vlan-configuration
R1(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 100
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#pid-tag external 9100 internal 8100
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config-vlan)#exit

R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#ip address 192.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit

The following shows the configuration of R2:


R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config)#vlan-configuration
R2(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 100
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#pid-tag external 9100 internal 8100
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config-vlan)#exit

R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit

Configuration Verification
Run the show command to verify the configuration result of R1:
R1#show running-config vlan
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
pid-tag external 9100 internal 8100
encapsulation-dot1q 100
$
$
! </vlan>

Run the show command to verify the configuration result of R2:


R2#show running-config vlan
! <vlan>

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vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
pid-tag external 9100 internal 8100
encapsulation-dot1q 100
$
$
! </vlan>

The following result indicates that R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged:


R2#ping 192.2.1.1
sending5, 100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max=157/190/199ms.

R1#ping 192.2.1.2
sending5, 100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.2, timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max=157/190/199ms.

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Chapter 5

QinQ Configuration
Table of Contents
Basic QinQ Configuration ...........................................................................................5-1
QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration ...................................................................5-4

5.1 Basic QinQ Configuration


5.1.1 QinQ Sub-Interface Overview
QinQ is short for 802.1Q in 802.1 Q. With more and more deployment of Ethernet
technologies in network (Metro Ethernet Network (MEN)), 802.1Q VLAN is restricted a lot
in user isolation and identifying. As there are only 12 bits in the VLAN TAG field defined
by IEEE802.1Q, which identifies 4k VLANs. QinQ comes into birth to solve the problem
that there are lots of users needing to be identified in MEN.
QinQ is generated to increase the number of VLANs. It adds a 802.1Q label on the base
of the conventional 802.1Q packet. Now, there are 4k*4k VLANs available by using QinQ.
QinQ supports 8bit sub-interfaces.
The internal and external tags of QinQ represent different information. For example, the
internal tag represents users, and the external tag represents services. A QinQ packet
is transmitted through operator networks with two tags. The internal tag is transmitted
transparently. QinQ is a simple and utility Virtual Private Network (VPN) technology.
Therefore, it can act as the extension of core Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) VPN
in MEN VPN to form an end-to-end VPN technology finally.

5.1.2 Configuring a QinQ Sub-Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a QinQ sub-interface.

Steps
1. Configure a QinQ sub-interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#vlan-configuration

Enters VLAN configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-vlan)#interface <interface-name>

Enters VLAN sub-interface


service configuration mode.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-vlan-if-interface-name)#qinq

Configures the internal

internal-vlanid <vlan-id> external-vlanid <vlan-id>

VLAN-ID and the external


VLAN-ID, ranging from 1 to
4094.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show interface-vlan qinq

Displays QinQ configuration of a specific

[<interface-name>]

interface or all interfaces.

End of Steps

5.1.3 QinQ Sub-Interface Configuration Example


Configuration Description
Figure 5-1 shows the an example of QinQ sub-interface configuration. R1 and R2 are
mutually connected. In this procedure, the interfaces gei-0/2/0/2.1 of R1 and gei-0/3/0/3.1
of R2 are encapsulated with QinQ IDs.
Figure 5-1 QinQ Sub-Interface Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1.
2.
3.
4.

Create a sub-interface.
Enter sub-interface VLAN configuration mode.
Configure a QinQ ID.
Configure the IP address of the sub-interface. R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged.

Configuration Command
The following shows the configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config)#vlan-configuration
R1(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#qinq

internal-vlanid 1 external-vlanid 2

R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config-vlan)#exit

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R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#ip address 192.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit

The following shows the configuration of R2:


R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config)#vlan-configuration
R2(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#qinq

internal-vlanid 1 external-vlanid 2

R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit
R2(config-vlan)#exit
R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3.1)#exit

Configuration Verification
Run the show command to check the configuration results.
The following shows the configuration result of R1:
R1#show running-config vlan
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
qinq internal-vlanid 1 external-vlanid 2
$
$
! </vlan>

The following shows the configuration result of R2:


R2#show running-config-interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
! <Interface>
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
ip address 192.2.1.2 255.255.255.0
$
! </Interface>
! </vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/3/0/3.1
qinq internal-vlanid 1 external-vlanid 2
$
$
!</vlan>

The verification result indicates that R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged:


R2#ping 192.2.1.1

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sending5, 100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max=157/190/199ms.

R1#ping 192.2.1.2
sending5, 100-byte ICMP echoes to 192.2.1.2, timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max=157/190/199ms.

5.2 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration


5.2.1 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Overview
To realize VLAN termination, it is necessary to partition VLAN sub-interfaces on physical
port of a router. QinQ can be configured on each VLAN sub-interface to terminate
VLAN-IDs contained in packets. As the number of sub-interfaces is limited, it is allowed
to configure several QinQs on a sub-interface. This is called QinQ Range. QinQ Range
sub-interfaces are configured if multiple QinQs are required on a sub-interface. ZXR10
M6000-S supports 64k QinQ Range sub-interfaces and 8bit sub-interfaces.
An internal VLAN-ID and an external VLAN-ID can be configured on each QinQ
sub-interface. However, multiple internal VLAN-IDs and external VLAN-IDs can be
configured on a sub-interface of QinQ Range.
QinQ internal tag and external tag represent different information. For example, the
internal tag represents users, and the external tag represents services. A QinQ packet is
transmitted with two tags. The internal tag is transmitted transparently. QinQ is a simple
and utility VPN technology. Therefore, it can act as the extension of core MPLS VPN in
MEN VPN to form an end-to-end VPN technology finally.

5.2.2 Configuring a QinQ Range Sub-Interface


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a QinQ Range
sub-interface.

Steps
1. Configure a QinQ Range sub-interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#vlan-configuration

Enters VLAN configuration


mode.

ZXR10(vlan-config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters VLAN sub-interface


service configuration mode.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-subvlan-if)#qinq range internal-v

Configures multiple internal

lan-range <vlan-id>-<vlan-id> external-vlan-range

and external VLAN tags,

<vlan-id>-<vlan-id>

ranging from 1 to 4094.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show interface-vlan qinq [<interface-name>]

Displays QinQ configuration on


a specific port or all ports.

End of Steps

5.2.3 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example


Configuration Description
The network topology of a QinQ Range sub-interface configuration example is shown in
Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-2 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Create a sub-interface.
2. Enter sub-interface VLAN configuration mode.
3. Configure QinQ Range.

Configuration Command
The configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config)#vlan-configuration

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R1(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#qinq range internal-vlan-range 1-10
external-vlan-range 1-10
R1(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
R1(config-vlan)#exit

Configuration Verification
Use the show command to check the configuration result.
R1(config)#show running-config vlan
! <vlan>
vlan-configuration
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
qinq range internal-vlan-range 1-10 external-vlan-range 1-10
$
$
!

</vlan>

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Chapter 6

SuperVLAN Configuration
Table of Contents
SuperVLAN Overview ................................................................................................6-1
Configuring a SuperVLAN .........................................................................................6-2
SuperVLAN Configuration Example............................................................................6-4

6.1 SuperVLAN Overview


SuperVLAN Introduction
SuperVLAN technology aggregates many SubVLANs together. These SubVLANs share
one IP sub-network and the same default gateway. In a SuperVLAN,
l
l
l
l

all SubVLANs can allocate IP addresses in the SuperVLAN flexibly and use the default
gateway of the SuperVLAN.
Each SubVLAN has its own independent broadcast domain, which ensures the
isolation between different users.
The communication between SubVLANs is routed by the SuperVLAN.
The SuperVLAN supports cross-board interface binding and QinQ interface binding.

SuperVLAN is a type of virtual interface formed by binding several interfaces, such as


VLAN sub-interface, QinQ sub-interface or Ethernet physical interface nn different boards.

SuperVLAN Feature
After VLAN is introduced, different VLANs cannot communicate with each other through
L2 forwarding. The communication is realized through L3 routing. Thus, it is necessary
to configure different IP address segments between VLANs. To save IP addresses,
SuperVLAN is used.
The principle of common VLAN is shown in Figure 6-1.
Figure 6-1 VLAN Configuration on Device without SuperVLAN

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On the device, the ports connecting A, B,C and D belong to different VLANs. Therefore,
the different IP address segments are configured on A, B, C and D. The communications
are realized through L3 route forwarding.
As shown in Figure 6-2, after SuperVLAN is used, VLAN 1 and VLAN 2 are bound to
SuperVLAN1, while VLAN 3 and VLAN 4 are bound to SuperVLAN2.
Figure 6-2 Configuration on Device with SuperVLAN

The network segment x.x.x.0/24 is configured on both A and B, and x.x.y.0/24 network
segment is configured on C and D. SuperVLAN 1 acts as the ARP proxy between A and B,
and SuperVLAN2 acts as the ARP proxy between C and D. Therefore, the communications
between A and B, and between C and D can be realized through L2 forwarding. However,
the communication between the hosts in different network segments (such as A and C)
still needs to be realized through L3 forwarding.
In addition, each VLAN member of SuperVLAN is allocated an IP address segment.
To ensure the security, the packets will be discarded if the IP addresses of the packets
received by the SuperVLAN do not match the allocated IP address segment.

6.2 Configuring a SuperVLAN


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a SuperVLAN.

Steps
1. Configure the attributes of the SuperVLAN:
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#supervlan

Enters SuperVLAN
configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-supervlan)#interface supervlan

Enters SuperVLAN interface

<supervlan-id>

configuration mode. The


SuperVLAN ID ranges from 1
to 2048.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-supervlan-superif)#arp-broadcast

Enables or disables the

{enable | disable}

function that SuperVLAN


broadcasts ARP to all its
SubVLANs. By default, this
function is disabled.

ZXR10(config-supervlan-superif)#inter-subvlan-rou

Enables or disables the

ting {enable | disable}

inter-SubVLAN routing
function. By default, this
function is enabled.

ZXR10(config-supervlan-superif)#ip-pool-filter

Enables or disables the

{enable | disable}

SuperVLAN IP pool filter


function. By default, this
function is enabled.

2. Configure the attributes of a SuperVLAN member interface.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#supervlan

Enters SuperVLAN
configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-supervlan)#interface <interface-name>

Enters SuperVLAN
sub-interface configuration
mode.

ZXR10(config-supervlan-subif)#supervlan

Binds the interface to the

<supervlan-id>

SuperVLAN. Range: 12048.

ZXR10(config-supervlan-subif)#vlanpool

Binds an IP address segment

<ip-address1><ip-address2>

to a SubVLAN interface.

3. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show supervlan [<supervlan-id>]

Displays the configuration of


SuperVLAN.

ZXR10(config)#show supervlan-pool [<supervlan-id>]

Displays the IP pool bound to SubVLAN.

End of Steps

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6.3 SuperVLAN Configuration Example


6.3.1 Integrated SuperVLAN Configuration Example
Configuration Description
SuperVLAN technology aggregates many SubVLANs together. These SubVLANs share
one IP sub-network and the same default gateway. In a SuperVLAN, all SubVLANs
can allocate IP addresses of SuperVLAN flexibly and use the default gateway of the
SuperVLAN. Each SubVLAN has its own independent broadcast domain, which ensures
the isolation between different users. The communication between SubVLANs is routed
by the SuperVLAN.
The network topology of a SuperVLAN configuration example is shown in Figure 6-3.
Figure 6-3 Integrated SuperVLAN Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
Create a SuperVLAN interface, disable source IP address filter function and then bind
SubVLAN interfaces to the specific SuperVLAN interface. Configure IP pool on SubVLAN
interfaces.
1. Create a SuperVLAN interface.
2. Configure an IP address.
3. Input SuperVLAN interface name, and then enter SuperVLAN aggregation interface
configuration mode.
4. Disable source IP address filter function.
5. Input the name of the sub-interface encapsulated with VLAN-ID, and then enter
SuperVLAN member interface configuration mod.
6. Bind the sub-interface to the SuperVLAN.
7. Configure IP pool on the sub-interface.
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Configuration Command
Configuration for ZXR10:
ZXR10(config)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
ZXR10(config-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#exit
ZXR10(config)#vlan-configuration
ZXR10(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
ZXR10(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 100
ZXR10(config-vlan-if-gei-0/2/0/2.1))#exit
ZXR10(config-vlan)#exit

ZXR10(config)#interface supervlan11
ZXR10(config-if-supervlan11)#ip address 192.11.1.1 255.255.255.0
ZXR10(config-if-supervlan11)#exit
ZXR10(config)#supervlan
ZXR10(config-supervlan)#interface

supervlan11

ZXR10(config-supervlan-superif)#ip-pool-filter disable
ZXR10(config-supervlan-superif)#exit
ZXR10(config-supervlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
ZXR10(config-supervlan-subif)#supervlan 11
ZXR10(config-supervlan-subif)#vlanpool 192.11.1.1 192.11.1.10
ZXR10(config-supervlan-subif)#end

Configuration Verification
Use the show command to check the configuration result, as shown below.
ZXR10#show supervlan
The total supervlan number:1

SuperVLAN No: 11
ARP-Broadcast

: Disable

Gratuitous-ARP-Broadcast

: Enable

Inter-SubVLAN-Routing-IPv4: Enable
Inter-SubVLAN-Routing-IPv6: Enable
IP-POOL-Filter

: Disable

ND-Broadcast

: Disable

---------------------------------------SubIntf

gei-0/2/0/2.1

ZXR10#show running-config supervlan


! <supervlan>
supervlan
interface supervlan11
inter-subvlan-routing enable
ip-pool-filter disable

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$
interface gei-0/2/0/2.1
supervlan 11
vlanpool 192.11.1.1 192.11.1.10
$
$
! </supervlan>

ZXR10(config)#show supervlan-pool
Addr-Begin
192.11.1.1

Addr-End

SuperVLAN-Name

192.11.1.10

supervlan11

SubIntf-Name
gei-0/2/0/2.1

6.3.2 VLAN-Bound-to-IP-Address Configuration Example


Configuration Description
See Figure 6-4 for the topology of an example for a VLAN being bound to an IP address.
Figure 6-4 VLAN-Bound-to-IP-Address Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Create a sub-interface and encapsulate a VLAN-ID.
2. Bind the sub-interface to a SuperVLAN.
3. Configure vlanpool in SuperVLAN mode.

Configuration Command
Configuration for R2:
R2#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.

End with CTRL/Z.

R2(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/10.1
R2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/10.1)#exit

R2(config)#vlan-configuration
R2(config-vlan)#interface gei-0/1/0/10.1
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/1/0/10.1)#encapsulation-dot1q 1
R2(config-vlan-if-gei-0/1/0/10.1)#exit
R2(config-vlan)#exit

R2(config)#interface supervlan11
R2(config-if-supervlan11)#ip address 192.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

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R2(config-if-supervlan11)#exit

R2(config)#supervlan
R2(config-supervlan)#interface gei-0/1/0/10.1
R2(config-supervlan-subif)#supervlan 11
R2(config-supervlan-subif)#vlanpool 192.1.1.1 192.1.1.10
/*VLAN bound to an IP address*/
R2(config-supervlan-subif)#exit
R2(config-supervlan)#exit

Configuration Verification
View the configuration for R2.
R2#show supervlan11
The total SuperVLAN number:1

SuperVLAN No: 11
ARP-Broadcast

: Disable

Gratuitous-ARP-Broadcast

: Enable

Inter-SubVLAN-Routing-IPv4: Enable
Inter-SubVLAN-Routing-IPv6: Enable
IP-POOL-Filter

: Disable

ND-Broadcast

: Disable

---------------------------------------SubIntf

gei-0/1/0/10.1

R2(config)#show supervlan-pool 11
Addr-Begin

Addr-End

SuperVLAN-Name

SubIntf-Name

192.1.1.1

192.1.1.10

supervlan11

gei-0/1/0/10.1

6.3.3 IP-MAC Address Binding Example


Configuration Description
Figure 6-5 shows an example of IP-MAC address binding.
Figure 6-5 IP-MAC Address Binding Example

Configuration Flow
1. Create a SuperVLAN interface on R1, and then configure the IP address for the
interface.
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2. Bind a physical interface to the SuperVLAN interface.


3. Configure vlanpool in SuperVLAN mode.
4. In ARP mode, enter a member interface of the SuperVLAN interface, and configure
the IP-MAC binding (use the MAC address of the peer end for the MAC address of the
member interface).
5. Configure the IP address of R2 that is in the same network segment as that of R1. R2
can be pinged from R1.
6. Configure a MAC flap for R2 interface. R2 cannot be pinged from R1.

Configuration Command
The following example shows the configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface supervlan255
R1(config-if-supervlan255)#ip address 192.11.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-supervlan255)#exit

R1(config)#supervlan
R1(config-supervlan)#interface gei-0/2/0/2
R1(config-supervlan-subif)#supervlan 255
R1(config-supervlan-subif)#vlanpool 192.11.1.1 192.11.1.10
R1(config-supervlan-subif)#exit
R1(config-supervlan)#exit

R1(config)#arp
R1(config-arp)#interface gei-0/2/0/2
R1(config-arp-if-gei-0/2/0/2)#arp permanent 192.11.1.2 0000.0145.4303
/*Bind a MAC adress to the IP address*/
R1(config-arp-if-gei-0/2/0/2)#exit
R1(config-arp)#exit

The following example shows the configuration of R2:


R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3)#ip address 192.11.1.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3)#end

R2#show arp interface gei-0/3/0/3


Arp protect interface is disabled
The count is 1
IP
Address

Hardware
Age

Exter

Address

Interface

Inter

Sub

VlanID VlanID Interface

---------------------------------------------------------------------------192.11.1.2

0000.0145.4303 gei-0/3/0/3

N/A

N/A

N/A

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Configuration Verification
R2 can be pinged from R1:
R1#ping 192.11.1.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echo(es) to 192.11.1.2,timeout is 2 second(s).
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 1/2/7 ms.

After configuring a MAC flap for R2 interface (configure an MAC address that is different
from the MAC address of the binded IP address), R2 cannot be pinged from R1.
R2(config)#interface gei-0/3/0/3
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3)#interface mac-address offset 2
R2(config-if-gei-0/3/0/3)#end
R2#show arp interface gei-0/3/0/3
Arp protect interface is disabled
The count is 1
IP
Address

Hardware
Age

Exter

Address

Interface

Inter

Sub

VlanID VlanID Interface

---------------------------------------------------------------------------192.11.1.2

0000.0145.4305 gei-0/3/0/3

N/A

N/A

N/A

R1#ping 192.11.1.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echo(es) to 192.11.1.2,timeout is 2 second(s).
.....
Success rate is 0 percent(0/5).

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Chapter 7

SmartGroup Configuration
Table of Contents
SmartGroup Overview ................................................................................................7-1
Configuring a SmartGroup..........................................................................................7-2
SmartGroup Configuration Example ...........................................................................7-7

7.1 SmartGroup Overview


SmartGroup Introduction
Link aggregation is also called port trunk or port aggregation. Link aggregation is to
aggregate several ports into an aggregation group to implement load balance of in/out
flows on each member port. This improves the reliability of the connections at the same
time. When a link is disconnected, the traffic will be reassigned among the remaining link
automatically. Link aggregation is implemented on the data link layer.
SmartGroup is to bind several different types of Ethernet interfaces into a logical
SmartGroup interface. On ZXR10 M6000-S, SmartGroup provides more flexible and
effective solutions about network architecture for users. It brings more flexibility in network
planning and network architecture designing with ZXR10 series products. It also improves
the network stability greatly, especially for Ethernet and network environments in which
Ethernet interfaces are used. SmartGroup function can extend bandwidth, which makes
the cost to construct network more reasonable.
l
l
l
l
l
l

SmartGroup supports aggregation of Ethernet interfaces across boards.


SmartGroup supports aggregation of different speeds (it is necessary to configure the
on mode).
There are two modes of load sharing, per-packet mode and per-destination mode.
64 SmartGroup interfaces can be configured at most.
In each SmartGroup interface, 8000 sub-interfaces can be configured at most .
There are 32 Ethernet interfaces at most in each SmartGroup interface.

SmartGroup Features
The link aggregation of SmartGroup is to aggregate several ports into an aggregation
group, thus to share out/in load among the member ports. This also improves the reliability
of the connections. Outwardly, the aggregation group seems as a port. Load sharing of link
aggregation supports load-sharing aggregation and non-load-sharing aggregation.Figure
7-1 shows a SmartGroup n.

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Figure 7-1 SmartGroup Link Aggregation

Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) provides a standardized method to exchange


information between mate systems on links. LACP allows link aggregation control entities
to make an agreement on the unity of the link aggregation cluster. It also allows to class a
link to a link aggregation cluster and enable the functions of receiving and sending in order.
The principle of LACP includes the following points:
l
l
l
l
l

LACP runs on a single physical port.


LACP is a procedure of constant negotiation at two ends. There are two negotiation
modes, active mode and passive mode.
If the negotiation is successful on a port, this port is an active port, otherwise it is a
inactive port. Only active ports can send and receive packets.
Negotiation packets are sent continually, and they are terminated on ports.
The negotiation of the ports in an aggregation group is independent between each
other without any interaction.

7.2 Configuring a SmartGroup


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a SmartGroup.

Steps
1. Create a SmartGroup.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface smartgroup

Creates a SmartGroup.

<smartgroup-id>

2. Configure an LACP interface and its parameters.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#lacp

Enters LACP configuration mode.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-lacp)#lacp system-priority <priority>

Configures the LACP system


priority. Range: 165535.
Default: 32768. The smaller the
value, the higher the priority.
A device has a unique system
priority and Mac address. The
system priority is a field of the
LACP negotiation message.
The interface of a higher priority
initiates the LACP negotiation.
For interfaces sharing the same
system priority, the interface
of the smaller MAC address
initiates the negotiation.

ZXR10(config-lacp)#lacp minimum-member <

Configures the global threshold

member-number>

for a SmartGroup interface to be


up. Range: 132. Default: 1.

ZXR10(config-lacp)#interface smartgroup

Enters LACP interface

<smartgroup-id>

configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures aggregation mode of

mode {802.3ad | on}

the SmartGroup.

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures the load sharing

load-balance {per-packet | per-destination}

mode of LACP. The default mode


is per-destination.

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures the threshold for the

minimum-member < member-number>

SmartGroup interface to be up,


in the range of 132, with the
default value 1.

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures LACP negotiation

fast respond

fast response mode.

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures the threshold of

active limitation < member-number>

member activation of the


SmartGroup. Range: 032.
Default: 32.

10

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Enters SmartGroup interface

sys-priority<priority>

configuration mode and configure


the system priority of LACP.
Range: 165535. Default:
32768.

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Step

Command

Function

11

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures the restore mode

restore{ revertive <holdoff-time>| immediately |

for the SmartGroup interface to

non-revertive}

switch from the standby status to


the active status. If revertive is
selected for restore mode, you
can set the holdoff-time in the
unit of second.

12

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Enters SmartGroup interface

aggregator timeout <10-500>

configuration mode and


configures the SmartGroup
timeout period. The default
timeout period is 30 seconds. If
a selected link aggregation group
cannot turn the LACP to UP
status, another link aggregation
will be selected.

13

14

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#lacp

Configures forcible switching in

force-switch

SmartGroup interface mode.

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid) #lacp

Configures the hold-off period of

hold-off<0-65535>

delayed switchover back for a


mc-lag.

15

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#mc-lag

Configures the mc-lag priority.

priority <priority>

Use the no format of this


command to restore the default
value. This command is valid in
802.3 protocol mode only.
The mc-lag priority can be
configured in ON mode, but the
configuration is invalid. The
range of the priority is 165535.

16

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#mc-lag

Configures the system ID

sys-id <mac-address> sys-priority <priority>

of the mc-lag, including the


system priority and system MAC
address. Use the no format
of this command to delete the
configuration. This command is
valid in 802.3 protocol mode only.
The system ID of the mc-lag
can be configured in ON mode,
but the configuration is invalid.
The system MAC address
does not support the broadcast

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Step

Command

Function
MAC address or multicast MAC
address. The range of the priority
is 165535.

17

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#mc-lag

Configures ICCP binding for the

iccp <iccp-session-id>

MC-LAG. Use the no format


of this command to delete the
configuration.

18

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#mc-lag

Configures the MC-LAG ID,

roid <roid> node-id <node-id>

including the node-ID and


roid. Use the no format of
this command to delete the
configuration.

19

ZXR10(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroupid)#mc-lag

Configures the operating mode

mode {auto|force-master|force-backup}

of the MC-LAG. The modes


include the automatic mode,
forced-master mode, and
forced-backup mode. This
command is valid in 802.3
protocol mode only.
The operating mode can be
configured in ON mode, but the
configuration is invalid.

802.3ad : The aggregation control mode of the smartgroup interface uses LACP of
802.3ad standard.
on: Static trunk, that is, LACP is not used. By default, the aggregation mode is static
trunk (on) mode.
3. Configure an LACP member interface and its parameters.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-lacp)#interface <interface-name>

Enters LACP member interface


configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-lacp-member-if-interface-

Adds an interface to the

name)#smartgroup <smartgroup-id> mode {passive |

SmartGroup and sets the

active | on}

link aggregation mode of this


interface.

ZXR10(config-lacp-member-if-interface-

Configures the long timeout

name)#lacp timeout {long | short}

or short timeout of an LACP


member port, in the range of
165535, with the default value
32768.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-lacp-member-if-interface-

Configures the priority of an

name)#lacp port-priority <priority>

LACP member port. The default


priority is 32768. The smaller the
value, the higher the priority. The
interface of higher priority is the
active interface.

ZXR10(config-lacp-member-if-interface-

Configure the track name used

name)#track <track-name>

by the LACP member interface to


associate the SAMGR. You can
know the status change of the
link by using the track name.

passive : The interface LACP is in passive negotiation mode.


active: The interface LACP is in active negotiation mode.
on: static trunk. In this mode, the interface does not run LACP, and it is necessary to
set the mode to "on" on both ends.
4. Verify the configurations.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show lacp {[<smartgroup-id>]{counters | internal

Views the current configuration and

| neighbors|mc-lag}| sys-id}

status of the LACP.

counters: counts of LACP packets sent and received on an interface.


internal: aggregation status of the member ports.
neighbors: state of member ports on the peer.
sys-id: LACP system priority and system ID.
mc-lag: information related to the mc-lag.
5. Maintain a SmartGroup.
Command

Function

ZXR10(config-lacp)#clear lacp [<smartgroup-id>]

Clears the count of LACP packets sent

counters

and received.

ZXR10#debug lacp {packets [interface

Sets the debugging switch for LACP

<interface-name>]| fsm [interface <interface-name>]|

packet sending and receiving, and the

all}

switch of the sate machine.

ZXR10#show debug lacp

Displays the commands for LACP


debugging functions that are enabled.

all: enables all debugging switches.


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packets: shows all packets on an interface.


fsm: shows all change information of the state machine on an interface.
End of Steps

7.3 SmartGroup Configuration Example


7.3.1 SmartGroup 802.3ad Mode Configuration Example
Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 7-2, R1 and R2 run LACP. The interface gei-0/2/1/5 on R1 and the
interface gei-0/3/0/5 on R2 are directly connected. The interface gei-0/2/0/9 on R1 and
the interface gei-0/3/0/9 on R2 are directly connected.
Figure 7-2 802.3ad Mode Configuration

Configuration Flow
1. Create smartgroup1 on R1, and create smartgroup1 on R2.
2. Enter LACP configuration mode from global configuration mode, and then enter the
smartgroup interfaces.
3. Set the aggregation mode of smartgroup1 to LACP on R1 and R2. Configure load
sharing policy and the minimum number of members.
4. Enter LACP configuration mode from global configuration mode, and then enter the
physical interfaces.
5. Add the physical interfaces on R1 and R2 to the smartgroup1.
6. Configure LACP negotiation mode and time-out period on the member interfaces of
smartgroup1 on R1 and R2.

Configuration Command
Configuration for R1:
R1(config)#interface smartgroup1
R1(config-if-smartgroup1)#ip address 196.1.1.27 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-smartgroup1)#exit
R1(config)#lacp
R1(config-lacp)#interface smartgroup1
R1(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#lacp mode 802.3ad
R1(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#lacp load-balance
R1(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#lacp

per-destination

minimum-member 1

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R1(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#exit
R1(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/2/1/5
R1(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/2/1/5)#smartgroup 1 mode active
R1(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/2/1/5)#lacp timeout short
R1(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/2/1/5)#exit
R1(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/2/0/9
R1(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/2/0/9)#smartgroup 1 mode active
R1(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/2/0/9)#lacp timeout short
R1(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/2/0/9)#exit
R1(config-lacp)#exit

Configuration for R2:


R2(config)#interface smartgroup1
R2(config-if-smartgroup1)#ip address 196.1.1.28 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-smartgroup1)#exit
R2(config)#lacp
R2(config-lacp)#interface smartgroup1
R2(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#lacp mode 802.3ad
R2(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#lacp load-balance
R2(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#lacp

per-destination

minimum-member 1

R2(config-lacp-sg-if-smartgroup1)#exit
R2(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/3/0/5
R2(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/3/0/5)#smartgroup 1 mode active
R2(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/3/0/5)#lacp timeout short
R2(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/3/0/5)#exit
R2(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/3/0/9
R2(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/3/0/9)#smartgroup 1 mode active
R2(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/3/0/9)#lacp timeout short
R2(config-lacp-member-if-gei-0/3/0/9)#end

Configuration Verification
Check the configuration for R1 and check whether the configuration takes effect.
R1(config)#show lacp 1 internal
Smartgroup:1
Flags:

* - Port is Active member Port


S - Port is requested in Slow LACPDUs
F - Port is requested in Fast LACPDUs
A - Port is in Active mode
P - Port is in Passive mode

Actor

Agg

LACPDUs

Port[Flags]

State

Interval Pri

Port

Oper

Port

Key

State Machine

RX

Mux
Machine

--------------------------------------------------------------------------gei-0/2/1/5 [FA*] ACTIVE


gei-0/2/0/9 [FA*] ACTIVE

1
1

32768 0x111
32768 0x111

0x3f
0x3f

CURRENT
CURRENT

COLL&DIST
COLL&DIST

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/*Port aggregation, Active means success, Inactive means failure*/

R1(config)#show running-config-interface smartgroup1


! <Interface>
interface smartgroup1
ip address 196.1.1.27 255.255.255.0
$
! </Interface>
! <lacp>
lacp
interface smartgroup1
interface smartgroup1
lacp mode 802.3ad
/*Negotiation mode*/
lacp minimum-member 1
/*The minimum number of members aggregated successfully. When the
number of links aggregated successfully is not less than this
value, smartgroup is up.*/
$
$
!</lacp>

R1(config)#show running-config lacp


!<lacp>
lacp
interface smartgroup1
lacp mode 802.3ad
lacp minimum-member 1
$
interface gei-0/2/0/9
/*In 802.3ad mode, only when at least one end of the link is in
active mode will the aggregation succeeds.*/
lacp timeout short
$
interface gei-0/2/1/5
smartgroup 1 mode active
lacp timeout short
$
$
! </lacp>

R1(config)#show ip interface smartgroup1


smartgroup1 AdminStatus is up, PhyStatus is up, line protocol is up
Internet address is 196.1.1.27/24
Broadcast address is 255.255.255.255

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IP MTU is 1500 bytes

R1(config)#show lacp 1 neighbors

/*View neighbors*/

Smartgroup 1

neighbors

Actor

Partner

Partner

Port

Oper

Port

Port

System ID

Port No.

Priority

Key

State

--------------------------------------------------------------------gei-0/2/0/9

0x8000,00d0.d012.1127

21

0x8000

0x111

0x3f

gei-0/2/1/5

0x8000,00d0.d012.1127

17

0x8000

0x111

0x3f

R1(config)#show lacp 1 counters


Smartgroup:1
Actor

LACPDUs

Port

Tx

Rx

Marker

LACPDUs

Marker

Tx

Err

Err

Rx

------------------------------------------------------------------gei-0/2/0/9

1840

1840

/*The value of Tx and Rx increments or decrements every 30 seconds or 1 second


according to the configuration of timeput.*/
gei-0/2/1/5

1840

1840

7.3.2 SmartGroup On Mode Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 7-3, the interface gei-0/2/1/5 on R1 and the interface gei-0/3/0/5 on
R2 are directly connected; the interface gei-0/2/0/9 on R1 and the interface gei-0/3/0/9 on
R2 are directly connected. R1 and R2 establish the connection through on mode without
negotiation.
Figure 7-3 On Mode Configuration

Configuration Flow
1. Create smartgroup1 on R1, and create smartgroup1 on R2.
2. Enter LACP configuration mode from global configuration mode, and then enter the
smartgroup interfaces.
3. Configure the same negotiation mode "on" on the smartgroup1 interfaces on R1 and
R2.
4. Enter LACP configuration mode from global configuration mode, and then enter the
physical interfaces.
5. Add the physical interfaces on R1 and R2 to the smartgroup1.
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Configuration Command
Configuration for R1:
R1(config)#interface smartgroup1
R1(config-if)#ip address 196.1.1.27 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#lacp
R1(config-lacp)#interface smartgroup1
R1(config-lacp-sg-if)#lacp mode on
R1(config-lacp-sg-if)#exit
R1(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/2/1/5
R1(config-lacp-member-if)#smartgroup 1 mode on
R1(config-lacp-member-if)#exit
R1(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/2/0/9
R1(config-lacp-member-if)#smartgroup 1 mode on
R1(config-lacp-member-if)#exit

Configuration for R2:


R2(config)#interface smartgroup1
R2(config-if)#ip address 196.1.1.28 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#lacp
R2(config-lacp)#interface smartgroup1
R2(config-lacp-sg-if)#lacp mode on
R2(config-lacp-sg-if)#exit
R2(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/3/0/5
R2(config-lacp-member-if)#smartgroup 1 mode on
R2(config-lacp-member-if)#exit
R2(config-lacp)#interface gei-0/3/0/9
R2(config-lacp-member-if)#smartgroup 1 mode on
R2(config-lacp-member-if)#end

Configuration Verification
Check the configuration for R1 and check whether the configuration takes effect.
R1#show lacp 1 internal
Smartgroup:1
Flags:

* - Port is Active member Port


S - Port is requested in Slow LACPDUs
F - Port is requested in Fast LACPDUs
A - Port is in Active mode
P - Port is in Passive mode

Actor

Agg

LACPDUs

Port

Oper

Port

Port[Flags]

State

Interval

Pri

Key

State Machine

RX

Mux
Machine

---------------------------------------------------------------------------gei-0/2/0/9

ACTIVE

30

32768

0x11

0x3d

N/A

N/A

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gei-0/2/1/5

ACTIVE

30

32768

0x11

0x3d

N/A

N/A

R1#show running-config-interface smartgroup1


! <Interface>
interface smartgroup1
ip address 196.1.1.27 255.255.255.0
$
! </Interface>
! <lacp>
lacp
interface smartgroup1
lacp minimum-member 1
$
$
! </lacp>

R1#show running-config lacp


! <lacp>
lacp
interface smartgroup1
$
interface gei-0/2/1/5
smartgroup 1 mode on
$
interface gei-0/2/0/9
smartgroup 1 mode on
$
$
! </lacp>

R1#show ip interface smartgroup1


smartgroup1 AdminStatus is up, PhyStatus is up, line protocol is up
Internet address is 196.1.1.27/24
Broadcast address is 255.255.255.255
IP MTU is 1500 bytes

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Chapter 8

POS Interface Configuration


Table of Contents
POS Interface Overview .............................................................................................8-1
Configuring a POS Interface.......................................................................................8-1
POS Interface Configuration Example ........................................................................8-4

8.1 POS Interface Overview


Packet Over SONET (POS) is a high speed, advanced WAN connection technology.
It uses high speed transmission channel provided by Synchronous Optical
Network/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH) to directly transmit IP packets.
The network is structured by high-end router and high-speed optical fiber.
POS uses SONET/SDH as physical layer protocol, encapsulates packets in High-level
Data Link Control (HDLC) frame and uses PPP as link control in link layer. IP packet
service runs on network layer. At present, POS 155Mbps, 622Mbps and 2.5Gbps, 10Gbps
interfaces are available.
POS realizes the mapping from IP packets to SONET payload by using PPP. POS is an
extensible protocol. Due to the supporting by SONET, POS overcomes the disadvantages
of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). By means of HDLC and PPP, POS provides
a mechanism that transmit packets in SONET Synchronous Payload Envelope (SPE)
directly.

8.2 Configuring a POS Interface


This section describes the configuration steps and commands of POS interface.

Steps
1. Configure a POS interface.
Step

Command

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>| byname

Configures an interface or sub

<byname>}

interface.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#ip address

Configures an IP address on a

{<ip-address><net-mask>|<A.B.C.D/X>}[<broadcast-a

POS interface.

Function

ddress>| secondary]

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#mtu <bytes>

Configures the MTU value of


the interface. Unit: byte, range:
1504-9600, default: 4600.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#ip mtu <bytes>

Configures the IP MTU value of


the IP packets to be processed by
the interface. Unit: byte, range:
68-9596 on a POS interface,
default: 4470.

Associates strict MTU with IP

ZXR10(config-if)#strict mtu

MTU and MTU on the interface.


6

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#encapsulation

Configures the encapsulation

{ppp | hdlc | frame-relay | {rx|tx}}

mode of an interface. The default


encapsulation mode is PPP.

2. Configure a POS interface clock.


To get better communication quality, it is necessary to select a clock mode for the
POS interface. Two clock modes can be selected for the POS interfaces at two ends
of communication: line-derived clock and internal clock.
Notice the following cases when configuring clock modes of POS interfaces.
l

When two POS interface interconnects or they are connected by Wavelength


Division Multiplexing (WDM), one end uses internal clock, and the other end uses
line-derived clock.
When the POS interface connects to a switch device, the internal clock is used if
the switch device is Data Circuit-terminating Equipment (DCE). The POS interface
of ZXR10 M6000-S is Data Terminal Equipment (DTE), the clock is line-derived
clock.
By default, the clock of POS interface is internal clock.

The POS interface clock modes are listed in Table 8-1.


Table 8-1 POS Interface Clock on Two Sides
Local Side POS

The Peer Side POS

Interface

Interface

Feasibility

Line-derived clock

Line-derived clock

Line-derived clock

Internal clock

Internal clock

Line-derived clock

Internal clock

Internal clock

Remark

The internal clock of


POS interfaces on
two sides have to be
synchronized.

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Chapter 8 POS Interface Configuration

To configure an interface clock on the ZXR10 M6000-S, use the following commands.
Steps

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#clock mode

Sets the mode of the sending

send{internal| line}

clock for the interface.


Internal: internal clock.
Default: internal.
Line: line-derived clock.

3. Configure a POS interface delay down/up.


When the status of physical layer is down/up, it is judged immediately that the
interface is down/up and the down/up state is reported. In this way, the updating and
convergence of the router are influenced.
To judge whether a flash exists during a set delay time, add the delay down command.
A timer is started for verifying the network state after the preset delay time.
l
l

If the network state is normal, the interface down is not triggered.


If the interface is still inactive, then the interface down is triggered.

To judge whether a flash exists during a set delay time, add the delay up command.
A timer is started for verifying the network state after the preset delay time.
l
l

If the network state is down, the interface up is not triggered.


If the interface is still up, then the interface up is triggered.

On the ZXR10 M6000-S, execute the following commands to activate the POS
interface delay down function.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enter interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#link-delay-down

Configures the delay time for

<timer>

an interface to be down from


up, range: 0-20000, unit: ms,
default: 0 (meaning no delay).

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#link-delay-up

Configures the delay time for

<timer>

an interface to be up from
down, range: 0-20000, unit:
ms, default: 0 (meaning no
delay).

4. Verify the configurations.,

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Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface [brief [phy

Shows interface configuration.

|<interface-name>|[{exclude | include}<line>]]]
ZXR10#show interface description

Shows interface description information.

ZXR10#show running-config-interface

Shows the clock mode, and POS interface

<interface-name>

delay down configuration.

End of Steps

8.3 POS Interface Configuration Example


8.3.1 POS Interface Basic Configuration Example
Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 8-1, the POS interface 192-0/1/0/1 on R1 connects to the POS interface
192-0/2/0/1 on R2. It is required that R1 and R2 can ping each other.
Figure 8-1 POS Interface Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure IP addresses of the POS interfaces on R1 and R2.
2. Validate configuration to make sure that R1 and R2 can ping each other.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#clock mode line
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#exit
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#ip address 11.12.13.14

255.255.255.0

R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#exit

Configuration on R2:
R2(config)#interface pos192-0/2/0/1
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#clock mode internal

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R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#exit
R2(config)#interface pos192-0/2/0/1
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#ip address 21.22.23.24 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#exit

Configuration Verification
Check the configuration on R1, as shown below.
R1#ping 21.22.23.24
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 21.22.23.24,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 12/18/20ms.

Check the configuration on R2, as shown below.


R2#ping 11.12.13.14
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 11.12.13.14,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 12/18/20ms.

8.3.2 POS Interface Delay Down/Up Configuration Example


Configuration Description
Signal loss causes frequent down/up of the R1 interface hardware. It is required to enable
the delay down/up function on the POS interface of R1, see Figure 8-2.
Figure 8-2 POS Interface Delay Down/Up Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Enter the interface configuration mode.
2. Configures the delay time for the POS interface to be down from up.
3. Configures the delay time for the POS interface to be up from down.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/3/3/1
R1(config-if-pos192-0/3/3/1)#link-delay-down 100
R1(config-if-pos192-0/3/3/1)#link-delay-up 100
R1(config-if-pos192-0/3/3/1)#exit

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Configuration Verification
If the ACT indicator on the board has no change during the configuration (100ms), execute
the show command on R1, and the result is displayed as follows.
R1#show running-config-interface pos192-0/3/3/1
! <Interface>
interface pos192-0/3/3/1
encapsulation hdlc
no shutdown
$
! </Interface>
! <pm_if>
interface pos192-0/3/3/1
link-delay-down 100
link-delay-up 100
$
! </pm_if>

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Chapter 9

CPOS Interface Configuration


Table of Contents
CPOS Overview .........................................................................................................9-1
Configuring CPOS Interface Attributes .......................................................................9-3
Configuring the Attributes of a CPOS Interface Section ..............................................9-4
Configuring the Lower-Order Channel of the CPOS Interface .....................................9-5
Configuring the Higher-Order Channel of the CPOS Interface ....................................9-7
Verifying CPOS Configurations...................................................................................9-8
CPOS Configuration Example ....................................................................................9-8

9.1 CPOS Overview


CPOS Introduction
The Channelized POS (CPOS) interface can precisely divide the bandwidth by fully utilizing
the SDH features, which:
l
l
l

Reduces the number of low-speed physical interfaces for routers.


Enhances the convergence capability of low-speed interfaces for routers.
Enhances the private-line access capability of routers.

From the physical perspective, the CPOS interface is called controller. It can be logically
channelized into multiple E1/T1 channels for transmission purposes.
The CPOS interface supports SDH transmission and SONET transmission.
l

SDH transmission
In SDH transmission mode, only the CPOS clock, E1 clock, and the E1 frame format
should be set. In addition, the multiplexing path should be selected based on the
country.

SONET transmission
In SONET transmission mode, only the CPOS clock, E1 clock, and the E1 frame
format should be set. In addition, the frame format for the CPOS interface should be
set to SONET, and the multiplexing path should be selected based on the country.

E1/T1-to-STM-1 Multiplexing
In a G.709-recommended SDH multiplexing procedure, there may be more than one path
for multiplexing a low-speed frame carrying the payload to an STM-N link. Figure 9-1 and
Figure 9-2 illustrate the processes of multiplexing an E1/T1 frame to an STM-1 frame.
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Figure 9-1 Process of Multiplexing E1 Channels to Form STM-1

Figure 9-2 Process of Multiplexing T1 Channels to Form STM-1

The multiplexing paths may vary with countries and areas. Either the AU-3 or AU-4
multiplexing path can be specified for a CPOS interface through the multiplex mode
command, which ensures the interconnection between two ends.

CPOS Interface Application Scenario


Some users may access the transport network by using middle-end or low-end devices
through E1/T1 leased lines, and the required bandwidth is between the E1 and T3 lines.
For example, several E1/T1 leased lines may be allocated for a data center.
The bandwidth of users is aggregated to one or more CPOS interfaces through a transport
network, and these interfaces are connected to a high-end device. The high-end device
identifies low-end devices uniquely through time slots.
More than one level of transport networks may be involved between the CPOS interface
and low-end devices, and each low-end device may communicate with the transport
network through other measures. This is logically similar to the scenario where low-end
devices are connected to router A through one or multiple E1/T1 lines, see Figure 9-3.

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Figure 9-3 Network Diagram for a CPOS Application

9.2 Configuring CPOS Interface Attributes


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the attributes of a COPS
interface.

Steps
1. Enter controller configuration mode of the CPOS interface.
Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#controller <interface-name>

Enters controller configuration


mode of the CPOS interface.

2. Configure the attributes of the CPOS interface.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#loopback {

Configures the loop-back mode

loopback-cancel | loopback-inner | loopback-outer }

for the CPOS interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#clock mode {

Configures the mode of the

internal |line}

sending clock for the CPOS


interface.
l

interval: internal clock.


Default: internal.

line: line clock.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#damping

Configures damping parameters

{<maxsuptime><suppress><reuse><halflife>|enable |disable}

for the CPOS interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#holdtime <holdtime>

Configures the holding duration


for the CPOS interface.

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{ loopback-cancel | loopback-inner | loopback-outer }: loop-back mode for interfaces,


including loopback-cancel, loopback-inner, and loopback-outer. The default is
loopback-cancel.
{ internal |line}: clock source for the CPOS interface, including internal (default) and
line.
<maxsuptime>: maximum suppression duration (s). The range is 2-600. The default
value is 20.
<suppress>: suppression threshold. The range is 2-10000. The default value is 2000.
<reuse>: reuse threshold. The range is 1-2000. The default value is 1000.
<halflife>: half-life (s) that is the duration when the penalty is reduced by half. The
range is 1-100. The default value is 5.
End of Steps

9.3 Configuring the Attributes of a CPOS Interface


Section
This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the attributes of a CPOS
interface section.

Steps
1. Configure the frame format of the CPOS interface as SDH.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#controller <interface-name>

Enters controller configuration


mode of the CPOS interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#framing sdh

Configures the frame format


of the CPOS interface to SDH.

2. Configure the attributes of the CPOS interface section.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#flag j0

Configures the trace byte J0 of

{1-trace-byte |16-trace-byte |64-trace-byte }<j0>

the CPOS interface section.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#flag j0ex

Configures the peer-end trace

{1-trace-byte |16-trace-byte |64-trace-byte }<j0ex>

byte J0 expected by the CPOS


interface section.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#threshold

Configures the Signal

sd-ber <sd>

Degradation (SD) BER threshold.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#threshold

Configures the Signal Failure

sf-ber <sf>

(SF) BER threshold.


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Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#aug mapping

Configures the mapping mode

{au3|au4}

of the multiplexing path for the


CPOS physical interface under
the SDH frame format.

1-trace-byte: byte 1 mode in overhead bytes. Length of the character string: 1.


16-trace-byte: byte 16 mode in overhead bytes. Length of the character string: 1-15.
64-trace-byte: byte 64 mode in overhead bytes. Length of the character string: 1-62.
<j0>: section trace bytes.
<j0ex>: expected peer-end section trace bytes.
au3: multiplexing path mode for mapping au3.
au4: multiplexing path mode for mapping au4.
End of Steps

9.4 Configuring the Lower-Order Channel of the CPOS


Interface
This procedure describes the steps and commands for the lowerorder channel of the
CPOS interface multiplexing path.

Steps
1. Configure the frame format of the CPOS interface as SDH.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#controller <interface-name>

Enters controller configuration


mode of the CPOS interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#framing sdh

Configures the frame format


for the CPOS interface to
SDH.

2. Configure the mapping mode and multiplexing path.


Step
1

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#aug

Selects mapping au4 (CPOS

mapping au4

only supports the au4 mode).

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#au4

Configures a multiplexing

<au4-num> tug3 <tug3-num>

path.

<au4-num>: value of the multiplexing path au4. Set the value to 1.


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<tug3-num>: value of the multiplexing path tug3. Range: 13.


3. Configure the E1 and lower-order channel.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#m

Selects the e1 mode (CPOS

ode e1

supports the e1 mode).

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#tug2

Creates an e1.

<tug2-num> e1 <e1-num>
3

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-

Configures the mode of the

e1)#clock mode send{internal|line| acr-domain <1-504>|

sending clock for e1. The

dcr-domain <1-504>}

modes include the internal


clock, line clock, auto-sensing
click, and differential clock.
Default: internal.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-

Configures the priority of the

e1)#clock ces-domain priority <1-63>

clock domain. Default: 63.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-e1)#f

Configures the e1 frame

raming { crc4|no-crc4}

format.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-

Configures the loop-back

e1)#loopback { loopback-cancel | loopback-inner |

mode for the e1.

loopback-outer }
7

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-e1)#f

Configures the overhead byte

lag j2 {16-trace-byte | 64-trace-byte | 1-trace-byte-hex}<j2>

j2 for the low-order channel.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-e1)#f

Configures the expected

lag j2ex {16-trace-byte | 64-trace-byte | 1-trace-byte-hex

peer-end overhead byte j2 for

}<j2ex>

the low-order channel.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3-e1)#f

Configures v5 value (000,

lag v5 <v5>

001, 010, 011,100,101, 110,


111) for the low-order channel.

10

Creates a frame channel.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3e1)#channelgroup <channel-num> timeslot <timeslot>

11

Creates an unframe channel.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3e1)#unframe

<tug2-num>: value of the tug2 layer of e1. Range: 17.


<e1-num>: value of e1. Range: 13.
<channel-num>: number of the created frame channel in the current e1.
<timeslot>: number of the time slot occupied by the frame channel in the current e1
(Range: 131).
End of Steps
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Chapter 9 CPOS Interface Configuration

9.5 Configuring the Higher-Order Channel of the CPOS


Interface
This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the higher-order
channel of the CPOS interface.

Steps
1. Configure the frame format of the CPOS interface as SDH.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#controller <interface-name>

Enters the controller


configuration mode of the
CPOS interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#framing sdh

Configures the frame format


for the CPOS interface to SDH
frame format.

2. Configure the mapping mode and multiplexing path.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#aug

Selects mapping au4 (CPOS

mapping au4

only supports the au4 mode).

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh)#au4

Configures a multiplexing

<au4-num> tug3 <tug3-num>

path.

3. Configure the path mode and parameters of the higher-order channel.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#m

Selects the e1 mode (COPS

ode e1

supports the e1 mode).

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#flag

Configures the value of the

j1 {1-trace-byte | 1-trace-byte-hex | 16-trace-byte |

high-order channel trace byte

64-trace-byte}<j1>

J1.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#flag

Configures the value of the

j1ex { 1-trace-byte-hex | 16-trace-byte | 64-trace-byte}<j1

expected peer-end high-order

ex>

channel trace byte J1.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#flag

Configures the signal flag

c2 <c2>

byte indicating the supported

upper-layer services.
5

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name-sdh-tug3)#flag

Configures the expected peer

c2ex <c2ex>

end signal flag byte.

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<j1>: description about the high-order channel trace byte J1.


l
l
l

16-trace-byte: allows 1-15 bytes.


64-trace-byte: allows 1-62 bytes.
1-trace-byte-hex: allows a hex value.

<j1ex>: description about the expected peer-end high-order channel trace byte J1.
<c2>: Signal flag byte is used for indicating the multiplexing structure and information
payload of the VC frame, for example, the loading information of the channel, the
types and mapping modes of the loaded services. This byte can be set as 000, 001,
002, 003, 004, 018, 019, 020, 021, 022, 023, 024, 025, 026, 027, 207, and 254.
For example, C2=00H indicates that the VC4 channel carries no signal. C2=02H
indicates that the payload carried by the VC4 channel is multiplexed by following the
TUG multiplex path. C2=15H indicates that the payload of the VC4 channel is FDDI
signals. To multiplex 2 M signals, C2 needs to select the TUG structure. The settings
of C2 on the Send Port and Receive Port must be the same. If the settings are not
the same, the HP-SLM alarm is submitted on the device containing the receive port,
indicating that the signals received actually on C2 is different from the signals which
C2 should receive.
End of Steps

9.6 Verifying CPOS Configurations


ZXR10 M6000-S provides the following command to verify CPOS attribute configuration
and channelized functions.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show controller <interface-name>

This displays the interface configuration,


channel configuration, alarm messages, bit
errors, and other information of the CPOS
interface.

ZXR10#show running-config-controller

This displays the configuration information of

<interface-name>[all]

a specified CPOS interface.

9.7 CPOS Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 9-4, the E1 interface and the two connected CPOS interfaces can
normally operate.

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Figure 9-4 CPOS Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Enter the CPOS controller configuration mode.


Select the frame type.
Select the mapping mode, and select AU4 to configure the E1 channelized interface.
Configure the AU number for the SDH E1.
Select the interface mode.
Enter the e1 configuration mode.
Configure the channelized interfaces with time slots.

Configuration Command
Configuration for ZXR10:
ZXR10(config)#controller cpos3-0/4/1/1
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/4/1/1)#framing sdh
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/4/1/1-sdh)#aug mapping au4
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/4/1/1-sdh)#au4 1 tug3 1
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/4/1/1-sdh-tug3)#mode e1
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/4/1/1-sdh-tug3)#tug2 2 e1 1
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/4/1/1-sdh-tug3-e1)#unframe
ZXR10(config-ctrl-cpos3-0/1/1/1-sdh-tug3-e1)#!
ZXR10(config)#interface cpos3_e1-0/3/1/1.1/2/1:1
ZXR10(config-if-cpos3_e1-0/4/1/1.1/2/1:1)#no shutdown

The configuration for the peer-end interface is similar.

Configuration Verification
Check the running status of the CPOS interface on ZXR10.
ZXR10#show ip interface brief include cpos
Interface

IP-Address

Mask

Admin Phy

Prot

cpos3_e1-0/4/1/1.1/2/1:1

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

/*After the two ends are successfully connected, the protocol status is "up". */
ZXR10 #show controller cpos3-0/4/1/1
cpos3-0/4/1/1 is up
Physical layer is Packet over (SDH)
Port connector type is OC48/STM16-SR
Clock

source: line

Clock(Tx) grade: S1=00 Quality unknown


Clock(Rx) grade: S1=00 Quality unknown(existing synchronization network)

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SPE scrambling : enable
Loopback is not set
BER thresholds :
SD: 10e-6

SF: 10e-4

SECTION
Active

Alarm: NONE

History Alarm: LOF = 0

LOS =0

AIS = 0

RDI =0

SD

= 0

SF

=0

TIM = 0

TU

=0

SEF = 0
Error

: BIP(B1) = 65535
BIP(B2) = 67108863

J0(TX)

: "ZTE ZXR10 M6000"

CRC-7

: 0xa6

REI(M1) = 67108863

5a 54 45 20 5a 58 52 31 30 20 54 38 30 30 30
J0(RX)

: "ZTE ZXR10 M6000"

CRC-7

: 0xa6

J0(EX)

: "ZTE ZXR10 M6000"

CRC-7

: 0xa6

5a 54 45 20 5a 58 52 31 30 20 54 38 30 30 30

5a 54 45 20 5a 58 52 31 30 20 54 38 30 30 30
Higher order Path 1: STM1/AU4 1/1 is up
Active

Alarm: TM

SLM

History Alarm: AIS = 0


TM

RDI = 0

= 1

TU

SLM = 1

LOP = 0

= 0

SLU = 0

UNEQP = 0
Error

: BIP(B3) = 5

C2(TX)

: 0x16

PPP/HDLC with payload scrambling

C2(RX)

: 0x16

PPP/HDLC with payload scrambling

C2(EX)

: 0x2

J1(TX)

: "ZTE ZXR10 M6000"

CRC-7

: 0xa6

NEWPTR

REI(G1) = 1

= 0

PSE = 0

NSE = 0

TUG structure

5a 54 45 20 5a 58 52 31 30 20 54 38 30 30 30
J1(RX)

: "ZTE ZXR10 M6000"

CRC-7

: 0xa6
5a 54 45 20 5a 58 52 31 30 20 54 38 30 30 30

J1(EX)

: "ZTE ZXR10 M6000"

CRC-7

: 0xa6
5a 54 45 20 5a 58 52 31 30 20 54 38 30 30 30

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Chapter 10

CE1 Configuration
Table of Contents
CE1 Overview ..........................................................................................................10-1
Configuring CE1.......................................................................................................10-2
CE1 Configuration Example .....................................................................................10-4

10.1 CE1 Overview


CE1 Introduction
E1 is a digital communication system defined by ITU-T. The transmission speed is 2.048
Mbit/s.
E1/CE1 interface refers to channelized E1 interface. It has two operating modes: E1 (clear
channel) mode and CE1 (channelized) mode.
l

When the interface operates in E1 mode, it is like an interface that does not have any
time slots, and has a bandwidth of 2.048 Mbit/s. Its logical features are the same with
those of a synchronization serial port. It supports link layer protocols, like PPP, HDLC
and frame trunk. It also supports IP network protocols.
When the interface operates in CE1 mode, it has 32 time slots (ID: 0-31). Among
which, time slot 1 to time slot 30 can be grouped in any methods, and time slot 0 is
used to transmit frame synchronization signals. Thus time slot 0 cannot be bound.
When some time slots are bound, they can be used as an interface (channel-set). Its
logical features are the same with those of a synchronization serial port. It supports
link layer protocols, like PPP, HDLC and frame trunk. It also supports IP network
protocols.

The CE1 configuration described in this manual is the configuration of the E1 interface in
CE1 operating mode.

Related Terms
l

E-Carrier and T-Carrier Interface


T-Carrier is the first digital carrier system. It defined the standards for digital
transmission and exchange, including the transforming of analogue voice signals to
digital signals. T-Carrier consists of 64 kbit/s signaling channels, called DS-0 (Digital
Signal). ANSI defined the standards for T-Carrier in T1.107. T-Carrier is widely used
in north America and Japan. It also contributes to the development of other carrier
systems, for example, E-Carrier.
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E-Carrier is a digital communication system defined by ITU-T. It evolves from E-1


(2.048 Mbit/s), and it is used in areas except north America and Japan.
l

Digital Carrier System


A carrier system has multiple logical signaling channels in a single physical channel.
Thus it supports multi-communication. In a digital carrier system, a single digital
circuit with large-capacity supports multiple logical signaling channels. Each signaling
channel supports an independent communication channel.

Channelized, Unchannelized, and Clear Channel


The following are the operating modes for E-Carrier and T-Carrier interfaces:

Channelized: In framed mode, time slots except frame header of digital code
stream (E1, T1, E3, and DS3) can be allocated to multiple channels.

Unchannelized: In framed mode, time slots except frame header of digital code
stream (E1, T1, E3, and DS3) can only be allocated to one channel.

Clear Channel: It is also call unframed mode. Any bit in a code stream carries
data, and the data in code stream belongs to one channel.

10.2 Configuring CE1


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring a CE1 interface.

Steps
1. Configure the properties of the CE1 interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#controller <interface-name>

Enters controller configuration


mode of the CE1 interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#loopback

Configures loopback mode

<loopback-mode>

(including loopback-cancel,
loopback-inner, and loopbackouter) of the CE1 interface.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#clock

Configures the mode of the sending

mode send{internal | line | acr-domain <1-24>|

clock for the CE1 interface. The

dcr-domain <1-24>}

modes include the internal clock


(default), line clock, auto-sensing
clock, and differential clock.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#clock

Configures the priority of the clock

ces-domain priority <1-63>

domain for the CE1 interface.


Default: 63.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#clock

Configures the mode of the

mode receive { internal | line }

receiving clock for the CE1


interface. The modes include
the internal clock and line clock.
Default: line.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#damping

Configures damping parameters

{<maxsuptime><suppress><reuse><halflife>| enable |

for the CE1 interface. Enable or

disable}

disable interface damping.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#holdtime

Configures holdtime when restart

<holdtime>

interface board or device. Range:


01200 seconds.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#framing

Configures the frame format

<frame-type>

(including crc4 and no-crc4) for the


CE1 interface in framed mode.

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#itf-type

Configures the filler type (including

<itf-type>

0x7e and 0xff) between frames for


the CE1 interface.

10

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#linecode

Configures line encoding format

<linecode>

(including ami and hdb3) for the


CE1 interface.

11

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#pcm

Configures frame format (including

<pcm>

pcm30 and pcm31) for the CE1


interface in framed mode.

12

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#threshold

Configures incorrect package

error-packet <errpacket>

threshold for the CE1 interface.


Range: 165535.

<maxsuptime>: maximum suppress limit. Range: 1-600 seconds. Default: 20 seconds.


<suppress>: suppress limit. Range: 1-10000. Default: 2000.
<reuse>: reuse limit. Range: 1-2000. Default: 1000.
<halflife>: amount of time that must elapse to reduce the penalty by one half. Range:
1-100 seconds. Default: 5 seconds.
2. Creating a channel.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#controller <interface-name>

Enters controller configuration


mode of CE1 interface.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#channelgr

Creates a framed channel.

oup <channel-num> timeslots <timeslot>


ZXR10(config-ctrl-interface-name)#unframe

Creates an unframed channel.

<channel-num>: ID of the framed channel in CE1 interface. Range: 1-31.


<timeslot>: time slot used by the framed channel. Range: 1-31.
3. Verify the configurations.
Command

Function

ZXR10#show controller <interface-name>

Displays the information of the interface,


alarm, and incorrect code of an effective
CE1 interface.

ZXR10#show running-config controller[all]

Displays the configuration information


of the CE1 interface.

End of Steps

10.3 CE1 Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 10-1, ce1-0/1/3/1 of R1 is connected with ce1-0/4/3/13 of R2. It is
required that R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged.
Figure 10-1 CE1 Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure controllers on both R1 and R2 to unframed controller and framed controller.
2. For an unframed controller, you can only enter the ce1-0/1/3/1:1 and ce1-0/4/3/13:1
interfaces to configure the IP addresses on both ends to be in the same network
segment.
3. For a framed controller, you must configure channelgroup and timeslots of ce1 both
on R1 and R2 to the same.
4. Enter the channelized interface of channelgroup on R1 and R2. In this example,
ce1-0/1/3/1:2 and ce1-0/4/3/13:2 interfaces are used. Configure the IP addresses of
both of the interfaces to be in the same network segment.
5. Test the configuration results. Ensure that R1 and R2 can be mutually pinged.
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Configuration Command
The following example shows how to configure CE1 on R1:
R1(config)#controller ce1-0/1/3/1
R1(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/1)#unframe

/*Configure to Unframed mode*/

R1(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/1)#exit
R1(config)#interface ce1-0/1/3/1:1
R1(config-if-ce1-0/1/3/1:1)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-ce1-0/1/3/1:1)#ip address 136.155.3.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-ce1-0/1/3/1:1)#exit

R1(config)#controller ce1-0/1/3/1
R1(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/1)#no unframe
/*To configure unframed controller and framed controller on
the same physical interface, run the no unframe command
before configuring the framed controller*/
R1(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/1)#channelgroup 2 timeslots 2
/*Configure framed channel ID and time slot*/
R1(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/1)#exit
R1(config)#interface ce1-0/1/3/1:2
R1(config-if-ce1-0/1/3/1:2)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-ce1-0/1/3/1:2)#ip address 136.155.3.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-ce1-0/1/3/1:2)#end

The following example shows how to configure CE1 on R2:


R2(config)#controller ce1-0/4/3/13
R2(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/13)#unframe

/*Configure to Unframed mode*/

R2(config-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/13)#exit
R2(config)#interface ce1-0/4/3/13:1
R2(config-if-ce1-0/4/3/13:1)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-ce1-0/4/3/13:1)#ip address 136.155.3.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-ce1-0/4/3/13:1)#exit

R2(config)#controller ce1-0/4/3/13
R2(config-ctrl-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/13)#no unframe
/*To configure unframed controller and framed controller on
the same physical interface, run the no unframe command
before configuring the framed controller*/
R2(config-ctrl-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/13)#channelgroup 2 timeslots 2
/*Configure framed channel ID and time slot*/
R2(config-ctrl-ctrl-ce1-0/1/3/13)#exit
R2(config)#interface ce1-0/4/3/13:2
R2(config-if-ce1-0/4/3/13:2)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-ce1-0/4/3/13:2)#ip address 136.155.3.1 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-ce1-0/4/3/13:2)#end

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Configuration Verification
For unframed mode, the following are the verification results on R1:
R1#ping 136.155.3.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 136.155.3.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 3/3/5 ms.

For unframed mode, the following are the verification results on R2:
R2#ping 136.155.3.1
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 136.155.3.1,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 3/3/4 ms.

For framed mode, the following are the verification results on R1:
R1#ping 136.155.3.2
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 136.155.3.2,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 39/40/42 ms.

For framed mode, the following are the verification results on R2:
R2#ping 136.155.3.1
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 136.155.3.1,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 34/37/42 ms.

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Chapter 11

PPP Configuration
Table of Contents
PPP Overview ..........................................................................................................11-1
Configuring PPP.......................................................................................................11-3
PPP Configuration Example .....................................................................................11-5

11.1 PPP Overview


PPP Introduction
PPP is a widely used WAN protocol.
It realizes point-to-point connections of
router-to-router and host-to-network across synchronous and asynchronous circuits. PPP
provides a set of solutions for problems of link establishment, maintenance, withdrawing,
upper layer protocol negotiation, authentication, and so on.
PPP comprises the following parts:
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Link Control Protocol (LCP): It is responsible for establishing, maintaining and


terminating a physical connection.
Network Control Protocol (NCP): NCP is a stack of protocols. It is responsible for the
network protocol running over the physical connection and solving the problems on
the upper layer network protocol.
Authentication protocol
The common authentication protocols used in PPP include Password Authentication
Protocol (PAP) and Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP). Generally,
PAP and CHAP are encapsulated on serial links to provide security authentication.

PAP and CHAP


PAP uses two-way handshake authentication. The user name and the password are
transmitted in plain text on links. The procedure of PAP authentication is described below.
1. The authenticated device sends its user name and password to the authenticating
device.
2. The authenticating device checks whether the user name and the password are correct
according to the configuration, and then returns different response according to the
result.
CHAP is safer than PAP. It uses three-way handshake to check the identification of the
remote node periodically. It uses inquiring messages to prevent twice-born attacks. The
procedure of CHAP authentication is described below.
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1. The authenticating device sends some packets generated at random to the


authenticated device.
2. The authenticated device uses its password and Message Digest 5 Algorithm (MD5)
to encrypt the random packets, and then sends the cryptograph to the authenticating
device.
3. The authenticating device uses its password saved for the authenticated device and
MD5 to encrypt the primary random packets. It compares the cryptographs, and then
returns different response according to the result.

PPP Features
PPP protocol has two parts, LCP and NCP. They are used to negotiate to establish and
maintain point-to-point link on interfaces (such as E1, T1, E3, T3 and POS). Meanwhile,
LCP and NCP provide packet encapsulation format which is different from that of Ethernet
protocol for upper layer protocols.
For a upper layer protocol packet (such as IP packet, MPLS packet, and so on), a 2bytes
protocol field is encapsulated to the packet, and two PPP headers with a fixed value
(0xFF03) is added. According to actual requirements, the PPP header can be compressed
by negotiation.
PPP negotiation has three stages, LCP, authentication (optional) and NCP.
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Authentication stage can be selected according to the actual requirements. Generally,


authentication is applied on access routers to authenticate and authorize access of
users.
NCP includes IP Control Protocol (IPCP), IPv6CP and MPLSCP, OSINLCP, Border
Gateway Protocol (BGP), and so on. Negotiation is necessary for IPCP (supporting
IPv4), but other NCP protocols can be selected according to actual requirements.
After IPCP negotiation is successful, the protocol be set up on a PPP port.

Compared with Ethernet encapsulation:


l

PPP has higher bandwidth use rate. For shorter packets, the effect is more
obvious. Additionally, compared with Ethernet encapsulation, the encapsulation of
a PPP packet header is more simple. Complex MAC header encapsulation and
decapsulation is removed from the mechanism of packet sending and receiving.
PPP protocol state machine is more complex than that of Ethernet, because PPP
protocol is set up after the negotiation is successful on an interface. After that, the
upper layer can send and receive service packets.
By default, the protocol state is in down state on an interface after a PPP interface
is created. After PPP negotiation is successful, the interfaces will be in up state.
After PPP link negotiation is successful, both sides will send LCP keepalive packets
periodically. If one side fails to receive ECHO response packets after N (N >= 1)
keepalive request packets are sent by the other side, the link will be in down state.
Meanwhile, the protocol state is down. The operations (such as route recalculation,
route update, and so on) are triggered.

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Chapter 11 PPP Configuration

11.2 Configuring PPP


This section describes the configuration steps and commands of PPP.

Steps
1. Configure the encapsulation mode of a POS interface to ppp.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters POS interface


configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#encapsulation

Configures the encapsulation

{hdlc | ppp | frame-relay}

mode on a POS interface.


Here, select ppp mode.

2. Configure the PPP.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#ppp

Enters PPP configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-ppp)#interface <interface-name >

Enters PPP interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Configures PPP authentication

authentication {pap | chap}

mode, PAP or CHAP.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Configures the local router domain

chap hostname <hostname>

name. By default, the local router


domain name is not configured.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Configures the local router

chap password {<password>| encrypted <password>}

password. By default, the local


router password is not configured.
The encrypted password consists
of 1200 characters.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Establishes a PPP link with the

open

peer router on its own initiative.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp pap

Configures PAP user name (1-159

sent-username <username> password {<password>|

bytes) and password (1-31 bytes).

encrypted <password>}

By default, PAP user name and


password are not configured. The
encrypted password consists of
1120 characters.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Configures timeout interval for

timeout negotiation [<timeout>]

PPP negotiation. By default, the


negotiation timeout interval is 5
seconds, in the range of 130
seconds.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Configures timeout interval of

timeout authentication [<timeout>]

authentication on a PPP link. By


default, the timeout interval of
authentication is 5 seconds, in the
range of 130 seconds.

10

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#keepa

Configures the interval to send

live [<timeout>| disable]

keepalive packets of a PPP link.


By default, the interval to send
keepalive packets is 10 seconds,
in the range of 132767 seconds.

11

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Configures the maximum number

max-echo <max_count>

of echo packets sent when the


device does not receive any echo
response from the peer. By default,
the number of echo packets is 5, in
the range of 110.

12

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Enables or disables the NCP

ipcp <enable| disable>

negotiation option IPCP of a PPP


link.

13

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp bcp

Enables or disables the NCP

<enable| disable>

negotiation option BCP of a PPP


link.

14

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Enables or disables the NCP

mplscp <enable| disable>

negotiation option MPLSCP of a


PPP link.

15

16

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#bind-i

Binds the IP pool and assigns an

p-pool <poolname>

IP address to the peer.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ip-acces

Configures the IPCP access type

s-type <dual| ipv4| ipv6>

of a PPP link: ipv4 and ipv6.


Default: dual, that is, both types
are supported.

3. Verify the configurations.

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Chapter 11 PPP Configuration

Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface [brief [phy

Views interface information.

|<interface-name>|[{exclude | include}<line>]]]
ZXR10#show ppp multilink [<multilink-number>]

Displays the abstract in the PPP multilink.

4. Maintain the PPP.


Command

Function

ZXR10#debug ppp all

Enables all debugging functions of PPP.

ZXR10#debug ppp authentication [interface

Enables the function for debugging PPP

<interface-name>]

authentication.

ZXR10#debug ppp error [interface <interface-name>]

Enables the function for debugging PPP


error information.

ZXR10#debug ppp events [interface

Enables the function for debugging PPP

<interface-name>]

events.

ZXR10#debug ppp lcp [interface <interface-name>]

Enables the function for debugging PPP


LCP packet analysis output.

ZXR10#debug ppp ncp [interface <interface-num>]

Enables the function for debugging PPP


NCP packet analysis output.

ZXR10#debug ppp packet [interface

Enables the function for debugging PPP

<interface-name>]

control packets output.

ZXR10#show debug ppp

Shows all enabled PPP debugging.

End of Steps

11.3 PPP Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 11-1, R1 and R2 are directly connected through the interfaces
POS192-0/1/0/1 and POS192-0/2/0/1. PPP authentication is enabled between R1 and
R2. It is required that R1 and R2 can ping each other successfully.
Figure 11-1 PPP Configuration Example

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Configuration Flow
1. Configure IP address on the POS192 interfaces of R1 and R2.
2. Configure authentication mode on the POS192 interfaces of R1 and R2.
3. Test the configuration to check whether R1 and R2 can ping each other successfully.

Configuration Command
The configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#ip address 11.12.13.14 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#exit
R1(config)#ppp
R1(config-ppp)#interface pos192-0/1/0/1
R1(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#ppp authentication pap
R1(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#ppp pap sent-username zte password zte
R1(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#end

The configuration of R2:


R2(config)#interface pos192-0/2/0/1
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#ip address 21.22.23.24 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#exit
R2(config)#ppp
R2(config-ppp)#interface pos192-0/2/0/1
R2(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#ppp authentication pap
R2(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#ppp pap sent-username zte password zte
R2(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#

Configuration Verification
Check the configuration result on R1, as shown below.
R1#ping 21.22.23.24
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 21.22.23.24,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),
round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

R1#show running-config-interface pos192-0/1/0/1


! <Interface>
interface pos192-0/1/0/1
ip address 11.12.13.14 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
$
! </Interface>
! <ppp>
ppp

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Chapter 11 PPP Configuration


interface pos192-0/1/0/1
ppp authentication pap
ppp pap sent-username zte password encrypted QYOXzHFY98jEIFmivoT6mA==
$
$
! </ppp>

Check the configuration result on R2, as shown below.


R2#ping 11.12.13.14
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 21.22.23.24,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),
round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

R2#show running-config-interface pos192-0/2/0/1


! <Interface>
interface pos192-0/2/0/1
ip address 21.22.23.24 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
$
! </Interface>
! <ppp>
ppp
interface pos192-0/2/0/1
ppp authentication pap
ppp pap sent-username zte password encrypted QYOXzHFY98jEIFmivoT6mA==
$
$
! </ppp>

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Chapter 12

HDLC Configuration
Table of Contents
HDLC Overview .......................................................................................................12-1
Configuring HDLC ....................................................................................................12-3
HDLC Configuration Examples.................................................................................12-4

12.1 HDLC Overview


HDLC Introduction
HDLC is a type of link layer protocol. It provides transparent point-to-point transmission for
the upper layer protocol (IP). It is parallel to other Layer 2 protocols (such as PPP, FR, and
so on) and provides services meeting different requirements for the upper layer protocol.
The hierarchy of HDLC in the protocol stack is shown in Figure 12-1.
Figure 12-1 Hierarchy of HDLC in Protocol Stack

HDLC can aggregate several POS interfaces encapsulated with HDLC into a POSgroup
logical interface. On ZXR10 M6000-S, posgroup provides more flexible and effective
solutions about network architecture for users. It brings more flexibility in network planning
and network architecture designing with ZXR10 series products. It also improves the
network stability greatly, especially for Ethernet and network environments in which
Ethernet interfaces are used. POSgroup function can extend bandwidth, which makes
the cost to construct network more reasonable.
l

POSgroup can improve the communication ability of the links. It aggregates several
POS interfaces into an interface. The bandwidth of a POSgroup interface is the
bandwidth sum of the member interfaces. In this way, the interface bandwidth is
increased.
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Posgroup supports the aggregation of POS interfaces across boards and of different
speeds.
POSgroup supports two modes of load sharing, per-packet mode and per-destination
mode.
64 POSgroup interfaces can be configured at most.
There are 16 POS interfaces at most in each POSgroup interface.

HDLC Features
HDLC provides a mechanism to detect whether the physical link works properly. It provides
an encapsulation mode for the upper layer packets. HDLC supports encapsulation for IP
packets and Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) packets. In addition,
HDLC can aggregate several POS interfaces encapsulated with HDLC into a logical
interface with larger bandwidth, that is, implementing link aggregation of POS interfaces.
Link aggregation means to aggregate several physical links with the same transmission
medium and speed to form a data channel in logic. The POSgroup link aggregation is
shown in Figure 12-2.
Figure 12-2 POSgroup Link Aggregation

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POSgroup link aggregation is to aggregate several physical POS interfaces into a


logical interface with more bandwidth.
The POS interfaces should be encapsulated with HDLC.
The POSgroup interface is a Layer 3 interface encapsulated with HDLC. In forwarding
of Layer 3 packets, except for the encapsulation of link layer protocol, the basic
forwarding principle and mechanism of a POSgroup are the same with that of a
SmartGroup.
Link aggregation of POS interfaces is implemented by MHDLC, including POS
interface aggregation, de-aggregation, state management of the aggregation
interface, change of load sharing, and so on.

Devices of most vendors support CISCO HDLC. At present, ZTE devices also support
CISCO HDLC. The main function of CISCO HDLC is to provide transparent transmission
for the upper layer protocol. The chief characteristic of CISCO HDLC is simple and
effective.

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Chapter 12 HDLC Configuration

12.2 Configuring HDLC


This section describes the configuration steps and commands of HDLC protocol.

Steps
1. Configure the encapsulation mode of a POS interface to hdlc.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters POS interface


configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#encapsulation

Configures the encapsulation

{ frame-relay | hdlc | ppp }

mode on a POS interface. Here,


select hdlc mode.

2. Configure the HDLC protocol.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#hdlc

Enters HDLC configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-hdlc)#interface <interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode from HDLC configuration
mode.

ZXR10(config-hdlc-if-interface-name)#keepal

Configures the interval to send

ive [<timeout>|disable]

HDLC link keepalive packets, in


the unit of second, in the range of
132767. The default value is 10
seconds.

ZXR10(config)#interface <posgroup-name>

Creates a posgroup and enters


posgroup interface configuration
mode.

ZXR10(config)#mhdlc

Enters MHDLC configuration.

ZXR10(config-mhdlc)#interface <interface>

Enters MHDLC interface


configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-mhdlc-member-if-interface-

Adds an interface to the posgroup

name)#posgroup <posgroup-id >

and sets the link aggregation


mode.

ZXR10(config-mhdlc)#interface <posgroup-name >

Enters posgroup interface


configuration mode from MHDLC
configuration mode. The format
of a posgroup name is "posgroup
+ group ID". The range of the
group ID is 1-64.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config-mhdlc-sg-if-posgroup-name)#)#m

Configures the threshold for a

hdlc minimum-member <member-number>

posgroup interface to be up, in


the range of 1-16. By default,
the value is 1, that is, as long as
one member interface is up, the
posgroup interface is up.

10

ZXR10(config-mhdlc-sg-if-posgroup-name)#)#m

Configures the load sharing mode

hdlc load-balance <mode>

of the aggregation group. The


default mode is per-destination.

3. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface [brief [phy |<interface-name

Views interface information.

>|[{exclude | include}<line>]]]
ZXR10#show mhdlc [<posgroup-id>]

Views the current configuration and state


of a posgroup interface.

4. Maintain the HDLC.


Command

Function

ZXR10#debug hdlc { packet [interface<interface-nam

Enables the debugging switch of HDLC

e>]| all }

packet sending and receiving. Use the


no format of this command to disable all
HDLC debugging switches.
Views the commands for HDLC

ZXR10#show debug hdlc

debugging functions that are enabled.

End of Steps

12.3 HDLC Configuration Examples


12.3.1 Basic HDLC Configuration Example
Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 12-3, the interface POS192-0/1/0/1 on R1 and the interface
POS192-0/2/0/1 on R2 are directly connected. The interfaces are encapsulated with
HDLC. It is required that R1 and R2 can ping each other successfully.

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Figure 12-3 Basic HDLC Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Set the encapsulation type to frame-relay on the POS192 interfaces of R1 and R2.
2. Configure IP addresses on the POS192 interfaces of R1 and R2. The IP addresses
are in the same segment.
3. Test the configuration to check whether R1 and R2 can ping each other successfully.

Configuration Command
Configuration for R1:
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#encapsulation hdlc
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#ip address 11.12.13.14 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#exit

Configuration for R2:


R2(config)#interface pos192-0/2/0/1
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#encapsulation hdlc
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#ip address 11.12.13.15 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-pos192-0/2/0/1)#exit

Configuration Verification
Check the configuration result on R1, as shown below.
R1#ping 11.12.13.15
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 11.12.13.15,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

Check the configuration result on R2, as shown below.


R2#ping 11.12.13.14
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 11.12.13.14,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

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12.3.2 POSgroup Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 12-4, the interfaces POS192-0/1/0/4 and POS192-0/1/0/1 on R1 are
encapsulated with HDLC. These two interfaces are aggregated into posgroup1. The
interfaces POS120/5/1/4 and POS192-0/5/1/1 on R2 are encapsulated with HDLC. These
two interfaces are aggregated into posgroup2. It is required that R1 and R2 can ping
each other successfully.
Figure 12-4 POSgroup Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Set the encapsulation type to HDLC on the POS192 interfaces of R1 and R2.
2. Create posgroup interfaces. Configure IP addresses on the POS192 interfaces of R1
and R2. The IP addresses are in the same segment.
3. Aggregate the POS interfaces to the POSgroups.
4. Test the configuration to check whether R1 and R2 can ping each other successfully.

Configuration Command
Configuration for R1:
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#encapsulation hdlc
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#exit
R1(config)#interface pos192-0/1/0/4
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/4)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/4)#encapsulation hdlc
R1(config-if-pos192-0/1/0/4)#exit
R1(config)#interface

posgroup1

R1(config-if-posgroup1)#ip address 11.12.13.14 255.255.255.0


R1(config-if-posgroup1)#exit

R1(config)#mhdlc
R1(config-mhdlc)#interface

pos192-0/1/0/1

R1(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#posgroup 1
R1(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/1/0/1)#exit
R1(config-mhdlc)#interface

pos192-0/1/0/4

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R1(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/1/0/4)#posgroup 1
R1(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/1/0/4)#end

Configuration for R2:


R2(config)#interface pos192-0/5/1/1
R2(config-if-pos192-0/5/1/1)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-pos192-0/5/1/1)#encapsulation hdlc
R2(config-if-pos192-0/5/1/1)#exit
R2(config)#interface pos192-0/5/1/4
R2(config-if-pos192-0/5/1/4)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-pos192-0/5/1/4)#encapsulation hdlc
R2(config-if-pos192-0/5/1/4)#exit
R2(config)#interface

posgroup2

R2(config-if-posgroup2)#ip address 11.12.13.15 255.255.255.0


R2(config-if-posgroup2)#exit

R2(config)#mhdlc
R2(config-mhdlc)#interface

pos192-0/5/1/1

R2(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/5/1/1)#posgroup 2
R2(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/5/1/1)#exit
R2(config-mhdlc)#interface

pos192-0/5/1/4

R2(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/5/1/4)#posgroup 2
R2(config-mhdlc-member-if-pos192-0/5/1/4)#end

Configuration Verification
Check the configuration result on R1, as shown below.
R1#ping 11.12.13.15
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 11.12.13.15,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

Check the configuration result on R2, as shown below.


R2#ping 11.12.13.14
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echoes to 11.12.13.14,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 129/185/200ms.

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Chapter 13

ICBG Configuration
Table of Contents
ICBG Overview ........................................................................................................13-1
Configuring an ICBG ................................................................................................13-1
ICBG Configuration Example....................................................................................13-2

13.1 ICBG Overview


An Inter-Chassis Backup Group (ICBG) can be bound to an interface and a redundancy
group to implement mapping between chassis. The master/backup relationship is
determined through detection, and devices are notified to perform inter-chassis ARP
backup. This saves the ARP learning procedure that takes a lot of time, saves the system
costs, and ensures that traffic at the forwarding plane is not lost because there is no ARP
entry after switchover.

13.2 Configuring an ICBG


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring an ICBG.

Steps
1. Create an ICBG.
Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#icbg <group-name>

Creates an IGBG and enters ICBG


configuration mode.
<group-name>: ICBG name.

2. Bind the ICBG to an interface in ICBG configuration mode.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-icbg-name)#bind interface

Binds the ICBG to an interface.

<local-port-name>

3. Bind the ICBG to a track.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-icbg-name)#track <track-name>

Binds the ICBG to a track.

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4. Bind the ICBG to a redundancy group.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-icbg-name)#bind rg <group-number>

Binds the ICBG to a redundancy


group.
<group-number>: number of the
bound redundancy group.

5. Configure the backup interval in ICBG configuration mode.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-icbg-name)#group-backup-interval

Configures the backup interval.

<value>

<value>: backup interval (in minutes),


range: 51440, default: 10.

6. Trigger backup in the ICBG immediately in ICBG configuration mode.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config-icbg-name)#group-backup-immediately

Triggers backup in the ICBG


immediately in ICBG configuration
mode.

7. Query an ICBG.
Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show icbg [<group-name>]

If no ICBG is specified, this command


displays information about all ICBGs.
If the specified ICBG does not exist,
the system returns an error.

End of Steps

13.3 ICBG Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 13-1, an ICBG is configured on PE1 and PE2.

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Figure 13-1 ICBG Configuration Example

Configuration Flow
1. Configure interface addresses on PE1 and PE2 to establish an OSPF neighbor
relationship.
2. Configure a redundancy group and ICCP connection between PE1 and PE2.
3. Configure a track on PE1 and PE2 each.
4. Bind the ICBG to the track and redundancy group on PE1 and PE2.
5. Trigger backup for the ICBG in ICBG configuration mode.

Configuration Commands
Configuration for PE1:
PE1(config)#interface loopback1
PE1(config-if-loopback1)#ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255
PE1(config-if-loopback1)#exit
PE1(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/2
PE1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#ip address 5.5.5.1 255.255.255.255
PE1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#exit
PE1(config)#router ospf 1
PE1(config-ospf-1)#router-id 1.1.1.1
PE1(config-ospf-1)#network 5.5.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
PE1(config-ospf-1)#network 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.0 area 0
PE1(config-ospf-1)#exit

PE1(config)#mpls ldp instance 1


PE1(config-ldp-1)#router-id loopback1
PE1(config-ldp-1)#exit
PE1(config)#redundancy interchassis group 1
PE1(config-rg-1)#apply arp
PE1(config-rg-1)#peer 2.2.2.2
PE1(config-rg-1)#exit

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PE1(config)#samgr
PE1(config-samgr)#track 1 interface gei-0/1/0/2
PE1(config-samgr)#exit

PE1(config)#icbg zte
PE1(config-icbg-zte)#bind interface gei-0/1/0/2
PE1(config-icbg-zte)#bind rg 1
PE1(config-icbg-zte)#track 1

Configuration for PE2:


PE2(config)#interface loopback1
PE2(config-if-loopback1)#ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255
PE2(config-if-loopback1)#exit
PE2(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/2
PE2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#ip address 5.5.5.2 255.255.255.255
PE2(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#exit
PE2(config)#router ospf 1
PE2(config-ospf-1)#router-id 2.2.2.2
PE2(config-ospf-1)#network 5.5.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
PE2(config-ospf-1)#network 2.2.2.2 0.0.0.0 area 0
PE2(config-ospf-1)#exit

PE2(config)#mpls ldp instance 1


PE2(config-ldp-1)#router-id loopback1
PE2(config-ldp-1)#exit
PE2(config)#redundancy interchassis group 1
PE2(config-rg-1)#apply arp
PE2(config-rg-1)#peer 1.1.1.1
PE2(config-rg-1)#exit

PE2(config)#samgr
PE2(config-samgr)#track 1 interface gei-0/1/0/2
PE2(config-samgr)#exit

PE2(config)#icbg zte
PE2(config-icbg-zte)#bind interface gei-0/1/0/2
PE2(config-icbg-zte)#bind rg 1
PE2(config-icbg-zte)#track 1
PE2(config-icbg-zte)#group-backup-immediately

Configuration Verification
Check the ICBG on PE1.

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PE1(config)#show icbg
==========================================
Total number of icbg:1
==========================================
Name

:zte

Track

:1

Interval

:10(min)

Interface :gei-0/1/0/2
Status

:master

Redundancy group:1
------------------------------------------

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Chapter 14

Multilink Configuration
Table of Contents
Multilink Overview ....................................................................................................14-1
Configuring Multilink .................................................................................................14-2
Multilink Configuration Example ...............................................................................14-4

14.1 Multilink Overview


Multilink Introduction
As an optional feature of PPP, PPP Multilink Protocol (Multilink) allows PPP to bind multiple
physical links into use like one high-performance link. It must be well prepared during
the link configuration. During the operation, Multilink fragments all the PPP frames and
transmits the PPP frame fragments through different physical links.
Multilink is realized as a new sublayer in the PPP architecture. The Multilink sublayer
is usually inserted into normal PPP mechanism and a network layer protocol using PPP.
Therefore, the Multilink sublayer can obtain all the network layer data sent through PPP
links. The received network layer data are then scattered to multiple physical links without
causing interruption between the normal PPP mechanism and the network layer protocol
of a PPP interface.

Multilink Features
Multilink port is a virtual port and has all the functions of a normal layer-3 port. Multiple PPP
ports are bound to the Multilink port, meaning that one Multilink virtual port corresponds to
multiple PPP physical real ports (Multilink corresponds to multiple physical links).
For relation between Multilink and PPP, refer to Figure 14-1. LCP is negotiated by each
PPP independently. The configuration options carried by an LCP must include options
corresponding to Multilink (such as MRRU, EPD, short sequence, and class header
format.) After the successful LCP negotiation, NCP negotiation is started. The NCP
negotiation is completed by the Multilink virtual port (the verifying flow of LCP is the same
as that of a normal PPP port, and therefore related details are omitted in the following
figure).

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Figure 14-1 Relation Between Multilink and PPP

Multilink has the following features.


l

During the basic parameters negotiation in the LCP link creation, the following three
configuration options are defined to negotiate the start of Multilink: Multilink Maximum
Received Reconstructed Unit (MRRU), Multilink Short Sequence Number Header
Format (SSNHF), and endpoint discriminator.
Before the use of Multilink, at least Multilink MRRU has to be negotiated successfully
on each link between two devices. Once the negotiation is completed, each physical
link has an LCP link. The LCP links form a virtual bundle, and Multilink will be able to
work.
On a low-speed link, such as the traditional circuit E1/T1, multiple low-speed links can
be bundled into one logical link through the Multilink protocol. To some extent, this
increases the bandwidth.
Comparing with an ordinary PPP packet in terms of encapsulation format, the long
Multilink packet increases a 4-byte overhead, and the short Multilink packet increases
a 4-byte overhead.
To some extent, Multilink fragmentation and reconstruction will occupy many CPU
resources.

14.2 Configuring Multilink


This section describes the configuration steps and commands of multilink interface.

Steps
1. Create a multilink interface.
Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface multilink<multilink-id>

Creates a multilink interface. The


interface ID range is 164.

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2. Configure a PPP interface and bind it to the multilink.


Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#ppp

Enters the PPP configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-ppp-interface-name)#interface

Enters the PPP interface

<interface-name>

configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#multili

Binds the link to the specified

nk-group multilink<multilink-id>

MPPP interface.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp

Sets the MPPP EPD attribute

multilink endpoint <endpoint-string>

in link negotiation to distinguish


sub-links that belong to different
MPPP links.

endpoint <string>: Description string. Range: 116 bytes. The default is generated
automatically based on certain rules. By default, endpoints of the sub-links in a multi
link are the same.
Parameter description for the command is as follows:
3. Configure parameters of MPPP.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#mppp

Enters the MPPP configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-mppp)#interface <interface-name>

Enters the MPPP interface


configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-mppp-if-interface-name)#mppp

Configures the MPPP load sharing

load-balance {per-destination | per-packet}

mode. It is necessary to unbind


the Multilink bundle before the
configuration. The default load
sharing mode is per destination.

ZXR10(config-mppp-if-interface-name)#mppp

Configures the MPPP

multilink fragmentation

fragmentation mode. It is
necessary to unbind the Multilink
bundle before the configuration.
No fragmentation is by default.

ZXR10(config-mppp-if-interface-name)#mppp

Enables or disables the NCP

mplscp <enable| disable>

negotiation option MPLSCP of a


MPPP link.

per-destination | per-packet: Load sharing mode of a Multilink interface: per destination


or per packet. Default: destination.
4. Verify the configurations.
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Command

Function

ZXR10#show ppp multilink [<multilink-id>]

Displays summary of a multilink.

5. Maintain the multilink.


Command

Function

ZXR10#debug ppp all

Enables all the PPP debugging


functions.

ZXR10#debug ppp authentication [interface

Enables the PPP authentication

<interface-name>]

debugging function.

ZXR10#debug ppp error [interface <interface-name>]

Enables the PPP error debugging


function.

ZXR10#debug ppp events [interface <interface-name>]

Enables the PPP event debugging


function.

ZXR10#debug ppp lcp [interface <interface-name>]

Enables the PPP debugging function


for LCP packet analysis and output.

ZXR10#debug ppp ncp [interface <interface-num>]

Enables the PPP debugging function


for NCP packet analysis and output.

ZXR10#debug ppp packet [interface <interface-name>]

Enables the PPP control packet output


debugging function.
Views all the active PPP debugging

ZXR10#show debug ppp

functions.

End of Steps

14.3 Multilink Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 14-2, the cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1 interface of R1 is directly connected
to the cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1 interface of R2. The CPOS interfaces of R1 and R2 are
respectively bound to the Multilink interface. It is required that R1 and R2 can successfully
ping each other.
Figure 14-2 Multilink Configuration Example

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Configuration Flow
1. Create a Multilink1 interface respectively on R1 and R2, and configure IP addresses
in the same network segment or different network segments for the created interfaces.
2. Set the load sharing mode of the Multilink interfaces to per packet.
3. Bind the CPOS interfaces of R1 and R2 respectively to the Multilink 1 interfaces.
4. Test the configuration result to confirm that the Multilink interfaces between R1 and R2
can successfully ping each other.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
R1(config)#interface multilink1
R1(config-if-multilink1)#ip address 11.12.13.14 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-multilink1)#exit

R1(config)#mppp
R1(config-mppp)#interface multilink1
R1(config-mppp-if-multilink1)#mppp load-balance per-packet
R1(config-mppp-if-multilink1)#exit
R1(config-mppp)#exit

R1(config)#interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1
R1(config-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1)#no shutdown
R1(config-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1)#exit

R1(config)#ppp
R1(config-ppp)#interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1
R1(config-ppp-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1)#multilink-group multilink1
R1(config-ppp-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1)#end

Configuration on R2:
R2(config)#interface multilink1
R2(config-if-multilink1)#ip address 21.22.23.24 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if-multilink1)#exit

R2(config)#mppp
R2(config-mppp)#interface multilink1
R2(config-mppp-if-multilink1)#mppp load-balance per-packet
R2(config-mppp-if-multilink1)#exit
R2(config-mppp)#exit

R2(config)#interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1
R2(config-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1)#no shutdown
R2(config-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1)#exit

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R2(config)#ppp
R2(config-ppp)#interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1
R2(config-ppp-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1)#multilink-group multilink1
R2(config-ppp-if-cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1)#end

Configuration Verification
View the configuration on R1:
R1#show running-config-interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1
! <Interface>
interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1
no shutdown
$
! </Interface>
! <ppp>
ppp
interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/1.1/1/1:1
multilink-group multilink1
$
$
! </ppp>

R1#show running-config-interface multilink1


! <Interface>
interface multilink1
ip address 11.12.13.14 255.255.255.0
$
! </Interface>
! <mppp>
mppp
interface multilink1
mppp load-balance per-packet
$
$
! </mppp>

View the configuration on R2:


R2#show running-config-interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1
! <Interface>
interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1
no shutdown
!
! </Interface>
! <ppp>
ppp

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interface cpos3_e1-0/2/1/2.1/1/1:1
multilink-group multilink1
$
$
! </ppp>

R2#show running-config-interface multilink1


! <Interface>
interface multilink1
ip address 21.22.23.24 255.255.255.0
$
! </Interface>
! <mppp>
mppp
interface multilink1
mppp load-balance per-packet
$
$
! </mppp>

Verify the configuration on R1:


R1#ping 21.22.23.24
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echo(es) to 21.22.23.24,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 5/7/10 ms.

Verify the configuration on R2:


R2#ping 11.12.13.14
sending 5,100-byte ICMP echo(es) to 11.12.13.14,timeout is 2 seconds.
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent(5/5),round-trip min/avg/max= 7/7/10 ms.

The verification result suggests that the Multilink configuration is successful.

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Chapter 15

Interface Handover
Configuration
Table of Contents
LAN/WAN Handover Overview .................................................................................15-1
Configuring Interface Handover ................................................................................15-2
Interface Handover Configuration Example ..............................................................15-2

15.1 LAN/WAN Handover Overview


10 G Ethernet can be used as LAN or WAN. Due to the difference of working environment
between LAN and WAN.
l

There are many differences between the requirements of indicators, including the
requirements of clock oscillation, Bit Error Rate (BER) and QoS. Therefore, the
standards of two different physical mediums are defined.
There are some common points between the two physical layers, for example, they
share the same MAC layer, only support full duplex, omit the CSMA/CD policy and
use optical fiber as physical medium.

The physical layer of a 10 G LAN has the following features. It supports 802.3 MAC
full duplex working mode. The frame format is the same as Ethernet frame format. The
working rate is 10 Gb/s. The a 10 G LAN transmits Ethernet frames on the optical fiber
directly. As LAN Ethernet uses Ethernet frame format, the transmission rate is 10 Gb/s.
A 10 G WAN uses OC-192c (optical counterpoint of STS-192c) frame format to transmit
data on links, and the transmission rate is 9.953280 Gb/s.
At present, RP-02XGE-SFP+-S/RP-01XGE-SFP+-S supports 10 G LAN and 10 G WAN
access.
Here take RP-02XGE-SFP+-S as an example, RP-02XGE-SFP+-S consists of an optical
interface module, a Physical layer (PHY) module, a Field Programmable Gate Array
(FPGA) and an Erasable Programmable Logic Device (EPLD).
The
command
can
manually
specify
the
line
interface
bard
RP-02XGE-SFP+-S/RP-01XGE-SFP+-S to switch between 10G LAN access and 10G
WAN access.

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15.2 Configuring Interface Handover


This procedure describes the steps and commands for the LAN/WAN handover of an
interface.

Steps
1. Configure the LAN/WAN handover of the interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#port-mode

Configures the LAN/WAN

lan-wan {lan | wan}

handover.

Caution!
If LAN/WAN attribute is not configured on a port, RP(S)-02XGE-SFP+-S will initialize
the port to LAN mode.
LAN/WAN handover will clear all upper layer configurations. During use, configure
other configurations after the LAN/WAN mode is fixed. If configurations are configured
before the LAN/WAN mode is fixed, all the configurations configured previously will be
cleared.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface brief

Shows the port state. The "xgei" means


LAN port mode, and "xgew" means WAN
port mode.

End of Steps

15.3 Interface Handover Configuration Example


Configuration Description
On ZXR10 M6000-S, hand over a LAN mode to WAN mode on xgei-0/2/1/1.

Configuration Flow
1. Use the show version command to view the slot of the sub-card that is required to hand
over.
2. Enter interface configuration mode from global configuration mode.
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Chapter 15 Interface Handover Configuration

3. Use the port-mode command to configure LAN/WAN mode handover.

Configuration Command
Configuration on ZXR10 M6000-S:
ZXR10(config)#interface xgei-0/2/1/1
ZXR10(config-if-xgei-0/2/1/1)#port-mode lan-wan wan
ZXR10(config)#

Configuration Verification
The handover result is shown below.
ZXR10#show ip interface brief phy
gei-0/2/0/1

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/2

10.2.1.1

255.255.255.0

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/3

unassigned

unassigned

down

down

down

gei-0/2/0/4

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/5

unassigned

unassigned

down

down

down

gei-0/2/0/6

172.0.2.1

255.255.255.0

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/7

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/8

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/9

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

gei-0/2/0/10

unassigned

unassigned

up

up

up

xgeiw-0/2/1/1

unassigned

unassigned

down

down

down

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Chapter 16

Port Damping Configuration


Table of Contents
Port Damping Overview............................................................................................16-1
Configuring the Port Damping Function ....................................................................16-1
Port Damping Configuration Example.......................................................................16-3

16.1 Port Damping Overview


In network applications, device interfaces are switched frequently from up state to down
state because of many reasons (such as physical signal disturbing, link layer configuration
error and so on). Thus, the routing protocols, MultiProtocol Label Switching (MPLS) and
so on are oscillated repeatedly, which influence on device and network heavily.
Damping controls the frequent interface up/down events to make the appearance
probability less than a certain frequency. In this way, device and network stability are not
influenced .
Port damping restrains the frequent up/down events on interface in the following aspects,
1. The penalty value of the port is added when its state turns to down.
2. The up/down state switching will not be reported if the penalty value exceeds the
suppression threshold value.
3. Penalty value is reduced automatically as the time goes on. It is similar to element
attenuation. Half-time decides damping decrement. The penalty value is attenuated
in every 500ms.
4. Port damping will be cancelled on interface when the penalty value attenuates to the
reuse threshold value. The penalty value will be set as 0 if the penalty value attenuates
to or less than 50% of reuse threshold value.
5. The suppression time will be calculated when port damping starts. Port damping will
be canceled if the down event is not received in the maximum suppression time.
6. Port state will not be reported unless up/down event occurs.
7. System will give an alarm when port damping is started, and a recovery alarm will be
given when port Damping is cancelled.

16.2 Configuring the Port Damping Function


This procedure describes the steps and commands for configuring the damping function
of an interface.

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Steps
1. Activate the port damping function.
Perform the following steps to activate the port damping function on a port of the ZXR10
M6000-S. The port damping function is activated by default.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface <interface-name>

Enters interface configuration


mode.

Enables the port damping

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#damping enable

function on a port.

2. Set port damping attributes.


Damping attributes are the maximum damping duration, damping threshold, reuse
threshold, and half-life. To set damping attributes on a port of the ZXR10 M6000-S,
perform the following steps after the port damping function is activated.
Command

Function

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#damping

Sets the port damping attributes

<maxsuptime><suppress><reuse><halflife>

on a port after the port damping


function is activated.

<maxsuptime>: maximum damping duration (s). Range: 1600. Default: 20.


<suppress>: damping threshold (s). Range: 110000. Default: 2000.
<reuse>: reuse threshold (s). Range: 12000. Default: 1000.
<halflife>: half-life (s). Amount of time that must elapse to reduce the penalty by one
half. Range: 1100. Default: 5.

Note:
Configuration requirements: <maxsuptime> is greater than <halflife>, and <suppress> is
greater than <reuse>.

3. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show damping <interface-name>

Displays port damping attributes.

The information to be displayed includes port type, physical address of port, flap times,
port damping times, the current penalty value, the maximum penalty value, the port
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Chapter 16 Port Damping Configuration

is suppressed or not, the maximum damping time, damping threshold value, reuse
threshold value, and half-life.
End of Steps

16.3 Port Damping Configuration Example


Configuration Description
As shown in Figure 16-1, the state of R1 interface switches from up to down frequently
because the signal coming from oscillation source is unstable. Enable port damping
function on R1 interface.
Figure 16-1 Port Damping Function Configuration Example Topology

Configuration Flow
Configure port damping function in the following steps.
1. Enter interface configuration mode.
2. Enable port damping function on R1 port (Port damping function is enabled by default).
3. Set port damping attributes.

Caution!
By default, the damping function is enabled for all ports. You can run the show damping
command to view the damping function state of interfaces.

Configuration Command
Configuration on R1:
R1(config)#interface gei-0/2/1/3
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/1/3)#damping enable
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/1/3)#damping 20 2000 1000 5
R1(config-if-gei-0/2/1/3)#end

Configuration Verification
View the configuration on R1, as shown below.
R1#show portdamping gei-0/2/1/3
===================================================================

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Flaps

:Displays the number of times that an interface has


flapped.

Penalty

:Displays the accumulated penalty.

MaxSTm

:Displays the maximum suppress.

SuppV

:Displays the suppress threshold.

ReuseV

:Displays the reuse threshold.

HalfL

:Displays the half-life counter.

MaxPenalty :Displays the maximum penalty.


DampNum

:Displays the number of dampening.

Suppress

:Indicates if the interface is dampened(F:FALSE,T:TRUE).

====================================================================
gei-0/2/1/3
MaxSTm SuppV ReuseV HalfL MaxPenalty DampNum Suppress Penalty Flaps
====================================================================
20

2000

1000

16000

--------------------------------------------------------------------

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Chapter 17

Other Interfaces
Configuration
Logical interfaces are manually configured interfaces which do not physically exist.
The ZXR10 M6000-S supports the following logical interfaces, loopback, NULL, Ulei,
Tunnel, SDU, SuperVLAN, and SmartGroup interfaces. These logical interfaces share
the following features:
1. There is no corresponding physical interface, though mapping relationships
sometimes exist between the real and logical interfaces.
2. Logical interfaces (except NULL interfaces) cannot be automatically generated
accompanied with physical interfaces. They have to be created manually in
accordance with actual requirements.

Table of Contents
Configuring a Loopback Interface .............................................................................17-1
Configuring a NULL Interface ...................................................................................17-4
Configuring a ULEI Interface ....................................................................................17-6
Configuring a Tunnel ................................................................................................17-8

17.1 Configuring a Loopback Interface


The loopback interface is a virtual interface that is most widely applied. After being created,
the loopback interface maintains in UP status and can be looped back. It is commonly used
to stabilize the configuration.

Context
A loopback interface has the following usage:
l

After planning the network architecture, the system administrator creates a loopback
interface for each router and assigns an IP address for each loopback interface.
The system administrator logs in to a router through the corresponding loopback IP
address by using the Telnet application. Since the loopback interface is always on
UP status after being created, the IP address of the loopback interface functions as
a device name. The loopback interface does not interconnect with the peer end.
Therefore, the IP address of the loopback interface is set as a 32-digit mask.
The IP address of loopback interface acts as Router-ID of dynamic routing protocol
(such as OSPF and BGP).

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In dynamic routing protocol running process (OSPF and BGP), a Router-ID needs to
be specified to act as the unique identifier of the router. The Router-ID is unique in the
entity autonomous system. The Router-ID is a 32-bit unsigned integer, which is very
similar to an IP address. The IP address cannot be repeated, therefore, Router-ID
is usually specified to be the IP address of a interface on router. The IP address of
a loopback interface is usually regarded as the identifier of a router, so it is the best
choice of Router-ID.
l

It can act as the source address of the BGP to create the TCP connection.
In BGP, the neighborhood is created by TCP connection between two routers
running BGP. Specify loopback interfaces to be the source addresses to create TCP
connection. It is usually applied to Interior Border Gateway Protocol (IBGP), which
can enhance the robustness of TCP connection.

The loopback interface can be used to configure a black hole routing.


The black hole routing configured by using the loopback interface can discard the
messages sent to the loopback interface.

Steps
1. Configuring a loopback interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface {<interface-name>| byname

Enters interface configuration

<byname>}

mode, configures the


loopback interface.
The loopback range is 164.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#ip address {<ip-

Configures the IP address

address><net-mask>|<A.B.C.D/X>}[<broadcast-address>|

and mask of the loopback

secondary]

interface.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show ip interface

Shows IP interface

ZXR10#show running-config-interface <interface-name>

Shows the configuration


information of the interface

End of Steps

Example of Configuring a Black Hole Routing by Using the Loopback Interface


l

Configuration description
A loopback interface usually acts as the next hop of the routing, which can have the
effect of black hole route.
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Figure 17-1 shows an example of configuring a black hole routing on R1 to introduce


the 192.11.1.2 host route to the black hole routing.
Figure 17-1 Loopback Interface Configuration Example

Configuration flow
1. Create the loopback interface and configure the IP address.
2. Configure the loopback interface to be the next hop of the routing.
Configuration command
The following shows the configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface loopback?
<1-64>
R1(config)#interface loopback1
R1(config-if-loopback1)#ip address 192.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if-loopback1)#exit
R1(config)#ip route 192.11.1.2 255.255.255.255 loopback1

Configuration verification
Run the show command to verify the configuration:
R1(config)#show running-config-interface loopback1
! <Interface>
interface loopback1
ip address 192.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
$
!</Interface>
!<static_route>
ip route 192.11.1.2 255.255.255.255 loopback1
!</static_route>

R1(config)#show ip forwarding route 192.11.1.2


IPv4 Routing Table:
status codes: *valid, >best
Dest
*> 192.11.1.2/32

Gw

Interface

Owner

Pri Metric

192.1.1.2

loopback1

static

Example of Using the Loopback Interface as Router-ID


l

Configuration description
Figure 17-2 shows an example of using the loopback interface as Router-ID on R1.

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Figure 17-2 Loopback Interface Acting as Router-ID

Configuration flow
1. Create a loopback interface and configure IP address.
2. Configure the loopback interface as Router-ID of routing protocol.
Configuration command
The following shows the configuration of R1:
R1(config)#interface loopback1
R1(config-if-loopback1)#ip adderss 1.1.1.2 255.255.255.255
R1(config-if-loopback1)#exit
R1(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/1
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#ip address 30.0.0.1 255.255.255.252
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/1)#exit
R1(config)#interface gei-0/1/0/2
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#ip address 30.0.2.1 255.255.255.252
R1(config-if-gei-0/1/0/2)#exit
R1(config)#router ospf 10
R1(config-ospf-10)#router-id 1.1.1.2
R1(config-ospf-10)#network 30.0.0.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
R1(config-ospf-10)#redistribute connected
R1(config-ospf-10)#exit

17.2 Configuring a NULL Interface


This procedure describes the application scenario and configuration of a NULL interface.

Context
The NULL interface is a logical interface that cannot be configured with an IP address. The
NULL interface can be used in the BGP to save an IP address, and it also can be used to
configure a black hole routing for avoiding loops.
All the data packets transmitting to the NULL interface are discarded. For example, all the
packets transmitting to 192.101.0.0 will be discarded by running the ip route 192.101.0.0
255.255.0.0 null1 command.

Steps
1. Configure a NULL interface.
The system automatically creates a NULL1 interface. It needs no configuration and
cannot be deleted.
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2. Check the configuration information of the NULL interface.


Command

Function

ZXR10#show running-config-interface

Shows the information of the NULL


interface.

End of Steps

Example
The following example shows how to configure a NULL interface.
l

Configuration description
The NULL interface does not forward any packet. All the packets transmitting to the
NULL interface are discarded. The NULL interface is usually used for:

Prevent route ring.

Filter traffic.

The NULL interface usually acts as the next hop of the routing, which has the effect of
black hole route. Figure 17-3 shows an example of constructing a blackhole routing
on R1 to introduce the 192.11.1.2 host route to the black hole routing.
Figure 17-3 NULL Interface Configuration Example

Configuration flow
Configure NULL interface as the next hop of static route.

Configuration command
The following shows the configuration of R1:
R1(config)#ip route 192.11.1.2 255.255.255.255 null?
<1-1>
R1(config)#ip route 192.11.1.2 255.255.255.255 null1

Configuration verification
Run the show command to verify the configuration:
R1(config)#show running-config-interface null1
!<Interface>
interface null1
$
!</Interface>
!<static_route>
ip route 192.11.1.2 255.255.255.255 null1

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!</static_route>

R1(config)#show ip forwarding route 192.11.1.2


IPv4 Routing Table:
status codes: *valid, >best
Dest
*> 192.11.1.2/32

Gw

Interface

Owner

Pri Metric

0.0.0.0

null1

static

17.3 Configuring a ULEI Interface


This procedure describes the application scenario of HLEI interfaces and steps and
commands for configuring a ULEI interface.

Context
A Universal Logical Ethernet Interface (ULEI) is a logical interface with Ethernet attributes.
The ULEI interface supports all Ethernet services (sub-interfaces, VLAN, QINQ, L2VPN,
L3VPN, routing, BFD, and MSTP). The ULEI interface implements the following purposes:
l

VPN bridging between layer 2 and layer 3.


That is, layer-2 VPN is terminated to layer-3 VPN on a device.
Implementing bridging between layer 2 and layer 3, a ULEI interface must be created
on an ETH board. A service bridging virtual link (SVB) is established between two
ULEI interfaces on an ETH board, and the two ULEI interfaces are bound with L2VPN
and L3VPN respectively.

Non-Ethernet interface implementing the ETH service.


The ULEI supports FR, ATM, and other bridging ETH services after being extended.
The ULEI is used to shield differences among various interfaces. Thus physical
interfaces are not sensed during services.
Implementing the heterogeneity of the ETH service, a ULEI interface must be created
on a POS board. After the POS interface is mapped to the ULEI interface, the ULEI
interface implements the ETH service.

Steps
1. Configure a ULEI interface.
Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#request interface [ulei_name]

Creates a ULEI interface.

ZXR10(config)#interface [ulei_name]

Enters ULEI interface configuration


mode.

2. Map the POS interface to the ULEI interface.

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Step

Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#ppp

Enters PPP configuration mode.

ZXR10(config-ppp)#interface <interface-name>

Enters PPP configuration mode.


[pos_name] is the name of the POS
interface.

Disables IPCP function.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#no ppp

ipcp enable
4

Enables the BCP function.

ZXR10(config-ppp-if-interface-name)#ppp bcp

enable
5

ZXR10(config)#interface [pos_name]

Enters POS interface configuration


mode.

ZXR10(config-if-interface-name)#map to

Maps the POS interface to the

<ulei_name>

ULEI interface. <ulei_name> is the


name of the ULEI interface.

3. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show running-config portmap

Displays the situation that a POS interface is


being mapped to a ULEI interface. portmap is
the name of the POS mapping module.

ZXR10(config)#show running-config interface

Displays configuration of the ULEI interface.

<ulei-name>

End of Steps

ULEI interface Configuration Example


l

Configuration description
Configure the mapping between a ULEI interface and a POS interface on the router.

Configuration flow
1. Enter PPP mode to configure a POS interface.
2. Create a ULEI interface.
3. Associate the ULEI interface with the POS interface.
Configuration command
Configuration for the router:
ZXR10(config)#ppp
ZXR10(config-ppp)#interface pos192-0/7/0/2
ZXR10(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/7/0/2)#no ppp ipcp enable
ZXR10(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/7/0/2)#ppp bcp enable
ZXR10(config-ppp-if-pos192-0/7/0/2)#exit

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ZXR10(config-ppp)#exit

ZXR10(config)#request interface ulei-0/7/0/1


ZXR10(config)#interface ulei-0/7/0/1
ZXR10(config-if-ulei-0/7/0/1)#no shutdown
ZXR10(config-if-ulei-0/7/0/1)#exit

ZXR10(config)#interface pos192-0/7/0/2
ZXR10(config-if-pos192-0/7/0/2)#map-to ulei-0/7/0/1
ZXR10(config-if-pos192-0/7/0/2)#exit

Configuration verification
Use the show command to verify the mapping configuration.
ZXR10#show running-config portmap
! <PMAP>
interface pos192-0/7/0/2
map-to ulei-0/7/0/1
$
! </PMAP>

17.4 Configuring a Tunnel


This procedure describes the application scenario of Tunnel interfaces and steps and
commands for configuring a Tunnel interface.

Context
Tunnel is a type of encapsulation technology that uses a network protocol to transmit
another network protocol. That is, the tunnel technology uses a network transmission
protocol to encapsulate data packets generated by other protocols in its own packets, and
then transmits them in the network.
At present, the tunnels supported by the ZXR10 M6000-S include GRE_tunnel, TE_tunnel,
and v6_tunnel.
l

GRE_tunnel
The Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) is a mechanism for encapsulating a
packet of one protocol into a packet of another protocol. This enables packets to be
transmitted across different networks. Channels over which packets are transmitted
across different networks are called tunnels. The GRE can also acts as Layer3
tunneling protocol of the VPN, providing a transparent channel for VPN data.
The process of transmitting packets through a GRE tunnel includes encapsulation and
decapsulation processes.
After receiving the data that needs to be encapsulated and routed over any network
layer protocol (such as IPX), the system first adds a GRE packet header to the data to
form a GRE packet, and then encapsulates the packet over another protocol (such as
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IP). As specified by the GRE encapsulation specification, the GRE can encapsulate
Layer-2 frames (such as PPP frames and MPLS) besides IP packets.
l

TE_Tunnel
The RSVP is an advertisement mechanism for reserved resources used across the
network. It is not a routing protocol. Routing decisions are made by the IGP protocol,
the IGP TE extension, and the CSPF. The RSVP is only used to advertise and maintain
reserved resources on the network. The TE-extended RSVP protocol is called the
RSVP-TE protocol, which can be used in MPLS-TE signaling.
The process of establishing a tunnel for RSVP-TE signaling is as follows:

1. The head end of a tunnel sends a Path message to the next hop along the
calculated path to advertise the procedure of establishing a tunnel.
2. After receiving the Path message, the downstream router performs admission
control, including checking the validity of the message and the resource
requested by the message. If admission control is successful, the downstream
router generates a new Path message and sends it to the next hop in the Explicit
Route Object (ERO).
3. The tail end of the tunnel also performs admission control. Knowing that the local
router is the destination of the Path message, the tail end returns a Resv message
to the upstream router, carrying the flag used when the upstream router sends the
packet to the local router.
4. After receiving the Resv message, each node reserves resources based on the
resource requirement of this message, writes the forwarding table based on the
flag carried by this message, generates a new Resv message, and sends it to
the upstream router. After the new Resv message arrives at the head node, the
establishment of a tunnel is completed.
v6_tunnel
The IPv6 over IPv4 tunneling mechanism first encapsulates an IPv4 packet header for
an IPv6 packet, and makes the IPv6 packet pass through the IPv4 network through a
tunnel. This interconnects isolated IPv6 networks.
A tunnel can be established between host-host, host-device, device-host, and
device-device. The termination of a tunnel may be the destination of an IPv6 packet,
and the IPv6 packet may be further forwarded. Based on the methods for obtaining
the IPV4 address of a tunnel termination, tunnels are divided into "self-defined
tunnels" and "auto tunnels".
For IPv4/IPv6 over IPv6 tunnels, the protocol encapsulates IPv4 or IPv6 packets to
enable encapsulated packets to be transmitted over another IPv6 network. These
encapsulated packets are IPv6-tunnel packets.

Steps
1. Configuring a Tunnel.
Run the following command to configure a GRE tunnel on the ZXR10 M6000-S:
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Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface gre_tunnel<tunnel_id>

Creates a GRE_tunnel. <tunnel_id> is the


number of the GRE tunnel, ranging from
1 to 4000.

Run the following command to configure a TE tunnel on the ZXR10 M6000-S:


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface te_tunnel<tunnel_id>

Creates a TE_tunnel. <tunnel_id> is the


number of the TE tunnel, ranging from 1
to 97535.

Run the following command to configure a v6 tunnel on the ZXR10 M6000-S:


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#interface v6_tunnel<tunnel_id>

Creates a v6_tunnel. <tunnel_id> is the


number of the v6 tunnel, ranging from 1 to
3072.

2. Verify the configurations.


Command

Function

ZXR10(config)#show ip interface gre_tunnel<tunne

Displays the status of a GRE_tunnel.

l_id>
ZXR10(config)#show ip interface te_tunnel<tunne

Displays the status of a TE_tunnel.

l_id>
ZXR10(config)#show ip interface v6_tunnel<tunne

Displays the status of a v6_tunnel.

l_id>

End of Steps

Tunnel Configuration Example


l

Configuration description
For how to configure a tunnel interface on a router, and detailed tunnel applications,
refer to the ZXR10 M6000-S Carrier-Class Router Configuration Guide (MPLS),
ZXR10 M6000-S Carrier-Class Router Configuration Guide (VPN), and ZXR10
M6000-S Carrier-Class Router Configuration Guide (IPv6).

Configuration flow
1. Enter tunnel interface configuration mode.
2. Configure the related attributes.
Configuration command
Configuration for the router:
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Chapter 17 Other Interfaces Configuration


ZXR10(config)#interface te_tunnel1
ZXR10(config-if-te_tunnel1)#ip unnumbered loopback1
ZXR10(config-if-te_tunnel1)#exit
ZXR10(config)#interface gre_tunnel1
ZXR10(config-if-gre_tunnel1)#ip unnumbered loopback1
ZXR10(config-if-gre_tunnel1)#exit
ZXR10(config)#interface v6_tunnel1
ZXR10(config-if-v6_tunnel1)#exit

Configuration verification
Run the show command to verify the configuration.
ZXR10(config)#show ip interface gre_tunnel1
gre_tunnel1 AdminStatus is up, PhyStatus is up, line protocol is down
Ip unnumbered loopback1

(use ip address:1.2.3.81)

IP MTU is 1476 bytes

ZXR10(config)#show ip interface te_tunnel1


te_tunnel1 AdminStatus is up, PhyStatus is up, line protocol is down
Ip unnumbered loopback1

(use ip address:1.2.3.81)

IP MTU is 1500 bytes

ZXR10(config)#show ip interface v6_tunnel1


v6_tunnel1 AdminStatus is up, PhyStatus is up, line protocol is down
IP MTU is 1460 bytes

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Figures
Figure 2-1 Five Classes of IP Addresses .................................................................. 2-1
Figure 2-2

Main IP Address Configuration Example ................................................. 2-5

Figure 2-3 Auxiliary IP Address Configuration Example ............................................ 2-6


Figure 2-4 MTU Configuration Example Topology ..................................................... 2-9
Figure 2-5 Interface MTU Configuration Example.................................................... 2-13
Figure 3-1 Ethernet Interface Configuration Example ............................................... 3-4
Figure 4-1

Structure of L2 Packet With VLAN ID ...................................................... 4-1

Figure 4-2 802.1Q VLAN Packet Header Structure ................................................... 4-2


Figure 4-3 VLAN Sub-Interface Configuration Example............................................. 4-3
Figure 4-4 VLAN Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example ................................. 4-6
Figure 4-5 VLAN TPID Configuration Example.......................................................... 4-9
Figure 5-1 QinQ Sub-Interface Configuration Example.............................................. 5-2
Figure 5-2 QinQ Range Sub-Interface Configuration Example .................................. 5-5
Figure 6-1 VLAN Configuration on Device without SuperVLAN ................................. 6-1
Figure 6-2

Configuration on Device with SuperVLAN ............................................... 6-2

Figure 6-3 Integrated SuperVLAN Configuration Example ........................................ 6-4


Figure 6-4 VLAN-Bound-to-IP-Address Configuration Example................................. 6-6
Figure 6-5 IP-MAC Address Binding Example........................................................... 6-7
Figure 7-1 SmartGroup Link Aggregation.................................................................. 7-2
Figure 7-2 802.3ad Mode Configuration .................................................................... 7-7
Figure 7-3 On Mode Configuration .......................................................................... 7-10
Figure 8-1 POS Interface Configuration Example...................................................... 8-4
Figure 8-2 POS Interface Delay Down/Up Configuration Example ............................ 8-5
Figure 9-1 Process of Multiplexing E1 Channels to Form STM-1............................... 9-2
Figure 9-2 Process of Multiplexing T1 Channels to Form STM-1............................... 9-2
Figure 9-3 Network Diagram for a CPOS Application ................................................ 9-3
Figure 9-4 CPOS Configuration Example.................................................................. 9-9
Figure 10-1 CE1 Configuration Example ................................................................. 10-4
Figure 11-1 PPP Configuration Example ................................................................. 11-5
Figure 12-1 Hierarchy of HDLC in Protocol Stack.................................................... 12-1
Figure 12-2 POSgroup Link Aggregation................................................................. 12-2
Figure 12-3 Basic HDLC Configuration Example..................................................... 12-5
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Figure 12-4 POSgroup Configuration Example ....................................................... 12-6


Figure 13-1 ICBG Configuration Example ............................................................... 13-3
Figure 14-1 Relation Between Multilink and PPP .................................................... 14-2
Figure 14-2 Multilink Configuration Example ........................................................... 14-4
Figure 16-1 Port Damping Function Configuration Example Topology ..................... 16-3
Figure 17-1 Loopback Interface Configuration Example ......................................... 17-3
Figure 17-2 Loopback Interface Acting as Router-ID............................................... 17-4
Figure 17-3 NULL Interface Configuration Example ................................................ 17-5

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Glossary
ATM
- Asynchronous Transfer Mode
BCP
- Bridging Control Protocol
BER
- Bit Error Rate
BGP
- Border Gateway Protocol
BOOTP
- Bootstrap Protocol
CFI
- Canonical Format Indicator
CHAP
- Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol
CIP
- Customer Instance Port
CSMA/CD
- Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect
DCE
- Data Circuit-terminating Equipment
DHCP
- Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
DTE
- Data Terminal Equipment
EPLD
- Erasable Programmable Logic Device
FDDI
- Fiber Distributed Data Interface
FE
- Fast Ethernet
FPGA
- Field Programmable Gate Array
GE
- Gigabit Ethernet
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ZXR10 M6000-S Configuration Guide (Interface Configuration)

GRE
- General Routing Encapsulation
HDLC
- High-level Data Link Control
IBGP
- Interior Border Gateway Protocol
IP
- Internet Protocol
IPCP
- IP Control Protocol
IS-IS
- Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System
ISO
- International Organization for Standardization
LACP
- Link Aggregation Control Protocol
LAN
- Local Area Network
LCP
- Link Control Protocol
MAC
- Message Authentication Code
MD5
- Message Digest 5 Algorithm
MEN
- Metro Ethernet Network
MPLS
- Multiprotocol Label Switching
MPLSCP
- MPLS Control Protocol
MTU
- Maximum Transmission Unit
NCP
- Network Control Protocol
OSI
- Open System Interconnection
PAP
- Password Authentication Protocol
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Glossary

PHY
- Physical layer
POS
- Packet Over SDH
POS
- Packet Over SONET/SDH
PPP
- Point to Point Protocol
RARP
- Reverse Address Resolution Protocol
RSVP
- Resource Reservation Protocol
SPE
- Signal Portal Element
TCI
- Tag Control Information
TPID
- Tag Protocol Identifier
VID
- VLAN Identifier
VLAN
- Virtual Local Area Network
VPN
- Virtual Private Network
WAN
- Wide Area Network
WDM
- Wavelength Division Multiplexing

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