You are on page 1of 44

Signature Assignment: Professional Development Portfolio

Abby Baker
SED 322
Fall 2016

Table of Contents
Cover Letter.....3
Resume.4-5
Teaching Philosophy..6
Vision Statement.6
Letter of Communication....7-8
Letter of Concern..7
Letter of Introduction....8
Syllabus ..9-14
Syllabus Contract Acknowledgement and Guardian Contact Information....14
Professional Growth Plan ..15-20
Appendix: Detailed Unit Plan.2142

ABBY BAKER
Phone: (623) 866-8384 Address: PO Box 69, Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 Email: ALBaker6@asu.edu

February 1, 2017

PRINCIPAL NAME
Principal
School Name
School Address
City, AZ Zip Code

DEAR PRINCIPAL NAME:


My name is Abby Baker, and I am a senior in the undergraduate iTeach program at Arizona State
Universitys Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, currently student teaching at School Name. I am asking for
you to consider me as an English teacher at School Name. As a teacher, I want to ensure that each student
realizes that English and professional success are mutually dependent, and that every student feels more
confident in their reading and writing abilities.
It is my goal to impart my passion for reading and writing to my students through teaching how important
mastering the English language will be in the post-secondary and professional lives of every student. I will
focus on elements of responsibility, timeliness, respect, and self-assuredness. I believe that this fits into
your schools vision of School Vision because it is my job to prepare students for life beyond high school.
I have student interned at Verrado High School and Carl Hayden Community High School, which prepared
me to work with students with varying interests and diverse backgrounds. I believe I am well-equipped to
manage a classroom and successfully facilitate an atmosphere of learning; I have learned many new,
tested instructional strategies, along with several tried-and-true methods.
I graduate in May 2017, and will be prepared to teach immediately; I have completed all of the
requirements to become a teacher. A portfolio of instructional strategies, lesson and unit plans, and more
are available on my website: abbylbaker.weebly.com. I would like to schedule an appointment with you to
tell you more about why I believe I am a good fit for your schools learning community. Thank you for your
consideration, and I look forward to hearing from you.
Respectfully,

ABBY BAKER

ABBY BAKER
Phone: (623) 866-8384 Address: PO Box 69, Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 Email: ALBaker6@asu.edu

EDUCATION
Arizona State University
Bachelor of Arts in English (New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences)
Certificate: Secondary Education (Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College)
GPA: 3.69 (Deans List Spring 2016)

Graduation May 2017

INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE
11th Grade English, Verrado High School
11th Grade Film Studies
3 instructional activities completed
1 90-minute lesson completed
12th Grade English, Carl Hayden Community High School
9th Grade English
8 instructional activities completed
1 50-minute lesson completed

January-April 2016

August-November 2016

WORK EXPERIENCE
Program Aide
June 2015-January 2017
Arizona State University, West campus
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI at ASU)
Assisted members with registering for courses and answering any questions members may have
about the program or registration process over the phone.
Drafted and proofread schedules/catalogs for all locations and training materials for staff and
clients.
Actively participated in coordinators meetings and facilitated the introduction of new or updated
policies.
Administrative Assistant
March-December 2014
Century 21 Northwest
Realty and Property Management
Multi-tasked assisting real estate and property management clients over the phone, in person, and
over email, including answering realty or property management questions, properly filing rental
applications, and handling real estate documents.
Created and implemented training materials for staff, Realtors, and clients.
The face of the realty and property management departments; first point-of-contact with all
clients.
Building Manager
February-December 2013
Arizona State University, West campus
Student Activities and Conference Services
Hired as event staff and was quickly promoted to Building Manager after four months.
4

ABBY BAKER
Phone: (623) 866-8384 Address: PO Box 69, Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 Email: ALBaker6@asu.edu
Supervised event staff and media technicians as they set up and tore down events and event

spaces on the West campus.

Responsible for keeping logs of event and media material usage and event progression.
Point-of-contact for clients of event management to ensure successful set up of event spaces.

QUALIFICATIONS

Well-versed in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, Forms and in
Adobe Photoshop through version CS6, along with other technological programs and devices. Able to learn
new computer and technological programs with ease.

Enthusiastic persona with an active drive for building and sustaining professional relationships; experience
in business, marketing, teaching, and adult education lends itself to effective and high-quality
communication with others on a variety of topics and over a host of mediums including letters, emails, texts,
phone calls, phone and video conferencing, and in-person.

Effective at determining a problem and creatively and quickly finding a resolution. A strong self-motivator
with resiliency, dependability, and organization and pre-planning skills developed over several years of
professional work experience.

Teaching Philosophy
I chose teaching as a profession because I truly enjoy helping people and working in social
environments. I am a licensed Realtor, and work with people of all generations and backgrounds to help
them buy and sell their homes. I have also worked in childcare for children under the age of 10, and loved
watching them learn about how the world works. Currently, I am employed at Arizona State University with
the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, which provides non-credit university-quality educational opportunities
for people over the age of 50. Working with people of all ages and personal experiences is extremely
rewarding for me, and I find high school students uniquely positioned to give new perspectives on a variety
of subjects that I might not have considered. As a voracious reader, I have always had a passion for
English, and am looking forward to having enlightening conversations about reading and writing with high
school students.
Based on the research of Madeline Hunter, Dr. Fred Jones, Richard Lavoie, and Dr. Harry Wong, I
believe all students have a right to an equal and fair education based on their ability, regardless of their
culture or ethnicity, educational or socioeconomic background, disability or giftedness, first language, or
familys involvement. Diverse classrooms are a fun opportunity for students to learn about each other and
the world, and they should be free from discrimination and ridicule. All students can be successful with
proper guidance and encouragement, and I understand that it is my responsibility as a teacher to ensure
that each and every student is given the opportunity to grow to their greatest potential.

Vision Statement
As a teacher, it is my job to prepare students for life beyond high school. I want to impart my
passion for reading and writing to my students through teaching how important mastering the English
language will be in the post-secondary and professional lives of every student. By focusing on elements of
responsibility, timeliness, respect, and self-assuredness, I will ensure that each student realizes that
English and professional success are mutually dependent, and that every student feels more confident in
their reading and writing abilities.

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Month 1, 2010

PARENT NAME
Parent or Guardian of Student Name
Student Address
City, AZ Zip Code

DEAR PARENT NAME:


My name is Abby Baker, and I am the English teacher of Student Name; I am presently struggling to
effectively communicate with him/her. I would greatly appreciate discussing the difficulties we are having in
the classroom with you in an attempt to begin the process of creating a successful learning environment
specific to Student Name.
It is my desire to ensure that every student in my classroom puts in a concerted effort to achieve their
maximum potential as a participant and a learner. I have checked areas of concern below that I believe
are exact actions or consequences of actions currently negatively affecting Student Name.
I would like to discuss this matter with you either through email, a phone meeting, or a face-to-face meeting
to set up a plan of action for Student Name. Thank you very much for your understanding and participation.
Respectfully,

ABBY BAKER
AREAS OF CONCERN
_______ A grade of 70% or lower
_______ A grade of 60% or lower
_______ A grade of 50% or lower
_______ A grade of 40% or lower
_______ A grade of 30% or lower
_______ A grade of 20% or lower
_______ A grade of 10% or lower
_______ Excessive excused absences
_______ Excessive unexcused absences
_______ Excessive excused tardies
_______ Excessive unexcused tardies

_______ Incomplete assignments/quizzes/exams


_______ Late assignments/quizzes/exams
_______ Missing assignments/quizzes/exams
_______ Lackluster performance on assignments
_______ Lackluster performance on quizzes/exams
_______ Behavioral problems in my classroom
_______ Behavioral problems in school
_______ Distraction to/disrespectful of peers or teacher
_______ Not materially prepared (lack of
materials/inappropriate materials)
_______ Not mentally/physically prepared (inattentive/sleeping)

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Month 1, 2010

PARENT NAME
Parent or Guardian of Student Name
Student Address
City, AZ Zip Code

DEAR PARENT NAME:


My name is Abby Baker, and I am the English teacher of Student Name. I would like to take the opportunity to
introduce myself to you and communicate my goals for your student, my classroom, and our learning
environment. A little about me: I am originally from South Carolina but have lived in Arizona since 2004. I
attended Verrado High School, and graduated from Arizona State Universitys Mary Lou Fulton Teachers
College with a degree in English and a certificate in Secondary Education. I love to read, hike, and craft!
As a teacher, it is my job to prepare students for life beyond high school. I want to impart my passion for reading
and writing to my students through teaching how important mastering the English language will be in the postsecondary and professional lives of every student. By focusing on elements of responsibility, timeliness, respect,
and self-assuredness, I will ensure that each student realizes that English and professional success are
mutually dependent, and that every student feels more confident in their reading and writing abilities.
Over the course of the class, we will cover the topics of topic, topic, and topic, and read: book, book, book,
book, and book. All texts for this class will be provided by the school, and many of them will be available in
several formats (including physical copies, digital copies, and audio formats).
Please take some time to go over the attached syllabus with your student and complete the Syllabus Contract
Acknowledgement and Guardian Contact Information form to indicate your understanding of my classroom
policies and procedures, the learning environment expectations, and the curriculum overview.
If you have any questions, concerns, or comments, please feel free to reach out to me via email, phone calls,
and face-to-face meetings. The office hours listed on my syllabus are times I am available to communicate with
parents and students alike. I look forward to having an open line of communication with you throughout the
class. I am excited about a fun-filled class with your child as a participant! We are going to have a great time
learning about major skill and major skill this year. Thank you very much for your understanding and
participation.
Respectfully,

ABBY BAKER
8

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Welcome freshman learners!

My name is Ms. Baker and I believe that as a teacher, it is my job to


prepare all students for life beyond high school. I want to impart my passion
for reading and writing to you through teaching how important mastering the
English language will be in the post-secondary and professional lives of
everyone. As a voracious reader, I have always had a passion for English,
and am looking forward to having enlightening conversations about reading
and writing with you!
If you have any questions, first reference the syllabus, then the posters
and whiteboards in my classroom, and finally my website
(abbylbaker.weebly.com). Any questions not answered by these materials
can be asked via email (abaker@phoenixunion.org), phone ((602) 764-3000
ext. 10000), or during my office hours. I only respond to emails and phone
calls during office hours, except in special circumstances.
In freshman English, we are going to have a fun year filled with
engaging short stories, useful reading and writing strategies, and tons of
interesting individual and group projects! Come prepared to learn every day!
Course Overview By Quarter
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
Unit 1: Puritan Narratives Young
Unit 3: Dystopic Narratives - 1984
Goodman Brown (5% of your grade)
(5% of your grade)
Group Project (5% of your grade)
Individual Project (5% of your grade)
Unit 2: Puritan Narratives The
Unit 4: Dystopic Narratives The
Crucible (5% of your grade)
Lottery (5% of your grades)
Unit 2 Test (10% of your grade)
Individual Paper (10% of your grade)
Quarter 1 = 25% of your overall grade
Quarter 3:
Unit 5: Myth Narratives The
Odyssey (5% of your grade)
Group Project (5% of your grade)
Unit 6: Myth Narratives Oedipus (5
% of your grade)
Individual Paper (10% of your grade)

Quarter 2 = 25% of your overall grade


Quarter 4:
Unit 7: African American Narratives
Passing (5% of your grade)
Individual Project (5% of your grade)
Unit 8: African American Narratives
Short Stories (5% of your grade)
Final Test (10% of your grade)

Quarter 3 = 25% of your overall grade

Quarter 2 = 25% of your overall grade

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

**The teacher reserves the right to change any and all units, assessments,
and grade allocations, with ample student notice.

Textbook and Assigned Reading

There will be no textbook for freshman English. All assigned readings


will be given as paper copies for individual use. Due to printing and copyright
restrictions, only one copy of the text will be available per student. For a
complete list of assigned readings, visit my website (abbylbaker.weebly.com).

Classroom Procedures

Procedures, different than rules and consequences, are guidelines by


which to do everyday tasks in the classroom; they are imperative to
maintaining order, timeliness, and routine. Procedures for the teacher and
students should be taught patterns of behavior that are constantly reinforced
and re-taught to maintain a stable and respectful learning environment.

Beginning Class

Before every class, the teacher will ensure that necessary materials for
the class period are written on the board in the Daily Materials section. As
students arrive to class, they will check the Daily Materials section and
collect the materials listed (books, colored pencils, worksheets) from the
material cabinet. After students collect the materials needed for class, they
will turn in any homework to the homework station and then will sit in their
assigned seat. When the bell rings, signifying the beginning of class, the
teacher will take attendance and prepare for the lesson while students
complete the bellwork projected on the mounted overhead projector in their
bellwork journal, writing the date before the day's entry. After three minutes,
the teacher will begin class.

Ending Class
At the end of instruction, a short closure activity will occupy the last
five minutes of class. The closure activity will either be explained by the
teacher or projected on the mounted overhead projector. If the activity is not
something the students will turn in immediately, they will write it in their
bellwork journal. If the activity is something the students will turn in
immediately, further instructions will be given to them. After they complete
their closure activity, students will pick up trash in their area and then sit in
their seats and chat with the students around them until the bell rings. It is
the teachers intention to dismiss students as quickly after the bell rings as
possible.
10

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Transitions

To transition smoothly, quickly, and efficiently between activities, two


signals will be given. The first signal is a timer; the teacher will tell the
students how long the timer will be set for and what to do when the timer
goes off before the beginning of an activity. The second signal is an auditory
signal of ladies and gentlemen, please focus your attention on me, where
students will cease their activity and any conversations and sit quietly facing
the direction of the teacher. These two signals will refocus class attention at
the end of an activity and allow the learning environment to be engaging and
productive.

Student Work

Homework Collection

The homework station has a bin for each class period, and as
previously stated, it will be the responsibility of the student to turn in
homework to the homework station at the beginning of class unless
otherwise stated by the teacher on specific assignments. The teacher will
collect the homework from the homework station after bellwork, and any
homework placed in the bin after original collection will be considered late
unless the student is absent or late with a pass.

Returning Work

Next to the homework station are crates for each class period with
folders for each student. Completed and graded work with names will be
placed by the teacher in the appropriate student folders, which students can
collect as they enter the room and collect materials and hand in homework,
or after class.

Handing Out Materials


The teacher will ensure that all materials needed for class will be
organized and accessible in the material cabinet before the beginning of the
day. Students, upon entering the classroom, will check the Daily Materials
section of the whiteboard and collect the listed materials before sitting down
in their assigned seats before class. Additional necessary materials will be
provided during instruction by the teacher.

Missed Work

Students with excused absence(s) will be allowed one day per day that
they were absent to complete missed work for full credit. The Missed Work
Binder will be on the homework station, and it will include any materials
needed to complete missed work; it also contains half-sheets of paper
regarding the absence that the student must fill out and staple to the
11

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

completed work. It is the responsibility of the student to collect and hand in


all missed work.

Late Work
All homework must be turned in by the end of the bellwork section of
each class-period. Quizzes and tests can be taken up to one week from
original test date for 50% credit of the students score. All other work turned
in late will be graded based on the following:
Day-of Late: 90% credit
1 Day Late: 75% credit
2 Days Late: 50% credit
3+ Days Late: 0% credit

Grading and Recording Student Work

Participation grades will be recorded daily into the gradebook at 4:00


PM.
Homework will be graded, recorded, and available for student
collection within 24 hours of receipt.
Quizzes and tests will be graded and recorded within 48 hours of
receipt, and available for student collection within one week after test
date (to allow for late quizzes and tests to be taken).
Essays will be graded, recorded, and available for student collection
within one week of receipt.
**The teacher reserves the right to give or not give extra credit work.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: plagiarism, selfplagiarism, allowing peers to plagiarize, using the internet to complete
coursework deemed individual work, not citing sources, not properly citing
sources. All instances of academic dishonesty will be dealt with on an
individual basis and will follow school and district guidelines.

Guardian Communication

Upon meeting each group of students, the teacher will ask their
guardians to fill out a sheet of contact information. Guardians will be emailed
every other week with a general progress report of classroom activities, as
well as a short individualized note about their students progress. Guardians
12

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

will be encouraged to email or call the teacher to discuss their student and
their grade. Guardians without email will have their students progress
report, along with a slip acknowledging that the guardian received it that
they must sign and have the student return, printed and sealed in an
envelope, and the student will be responsible for returning the signed slip.
Any difficulty receiving the signed slip will result in the teacher calling the
guardian to give the progress report via phone. For any behavioral issues,
concerns, or success, the guardian will be called.

Consideration for Diverse Learners

All students have a right to an equal and fair education based on their
ability, regardless of their culture or ethnicity, educational or socioeconomic
background, disability or giftedness, first language, or familys involvement.
Diverse classrooms are a fun opportunity for students to learn about each
other and the world, and they should be free from discrimination and
ridicule. All students can be successful with proper guidance and
encouragement, and every student will be given the opportunity to grow to
their greatest potential. All students that need or want extra instruction on
assignments can receive individualized instruction during my office hours.

Rules and Consequences

After high school, students will be asked to follow rules, whether in


continuing education or in their place of employment; rules notify society
what is acceptable and what is not. In the classroom, rules are expected to
be followed to ensure respect, understanding, and efficiency. If rules are
broken, consequences will follow due process, will be reasonable, and will fit
the level of infraction. It is imperative for students to be able to recognize
and follow rules not only in the classroom, but in preparation for the rest of
their lives. All rules and consequences will be taught during the first week of
class, re-taught after violations, and will be posted in the classroom.
**All rules and consequences follow district and school policy.
1.

Rules

Allow others and yourself to learn by focusing on instruction in the


classroom.
2.
Keep your good reputation and allow yourself to be guilt- and blamefree by doing your work yourself.
3.
Value other peoples property, including the property of the school, as
you value your own.
13

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

4.

Share only positive or constructive feedback about the work, thoughts


and opinions, and contributions to instruction of yourself, your peers, and
the teacher.
5.
Be honest and responsible when you have difficulty completing work
and/or do not try your hardest.

Consequences
Negative consequences
1 Offense: Warning and Student Conference
2 Offense: Written Warning
3 Offense: Call to Guardian
4 Offense: Detention and Call to Guardian
5 Offense: Administrative Referral
**The teacher reserves the right to skip consequences based upon the
severity of the violation.
st

nd
rd
th
th

Positive consequences

Communication with your guardian regarding good behavior or


contributions

Extra bathroom passes

Picking one thing out of the Positive Consequences jar

Vouchers worth 5 points that can be added to any graded assignment

Choose where to sit for one day


**The teacher reserves the right to determine if a student will receive a
positive consequence and what the consequence will be.

Syllabus Contract Acknowledgement and Guardian


Contact Information
Student's full name: ______________________________ Ms. Baker's English hour:
_______
Guardian 1 full name:
__________________________________________________________
Guardian 1 relationship to student:
______________________________________________
14

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Guardian 1 phone: __________________ Guardian 1 email:


__________________________
Guardian 1 preferred contact method: PHONE / EMAIL
Guardian 1 preferred contact hours:
_____________________________________________
Other comments/information:

Guardian 2 full name:


__________________________________________________________
Guardian 2 relationship to student:
______________________________________________
Guardian 2 phone: __________________ Guardian 2 email:
_________________________
Guardian 1 preferred contact method: PHONE / EMAIL
Guardian 1 preferred contact hours:
_____________________________________________
Other comments/information:
By signing this paper, I acknowlege that I received a copy of the syllabus for
Ms. Baker's freshman English class and agree to all of the terms outlined
within it. I also acknowledge that all above information is correct and agree
to keep it up-to-date.
___________________________
Student Signature

___________________________
Student Name

15

_________________
Date

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________
Guardian 1 Signature

___________________________
Guardian 1 Name

_________________
Date

___________________________
___________________________
_________________
(optional) Guardian 2 Signature (optional) Guardian 2 Name
Date

Professional Growth Plan


One Year Professional Growth Plan
Measurable
Attainable

Area of Focus

Specific

Planning and
Preparation:
Designing Instruction
I will pre-plan learning
activities, including
developing activities,
printing supporting
materials, and setting
up the classroom for
two lessons per week
by engaging in my
professional learning
community (PLC) on at
least a weekly basis for
the duration of the
schoolyear.
Classroom
Environment:
Managing Student
Behavior
I will pre-plan classroom
management
techniques including
procedures, rules, and
consequences by
creating three different
procedures, five rules,
and five negative and
positive consequences,

including
developing
activities,
printing
supporting
materials, and
setting up the
classroom

for two
lessons per
week

engaging in
my
professional
learning
community
(PLC)

pre-plan
learning
activities

including
procedures,
rules, and
consequences

creating three
different
procedures,
five rules,
and five
negative and
positive
consequence
s

develop
those based
on teaching
support
materials
found on
education
websites

pre-plan
classroom
managemen
t techniques

16

Relevant

Time
Frame
on at least
a weekly
basis for
the
duration of
the
schoolyear

before the
beginning
of my first
year

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

and develop those


based on teaching
support materials found
on education websites
before the beginning of
my first year.

Instruction:
Demonstrating
Flexibility and
Responsiveness
I will use evaluation
techniques of my
flexibility and
adjustment of lessons
to student needs by
creating selfevaluations and peer
evaluations and asking
at least five teachers to
evaluate my flexibility
and response to
students by the end of
my first year.

creating selfevaluations and


peer evaluations

asking at
least five
teachers

17

evaluate my
flexibility and
response to
students

use
by the end
evaluation
of my first
techniques
year
of my
flexibility and
adjustment
of lessons to
student
needs

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Professional
Responsibilities:
Maintaining Accurate
Records
I will maintain accurate
records by developing a
routine for classwork
and homework
collection, grading
outcome and
recordation, and
classwork and
homework return by
joining the American
Association of
Educators and
implementing at least
two of their professional
resources before the
beginning of my first
year.

Area of Focus

developing a
routine for
classwork and
homework
collection,
grading outcome
and recordation,
and classwork
and homework
return

implementing
at least two of
their
professional
resources

joining the
American
Association
of Educators

Five Year Professional Growth Plan


Specific
Measurable
Attainable

18

maintain
accurate
records

before the
beginning
of my first
year

Relevant

Time
Frame

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Planning and
Preparation:
Designing Instruction
I will pre-plan learning
activities, including
developing activities,
printing supporting
materials, and setting
up the classroom for
three lessons per week
and by becoming the
head of my professional
learning community
(PLC) and sharing my
resources on at least a
weekly basis for the
duration of the
schoolyear.
Planning and
Preparation: Setting
Instructional
Outcomes
I will determine
suitability for diverse
learners in my
classroom by interacting
with the case manager
of every student with an
IEP or 504 at the
beginning of every
semester and creating a
set of accommodating
materials, classwork,
and homework for every
unit by the end of my
fifth year.

including
developing
activities,
printing
supporting
materials, and
setting up the
classroom

for three
lessons per
week

becoming
the head of
my
professional
learning
community
(PLC) and
sharing my
resources

pre-plan
learning
activities

on at least
a weekly
basis for
the
duration of
the
schoolyea
r

creating a set of
accommodating
materials,
classwork, and
homework

for every unit


by the end of
my fifth year

interacting
with the
case
manager of
every
student with
an IEP or
504

determine
suitability for
diverse
learners in
my
classroom

at the
beginning
of every
semester

19

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Classroom
Environment:
Managing Student
Behavior
I will pre-plan classroom
management
techniques including
procedures, rules, and
consequences by
creating evaluation
materials for classroom
behavior and following
procedures and rules,
by attending at least
three in-person teaching
seminars before the
beginning of my fifth
year.
Classroom
Environment:
Establishing a Culture
for Learning
I will establish the
importance of content to
create a culture for
learning by attending at
least thirty student
activities or games, and
becoming involved in
the school community
and developing content
around my students
interests by the end of
my fifth year.
Instruction:
Demonstrating
Flexibility and
Responsiveness
I will set responsiveness
goals at the beginning
of my fifth year based
on the self-evaluations
and peer evaluations of

including
procedures,
rules, and
consequences

attending at
least three inperson
teaching
seminars

creating
evaluation
materials for
classroom
behavior
and
following
procedures
and rules

pre-plan
classroom
managemen
t techniques

before the
beginning
of my fifth
year

becoming
involved in the
school
community

attending at
least thirty
student
activities or
games

developing
content
around my
students
interests

establish the
importance
of content to
create a
culture for
learning

by the end
of my fifth
year

set
responsiveness
goals

assess
myself on
goal
completion

evaluate my
flexibility
and
response to
students

based on the
selfevaluations
and peer
evaluations

at the
beginning
of my fifth
year and
at the end
of my fifth
year

20

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

my flexibility and
adjustment of lessons to
student needs collected
my first four years of
teaching, and assess
myself on goal
completion at the end of
my fifth year.
Instruction: Using
Assessment in
Instruction
I will develop my
abilities to provide
assessment during
instruction by creating
assessment criteria (ie.
a rubric or activity) that
is reasonable to
implement during a day
of teaching for at least
five lessons in every
unit plan by the
beginning of my fifth
year of teaching using
resources found on
Edutopia.com.
Professional
Responsibilities:
Maintaining Accurate
Records
I will maintain accurate
records by developing
and updating a routine
for classwork and
homework collection,
grading outcome and
recordation, and
classwork and
homework return by
retaining membership in
the American
Association of
Educators and

by creating
assessment
criteria (ie. a
rubric or
activity)

for at least
five lessons
in every unit
plan

using
resources
found on
Edutopia.
com

developing and
updating a
routine for
classwork and
homework
collection,
grading
outcome and
recordation, and
classwork and
homework
return

implementing
at least ten of
their
professional
resources

retaining
maintain
membership accurate
in the
records
American
Association
of Educators

21

develop my
abilities to
provide
assessment
during
instruction

by the
beginning
of my fifth
year of
teaching

before the
beginning
of my fifth
year.

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

implementing at least
ten of their professional
resources before the
beginning of my fifth
year.
Professional
Responsibilities:
Participating in a
Professional
Community
I will participate in a
professional community
to establish professional
relationships, network,
and learn about new
teaching techniques by
joining the Arizona
Education Association
(AEA) and participate in
at least one event by
the end of my fifth year.

establish
professional
relationships,
network, and
learn about new
teaching
techniques

participate in
at least one
event

joining the
Arizona
Education
Association
(AEA)

Unit Plan Overview


22

participate in
a
professional
community

by the end
of my fifth
year

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Rationale
To enjoy reading and writing fictional narratives, students must be given models of successful and
classic fictional narratives, and have ample scaffolding, structure, and support when focusing on writing a
fictional narrative. Students must understand why effective writing is purposeful in all aspects, including
descriptions, conventions, and details, and be able to translate that understanding into their own writing.
Reading and writing fictional narratives, specifically short stories, is about efficiently and clearly telling a
story, and through modeling and practice students will grow to learn that translating the story that needs to
be told is the most important part of short stories. Practicing reading and writing short stories will help
students not only search for and deliver meaning in the professional world through informative or
persuasive text, but will also aid them in communication in social settings of all types.

Essential Questions
How this unit will connect to students and the world
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

How do effective word choice, conventions, details, and descriptions change a story?
Why do we read short stories?
How are the themes and subjects of short stories relevant to our lives?
Why do we create fictional characters and events?
Is there a correct way to tell a story?

Enduring Understandings
What this unit will teach students about the world

Authors write with different purposes in mind.


Word choice is critical to effective conveyance of message and voice.
Structure is essential to effective communication.
Constructing meaning in writing is strategic.
Reading critically is necessary to understand, reflect upon, and reiterate ideas.

23

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Standards and Measurable Outcomes


Common Core Standard
(ELA1112.W.3)
Write narratives to develop real or
imagined experiences or events
using effective technique, well
chosen details, and well
structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader
by setting out a problem,
situation, or observation and its
significance, establishing one or
multiple point(s) of view, and
introducing a narrator and/or
characters; create a smooth
progression of experiences or
events.

b. Use narrative techniques, such


as dialogue, pacing, description,
reflection, and multiple plot lines,
to develop experiences, events,
and/or characters.

c. Use a variety of techniques to


sequence events so that they
build on one another to create a
coherent whole and build toward
a particular tone and outcome
(e.g., a sense of mystery,
suspense, growth, or resolution).

Measurable Outcome (Objectives Aligned to


Standards)
SWBAT:
Write a short story fictional narrative
Create a fictional story with detailed characters,
settings, and events
Create a plot with an exposition, rising action,
climax, falling action, and resolution
SWBAT:
Identify problems and solutions in written,
visual, and oral stories
Understand point of view and be able to write a
short story from one of them
Understand and identify narrators in written
stories and in the short story they create
Understand character interaction and
development and be able to identify physical
characteristics and personality traits from written
stories and of the characters they create
SWBAT:
Read, write, and understand dialogue in short
stories
Understand and apply pacing in storytelling
Internally visualize and externally draw
descriptions in written short stories
Write descriptions of characters, settings, and
events
Recognize and understand the importance
multiple plot lines play in short stories
SWBAT:
Understand the similarities and differences
between the story and plot
Identify the story and plot of written and visual
stories
Understand tone
Identify the plot, tone, and outcome in their own
short story
24

Objective
Number
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4

3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
4
4.1

4.2
4.3
4.4

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

d. Use precise words and


phrases, telling details, and
sensory language to convey a
vivid picture of the experiences,
events, setting, and/or characters.

e. Provide a conclusion that


follows from and reflects on what
is experienced, observed, or
resolved over the course of the
narrative.

SWBAT:
Use language and vocabulary to be able to
describe in detail a person, place, thing, or
event
Create visual representations of written stories
and written representations of visual stories
Use newly developed descriptor vocabulary in
daily language and writing
Determine what types of descriptions are
important and which are not
Identify bias in written or verbal descriptions
SWBAT:
Identify the theme or moral of a written, verbal,
or visual story
Write a conclusion to a short story
Reflect on the meaning of short stories by
writing conclusion summaries

5
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
6
6.1
6.2
6.3

Unit Plan
Day
Day
1

Standards
and
Objectives
(ELA11
12.W.3)
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
3.3
5.2

Instructional Tasks

Introduction into short stories


Define and discuss character,
narrator, point of view, and begin
discussing problems and solutions
Activity 1: Students will write a short
story with a partner using a handout
that has two fully formed characters
and a problem. The pair will work
together to write a minimum twopage short story that uses both
characters, determines a narrator
and point of view, and provides a
solution to the problem.
Activity 2: Students will get into
groups of four and then individually
read the short story The Story of an
Hour by Kate Chopin, highlighting
25

Aligned Assessments
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to create two
characters, determine a narrator and
point of view, and begin
brainstorming five different problems
and solutions as homework.
Assessment
Students will submit the short stories
created with their partners during
Activity 1 for assessment. During the
Activity 2, the teacher will walk
around and check each short story
to ensure students are identifying
key ideas correctly, and they will
receive participation points for their
identifications. Additionally, the
groups of four from this activity will

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day
2

(ELA11
12.W.3)
2.1
4.1
4.2

Day
3

(ELA11
12.W.3)
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5

physical characteristics of the


characters in the story in green, and
personality traits of the characters in
pink. After reading the story
individually, students will work with
their group to draw pictures of the
characters using evidence from the
short story.
Discuss problems and solutions,
resolutions, and the differences and
similarities between story and plot.
Activity 1: Students will listen to the
teacher read two-paragraph
problem/solution stories.
Individually, they will write down the
problem and solution. Next,
students will listen and follow along
with the teacher as they read three
and four paragraph stories.
Individually, they will write down the
problem and solution/resolution.
With their elbow partners, they will
diagram the plot and summarize the
story. In groups of four, they will
discuss how the plot and story
differed or were similar.
Activity 2: Students will listen and
watch the TED talk My escape from
North Korea by Hyeonseo Lee.
They will identify problems,
solutions, the plot, and the story.
Discuss the importance of detailed
descriptions of people, places,
things, and events. Introduce
descriptive vocabulary and discuss
bias in descriptions.
Activity 1: Students will receive a
series of pictures or drawings that
include everything from everyday
items to colors to concepts, and will
be asked to write a paragraph for
each one describing them in detail.
26

create a drawing of the characters


that will be turned in as a form of
assessment. The independent
practice will serve as a check for
understanding and provide
scaffolding for the next lesson.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to write a two
to four paragraph story from their
childhood in chronological order,
from the perspective of being a child.
Then, they will be asked to write a
two to four paragraph story where
the plot is different than before, and
interject their teenage voice and
perspective.
Assessment
Students will submit their individual
answers and the answers from their
elbow partner activity and group
activity from Activity 1 as a check for
understanding and an informal
formative assessment. They will also
turn in the worksheet from Activity 2.
The independent practice will serve
as a check for understanding and
provide scaffolding for the next
lesson.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to add more
details to the people, places, things,
and events they have outlined.
Assessment
Students will submit their
paragraphs describing the visual
representations and any visual
representations they drew of the
paragraph descriptions as a

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day
4

(ELA11
12.W.3)
1.1
1.2
1.3

Day
5

(ELA11
12.W.3)
1.1
1.2
1.3

Students will trade with their


Monday partners and will revise for
more detail and identify bias.
Activity 2: Students will receive a
series of paragraphs or sentences
that they have to visually represent
to their elbow partner (either through
interpretive dance, charades, or
drawing). Students will give
constructive feedback.
Reading day: Students will
individually and silently read A
Rose For Emily by William
Faulkner, Yellow Wallpaper by
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Writing day: Students will be asked
to begin writing a draft of their short
story fictional narrative using the two
characters, narrator and point of
view, and a couple of the
problem/resolutions they worked on
during independent practice.

Brainstorming day: Students will be


asked to brainstorm about their
short story fictional narrative (Do
they like where it is going? Do they
know if the plot will match the story?
Are their characters developed
enough?)
Revision day: Students will work on
each others drafts and help spark
the brainstorming process.

27

formative assessment from Activities


1 and 2. The teacher will give
participation points during the
activities for student involvement.
The independent practice will serve
as a check for understanding and
provide scaffolding for the next
lesson.

Independent Practice
Students will be asked to continue
working on their fictional short story
narrative that they began working on
during class.
Assessment
During reading and writing time,
which are both individual activities,
the teacher will meet with each
student to assess their
understanding of the reading
materials, their interaction level with
the coursework, and their
comfortability with practical use of
content. The independent practice
will serve as a check for
understanding and provide
scaffolding for the next lesson.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to write a
one-paragraph summary and twoparagraph response to both of the
short stories read during class on
Day 4. Students will be encouraged
to work on their short story.
Assessment
During brainstorming and revision
time, which are both group activities,
the teacher will meet with pairs or
groups of students to check their

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day
6

(ELA11
12.W.3)
3.2
4.3
4.4

Day
7

(ELA11
12.W.3)
3.1
3.5

Discuss how the tone and voice of a


short story changes the perspective
for the reader, and how pacing can
affect the way a story is presented.
Activity 1: Students will be grouped
into four based on the birthday
grouping method. After receiving the
short story Some of Us Had Been
Threatening Our Friend Colby by
Donald Barthelme, students will
read aloud to each other the story,
pausing after each paragraph. One
student will be the summarizer,
two will be the questioners, and
one will be the recorder. Desired
discussion will be about the contrast
in tone and topic, along with pacing.
Activity 2: Students will be asked to
individually write a somber sentence
with a happy tone, and a happy
sentence with a somber/angry tone,
and then share their sentences
aloud.
Discuss how dialogue can add
insight into a characters thoughts,
break up large pieces of text, and
convey ideas or events quickly.
Also, discuss how multiple stories
within a story can affect the reader.
Activity 1: Students will popcorn
read The Necklace by Guy de
Maupassant, during which they will
highlight dialogue in the text. After
reading the story, students and their
elbow partners will discuss the
function and usage using a guiding
worksheet.
Discussion of homework: The
28

understanding and progress with the


short story, and to guide them
through the brainstorming and
revision process.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to write a
letter to the teacher that outlines the
tone and voice of their short story,
using the desired tone and voice to
convey understanding.
Assessment
Each group for Activity 1 will turn in
the paper they wrote down questions
and answers about, and the teacher
will roam the classroom and give
students participation points for
involvement and willingness to gain
knowledge. The teacher will check
for understanding regarding tone
informally during Activity 2 when
students share their sentences. The
independent practice will serve as a
check for understanding and provide
scaffolding for the next lesson.

Independent Practice
Students will watch the movie The
Prestige and fill out a work-packet
as they watch that asks them to
identify characters, setting, point of
view, theme, etc. After watching the
movie, students will be asked to
write one paragraph about how
multiple stories affect the overall
story.
Assessment
The teacher will collect the guiding
worksheet from Activity 1 and will
check students papers for proper

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

teacher will give a lesson on


multiple stories and go over
instructions.
Day
8

(ELA11
12.W.3)
4.4
6.1
6.2
6.3

Day
9

(ELA11
12.W.3)
1.1
1.2
1.3

Discuss theme and moral, and their


relevance to all short stories.
Activity 1: Students will read
selected short stories from Aesops
Fables, individually writing a
summary, conclusion, and
identification of the moral for each
one.
Activity 2: Students will get into pairs
with their Lovesick partners and
create a fable, complete with a
drawing, on a sheet of construction
paper, modeling their stories off of
Aesops Fables.

Reading day: Students will


individually and silently read The
Raven by Edgar Allen Poe, The
Lottery by Shirley Jackson
Writing day: Students will be asked
to continue working on the draft of
their short story fictional narrative,
focusing on the tone of their story
and how that relates to their
theme/moral, and on introducing
dialogue into the story.

29

highlighting of dialogue. The


independent practice will act as a
check for understanding and a
formal formative review of
instructional content.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to identify the
theme of each short story read in
class, except Aesops Fables or as
homework over the course of the
unit, writing a paragraph or more for
each story.
Assessment
The teacher will collect student work
from Activity 1. Also, students will
hang up their projects from Activity 2
on a designated wall in the
classroom, where the teacher can
assess them all. The independent
practice will act as a check for
understanding and a formal
formative review of instructional
content.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to continue
working on their fictional short story
narrative that they worked on during
class.
Assessment
During reading and writing time,
which are both individual activities,
the teacher will meet with each
student to assess their
understanding of the reading
materials, their interaction level with
the coursework, and their
comfortability with practical use of
content. The independent practice
will serve as a check for
understanding and provide
scaffolding for the next lesson.

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day
10

(ELA11
12.W.3)
1.1
1.2
1.3

Day
11

(ELA11
12.W.3)
3.4
5.4

Day
12

(ELA11
12.W.3)
1.1
1.2
1.3

Brainstorming day: Students will be


asked to brainstorm about their
short story fictional narrative (Do
they like where it is going? Have
they added enough or too much
dialogue? What is the theme/moral
of the story going to be?)
Revision day: Students will work on
each others drafts and help refine
parts of each others stories.

Discuss the impact positive and


negative of descriptions of people,
places, ideas, and events on the
story and the readers perspective.
Activity 1: Students will individually
read models of under-descriptive
and over-descriptive paragraphs
and write about why they think it is
not the most effective way to write
and read.
Activity 2: Students will read The
Red Wheelbarrow by William
Carlos Williams, and an excerpt
from The Good Earth by Pearl S.
Buck. They will discuss with their
elbow partners why both of these
Exam: Characters, narrator, point of
view, problems/solutions,
stories/plots, descriptions, tone,
pacing, dialogue, theme, and
vocabulary words.
After a student completes the exam,
they can conference with the
teacher or work on their short story.

30

Independent Practice
Students will be asked to write a
one-paragraph summary and twoparagraph response to both of the
short stories read during class on
Day 4. Students will be encouraged
to work on their short story.
Assessment
During brainstorming and revision
time, which are both group activities,
the teacher will meet with pairs or
groups of students to check their
understanding and progress with the
short story, and to guide them
through the brainstorming and
revision process.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to write a
powerful statement or thought using
little description, and a powerful
statement or thought using a lot of
description.
Assessment
Assignments from Activities 1 and 2
will be collected. Also, the teacher
will give participation points based
on involvement with the content. The
independent practice will serve as a
check for understanding and provide
scaffolding for the next lesson.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to continue
working on their fictional short story
narrative that they worked on during
class, and bring a final typed draft to
class the next day.
Assessment
The exam will serve as a summative

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day
13

Day
14

Day
15

(ELA11
12.W.3)
1.1
1.2
1.3

(ELA11
12.W.3)
2.1
2.3
5.5
6.1
6.3

(ELA11
12.W.3)
2.1
2.3
5.5
6.1
6.3

Final revision day: Students will


work on each others drafts and help
refine parts of each others stories.

Presentations: Students will present


their short stories to the class by
reading them aloud or bringing a
copy for every student and having
them read it individually or aloud.
After each presentation, students
will be asked to give positive and
constructive feedback to the
presenter, and write a two-sentence
summary/conclusion.
Presentations: Students will present
their short stories to the class by
reading them aloud or bringing a
copy for every student and having
them read it individually or aloud.
After each presentation, students
will be asked to give positive and
constructive feedback to the
presenter, and write a two-sentence
summary/conclusion.

assessment for the unit, to display


that students can identify content.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to complete
their fictional short story narrative
and bring the final copy to class the
next day.
Assessment
During revision time, the teacher will
meet with pairs or groups of
students to guide them through the
final revision process.
Assessment
The short story will serve as a
summative assessment for the unit,
to display that students can properly
translate content into writing.

Assessment
The short story will serve as a
summative assessment for the unit,
to display that students can properly
translate content into writing.

Day 1: 55-Minute Lesson Plan


Subject: Short Stories are Spiffy! ELA

Grade Level: 11-12

Focus Standards
(ELA1112.W.3)
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its
31

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters;
create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
Learning Outcomes
Objective
SWABAT:
The student will create a character, narrator,
problem, and resolution, and determine a
Identify problems and solutions in written, visual, and
point of view by writing a fictional short story.
oral stories
Understand point of view and be able to write a short
story from one of them
Understand and identify narrators in written stories and
in the short story they create
Understand character interaction and development
and be able to identify physical characteristics and
personality traits from written stories and of the
characters they create
Internally visualize and externally draw descriptions in
written short stories
Create visual representations of written stories and
written representations of visual stories
Texts
Timing
Chopin, Kate. The Story of An Hour. Prod. Virginia
Anticipatory Set: 3 minutes
Commonwealth University. 1894. Short Story,
Information: 10 minutes
Web. 5 April 2016.
Activity 1: 17 minutes (2 minutes for
<https://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/hour/>.
pairing, instruction, and check for
understanding, 15 minutes to complete
activity)
Activity 2: 23 minutes (3 minutes for
pairing, instruction, and check for
understanding, 20 minutes to complete
activity)
Closure: 2 minutes
Anticipatory Set
Think about a funny or sad story that you have been a part of or heard. Then, turn to your elbow partner
and take turns telling your story. Please be sure your story is school- appropriate.
Ask two students to share their stories with the class.
Today we are going to write fictional short stories by creating a character or characters, determining the
narrator and point of view, and forming a problem and solution.
Learning Plan: Scope and Sequence
32

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

The teacher will guide a discussion with the class to teach the following:
Character
o Definition: Character can be defined as any person, animal, or figure represented in a
literary work.
o Characters:
Protagonist: main character
Antagonist: characters that oppose or compete with the protagonist
o Types of Characters:
Flat: two-dimensional, relatively uncomplicated, a filler character
Round: complex, behaves, talks, and thinks in an extremely realistic fashion
Static: a character that does not change
Dynamic: a character that changes
Flat vs. Static
o A flat character is referring to the amount of development the author has chosen to reveal
to the audience; these characters are often vague outlines with not much filler. Missing true
personality or character traits.
o A static character is referring to the amount of change that the character goes through in
the story, which is none.
Round vs. Dynamic
o A round character is referring to the amount of development the author has chosen to
reveal to the audience; these character are often realistic and have full personalities and
character traits.
o A dynamic character is referring to the amount of change that the character goes through
in the story, which is some.
What should you know about your characters?
Narrator
o Definition: A narrator can be defined as a person who gives an account or tells the story of
events, experiences, etc.
o What is the difference between a narrator and a character?
o Does the narrator always have to be the protagonist?
o Does the narrator always have to be the main character?
Point of View
o Definition: The point of view can be defined as the narrators position in relation to the story
being told.
o First Person: the storyteller is a character in the text, uses the pronoun I
Participant observer: a minor character who is involved in the action peripherally
and reports on the activities of others.
Protagonist: the main character
o Second Person: the reader becomes a character in the text, uses the pronoun you
o Third Person: writing from an outside perspective, uses pronouns like he, they, she
Omniscient: the narrator can see, hear, show, and tell all about all characters
Limited: the narrator can only see, hear, show, and tell all about certain characters
33

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

or events.
Dramatic: the narrator cannot see, hear, and tell all, but only show what is
happening in the exterior world (no insight into the minds of any character, except
through aside or soliloquies)
Activity 1: Grouping and Check for Understanding
Activity 1: Understanding Character
Interaction
Activity 1: Round-Table Pairing
Activity 1:
With the teachers direction and observation, students will
The teacher will ask students to write a short
count off into pairs, ones will pair with another one, twos
story with their partner using the Short Story
with twos. Students will be given thirty seconds to get into
Map handout. Each pair has a different
their assigned pairs, ensure that each pair has a Short
handout, with each handout having two fully
Story Map handout. Then the auditory signal of ladies
formed characters and a problem. The pair
and gentlemen, attention up here will draw the students
will work together to write a minimum twoattention back to the teacher, instructions will be given, and page short story that uses both characters,
the teacher will check for understanding.
determines a narrator and point of view, and
provides a solution to the problem. The story
Activity 1: Check For Understanding
should flow and provide enough background
The teacher will ask questions by randomly calling on
and information for the Short Story Map
students using popsicle sticks, clarifying any
handout to not be necessary for successful
misunderstandings, and checking for understanding by
reading of the story. After the allotted time,
using the following questions:
the auditory signal will draw the class back
How are you going to be getting into pairs?
together and the teacher will collect the short
stories from the pairs for assessment.
How many handouts should each pair have?
How long do you and your partner have to create
the short story?
What information from the handout do you have to
use?
How many short stories should each pair turn in?
Can someone please summarize the expectations
for this activity?
Activity 2: Grouping and Check for Understanding
Activity 2: Understanding Character
Development
Activity 2: Jigsaw Grouping
Activity 2:
The teacher will place one colored jigsaw piece on the
The teacher will have students get into
edge of each students workspace. Students will be given
groups of four and then individually read the
forty-five seconds to find the three other people who have
short story The Story of an Hour by Kate
jigsaw pieces that are the same color as theirs, and sit in
Chopin, highlighting physical characteristics
chairs at desks facing each other. The teacher will give
of the characters in the story in green, and
each group four copies of the short story The Story of an
personality traits of the characters in pink.
Hour by Kate Chopin, four green highlighters, and four
After reading the story individually, students
pink highlighters. Then the auditory signal of ladies and
will work with their group to draw pictures of
gentlemen, attention up here will draw the students
the characters using evidence from the short
34

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

attention back to the teacher, instructions will be given, and


the teacher will check for understanding.

story. At the end of the allotted time, the


auditory signal will draw the class back
together and each group will tape their
character drawings on a designated wall in
the classroom.

Activity 2: Check For Understanding


The teacher will ask questions by randomly calling on
every fifth student, clarifying any misunderstandings, and
checking for understanding by using the following
questions:
How are you going to be getting into groups? How
many will be in each group?
Are you reading the story as a group or
individually?
What color do you use to indicate physical
characteristics? What color do you use to indicate
personality traits?
What are you doing with your group after reading
the short story individually?
Can someone please summarize the expectations
for this activity?
Closure
Write on a sheet of paper, as an exit ticket, a different solution to the problem from the Short Story Map
handout from the one used in the short story you wrote with your partner. Underneath that, write two
physical characteristics and two personality traits of your favorite character.
Independent Practice
Students will be asked to create two characters, determine
a narrator and point of view and begin brainstorming five
different problems and solutions as homework for
individual practice. These components will be used as a
check for understanding and in upcoming unit plans for
writing individual fictional short stories from scratch.

Assessment
Students will submit the short stories created
with their partners during the Understanding
Character Interaction Activity for assessment.
During the Understanding Character
Development Activity, the teacher will walk
around and check each short story to ensure
students are identifying key ideas correctly,
and they will receive participation points for
their identifications. Additionally, the groups of
four from this activity will create a drawing of
the characters that will be turned in as a form
of assessment. The independent practice will
serve as a check for understanding and an
informal formative assessment.

Differentiation
All diverse learners, including students with IEPs and 504s, will be accommodated for. Students that need
35

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

differentiation in regard to writing will be given more scaffolding and structure in instruction. Students that
need differentiation in regard to reading will be given more time to read texts discussed in class; the teacher
will ensure students either receive the texts a day before class discussion or be excused from discussion in
exchange for another assignment to check for understanding.

Day 1: Activity 1 Rubric


Indicators
Length of story
Use of characters

Problem/solution
relationship

Flow and
descriptions
Conventions

Exceeds
Over two pages

Meets
Two pages

Approaches
Between over one
page and under
two pages
Characters
Both characters
Both characters
interact according are used
are used but stray
to their shell,
according to their
from their shell, or
creatively, and
shell
only one character
effectively
was used
Problem and
Problem and
Problem and
solution are clearly solution are clearly solution are
outlined, logical,
outlined and
vaguely outlined
creative, and
logical
or confusing
leave the reader
thinking
Flow is organic
Flow is logical and Flow is illogical
and descriptions
descriptions are
and descriptions
are colorful
used to forward
are lacking or
story
digressive
Conventions are
Conventions are
Conventions are
above the quality
the quality of a
below the quality
of a first draft
first draft
of a first draft

36

Falls Far Below


One page or
under
One character
was used, or other
characters were
used instead of
those provided
Problem and
solution are not
explained
effectively, or do
not exist
Flow and
descriptions are
nonexistent
Story is
unreadable

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day 2: Detailed Lesson Plan


Subject: Short Stories are Spiffy! ELA

Grade Level: 11-12


Focus Standards

(ELA1112.W.3)
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its
significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters;
create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a
coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense,
growth, or resolution).
Learning Outcomes
Objective
SWABAT:
The student will be able to identify
Identify problems and solutions in written, visual, and
problems/solutions, stories, and plots in
oral stories
written, visual, and oral stories (2.1, 4.2).
Understand the similarities and differences between
The student will be able to understand
the story and plot
the similarities and differences between
the story and plot (4.1).
Identify the story and plot of written and visual stories
Texts
Lee, Hyeonseo. "My escape from North Korea." February 2013. TED. Video, Web. 1 April 2016.
<http://www.ted.com/talks/hyeonseo_lee_my_escape_from_north_korea?language=en>.
Anticipatory Set
Write down your three favorite movies. Next to each movie, write down what the problem was and how it
was resolved.
Ask four students to share their movies and proposed problem/solutions.
Today we are going to understand how problems and solutions help shape a story, and why problems and
solutions are presented in the way they are.
Learning Plan: Scope and Sequence
Discuss problems and solutions, resolutions, and the differences and similarities between story and plot.
Activity 1
37

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Students will listen to the teacher read two-paragraph problem/solution stories. Individually, they will write
down the problem and solution. Next, students will listen and follow along with the teacher as they read
three and four paragraph stories. Individually, they will write down the problem and solution/resolution. With
their elbow partners, they will diagram the plot and summarize the story. In groups of four, they will discuss
how the plot and story differed or were similar
.
Activity 2
Students will listen and watch the TED talk My escape from North Korea by Hyeonseo Lee. They will
identify problems, solutions, the plot, and the story.
Closure
Write on a sheet of paper, as an exit ticket, how you are going to spend the rest of your school-day; try your
hardest to write the sequence of events in a logical, but non-chronological, way.
Independent Practice
Assessment
Students will be asked to write a two to four paragraph
Students will submit their individual answers
story from their childhood in chronological order, from the
and the answers from their elbow partner
perspective of being a child. Then, they will be asked to
activity and group activity from Activity 1 as a
write a two to four paragraph story where the plot is
check for understanding and an informal
different than before, and interject their teenage voice and
formative assessment. They will also turn in
perspective.
the worksheet from Activity 2. The
independent practice will serve as a check for
understanding and provide scaffolding for the
next lesson.
Differentiation
All diverse learners, including students with IEPs and 504s, will be accommodated for. Students that need
differentiation in regard to writing will be given more scaffolding and structure in instruction. Students that
need differentiation in regard to reading will be given more time to read texts discussed in class; the teacher
will ensure students either receive the texts a day before class discussion or be excused from discussion in
exchange for another assignment to check for understanding.

38

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day 2: Activity 2 Rubric


Indicators
Student identified at least one problem
Student identified at least one solution
Student identified a correlative problem and solution
Student identified the plot
Student identified the story
Student differentiated plot and story

39

Yes

No

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day 3: Detailed Lesson Plan


Subject: Short Stories are Spiffy! ELA

Grade Level: 11-12


Focus Standards

(ELA1112.W.3)
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of
the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
Learning Outcomes
Objective
SWABAT:
The student will be able to use language
Use language and vocabulary to be able to describe in
and vocabulary to be able to describe in
detail a person, place, thing, or event
detail a person, place, thing, or event
(5.1).
Create visual representations of written stories and
The student will be able to create visual
written representations of visual stories
representations of written stories and
Use newly developed descriptor vocabulary in daily
written representations of visual stories
language and writing
(5.2).
Determine what types of descriptions are important
The student will be able to use newly
and which are not
developed descriptor vocabulary in daily
Identify bias in written or verbal descriptions
language and writing (5.3).
The student will be able to determine
what types of descriptions are important
and which are not (5.4).
The student will be able to identify bias in
written or verbal descriptions (5.5).
Texts
None
40

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Anticipatory Set
On a blank piece of paper, describe to the best of your abilities a door, any door, leaving a space between
each line.
Ask three students to share their description.
Today, we are going to learn how to better describe people, places, things, and events using colorful word
choice and careful sentence structure.
Learning Plan: Scope and Sequence
Discuss the importance of detailed descriptions of people, places, things, and events. Introduce descriptive
vocabulary and discuss bias in descriptions.
Activity 1
Students will receive a series of pictures or drawings that include everything from everyday items to colors
to concepts, and will be asked to write a paragraph for each one describing them in detail. Students will
trade with their Monday partners and will revise for more detail and identify bias.
Activity 2
Students will receive a series of paragraphs or sentences that they have to visually represent to their elbow
partner (either through interpretive dance, charades, or drawing). Students will give constructive feedback.
Closure
Refer back to the description of a door that you wrote at the beginning of class, and revise it to be more
detailed and descriptive; this will be an exit ticket.
Independent Practice
Assessment
Students will be asked to add more details to the people,
Students will submit their paragraphs
places, things, and events they have outlined.
describing the visual representations and any
visual representations they drew of the
paragraph descriptions as a formative
assessment from Activities 1 and 2. The
teacher will give participation points during
the activities for student involvement. The
independent practice will serve as a check for
understanding and provide scaffolding for the
next lesson.
Differentiation
All diverse learners, including students with IEPs and 504s, will be accommodated for. Students that need
differentiation in regard to writing will be given more scaffolding and structure in instruction. Students that
need differentiation in regard to reading will be given more time to read texts discussed in class; the teacher
will ensure students either receive the texts a day before class discussion or be excused from discussion in
exchange for another assignment to check for understanding.

41

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Day 3: Activity 1 Rubric


Indicators
Student worked well with their
partner
Student wrote a paragraph using
full sentences
Student creatively approached
the activity
Student gave constructive and
useful revision tips
Student applied revision tips to
their paragraphs
Student identified bias in their
paragraphs
Student identified bias in the
paragraph of their partner

Yes

42

No

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

References
Aesop. Aesop's Fables. Prod. Tales with Morals. n.d. Short Story, Web. 1 April 2016.
<http://www.taleswithmorals.com/>.
Barthelme, Donald. Some of Us Had Been Threatening Our Friend Colby. Prod. The Estate of Donald
Barthelme. 1976. Short Story, Web. 4 April 2016. <http://jessamyn.com/barth/colby.html>.
Buck, Pearl S. The Good Earth (excerpts). Prod. Bookrags. n.d. Book Excerpts, Web. 3 April 2016.
<http://www.bookrags.com/notes/ge/quo.html#gsc.tab=0>.
Chopin, Kate. The Story of An Hour. Prod. Virginia Commonwealth University. 1894. Short Story, Web. 5
April 2016. <https://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/hour/>.
Faulkner, William. A Rose For Emily. Prod. American Studies at the University of Virginia. n.d. Short Story,
Web. 2 April 2016. <http://xroads.virginia.edu/~drbr/wf_rose.html>.
Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery. Prod. Middlebury College. 1948. Short Story, Web. 4 April 2016.
<https://sites.middlebury.edu/individualandthesociety/files/2010/09/jackson_lottery.pdf>.
Lee, Hyeonseo. "My escape from North Korea." February 2013. TED. Video, Web. 1 April 2016.
<http://www.ted.com/talks/hyeonseo_lee_my_escape_from_north_korea?language=en>.
Maupassant, Guy de. The Necklace. Prod. eastoftheweb: shortstories. n.d. Short Story, Web. 1 April 2016.
<http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/Neck.shtml>.
Perkins Gilman, Charlotte. Yellow Wallpaper. Prod. Project Gutenberg. n.d. Short Story, Web. 4 April 2016.
<https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1952/1952-h/1952-h.htm>.
43

Freshman English Class


Ms. Baker, Room 1300
Email: abaker@phoenixunion.org Phone: (602) 764-3000 ext. 10000
Website: abbylbaker.weebly.com Office Hours: Monday-Friday 3:30-5:30
PM
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Poe, Edgar Allen. The Raven. Prod. Poetry Foundation. n.d. 2 April 2016.
<http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/178713>.
William, William Carlos. The Red Wheelbarrow. Prod. The Academy of American Poets. n.d. Poem, Web. 5
April 2016. <https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/red-wheelbarrow>.

44