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Vibration route setup and

analysis of a Plunger Pump

Discussion Guideline

Description of Plunger pumps and parts


Mechanical overview
Route setup
Data Analysis

Plunger pump description


Plunger pumps are seen in most of our
areas but the monitoring of them is often
neglected. They are however critical to
many of the operations we deal with so
monitoring them can be beneficial.
Designed with exceptional versatility to
efficiently meet the requirements of a
wide variety of pumping applications.
Ruggedly designed for minimum
maintenance.
Meet the heavy-duty requirements of
continuous duty operation in general
industry as well as API 674 services.

Plunger pump description


Driven via electric motors
or diesel engines
V-belt or gear reduction.
Stuffing boxes are
Specifically designed for
applications to maximize
packing life and minimize
maintenance.
3 X- Heads Triplex
5 x heads - Quintuplex

Mechanical Overview
1. Fluid Cylinder
2. Discharge Manifold
3. Liquid End Bolting
4. Suction Manifold
5. Suction Valve
Assembly
6. Discharge Valve
Assembly
7. Stuffing Box Assembly
8. Stuffing Box Spring
9. Packing
10. Plunger

Mechanical Overview
11. Stuffing Box Flange
12. Crosshead Extension
13. Crosshead Stub Seal
14. Crosshead
15. Wrist pins & Bearing
16. Connecting Rod and
Bearing Assembly
17. Crankshaft
18. Crankshaft Main
Bearings
19. Crankshaft Oil Seal
20. Power Frame

Splash Lubricated crossheads

The internals

The motor

Motors may be directly


mounted or normally
elevated above
Most have a speed
reduction between the
motor and the plunger
pump
Drives the belt between the
pump and motor
Normally run at 1800 RPM
Can be on a VFD

The Main bearings

The Outer two main


bearings are tapered
roller element bearings
The Inner two bearings
are bronze sleeve type

The crossheads

Crossheads are splash


lubricated
Fully cylindrical, probably
do not have replaceable
shoes

The frame

Heavy Duty frame


Lots of internal webbing
to provide stiffness
Bolted to skids

The piping

Decide which piping is


important
Discharge piping will
normally have a bladder
style pulsation suppressor
Relief valves can be
mounted on small bore
piping and can vibrate

Route Setup

Motor Setup in Windrock MD

Inboard and outboard motor points


Needs both ips and gs
In velocity H,V,A on both ends if accessible
In acceleration horizontal on both ends if
accessible.
Acceleration (gs) on Motor OB,
Horizontal, High F-max for bar pass.
Acceleration (gs) on Motor IB, Horizontal,
Low F-max, high lines.
Use an Accelerometer
Probably need a stinger to get between
motor fins. Reminder, a stinger is a low
pass filter, in that it reduces the amplitude
of high frequencies.
Suggested
It can be used with caution.
Velocity
It may reduce the bearing frequencies.
Acceleration
Grease fitting may be best data point for
clarity

Fmax

Lines

75,000

400

150,000

800

Main bearing Setup in Windrock MD


Setup 4 bearing points
Requires both velocity
and acceleration
Only take in one
orientation.
Vertical orientation seems
to be best
Suggested

Fmax

Lines

Velocity

75,000

800

Acceleration 600,000

1600

Crossheads Setup in Windrock MD


Setup 5 crosshead points
Requires both velocity
and acceleration
Only take in one
orientation.
Vertical orientation seems
to be best
Suggested

Fmax

Lines

Velocity

75,000

800

Acceleration 600,000

1600

Frame Setup in Windrock MD


Setup points for opposite
corners
On corner #1 do
horizontal, Vertical and
Axial
On corner #2 do
horizontal, Vertical
Setup for displacement
and velocity
Suggested

Fmax

Lines

Velocity

37,500

400

mils

9,360

400

Piping Setup in Windrock MD


Setup points for suction &
discharge piping
Setup points for any
pulsation dampener,
recycle line, or associated
piping
Setup for displacement
and velocity
Suggested

Fmax

Lines

Velocity

37,500

400

mils

9,360

400

Go Collect some data

Motor Data Review

1x (Balance), 2x (alignment)
Bearing frequencies (BSF, BPFO, BPFI)
Electrical (Bar Pass, Air Gap)

Main Bearing Data Review

Bearing frequencies (BSF, BPFO, BPFI) may not be possible to define in


data
Get a baseline and look for increasing velocity or acceleration
Look for a bell curve around 50,000 CPM (800 Hz) as bearing
clearances increase in center shell bearings

Crosshead Data Review

Get a baseline and look for increasing velocity or acceleration


Look for a bell curve around 50,000 CPM (800 Hz) as bearing
clearances increase in center shell bearings

Pulsation Dampeners
Dampeners are used to reduce suction and discharge pressure
pulsations.
A properly sized and located suction dampener can reduce the
system pulsations.
If the dampener is the flow-through type, it should be located
on the same side as the pipe, not at the dead end of the
manifold.
The most commonly used dampeners are the gas-bladder types.
These units are normally charged with nitrogen gas at 50 to 66
percent of the system pressure.
Although these units are relatively inexpensive, they can
attenuate up to 90 percent of the pressure pulsations, below 50
Hz, in the interconnecting piping system if charged

Beware of small bore piping on the


discharge side

Small bore piping is very prone


to vibrate with the pulsations
on the discharge side.
Ensure all piping is adequately
supported

Conclusion of presentation