Indiana Wesleyan University

Elementary Education Lesson Plan Template
Reading, Writing, and Oral Language
2007 ACEI Standards
Goin’ Someplace Special, Patricia C. McKissack/Jerry Pinkney
Problem Confronted: Racism
Brittney Tuttle
READINESS
I.
Goals/Objectives/Standard(s)
A. Goal(s)—
1. Students will identify and address social injustices found within literature and
modern society.
2. Students will create pledges against personal participation in social injustices.
3. Students will identify individual roles within the larger social context of injustice.
B. Objective(s)—
1. Given the story Goin’ Someplace Special by Patricia C. McKissack and Jerry
Pinkney, students will state the key details that compose the theme of the
book through discussion, simulations, and creation of “All Are Welcome” sign.
2. Given a written prompt, students will formulate text-to-self and text-to-world
connections through written explanation and drawings on airplane die cuts to
be posted on the ‘Classroom World Board’.
3. Given a discussion prompt, students will decompose social injustice as a
whole into its individual parts that have the ability to impact outcomes
through verbal discussion and peer collaboration.
C. Standard(s): Professional Society/State/District
1.RL.2.1 Ask and answer questions about main idea and key details in a text.
II.

Materials and Management
a. Materials:
 The book, Goin’ Someplace Special by Patricia C. McKissack and illustrated
by Jerry Pinkney
 Bag of items describing my favorite place; home
 Signs labeled ‘No Persons Wearing Jeans Allowed’, ‘Persons Wearing Tennis
Shoes Only’, ‘Boys Only’, and ‘Girls Only’
 String
 17 Airplane Die cuts
 One large board with a picture of the world
 Tape
 Glue
 Marker
 Paper and letters/number for sign that reads “All Are Welcome/Room 6”
 Construction paper chain links
b. Time



Total: approximately 40 minutes
Anticipatory Set: 3 minutes
Instruction: 15 minutes
Guided Practice: approximately 15 minutes

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Closure: 10 minutes

c. Space
I will use the space in the reading corner to read aloud the book to the students and deliver
my anticipatory set. I will also have the students sitting in the reading corner during direct
instruction. During guided practice, I will have the students sitting at their individual desks
to complete their writing prompt, and will use the reading corner to help students post their
airplanes on the world board. For closure, the students will return to the reading corner to
help construct the sign that read “All Are Welcome” to be hung in the hallway above the
classroom door.
d. Behavior
To manage behavior, I will give positive re-directives to the students. I will use a construction
paper classroom chain to motivate students; stickers will be rewarded as whole group
positive reinforcement as deemed appropriate. I will also utilize the classroom behavior
management system.
For transitions, I will use the method implemented by my cooperating classroom teacher.
She uses transitional songs, which is developmentally appropriate to their age and familiar
by her students. In addition to songs, I will use the clapping method to gain attention of the
class if needed.
III.

Anticipatory Set

For the anticipatory set, I will introduce a bag of souvenirs describing my favorite and special
place, home, to the students. This introduction will directly correlate to the book Goin’
Someplace Special. Later in the lesson, students will be able to describe their own special
place.
“I brought a bag with me today, and I want you to help me figure out what is inside! (Pull out
a picture of my family in front of my house.) Oh this is a picture of my family in front of my
house. These are my three sisters, these are my three brothers, and this is my mom!” I will
continue to pull items from my bag. “I chose to bring all of these things today because these
all represent my home and I wanted you guys to see my home. My home is my favorite
special place.”
IV.

Purpose

“I am going to read Goin’ Someplace Special by Patricia C. McKissack and illustrated by Jerry
Pinkney. While I am reading, I want you to think about all the different things Tricia Anne,
the girl here in the story, has to do in order to get to her special place. I also want you to
think about what YOU could do to help make a difference.”
PLAN FOR INSTRUCTION

V.

(ACEI 1.0)

Foundational Theory: Reader-response criticism is a theory that focuses on the
reader or readers and their transactions and experiences with the literary work,
rather than primarily focusing on the author and elements of literature within the
text.
Adaptation to Diverse Students—

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(ACEI 3.2)

To accommodate for the needs of young readers and writers, I will draw lines on the
airplanes to guide them as they write sentences. To adapt to learners, I will allow the gifted
students to write sentences on their airplane to include with their pictures. For upcoming
writers, I will provide a written prompt with blanks and have them follow phonics
generalizations to construct spellings of unknown words. For struggling writers, I will allow
them to draw and explain their choice.
During discussion, I will have the students relate to the story through their own experiences.
Each student will have the opportunity to respond according to his appropriate
developmental level. The students will also be able to express their individual learning style
and need within their written explanation. During whole group, struggling students may be
reinforced by their other peers.
To accommodate for all learning types, I will include visual representations of the discussed
content through anchor charts and the world board, discussions and responses for auditory
learners, and simulations for kinesthetic learners.
For Daniel, Kaitlyn, and Michael, I will offer teacher assistance during guided practice to
retain the attention of the students and guide them accordingly.
VI.

Lesson Presentation (Input/Output)

To begin my lesson presentation, I will conduct a read aloud on Goin’ Someplace Special by
Patricia C. McKissack and illustrated by Jerry Pinkney. I will read the story using different
engaging voices for the characters so that the students can clearly differentiate between
characters. The students will be gathered with me in the reading corner.
After I finish the read-aloud, I will have a grand conversation with guiding questions. I will
use natural response and Bloom’s Taxonomy as a guide to my questioning. I will ask the
following questions:
1. How did you like the story?
2. What did you like/didn’t like about the story?
3. Where was Tricia Ann’s special place?
4. What made it so special to Tricia Ann?
5. What made it hard to get to her special place?
6. What do you think the problem in the story was?
7. How would you feel if you had a hard time getting to your special place?
8. What can you do to help make a change?
(ACEI 2.1)
(ACEI 3.3)
VII.

Check for understanding.

After we participate in the grand conversation, I will extend the learning experience through
simulations. The students will be asked to act according to the signs I introduce. These signs
will be unfair and address the social injustices experiences during the time of Jim Crow
within classroom context. I will first ask individual students to move according to the signs,
and then I will separate the whole class according to gender.
“Now, we are going to see how Tricia Ann felt when she was reading all the signs that told
her what she could and could not do!” I will begin by asking the students the following:
 Ask student, “where would you like to sit?”, then put a sign that says “No Persons
Wearing Jeans Allowed”
 Ask student, “where would you like to sit?”, then put up sign that says “People
Wearing Tennis Shoes Only”

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Ask student, “How do you feel when (student) can sit where she wants, but you
can’t?”
Ask the students “How do you feel about having signs tell you what you can or
cannot do?”
Emphasize that this is what Tricia Ann experienced. “This is what Tricia Ann
experienced in the story. What were some of the signs that she had to follow?”

After the student sitting simulation, I will include the whole class in separating signs. I will
lay down a string and on one side there will be a sign labeled “boys only” and the other sign
“girls only.” Then I will tell the students to sit accordingly and then use questioning to assess
understanding.
“Okay! Now, let’s see what you think about this. What if I laid this string down here, making
a line. And then I put this sign that says “boys only” up close to the front next to the
teacher, and this sign that says “girls only” way back here away from the teacher. Go sit
where the sign tells you to sit please.” I will ask the following questions:
 How do you feel being told where to sit?
 Is it fair that the girls have to sit farther away from the teacher just because they are
girls?
 What was one thing that happened in the story that was like this?
 How could we change it to make it fair?
After discussion, I will use a song and verb to transition back to seats. While the students are
in their seats, I will model directions for the airplane activity. I will ask the students to repeat
the directions so I know they understand expectations. “I have these airplanes. On these
airplanes, I want you to draw a picture of yourself as the pilot, just like I did! This is me.
Then, I want you to draw a picture of your special place is and write a sentence of why it is
your special place. On my airplane I put, “My special place is my home because it is where
my family that I love lives.” At the top of the airplane it says: All Are Welcome Aboard. What
do you think that means? Good! You are the pilot of your own life and you get to decide who
you treat well and where you go. When you get down writing down your special place and
drawing yourself as the pilot and a picture of your special place, bring your airplane to me,
and we will put it on the world!”
For the airplane activity, they will draw a picture of them as a pilot and a picture of their
special place. The plane will say “All Are Welcome Aboard”. This airplane signifies that they
are the pilot of their actions. On the airplane, they will draw a picture of their special place
and write/verbally explain why it is their special place. I will provide a prompt that reads:
‘__________ is my special place because _________.’ After they finish working on their airplane,
they will bring it to me and together we will attach the plane to the ‘Classroom World Board’
I created. This board will be a picture of the world with all the different airplanes attached. I
will walk around the room and monitor student behavior and participation as they are
working on their airplanes.
After students finish creating the world board, we will gather again in the reading corner to
discuss meaning and action plans. I will relate the material we learned about including all to
classroom context. I will write responses on an anchor chart for students to visualize. I will
ask the following questions to assess student understanding:
 Why is it important to include everybody on the planes we made?
 How can we include everybody in the cafeteria?
 How could we include everybody on the playground?
After discussion, we will move into our closure activity.
I will assess student learning through discussion answers and observation during the grand
conversation. I will also use the writing explanations created by the students to determine

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understanding. Based on formative assessments and observation: If 80% of the students
show mastery of content, move forward in the lesson and unit. Address the 20% in a small
group setting for reinforcement and re-teaching, scheduled for a meeting time sometime
throughout that week. If less than 80% show mastery, then re-teach the lesson to the whole
class, using different literature and instructional strategies.
VIII.

Review learning outcomes / Closure

After the class participates in a discussion about how to include everybody no matter where
we are, we will make a sign together that reads “All Are Welcome”, just like the ‘special
place’ in the library, to hang in the hallway above the doorway. I will hand each student a
letter and one student a number (6 is the classroom number). There are 14 students and 13
letters in ‘All Are Welcome’, plus one number to signify which room. I will call each student
to come to the paper sign, attach their letter, and sign his/her name. The signatures will
signify a class contract. After this activity, the lesson will be over.
“We are going to make an All Are Welcome sign for our room, just like the one in the book.
This sign means that everybody is welcome in our classroom. I am going to give each of you
a letter, and when I call your letter, come up to the paper and help us spell the sign! Then I
want you to sign your name on the sign. When you sign your name, it means that you are
going to be nice to everybody and treat them fairly.” I will ask the following questions:
 What will you do next time you see someone being treated unfair?
 What does our sign mean?
The teacher will emphasize that all students have the ability to make a change and include
everybody. The class will discuss how individual actions can change a big problem, relating
to the idea that All Parts Contribute to a Whole.
PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT
(ACEI 4.0)
Formative Assessment: For formative assessment I will use observation, questioning, and
discussion responses to determine student understanding and competency. Informal
observation will be the primary mode of assessment during the simulation activities and
discussion. Individual student’s airplane die cuts and written explanations will also be a valid
form of formative assessment during the guided practice portion of the lesson. Student
discussion revolving around individual roles (parts) in the fight for social justice (whole) will
be a formative assessment in regards to the big idea.
Summative Assessment: For summative assessment, the teacher will assess understanding
through the student explanation on the airplane die cuts. She will also assess understanding
through student discussion about what it means to have “All Welcome” on their airplane and
classroom sign.
REFLECTION AND POST-LESSON ANALYSIS
1 How many students achieved the lesson objective(s)? For those who did
not, why not?
All fourteen students appeared to achieve the lesson objective through self-reflection,
drawing techniques, and verbal explanations. In future read-alouds, I will review the concept
of theme and application to reinforce the knowledge gained from this objective.
2 What were my strengths and weaknesses?
My behavior management plan, anticipatory set, and closure were the strengths in my
lesson. I was able to motivate the students with a tangible item that could be monitored
easily and used as whole-group reinforcement. My anticipatory set engaged the students
early on, and they were anxious to learn where the character in the book’s special place

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was. Lastly, my closure included elements of application that allowed the students to walk
away from the lesson with text-to-self connections.
My weaknesses included limited wait time after giving redirectives, levels questioning for
comprehension, and noise during transitions. After I give a redirective, I must wait and make
sure that the action is followed through by the student. I also need to diversify my
comprehension questioning, rather than just asking, “Okay?” for confirmation. Lastly, my
transitions included multiple intelligences through songs and ‘verbs’ to get from place to
place, but I must remind the students that noise should be held at a minimum.
3 How should I alter this lesson?
To alter the lesson, I will provide a checklist to determine appropriate assessment of student
responses and airplane drawings.
4 How would I pace it differently?
Overall, the pacing was appropriate for the lesson. If I were to teach it again, I would
dedicate 15 more minutes to ensure that students would be able to share their special
places with other classroom members, and that there would be enough time dedicated to
the simulation activities. I would also consider the depth of specific questions and allow
more time for students to respond on questions that go beyond comprehension into
synthesis and evaluation though processes.
5 Were all students actively participating? If not, why not?
All students were actively participating. During certain points, I did have to redirect some
students during the read aloud to maintain their attention.
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What adjustments did I make to reach varied learning styles and ability
levels?
a Bloom’s Taxonomy
I considered the depth of my questioning and aimed for the questions to
reflect the model of Bloom’s Taxonomy. I asked comprehension questions, as
well as application questions.
b

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Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences
I adapted to visual learners through the picture book, vision of the
construction paper chain, and the drawings. I adapted to auditory and
linguistic learners through verbal response. Kinesthetic learning types were
addressed through movement in the classroom, construction of signs, and
dancing during transitions. Musical learners were addressed through songs
during transitions.

How could I adapt instruction to include differentiation regarding the
writing abilities of students?
To adapt to learners, I will allow the gifted students to write sentences on their
airplane to include with their pictures. For upcoming writers, I will provide a written
prompt with blanks and have them follow phonics generalizations to construct
spellings of unknown words. For struggling writers, I will allow them to draw and
explain their choice.
Revision Date: September 12, 2016
2007 ACEI Standard

6

Indiana Wesleyan University
Elementary Education Lesson Plan Design and Assessment Rubric
Reading, Writing, and Oral Language

Goals
Objectives
Standards

Anticipatory
Set

Purpose

Needs Improvement
1
Lesson objectives are
poorly written and/or
have little or no
connection to learning
goals or standards.
Little connection
exists between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments.
The anticipatory set is
missing or has little or
no connection to the
goal or content of the
lesson.

Emerging
Competence 2
Lesson objectives are
correlated with
learning goals and
standards. The
connection between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments is weak
or unclear.

Competent 3

The connection
between the
anticipatory set and
lesson objectives and
content is weak or
unclear.

The anticipatory set is
clear and direct and
focuses students’
attention on the
lesson.

The statement of
purpose is ambiguous
or worded so
generally that the
connection with the
content of the lesson
is not apparent.

A statement of
purpose is included in
the lesson, but has
little power to
motivate students and
capture their
imaginations.

The statement of
purpose is clearly
connected to the
content of the lesson
and is presented in
terms that are easily
understood by
students.

The lesson plan
contains objectives
that connect goals
and standards with
lesson activities and
assessments.

Outstanding 4
The lesson plan
contains clearly stated
content objectives.
Objectives are
logically connected to
appropriate goals and
standards and are
consistent with lesson
activities and
assessments.
The anticipatory set
connects the current
lesson with previous
and future learning
and focuses students’
minds and attention
on the day’s lesson.
The statement of
purpose has the
power to capture the
imaginations of
students and motivate
them to accomplish
the expected learning.

Readiness
Instructional Technology
The candidate seeks appropriate ways to evaluate and employ technological tools, resources, and
skills as they apply to specific content and pedagogical knowledge, assessment practices, and
student achievement. The selection of appropriate technological tools reflects the candidate’s
ability to make sound instructional decisions that enable all students to achieve the expected
outcomes. INTASC 6.i, 8.g, 8.o
Plan for Instruction

Adaptation
to Diverse
Students
ACEI
Standard
3.2

Lesson
Presentatio
n
Reading,
Writing,
and Oral
Language
ACEI

Needs Improvement
1
Few or no instructional
opportunities are
included. Any
instructional
opportunities are not
developmentally
appropriate or
adapted to diverse
students.

Emerging
Competence 2
Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson; however, they
are not adapted to
diverse students.

The candidate’s plan
suggests he or she
does not understand
reading, language,
and child
development
concepts.

The candidate’s plan
suggests a limited
understanding of
reading, language,
and child
development
concepts.

The candidate cannot

The candidate designs

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson. The
opportunities are
developmentally
appropriate and/or are
adapted to diverse
students.

Specific instructional
opportunities are
provided in this lesson
that demonstrate the
candidate’s
understanding of how
students differ in their
development and
approaches to
learning. The
instructional
opportunities are
adapted to diverse
students.
The candidate’s
lesson plan
demonstrates that he
or she understands all
of the concepts from
reading, language,
and child
development and uses
them effectively in

The candidate’s plan
demonstrates
understanding of
reading, language,
and child
development
concepts and their
use in classroom
instruction.

Standard
2.1

Lesson
Presentatio
n
ACEI
Standard
3.3

Check for
Understand
-ing

Review
Learning
Outcomes

design appropriate
lessons to teaching
reading, writing,
speaking, viewing,
listening, and thinking
skills.

a minimally
appropriate lesson to
teaching reading,
writing, speaking,
viewing, listening, and
thinking skills.

The candidate’s plan
does not demonstrate
the ability to help
students to
successfully apply
their developing skills
to differing situations,
materials, or ideas.

The candidate’s plan
demonstrates some
ability to help
students to apply their
developing skills to
differing situations,
materials, or ideas
successfully.

The lesson
presentation does not
encourage elementary
students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

The lesson
presentation includes
little provision for
students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

The lesson
presentation includes
at least one teaching
strategy that
encourages
elementary students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.

Little or no provision is
included to check for
student understanding
or to reteach concepts
that elude students
during the initial
presentation.

A guided practice
section is included in
the lesson plan, but
the connection with
the lesson
presentation is weak
and/or unclear.

The lesson plan
includes a plan and
the means to check
for student
understanding of the
lesson. A provision is
included to reteach all
or part of the lesson
to all or part of the
class.

Lesson closure is not
included, or is not
related to the goals
and/or content of the
lesson.

Lesson closure is
weak and/or poorly
written.

Lesson closure relates
directly to the lesson
purpose and/or
objective.

He or she designs
appropriate lessons
with adequate use of
theory to teach
reading, writing,
speaking, viewing,
listening, and thinking
skills.
Plan demonstrates the
candidate’s ability to
help students
successfully apply
their developing skills
differing situations,
materials, and ideas.

Closure

planning.
His or her instructional
activities integrate
and support theory to
teach reading, writing,
speaking, viewing,
listening, and thinking
skills in multiple ways
and in a variety of
settings.
The candidate’s plan
demonstrates his or
her ability to help
students connect their
reading, writing and
oral language
together in creative
ways to link language
to everyday life.
The lesson
presentation includes
a variety of teaching
strategies that
encourage elementary
students’
development of
critical thinking and
problem solving.
Plans to check for
student understanding
of the content are an
integral part of the
lesson, and include
frequent questions
and other actively
engaging forms of
formative assessment
during guided
practice.
Lesson closure is
clearly correlated to
the content of the
lesson and actively
engages students in
summarizing the
essential elements of
the lesson.

Plan for Assessment

Formal and
Informal
Assessment
ACEI 4.0

Needs Improvement
1
The lesson plan does
not include
assessment activities,
or there is little or no
correlation between
planned assessment
activities and lesson
goals and objectives.
Any assessments
included are not
developmentally
appropriate for the

Emerging
Competence 2
Assessment activities
are included in the
lesson, but they are
not well correlated to
and/or do not cover
the full range of LP
goals and objectives.
The assessment
strategies do not
promote development
of each student.

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

A plan for formal and
informal assessment
throughout the lesson
is included. The
assessment strategies
are uniquely designed
for the students.

Formal and informal
assessments
strategies are a
seamless and
integrated part of the
lesson. The
assessments are
highly correlated to
the learning objectives
and promote
continuous
intellectual, social,

students.

Reflection
and PostLesson
Analysis

emotional, and
physical development
of each student.

Self-answer questions
are not included in the
lesson plan.

Self-answer questions
are included, but do
not fit the content or
purposes of the
lesson.

The lesson plan
includes all required
self-answer questions.

Additional self-answer
questions are included
that specifically
address unique lesson
content and
methodology.

Lesson Plan Summative Assessment
Element
Goals Objectives Standards
Anticipatory Set
Purpose
Adaptation to Diverse Students
ACEI 3.2
Lesson Presentation
ACEI 2.1
Lesson Presentation
ACEI 3.3
Check for Understanding
Review Learning Outcomes Closure
Formal and Informal Assessment
ACEI 4.0
Reflection and Post-Lesson Analysis

Score

Total Score
Note to faculty
When used for submission in methods course, include data for ACEI
standards on collaborative site.
When used for student-teaching admission, all of the following apply.
Passing total score = 30/40
No individual element score < 2
Signed by faculty

Culminating Assessment
Developmen
t
Learning
Motivation
ACEI 1.0

Needs Improvement
1
The candidate’s lesson
plan suggests he or
she does not
understand the major
concepts, principles,
theories, and research.

Emerging
Competence 2
The candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates a
limited understanding
of the major concepts,
principles, theories,
and research.

The candidate’s plan
does not provide
opportunities to
support students’
development,
acquisition of
knowledge, and
motivation.

He or she designs
lessons with minimally
appropriate learning
opportunities.

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

The candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates
understanding of the
major concepts,
principles, theories,
and research and uses
them in planning.

The candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates
that he or she fully
understands all of the
major concepts,
principles, theories,
and research and uses
them effectively in
planning.

He or she designs
appropriate lessons
with adequate learning
opportunities that
acknowledge students’
development,
acquisition of
knowledge, and
motivation.

He or she includes
learning opportunities
that support students’
development,
acquisition of
knowledge, and
motivation.

Culminating Assessment Score:

_________