Indiana Wesleyan University

Elementary Education Lesson Plan Template (DIRECT INSTRUCTION)
Social Studies--2007 ACEI Standards
Student:
IWU Supervisor:
Teaching Date:

School:
Co-op Teacher:
Grade Level: First

READINESS
I. Goal(s)/Objective(s)/Standard(s)
A. Goal–
1.
2.
3.

Students will be able to distinguish between land and water masses on a globe and a 2D picture of a
globe.
Students will be able to identify water and land masses utilizing map representations.
Students will be able to identify water and land as individuals parts that help contribute to the whole
considered as the planet Earth.

B. Objective(s) –
1. Given an inflatable globe, students will be able to identify whether their finger lands on a
piece of land or water through a verbal statement.
2. Given a world 2D picture of a globe, students will be able to distinguish between land and
water masses by identifying whether their game piece lands on water or land through
keeping a tally record of frequency between each physical characteristic.
3. Given an interactive sheet, students will be able identify land and water masses on a globe
through cutting and pasting labels, utilizing a map legend, and coloring corresponding map
components accordingly.
4. Upon completion of the lesson, students will recognize that land and water are individual
parts that contribute to the whole world through verbal discussion, interactive globe
activities, and a sorting sheet.
C. Standard(s) –
NCSS: (2) People, Places, and Environments

IAS: (1.3.2) Identify and describe continents, oceans, cities and roads on maps and globes.
*Lack of social studies instruction considered in isolated lesson design. Serves

as

a starter lesson that familiarizes students with globe concepts and purposes.
ISTE: (6c) Students communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively by creating or
using a variety of digital objects such as visualizations, models or simulations.
II. Materials & Management:
A.

Materials:






B. Time:





Globe
Big post-it note
Inflatable globe
Flat maps (3)
Frequency recording chart*
Game pieces
Interactive globe sheet*

Total: approximately 35 minutes
Anticipatory Set: 3 minutes
Lesson Presentation: 10 minutes
Guided Practice: 10 minutes
Independent Practice: 7 minutes
Closure: 3 minutes

C. Space:

The teacher will use the space around the classroom for her instruction. For the anticipatory set, the
students will be seated at their individual desks with the teacher positioned at the front of the classroom
moving the Google Earth application on the Smartboard. For lesson presentation, the teacher will be at the
front of the room and students seated at their individual desks. For guided practice, the students will
gather in the ‘morning meeting’ area for the inflatable globe activity. After the globe activity, they will
transition activities and return to their individual desks, but will work with the people positioned within
their desk groups. For independent practice, the students will work independently at their individual desks.
The teacher will roam the perimeter of the classroom during guided and independent practice.
D. Behavior:
To manage behavior, I will give positive re-directives to the students. I will use a construction paper
classroom chain to motivate students (familiar system to the students now); stickers and pencils will be
rewarded for whole group positive reinforcement as deemed appropriate. I will also utilize the classroom
behavior management system.
For needed transitions, I will use the clapping method to gain attention of the class during transitions
between activities or to gain attention. During activities, I will utilize the strategy “Ask 3 Before Me”, and if
3 other students do not know, then they may approach me or raise their hand to ask their question. I will
be walking around the room guiding students during guided and independent practice.
For guided practice, students will be pre-grouped according to the seating arrangement in the classroom.
E. Technology:
For technology inclusion, the teacher will incorporate Google Earth in her anticipatory set. She will use the
Expanding Environmental Theory to guide her instruction. She will begin Google Earth with an image of
their school. Then, she will expand out to show the Earth, which will connect the activity to the lesson
presentation components and standards.
III. Anticipatory Set--

For the anticipatory set, the teacher will use the Google Earth application to engage students. She will
begin with a picture of their school, and ask the students to identify the picture on the screen and why it is
important to them. Then, she will expand the Google Earth to include other parts of the community familiar
to students (Dollar General, grocery store). She will encourage response from students. After a tour of the
community, she will expand to the state of Indiana and will mark and discuss with students where
Fairmount appears on the state of Indiana. “This is a picture of our state. Our state is called Indiana.”
Lastly, she will expand the program to include a picture of the whole Earth. “Now this is a picture of our
WHOLE Earth! We live on the Earth, in Fairmount. Fairmount is small compared to the whole world, isn’t it?
Cities, just like Fairmount, are small parts of the whole world!” After discussing how we are a part of the
whole Earth, the teacher will move forward with her purpose statement and lesson presentation of globe
components.
During the anticipatory set, the teacher will propose the following questions:






What is this a picture of? How often do you go to this place?
Why is this place important to you?
Have you ever taken a vacation to a different place?
Have you ever seen a picture of the whole world? Do you think that the whole world is big?
Are the small parts important to making a big world?
Do you think the world is important? Why?

IV. Purpose:

After the anticipatory set, the teacher will state the purpose. She will use the purpose statement to align
with previous lesson messages of how to “find your place.”
“Today we are going to learn more about our world and look at pictures of our world. It is important to
know about pictures of our world because we all have special places in the world, like where we live and
where we go to school. Even though we all live in different places, we all belong to one planet called Earth.
The Earth has many parts that contribute to a whole.”
PLAN FOR INSTRUCTION
V. Adaptation: (ACEI 3.2)
A. Remediation – For remediation, I will have students that are not demonstrating competency meet
in a small group with the teacher the next day. To reinforce the material, I will have students paint
and construct paper globes and participate in an open-ended discussion involving how land and
water are different and why some things are on land instead of water (vice versa).
B. Enrichment –For enrichment opportunities, gifted students will be able to locate North America on
their independent globe worksheet. She will also guide them to discuss why some things
live/happen on land rather than water and vice versa. She will stress the relationship between
people and environments.
C. ELL – For an ELL student, I will also show them pictures from their community on Google Earth and
on the globe. For Enrique, if still attending, I will incorporate aspects of Texas on the globe and
Google Earth to make the content relatable for him individually. For Daniel, I will include showcases
of Oklahoma, for he just moved from that state to Indiana.
D. Exceptional Needs-For Kaitlyn, Michael, and Daniel, the teacher will closely monitor behavior and
engagement. She will use proximity to keep them on track. They will be able to respond to
discussion prompts at their individual development rate. In addition to collaboration, activities will
be changed often to maintain the interest and attention of these learners.
VI. Lesson Presentation:
A. INPUT:

Input Modeling/Modeled Practice –
For lesson presentation input, the teacher will provide definitions regarding a globe and the features of a
globe. She will use questioning and comparisons to engage the students. The teacher will begin by holding
up a globe. “This is a globe. A globe is a picture of the world, just like what we saw on Google Earth. What
is a globe? (wait for student response: a picture of the world) Good!” The teacher will write the definition of
globe on the board and draw a picture for students as reference.
Once students are familiar with the purpose of the globe, the teacher will begin instruction on the features
of the globe (primarily water and land representations for this lesson). She will identify the land and water
representations on the globe, and ask several students to come identify between the two features. Then,
she will guide the students in comparing the physical features of land versus water through the product of
an anchor chart. They will compare and contrast the two features, offer characteristics of both, and identify
how to locate water and land features on a globe.
“The globe is made up of two parts: land and water. Here is the land (the teacher points). The land on this
globe is green. The land means that people live there. This piece of land is called North America, and it is
where Fairmount is. See, this is where we are on the globe! Kyran, can you come point to where Fairmount
is? Good! Here is the water (the teacher points). The water on this globe is blue. The water is where some

animals live and why we have boats. Kaitlyn, can you come point to land for me? (The teacher calls
another students) (The teacher calls up student to point to either land or water.)” After providing
definitions of the globe features, the teacher will begin constructing the anchor chart. She will provide the
first example to model the activity and set expectations. The teacher will ask the following questions to
gauge understanding and engagement of students:

What are some things that live in the water? What are some things that live on land?

What color is the land on this globe? (green) What color is the water on this globe? (blue)

What are some plants that live in water? What are some plants that live on land?

Where can we find buildings?

What are some other things that are a part of water? A part of land?

Why is it important to know the differences between land and water? (Guide students to
understand that because they have different things and places, land and water should be shown
differently on pictures of the world, like globes.)

The teacher will use student response and identification strategies to assess understanding. After the
construction of an anchor chart, the teacher will move forward in guided practice.

Checking Understanding –
To check for understanding, I will use formative and summative assessment strategies that address several
components of multiple intelligences. I will use guided questioning during lesson presentation to determine
competency and understanding in students. I will continuously ask comprehension questions and analyze
student answers during each lesson component. The teacher will use the inflatable globe activity, flat
globe frequency activity, discussion responses, and observation techniques to assess the competency of
each student. Visual understanding will be assessed through the distinguishing between globe features,
kinesthetic understanding will be assessed through the inflatable globe and flat globe activities, and
auditory understanding will be assessed through student discussion and response to teacher questioning.
During instruction, I will observe the individual body language of the students and the students’
interactions with each other during the group activities. I will also observe their thought processes when
observing and analyzing the features of a globe during the activities. If students appear to be struggling,
the teacher will assist them at their individual desk, or prompt collaboration among the desk group to aid
in the solving of the problem.
Based on checklist data and observation: If 80% of the students show mastery of content, move forward in
the lesson and unit. Address the 20% in a small group setting for reinforcement and re-teaching, scheduled
for a meeting time sometime throughout that week. If less than 80% show mastery, then re-teach the
lesson to the whole class, using different instructional strategies.

Guided Practice –
B. OUTPUT: (ACEI 2.4 & ACEI 3.3)
For the guided practice component of lesson presentation, the teacher will interact with the students in a
hands-on activity of globe handling and identification of water and land masses represented on the globe.
She will use an inflatable globe and will pass it around the group of students gathered in the morning
meeting (reading corner) of the classroom. She will begin the activity by modeling herself. Then, she will
pass the globe to a student. She will ask the following questions to guide understanding:

Did your right pinkie finger land on water or land?

How do you know?

Is land a small part of the whole world? Why is it important to the world? Is water…?

After the inflatable activity, the teacher will have students transition back to their seats and she will
present the flat globe activity. During this activity, students will work within their desk groups using a 2D
model of a globe. “This is a flat picture of a globe. A globe is round and shows land and water. This picture
is a flat globe that shows land and water too. In your groups, you will each have a flat globe. One person at
a time will flip the game piece on the flat map. The piece should land on your flat map like this. Tell
whether your piece landed on water or on land. If it landed on land, put a tally mark in the ‘land box’ on
your sheet. If it landed on water, put a tally mark in the ‘water box’ on your sheet. Every time the piece
lands, put a tally mark where it needs to go! After this, we will share with the class whether the piece
landed on the water more or the land more.” The students will use game pieces to toss, and wherever the
game piece lands (water or land) the student will record the landing on a frequency recording chart. The
teacher will ask guided questions and make informal observations to assess student understanding.
After students are given time to complete the flat globe activity, the teacher will guide instruction with an
open discussion involving the globe. She will ask the following questions:

What is this piece of paper? (A picture of the globe!)

Did your piece fall on land more? Or water more? Look at your recording charts.

Based on the globe, do you think the world has more land or water?

Why should we know about the land and water on the world?

What are small things on the globe, like water and land, important to the whole world?

Independent Practice –
For independent practice, the teacher will direct students to complete an interactive sheet regarding globe
feature identification. Students will need to cut labels of the globe (land and water) and paste them onto
the corresponding box. After cutting and pasting, the student will be asked to color the land one color, and
the water a different color. Then, using the colors they chose to label the globe features, they will complete
a map legend indicating which color is land and which is representative of water volume. The teacher will
have an example completed for them posted on the board for reference.
The teacher will collect these individual sheets as formative assessment. She will walk around the room
during this time, guiding students with expectations and redirecting Kaitlyn, Michael, and Daniel.

Closure –
For closure, the teacher will guide discussion. She will ask the following questions to review and gauge
student understanding:
 What activity did you like the best when we were learning about our globe? Why?
 What part of the globe is land?
 What part of the globe is water? How do you know?
 Why is it important to have a picture of our world?

Why should we know the different parts of our globe and world?

The teacher will emphasize the we should know the different parts of our whole world because ALL PARTS
CONTRIBUTE TO A WHOLE.
After the lesson closure discussion, the teacher will offer the instruction back to the cooperating teacher.
“Thank you for your hard work today! I am glad that we were able to learn more about the world we live
in!”
PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT (ACEI 4.0)
Formative: For formative assessment, the teacher will use informal observations and discussion
responses offered by individual students. She will also utilize the group recording charts and the
independent globe interactive sheet to assess student understanding of the lesson objective regarding
identifying and distinguishing between land and water features on a globe.
Summative: For summative assessment, I will include a question asking students to identify between land
and water features on a globe on the end of unit celebration of learning. After this lesson, I will also have
them physically use post-it notes to label a globe in the classroom, and display the globe in the classroom.
This will be used to assess student content retention.
REFLECTION AND POST-LESSON ANALYSIS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

How many students achieved the lesson objective(s)? For those who did not, why not?
What were my strengths and weaknesses?
How should I alter this lesson?
How would I pace it differently?
Were all students actively participating? If not, why not?
What adjustments did I make to reach varied learning styles and ability levels?
a. Bloom’s Taxonomy
b. Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences
7. Were students able to comprehend that the globe was a ‘picture of the world’ and that they lived on a section
of the world?
8. Was the flat globe activity too abstract for student understanding and competency?
9. Were all students engaged and receptive to the lesson instruction? What activity seemed to be the biggest ‘hit’
with students?
10. How was my time management?

Name: ______________________________________________________
Directions: Put a tally mark in the box where the item
landed.

Land

Name:

Water

______________________________________________________

Directions: Cut out ‘land’ and ‘water’ and glue them in the correct boxes.
Color the land one color on the globe. Color the water a different color on
the globe. In the box, mark what color you used to color water and which
one you used to color land.

Key
Land
Water

Land

Water

Readiness

Needs Improvement
1

Emerging
Competence 2

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

Lesson objectives are
poorly written and/or
have little or no
connection to learning
goals or standards.
Little connection
exists between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments.

Lesson objectives are
correlated with
learning goals and
standards. The
connection between
objectives and lesson
activities and
assessments is weak
or unclear.

The lesson plan
contains objectives
that connect goals
and standards with
lesson activities and
assessments.

The lesson plan contains
clearly stated content
objectives. Objectives are
logically connected to
appropriate goals and
standards and are
consistent with lesson
activities and assessments.

The anticipatory set is
missing or has little or
no connection to the
goal or content of the
lesson.

The connection
between the
anticipatory set and
lesson objectives and
content is weak or
unclear.

The anticipatory set
is clear and direct
and focuses students’
attention on the
lesson.

The anticipatory set
connects the current
lesson with previous and
future learning and focuses
students’ minds and
attention on the day’s
lesson.

The statement of
purpose is ambiguous
or worded so
generally that the
connection with the
content of the lesson
is not apparent.

A statement of
purpose is included in
the lesson, but has
little power to
motivate students and
capture their
imaginations.

The statement of
purpose is clearly
connected to the
content of the lesson
and is presented in
terms that are easily
understood by
students.

The statement of purpose
has the power to capture
the imaginations of
students and motivate
them to accomplish the
expected learning.

Plan For
Instruction

Needs Improvement
1

Emerging
Competence 2

Adaptation to
Diverse Students

Few or no instructional
opportunities are
included. Any
instructional
opportunities are not
developmentally
appropriate or
adapted to diverse
students.

Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson; however, they
are not adapted to
diverse students.

Instructional
opportunities are
provided in this
lesson. The
opportunities are
developmentally
appropriate and/or
are adapted to
diverse students.

Specific instructional
opportunities are provided
in this lesson that
demonstrate the
candidate’s understanding
of how students differ in
their development and
approaches to learning.
The instructional
opportunities are adapted
to diverse students.

The candidate’s
lesson plan suggests
that he or she is not
familiar with the
themes, concepts, and
modes of inquiry
drawn from the
academic fields of the
social studies.

The candidate’s
lesson plan suggests
emerging familiarity
with the themes,
concepts, and modes
of inquiry drawn from
the academic fields of
the social studies.

The candidate
demon-strates an
under- standing of
the themes,
concepts, and modes
of inquiry drawn from
the social studies in
his or her lesson
plan. He or she
develops experiences
to help elem.
students learn about
major social studies
concepts. The
candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates an
understanding of the
major concepts and
modes of inquiry
from the social
studies, and enables
stu- dents to learn
about the major
themes that integrate
knowledge across the
social students and
helps them become
productive

The candidate
demonstrates in-depth
knowledge and
understanding of how the
major concepts and
themes of social studies
are integrated across
academic fields in his or
her lesson plan.

Goals
Objectives
Standards

Anticipatory Set

Purpose

ACEI Standard 3.2

Lesson Presentation

Social Studies
ACEI Standard 2.4

The candidate does
not demonstrate
understanding of the
major concepts and
modes of inquiry from
the social studies, and
does not promote
elementary students’
ability to make
informed decisions as
citizens of a culturally
diverse democratic
society and
interdependent world.

The candidate
demonstrates limited
understanding of the
major concepts and
modes of inquiry from
the social studies, and
minimally promotes
elementary students’
ability to make
informed decisions as
citizens of a culturally
diverse democratic
society and
interdependent world.

Competent 3

Outstanding 4

The candidate’s lesson
plan demonstrates an indepth understanding of the
social studies and a
significant ability to help K6 students learn the
essential concepts and
become productive
participants in a
democratic society.