Eros/Cupid

Eros (Cupid) is the god of passion, desire, and (sometimes) love. Usually said to be Venus'
(Aphrodite's) son. When you hear a god described like that, you might think that any story he pops
up in will end happily. Two people will meet, fall in love, skip through fields of flowers, make babies,
and all that good stuff. However, this is hardly ever what goes down when Eros comes a knockin'.
Instead, the mischievous little guy causes trouble everywhere he goes – sometimes, for no better
reason than his own personal amusement.
1. Based on this description of Cupid and these images, if you called cupid what would you
expect him to look like?
2. Glance at the title of the poem. What does the title suggest to you? What denotations are
presented in the title? What connotations do the words posses?
3.
Paraphrase here (Translate the
Annotation for Literary
Eros by Anne Stevenson (1990)
Devices (SHIPMAST)
poem into your own words. What is

this poem about?
I call for love
But help me, who arrives?
This thug with broken nose
And squinty eyes.
'Eros, my bully boy,
Can this be you,
With boxer lip
And patchy wings askew?'
'Madam,' cries Eros,
'Know the brute you see
Is what long overuse has made me.
My face that so offends you
Is the sum
Of blows your lust delivered
One by one.
Stanza Three
We slaves who are immortal
Gloss your fate
And are the archetypes
That you create.
Better my battered visage,
Bruised but hot,
Than love dissolved in loss
Or left to rot.'

3.
4.
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7.
8.

What is the subject of both poems?
What is the author's tone (attitude) about the subject in the poem?
Which words that the author chose (diction) makes the tone obvious?
How does that word choice help the reader pick up on that tone?
Is there a change in tone at any point in the poem? Where and how?
What literary devices is being used the most in the poem?

Annotation for Literary
Devices (SHIPMAST)

To Cupid by Joanne Baillie

Paraphrase here

Child, with many a childish wile,
Timid look, and blushing smile,
Downy wings to steal thy way,
Gilded bow, and quiver gay,
Who in thy simple mien would
trace
The tyrant of the human race?
Who is he whose flinty heart
Hath not felt the flying dart?
Who is he that from the wound
Hath not pain and pleasure
found?
Who is he that hath not shed
Curse and blessing on thy head?
9. Glance at the title of the poem. What does the title suggest to you? What denotations are
presented in the title? What connotations do the words posses?
10. What is the subject of both poems?
11. What is the author's tone (attitude) about the subject in the poem?
12. Which words that the author chose (diction) makes the tone obvious?
13. How does that word choice help the reader pick up on that tone?
14. Is there a change in tone at any point in the poem? Where and how?
15. What literary devices is being used the most in the poem?

16. Write a few paragraphs with evidence that compares and contrasts the way Eros is treated in
these two poems.

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