Part 1: The Audience 

 
The target audience for this Instructional Design Solution is the secondary school faculty 
members at Canadian Academy.  ​
Canadian Academy is a non­profit, private school located in 
Kobe, Japan.  The school offers grades K­12 instruction and follows the International 
Baccalaureate curriculum.  The school also offers a US diploma certified by the Western 
Association of Schools and Colleges.  The teachers are diversified and come primarily from new 
Zealand, Australia, England, India, Canada, and the US.  Teachers are required to have a 
National Teachers Certification. 
 
The problem is that students and faculty are creating multimedia presentations that incorrectly 
use and/or incorrectly attribute copyrighted material.  This problem first came to light when 
several incidents of plagiarism were reported by teachers.  Students were not attributing the 
source of copyrighted material such as films, music, and images in their work.  Further 
investigation revealed that many teachers were not familiar with attribution guidelines and could 
not model or teach how to properly attribute digital media. 
 
The need for this instruction came from a critical incident in which students were reprimanded 
for academic dishonesty.  Following these incidents, faculty members expressed the need for 
instruction in copyright regulations.  Currently, there is not a clear and consistent instruction 
presented to students regarding the use and attribution of copyrighted digital media. 
 
It will be necessary to gather data on the types of digital media that are being used in the 
classrooms and then gather data on regulations for using and attributing the digital media. 
Finally, a clearly articulated policy will need to be created, shared publicly, and then presented 
to the faculty members.   
 
Ultimately, the goal is for all secondary school teachers to be knowledgeable on the rules and 
expectations of using and attributing digital media so they can model appropriate attribution and 
provide a consistent set of expectations to the students. ​
 As Information technology becomes 
ever more complex, and as information becomes more readily available in digital formats, it has 
become increasingly easier to use the creative work and ideas of others.  Often times, students 
and adults mistakenly believe that ideas and images found on the internet are free for public 
use.  It is important for educators to be knowledgeable about the attribution of digital media so 
that they can model and uphold the principles of academic honesty.  Teachers should be able to 
identify royalty free sources for digital media including images and sounds.  They should also be 
able to illustrate correct methods for attribution using a standard such as MLA or APA. 
 

 
 
 
 

Part II: Learner Analysis: 
Your Learner analysis must include the following seven (7) sections in order:
 

 

1. Introduction:  
The target audience for this design is the secondary teachers at Canadian Academy.  General data 
was obtained by contacting the secretary to the Headmaster, Yoko Okada.  One of her 
responsibilities is to manage work visas for overseas hires and to verify work credentials of the 
faculty members.  Yoko supplied me with the names and ages of the teachers and, because I’m 
employed at the school, I was able to determine the gender and nationality of the staff.  Canadian 
Academy employs 35 full­time teachers in the secondary school; 20 members are male and 15 
are female.  Teachers represent a variety of nationalities including the United States, Australia, 
England, Canada, New Zealand, Ireland, and Japan.  The age of teachers ranges from 28 to 65 
(the mandatory retirement age) with the average age being 45.  All teachers have at least a 
Bachelor’s degree and most have graduate degrees.  
 
2. Entry Skills and Prior Knowledge 
The tech department sent out survey in mid­May to determine the strengths and weaknesses of 
our staff regarding technical proficiency.  The purpose of the survey was to determine the most 
relevant PD needed for the upcoming school year 2015­2016.  One question asked teachers “to 
what extent does your  teaching involve the use of multimedia?” with multimedia including film 
clips from the internet, images and music.  90% of the teachers responded “at least once a week.” 
A second question on the survey asked teachers “To what extent do you feel that you model and 
provide adequate instruction in attribution?”  80% of the teachers responded that they felt “very 
competent, I always model and expect my students to use correct attribution.”   
 
The results of the second question from the survey run counter to what has been observed in the 
classrooms.  As  the secondary school librarian, I often work with teachers on Information 
literacy and I average about two “push­in” classes per week in which teach at least part of the 
lesson.  In approximately half of these sessions, I personally observed incomplete or missing 
citations.  Furthermore, in the instances where citations were complete, several citations were not 
readily apparent to the audience. 
 
However, teachers at Canadian Academy are very competent with using APA citations for 
printed text.  APA was adopted as a standard in 2002 and citations are mandatory on all 
externally moderated assessments for grade 12 students.  There is an APA guide found on the 
library page that links to the “Purdue OWL” citation site and many teachers also share a similar 
link on their class web page.  
 
3. Attitudes Toward Content & Academic Motivation 

As adult learners, the teachers at Canadian Academy are highly­motivated to improve practice 
that benefits students.  There is a universal value amongst teachers regarding Academic Honesty 
and, I have observed, that all teachers believe that attribution is an important skill for students. 
 
4. Educational Ability Levels 
There is a very high Educational Ability Level amongst the staff at Canadian Academy.  As 
mentioned in the introduction, all teachers are required to have the minimum of a bachelor’s 
degree and more than half have a graduate degree.  An informal survey of twelve staff members 
revealed a range in the types of Universities attended by the staff.  Besides attending universities 
from various countries, teachers also received degrees from various tiered universities.  Some 
students graduated from elite universities such as Oxford and Yale, while others have taken 
on­line degrees from smaller, lesser known universities. 
 
5. General Learning Preferences 
Professional development is important at Canadian Academy and every Wednesday,teachers 
participate in in­house PD.  Students are dismissed an hour early, at 2:30, and teachers 
participate in PD from 2:30 to 4:30 for a total of about 60 hours of in­house PD during the year. 
During this PD time, I have observed much in regards to the learning preferences of the teachers 
at CA.  One observation is that teachers want to see the relevancy of the topic at the start of the 
PD session or they lose interest and motivation.  A second observation is that teachers feel that 
small group collaboration is often misused as a time filler rather than used in a consistently 
meaningful way to share ideas.  A third observed learning preference is that teachers want at 
least part of the PD time to be used to apply the skills presented. 
 
6. Attitude Toward Education in General 
The teachers at Canadian Academy have a very positive attitude towards education in general. 
Unlike many schools in economically depressed areas that often rely on inexperienced teachers, 
the teachers at CA all have prior experience in education before taking a job here.   
 
Teachers’ attitudes towards their own personal continuing education are more mixed.  I 
interviewed our teacher PD representative, Tony Bellew, to discuss how teachers at CA are using 
the school’s PD opportunities.  I was informed that the school has a generous annual PD budget 
of ¥10,000,000 or $80,000 US and teachers are encouraged to apply.  The funds may be used for 
reimbursement of workshop fees, accommodations, transportation, and meals.  During the 
2014­2016 school year, no teacher was denied for PD that applied.  Four teachers were approved 
for three PD opportunities, three teachers applied for two PD opportunities, and three teachers 
applied for one PD opportunity.  In total, ten out of thirty­five teachers applied for and were 
approved for PD opportunities throughout the year.  Mr. Bellew commented that he has observed 
that, typically, the same teachers apply each year for different PD opportunities.  This suggests 

that about a third of the teachers at CA highly value continuing education and about two­thirds 
seem to value it less. 
  
7. Group Characteristics 
The secondary teachers are a diverse group ranging from age 28 to 65 and come from a variety 
of socio­economic backgrounds.  Teachers represent various nationalities, and most come from 
countries where English is the first language; however, five teachers are native Japanese 
speakers, and two are  natives of Spain.  This information was gathered through Yoko Okada, the 
Headmaster’s secretary. 
 
Canadian Academy is a relatively small school, and I’ve observed teachers at CA tend to form 
small social groups based primarily on age and secondarily by academic subject.  There is a also 
a small contingent of teachers who have taught at CA prior to the introduction of the IB: Middle 
Years Program in 2007 that are unified in their initial reluctance to accept the program.  While 
this unwillingness to adopt a new curriculum was at one time vocal and passionate, they have 
now accepted the program and are more unified by their past experience than by a mutual 
pedagogical conflict.   
 
While petty differences exist between the staff members, there is an overall level of 
professionalism that pervades, and teachers are motivated to learn ideas and skills that they 
perceive will benefit them in their profession. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Part 3: Task Analysis 
 
Since the goal is for all secondary school teachers to be knowledgeable on the rules and 
expectations of using and attributing digital media so they can model appropriate attribution and 
provide a consistent set of expectations to the students, I identified that this task will require a 
significant amount of facts, concepts and rules related to attribution.  There will also be some 
procedural instruction related to the presentation of the source information for attribution.   
 
Therefore, I will be conducting a task analysis using a topic analysis and a procedural analysis to 
include both the information that must be included when citing media and also the procedure for 
presenting the information.  
 
I began by starting by imagining myself as a teacher and having a piece of media but not 
knowing how to correctly attribute it.  This lead me to the beginnings of my flow chart.  As I 
walked through the various steps, I could see what specific facts would be needed and I gathered 
that information as I went through the steps.  I also realized that there will be a number of steps 
in which the teacher doesn’t know the right answer and will, therefore, need some additional 
instruction as to how find the information they are looking for. 
 
Content and Procedure Outline 
I.
What type of media am I using?  
A. Image,  
B. Audio 
C. Video 
II.
Image­Where did you acquire this image? 
A. My Image 
1. Provide the title, your name, the date the image was created, and a URL if 
if publicly accessible. 
B. From a first hand source (friend, relative, teacher, student) 
1. Provide the title, your name, the date the image was created, and a URL if 
if publicly accessible. 
C. From a book 
1. Provide the title, your name, the date the image was created, and a URL if 
if publicly accessible. 
D. From the web 
1. Is it royalty free? 
2. Is the webpage the original site in which the image was published? 
III.
Audio­Where did you acquire this audio? 
A. I created the music/sound 

IV.

1. Consider adding it to the creative commons 
2. Include your name, the date it was created, and a title for the clip 
B. I purchase the music/sound legally? 
1. You can use up to ten percent of the audio for non­commercial purposes 
2. Include the author, the title, the publication date and where it can be 
accessed by the public. 
C. It came from a Creative Commons source? 
1. Look closely at the author’s requirements for using the piece and cite the 
author, title, publication date, and url 
D. It came from YouTube or a similar public website 
1. Is it professional or amature? 
a) Professional­you may use up to ten percent legally. Cite the artist, 
the title, the date of original publication, and the link 
b) Amateur­check the author’s specific comments for usage. If no 
comments are available, you may use up to ten percent for 
non­commercial purposes and you must cite title, author, date of 
access and the URL. 
Video­Where did you acquire this video? 
A. I shot the video yourself 
1. Consider adding it to the creative commons 
2. Include your name, the date it was created, and a title for the clip  
B. I purchased the film legally 
1. You can use up to ten percent of the audio for non­commercial purposes 
2. Include the author, the title, the publication date and where it can be 
accessed by the public. 
C. It came from a Creative Commons source  
1. Look closely at the author’s requirements for using the piece and cite the 
author, title, publication date, and url 
D. It came from YouTube or a public website 
1. Is it professional or amature? 
a) Professional­you may use up to ten percent legally. Cite the artist, 
the title, the date of original publication, and the link 
b) Amateur­check the author’s specific comments for usage. If no 
comments are available, you may use up to ten percent for 
non­commercial purposes and you must cite title, author, date of 
access and the URL. 

 
Subject Matter Expert 

I realized early on that I will need two SME’s for this task. As the secondary school librarian and 
having strong content knowledge in research and citations, I can identify the required 
information for correct attribution. I have a Masters in Literature for Georgia Southern and have 
worked as an English teacher for thirteen years prior to my current assignment as secondary 
school librarian.  As an English teacher, I have assigned tasks to students that required them to 
use outside information and incorporate that information into a presentation, both written and 
oral. It has always been a priority to have students accurately attribute their sources and to make 
the attributions apparent to their audience.  
 
I will also consult with our school’s tech coordinator, Julie, to ensure that I have the most up to 
date information on royalty free sources and legal requirements for using digital media. Julie has 
a Master’s in Education from Armstrong State University and has taught for twelve years. She 
has taught Literature and Design Technology. Last year, she completed a Certificate in 
Educational Technology through ​
COETAIL​
 offered by the State University of New York. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

Part IV: Objectives 
 

Terminal Objective 1:​
 To communicate concepts to an audience through the use of multimedia  
Enabling Objectives:  
1A: ​
To effectively use images, audio and film in classroom presentations 
2A: ​
To expect students to use images, audio and film in classroom presentations 
 

Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model appropriate attribution for digital media 
Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method for attributing an image, audio, and film source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a multimedia presentation of an image, audio, and film 
source 
 

Terminal Objective 3:​
 To value the creativity of others by appropriately attributing their 
contributions 
3A. ​
Know at least one Creative Commons source for images, audio, and film. 
3B.​
 Share at least one artistic composition with the public through the Creative Commons 
 
 
 
 
Content 

Performance 
Recall 

Application 

Fact 

2A 

2B 

Concept 

3A 

3B 

Principles 

 

2B 

Procedures 

 

1A,2A 

Interpersonal 

 

 

Attitude 

 

3B 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Instructional Objectives 

ISTE Teacher Standards 

1, 1A, 2B.  

2c. Communicate relevant information and ideas 
effectively to students, parents, and peers using a 
variety of digital age media and formats.  

1A, 2A, 

4a. ​
Advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and 
ethical use of digital information and technology, 
including respect for copyright, intellectual property, 
and the appropriate documentation of sources  

1A, 2A, 3A, 3B 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4c. Promote and model digital etiquette and 
responsible social interactions related to the 
use of technology and information 

 

 

Goals 

Assessment 

UDL 

LESSON 1 

Students should 
acknowledge the value 
of using multimedia 
presentations in the 
classroom and the 
importance of attributing 
the media correctly 

Terminal Objective 3:​
 To value the 
creativity of others by appropriately 
attributing their contributions 

Assessment 1: ​
Each 
group will be responsible 
for providing a script of a 
role play shared on the 
discussion forum. 
Example 1A 

Teachers will be 
grouped by grade 
level so the task will 
be more authentic for 
their specific field. 
teachers can choose 
to work alone or in 
groups.   

LESSON 2 
Students will explore 
various web sites that 
provide fair use of media 
such as the Creative 
Commons, the Google 
Search feature,Compfight, 
Youtube, Flickr and 
Jamendo. 

Students will ​
investigate 
where to find royalty­free 
media and how to add 
their own personal 
media to the databases.  

Objective 3A. ​
Know at least one Creative 
Commons source for images, audio, and 
film. 
Objective 3B.​
 Share at least one artistic 
composition with the public through the 
Creative Commons 

Assessment 2: ​
Each 
student will provide at 
least two examples of 
royalty free media from at 
least two mediums that 
they intend to use in their 
final assessment 
presentation.  They must 
also submit a link to at 
least one medium that 
they have submitted for 
free use.  Links should be 
provided in the discussion 
forum. 

Teachers will have 
the choice as to 
which type of media 
that they wish to 
submit to provide 
flexibility based on 
their media 
experience. 

LESSON 3 
Students will look at APA 
and MLA methods of citing 
images and adapt them for 
Powerpoint, Keynote, and 
one other presentation 
method.  They will create a 
mnemonic device for 
remembering the 
components of a lull 
citation 

Students will ​
understand 
how to adapt a common 
method of citation for a 
variety of media 
presentation formats. 

Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model 
appropriate attribution for digital media 
Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method 
for attributing an image, audio, and film 
source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a 
multimedia presentation of an image, 
audio, and film source 

Assessment 3: ​
Students 
will submit their 
mnemonic device to the 
discussion forum 

There is a great deal 
of flexibility regarding 
the mnemonic device 
that may be 
submitted.  Weaker 
students may request 
to be paired with 
another student in 
order to assist in 
completing the task. 

LESSON 4 
Students will look at APA 
and MLA methods of citing 

Students will ​
understand  Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model 
how to adapt a common  appropriate attribution for digital media 
method of citation for a 

Assessment 4: ​
Students 
will submit their 
mnemonic device to the 

There is a great deal 
of flexibility regarding 
the mnemonic device 

Students discuss the use of 
multimedia presentations in 
their classroom.  They will 
work in small groups to role 
play students’ perspectives of 
poorly cited media. 

Objectives 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

film and adapt them for 
Powerpoint, Keynote, and 
one other presentation 
method.They will create a 
mnemonic device for 
remembering the 
components of a lull 
citation 

variety of media 
presentation formats 

discussion forum 
Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method 
for attributing an image, audio, and film 
source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a 
multimedia presentation of an image, 
audio, and film source 

that may be 
submitted.  Weaker 
students may request 
to be paired with 
another student in 
order to assist in 
completing the task. 

LESSON 5 
Students will look at APA 
and MLA methods of citing 
audio and adapt them for 
Powerpoint, Keynote, and 
one other presentation 
method.They will create a 
mnemonic device for 
remembering the 
components of a lull 
citation 

Students will ​
understand 
how to adapt a common 
method of citation for a 
variety of media 
presentation formats 

Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model 
appropriate attribution for digital media 
Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method 
for attributing an image, audio, and film 
source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a 
multimedia presentation of an image, 
audio, and film source 

Assessment 5: ​
Students 
will submit their 
mnemonic device to the 
discussion forum 

There is a great deal 
of flexibility regarding 
the mnemonic device 
that may be 
submitted.  Weaker 
students may request 
to be paired with 
another student in 
order to assist in 
completing the task. 

LESSON 6 
Students will create a 
useful presentation or 
modify a presentation using 
royalty free sources and a 
standard for citation 

Students will gain 
practical experience by 
applying the principles 
learned in the previous 
lessons to a 
presentation they intend 
to use in their 
classroom. 

Terminal Objective 1:​
 To communicate 
concepts to an audience through the use of 
multimedia  
Enabling Objectives:  
1A: ​
To effectively use images, audio and 
film in classroom presentations 
2A: ​
To expect students to use images, 
audio and film in classroom presentations 

Assessment 6: ​
Each 
student is responsible for 
sharing a multimedia 
presentation using royalty 
free resources that have 
been correctly attributed 
on the discussion forum 

Teachers are allowed 
to submit a new 
presentation or work 
on a presentation 
they’ve already 
completed.  This 
allows for teachers 
with more experience 
to avoid duplicating a 
task they are already 
proficient in. 

 
 

Assessment 1 Example: Sample Script 
 
Scene opens in a typical classroom with teachers arranged around a whiteboard.  The teacher is standing in the front of the class with a 
presentation behind him.  The Title of the presentation is: ​
Contributing Factors to the High Infant Mortality Rate in Developing Countries 
Behind the title is a humorous image of an Indian Hindi, praying while standing on his head. 
 
Teacher: ​
...it’s those eight factors that prevent developing countries from achieving a lower Infant Mortality rate.  Next week, you are 
responsible for choosing one of the factors and applying it to a developing country of your choice and presenting it to the class.  You need at 
least two graphs and two visual elements. 
 
Student A: Do we need citations? 
 
Teacher: Of course.  You should always cite your sources. 
 
Student A: APA? 
 
Teacher: OK, … or just put the link at the end of the slide. 
 
Several students giggle 
 
Teacher: What?  Do you want to do a full citation? 
 
Student B: ​
smiling ​
No, sir 
 
Teacher: Then what? 
 
Student B: The librarian says we should always do full citations even if our teacher tells us we don’t have to. 
 
Teacher: Well, he’s right but this is just an informal task to check your understanding of the concepts. 
 
Student A: Did you cite your information in your presentation? 
 

Teacher: No because I know this stuff. 
 
Assessment 2 Example:​
 S
​hared Media 
 
Link to a media file submitted for public use. 
 

Assessment 3, 4, and 5 Example: Mnemonic Device 
 
Basic Format for an Electronic Image  
A​
uthor (Role of Author).  

Y​
ear image was created.  
T​
itle of work [Type of work],  
R​
etrieved from URL (address of website) ­  
See more at: http://www.landmark.edu/library/citation­guides/landmark­college­citation­guides/apa­citation­style­guide/#Images 

 
Mnemonic Device:  
A​
ttribute what ​
Y​
ou ​
T​
ake, ​
R​
emember!  
 

Assessment 6 Example: Presentation with citations 
 
Link to a presentation with cited media 
  
 

 

 

 

Goals 

UDL 

Assessment 

LESSON 1 

Students should 
acknowledge the value 
of using multimedia 
presentations in the 
classroom and the 
importance of attributing 
the media correctly 

Terminal Objective 3:​
 To value the 
creativity of others by appropriately 
attributing their contributions 

Content for the 
course will be 
provided in a 
downloadable pdf for 
each lesson.  Also, a 
video tutorial for the 
content will be 
provided. 

Assessment: ​
Each 
group will be 
responsible for providing 
a script of a role play 
shared on the 
discussion forum 

LESSON 2 
Students will explore 
various web sites that 
provide fair use of media 
such as the Creative 
Commons, the Google 
Search feature,Compfight, 
Youtube, Flickr and 
Jamendo. 

Students will know 
where to find royalty­free 
media and how to add 
their own personal 
media to the databases.  

Objective 3A. ​
Know at least one Creative 
Commons source for images, audio, and 
film. 
Objective 3B.​
 Share at least one artistic 
composition with the public through the 
Creative Commons 

Content for the 
course will be 
provided in a 
downloadable pdf for 
each lesson.  Also, a 
video tutorial for the 
content will be 
provided. 

Assessment: ​
Each 
student will provide at 
least two examples of 
royalty free media from 
at least two mediums 
that they intend to use in 
their final assessment 
presentation.  They 
must also submit a link 
to at least one medium 
that they have submitted 
for free use.  Links 
should be provided in 
the discussion forum. 

LESSON 3 
Students will look at APA 
and MLA methods of citing 
images and adapt them for 
Powerpoint, Keynote, and 
one other presentation 
method.  They will create a 
mnemonic device for 
remembering the 
components of a lull 
citation 

Students will know how 
to adapt a common 
method of citation for a 
variety of media 
presentation formats. 

Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model 
appropriate attribution for digital media 
Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method 
for attributing an image, audio, and film 
source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a 
multimedia presentation of an image, audio, 
and film source 

Content for the 
course will be 
provided in a 
downloadable pdf for 
each lesson.  Also, a 
video tutorial for the 
content will be 
provided. 

Assessment: ​
Students 
will submit their 
mnemonic device to the 
discussion forum 

LESSON 4 
Students will look at APA 
and MLA methods of citing 

Students will know how 
to adapt a common 
method of citation for a 

Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model 
appropriate attribution for digital media 

Content for the 
course will be 
provided in a 

Assessment: ​
Students 
will submit their 
mnemonic device to the 

Students discuss the use of 
multimedia presentations in 
their classroom.  They will 
work in small groups to role 
play students’ perspectives of 
poorly cited media. 

Objectives 

 

film and adapt them for 
Powerpoint, Keynote, and 
one other presentation 
method.They will create a 
mnemonic device for 
remembering the 
components of a lull 
citation 

variety of media 
presentation formats 

Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method 
for attributing an image, audio, and film 
source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a 
multimedia presentation of an image, audio, 
and film source 

downloadable pdf for 
each lesson.  Also, a 
video tutorial for the 
content will be 
provided. 

discussion forum 

LESSON 5 
Students will look at APA 
and MLA methods of citing 
audio and adapt them for 
Powerpoint, Keynote, and 
one other presentation 
method.They will create a 
mnemonic device for 
remembering the 
components of a lull 
citation 

Students will know how 
to adapt a common 
method of citation for a 
variety of media 
presentation formats 

Terminal Objective 2:​
 To model 
appropriate attribution for digital media 
Enabling Objectives: 
2A.​
 To know at least one citation method 
for attributing an image, audio, and film 
source 
2B.​
 To demonstrate correct attribution in a 
multimedia presentation of an image, audio, 
and film source 

Content for the 
course will be 
provided in a 
downloadable pdf for 
each lesson.  Also, a 
video tutorial for the 
content will be 
provided. 

Assessment: ​
Students 
will submit their 
mnemonic device to the 
discussion forum 

LESSON 6 
Students will create a 
useful presentation or 
modify a presentation using 
royalty free sources and a 
standard for citation 

Students will gain 
practical experience by 
applying the principles 
learned in the previous 
lessons to a 
presentation they intend 
to use in their 
classroom. 

Terminal Objective 1:​
 To communicate 
concepts to an audience through the use of 
multimedia  
Enabling Objectives:  
1A: ​
To effectively use images, audio and 
film in classroom presentations 
2A: ​
To expect students to use images, audio 
and film in classroom presentations  

Content for the 
course will be 
provided in a 
downloadable pdf for 
each lesson.  Also, a 
video tutorial for the 
content will be 
provided. 

Assessment: ​
Each 
student is responsible 
for sharing a multimedia 
presentation using 
royalty free resources 
that have been correctly 
attributed on the 
discussion forum 

Part VIII: Course Assessment Tool 
 
At the end of each lesson, teachers will be encouraged to provide feedback on the 
efficacy of the lesson and indicate their perceived level of proficiency of the skills of 
each lesson via a Google Form.  The form will be directly emailed to the students at the 
completion of the lesson and will include the link.  Furthermore, the students will be 
made aware that the replies will be anonymous.  Teachers may choose not to respond if 
they feel that the lesson was effective and they feel they gained proficiency.   
 
Teachers that feel otherwise can respond to the following prompts: 
1. Which topic do you feel needed more explanation? 
2. To what extent did you feel the assessment allowed you to demonstrate 
your proficiency? 
3. How useful were the downloadable handout sheets? 
4. What suggestions do you have to improve this lesson? 
 
The results of the survey will be shared with the SME, the Director of Technology of the 
school, to evaluate the online module.  At the end of the session, I will meet with the 
Director of Technology to discuss the feedback received and to review the lesson 
modules to identify areas for improvement.