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SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

Lesson Plan Template


TOPIC
Name
Subject
Grade Level
Date/Duration
Big Ideas
Essential
Questions
PA/Common
Core/Standards

Objective
Bloom's
Taxonomy
Webb's Depth of
Knowledge
(DOK)
Formative &
Summative
Assessment
Evidence

DETAILS
Miss Miller
Science
3
Two 40 minute class periods
Blubber is crucial for the survival of penguins and other
Antarctic animals.
What is blubber?
How does blubber help animals survive in the
Antarctic?
Standard 3.1.3.C2: Describe animal characteristics that
are necessary for survival.
Standard 3.1.8.A8: Explain mechanisms organisms use
to adapt to their environment.
During a viewing of a video about Antarctic animals (C),
all third grade students (A) will correctly define (B)
blubber and list three (D) animals that have blubber by
completing the questions on their Lab Sheets.
All third grade students (A) will correctly list (B) one (D)
way blubber helps Antarctic animals survive during the
completion of the lab and Lab Sheet (C).

ISTE Standards
for Students
Framework for
21st Century
Learning

Accommodation
s, Modifications

Formative Assessment:
Formal Evaluation:
Teacher grades the Lab Sheets.
Informal Evaluation:
Teacher takes notes on the students responses during
the pre-assessment.
Teacher also takes notes on the students responses to
the questions the teacher asks while walking around
during the lab.
During the pre-assessment, students take turns coming
up to the Smart Board to write what they know about
blubber. Then, during the summary and review,
students use their iPads to communicate how they met
the objective.
These activities align with ISTE Standard 6: Students
communicate clearly and express themselves creatively
for a variety of purposes using the platforms, tools,
styles, formats and digital media appropriate to their
goals.
They also fit into the Learning and Innovation Skills of
the Framework for 21st Century Learning.
Student Profile:
Name of Student: Thomas

CK

Age: 9
Grade Level: 3
Type of Disability: Cerebral Palsy with Cognitive
Disability
Summary of disability characteristics: Hypotonia
(floppiness) in one arm, lack of coordination and
balance, speech difficulty (dysarthria), scooter bound,
able to use cane to stand for short periods of time,
sways when standing, leg braces (orthotic devices) on
both legs, gait disturbance (walks with a propulsive
gait), unsteadiness when walking, and learning
disability
Academic Profile: Below grade level (in special
education)
Capabilities: Able to operate scooter with hand that is
not impaired, able to support self with cane for a few
minutes, able to walk with cane for a few steps, able to
type on the computer with hand that is not impaired,
and able to write with hand that is not impaired
Limitations: Unable to stand with cane for long periods
of time, trouble talking clearly, difficulty writing legibly,
difficulty participating in some physical activity
(running, catching a ball, and throwing a ball), difficulty
with precise motions and fine motor skills (picking up a
pencil or other small object), and unable to sit down
without using both hands for support

SUPERVISING
TEACHERS
SIGNATURE

Accommodations:
Student will sit at scooter compatible desk and lab
table.
Teacher will highlight the directions on the Lab Sheet.
When the student goes to get the lab materials, the
teacher will help him put the materials in the pocket of
his scooter and then his partner will take them out of
the pocket when he gets back to the lab table.
The students partner and the teacher will help the
student get the plastic bag on his hand since he only
has one hand that isnt impaired.
Student will use a slant board and a pencil grip to
complete the Lab Sheet.

Seton Hill University Lesson Plan Template Step-by-Step


Procedures
RATIONALE for
the Learning
Plan

Introduction

Explicit
Instructions

Lesson
Procedure

CK
This lesson is an extension of a previous lesson with
Standard 3.1.3.C2: Describe animal characteristics that
are necessary for survival. The previous lesson focused
on adaptations in general. This lesson deals specifically
with adaptations of Antarctic animals.
Activating Prior Knowledge
Teacher asks students if they remember their discussion
of adaptations that animals need to survive.
Hook/Lead-In/Anticipatory Set
Teacher tells students that today, they are going to look
more closely at what helps penguins and other Antarctic
animals survive.
Teacher tells students that they are going to watch a
video about Antarctic animals and do a fun experiment.
Big Idea Statement
Teacher states the Big Idea in kid-friendly terms: Blubber
is very important for Antarctic animals to survive.
Essential Questions Statement
Teacher states the Essential Question in kid-friendly
terms: How does blubber help Antarctic animals live in
their habitat?
Objective Statement
Teacher states the Objectives in kid-friendly terms:
We are going to watch a video about Antarctic animals.
By the end of the video, you will be able to write the
definition of blubber and list three animals that have
blubber on your Lab Sheets.
We are also going to do a lab. At the end of the lab, you
will write how blubber helps Antarctic animals survive.
Transition
The class sings the Blubber Song.
Key Vocabulary
Blubber: thick layer of fat between an animals skin and
its muscles
PreAssessment of Students
Teacher asks students what they know about blubber.
Students take turns coming up to the Smart Board to
write their ideas.
Teacher passes out the Lab Sheets.
The class watches a video about Antarctic animals.
After the video, the teacher asks a few questions such as
What are some of the physical characteristics of
Antarctic animals? and What helps these animals
survive in the cold water?
Modeling of the Concept
Teacher tells students that they will be doing a lab where
they get to feel what it is like to have blubber.

Teacher models the lab.


Teacher puts solid shortening in one plastic storage bag.
Teacher puts hand in another plastic storage bag.
Teacher puts the bag-covered hand into the bag with the
shortening.
Teacher kneads the shortening to make sure the hand is
completely surrounded by shortening.
Teacher asks a student to help wrap masking tape
around the part of the bag covering the wrist.
Teacher puts hand into a bucket of ice water.
Teacher records the amount of time the hand stays in
the ice water. Teacher also records what it feels like.
Teacher asks another student to help cover the other
hand with two plastic storage bags without shortening.
Teacher puts hand into a bucket of ice water.
Teacher records the amount of time the hand stays in
the ice water. Teacher also records what it feels like.
Teacher tells students that they will take turns doing the
lab with their partner.
Teacher models how students will complete the Lab
Sheet. They will complete the first chart before the
experiment and the second chart after the experiment.
Students complete the first chart (predictions) together
as a class. Teacher reads each question out loud and
gives students time to record their responses.
Teacher gives each student a partner and instructs them
to move back to the lab table.
Teacher gives each group a Direction Sheet.
Guiding the Practice
Teacher walks around the room as students are doing
the lab.
Teacher assists students in completing the steps of the
lab. The students will have a Direction Sheet, but they
may still need some assistance.
Teacher also makes sure students are completing the
second chart on their Lab Sheet.
Teacher discusses the students predictions and results
with them.
Teacher asks questions such as, Why do you think that
will happen? or Why do you think that happened?
Providing the Independent Practice
Students will work in their groups to complete the lab.
They will put their hand (with blubber and without
blubber) in water. They will see how long their hands can
stay in the water and how it feels. Students will record
all of this information on their Lab Sheets. They will also
answer one final question: How does blubber help
penguins survive?

Transition
Teacher will have each student come get the lab
materials.
The student with the longest last name will come get the
plastic storage bags and Crisco. The student with the
shortest last name will come get the stop watch,
masking tape, and paper towels.
Reading
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwfKCX_8fbA
Materials
Blubber Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
Technology
v=_wUFZxiCy1c
Equipment
Lab Sheets:
Supplies
http://kelceymillerscienceandhealth.weebly.com/lessonplan-3.html
Direction Sheet:
http://kelceymillerscienceandhealth.weebly.com/lessonplan-3.html
Plastic storage bags
Crisco
Bucket of ice water
Stop watch
Masking tape
Paper towels
Homework sheet:
http://kelceymillerscienceandhealth.weebly.com/lessonplan-3.html
Evaluation of
Formal Evaluation
the
Teacher grades the Lab Sheets.
Learning/Master Informal Evaluation
y of the
Teacher takes notes on the students responses during
Concept
the pre-assessment.
Teacher also takes notes on the students responses to
the questions the teacher asks while walking around
during the lab.
Closure
Summary & Review of the Learning
Teacher asks the students to restate the Objective.
Teacher asks students how they met the Objective.
Students use their iPads to submit their responses on a
NearPod presentation.
Teacher asks students what difficulties they encountered
during the lab.
Teacher asks other students for suggestions on how they
could have solved these problems.
Teacher asks for students comments on the lesson and
how it could be improved.
Homework/Assignments
Teacher passes out the homework sheet and explains
the directions to the students.
Students will be reflecting on what they learned in class


Teacher
Self-reflection

and writing a few sentences.


Teacher states the due date for the homework sheet.
The due date is also noted on the sheet.
I will know that students can define blubber and list
three animals that have blubber when they answer the
questions on their Lab Sheets.
I will know that students can list one way blubber helps
Antarctic animals survive when they complete the lab
and record their responses on their Lab Sheets.
If students do not master the concept, I will re-teach it in
a different way.
I will do the lab with the whole class instead of breaking
them into groups.
I could also do a different lab where students cover an
ice cube with Crisco and compare its melting time with a
regular ice cube.