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2nd Annual Conference Report

Unity and Partnership:


Supporting a Just and
Sustainable Peace in South Sudan

September 25-26, 2016


Washington, DC

Report Contents
Summary ....................................................................................................................................................... 3
Opening Remarks .......................................................................................................................................... 4
Advocacy Training: The Basics ..................................................................................................................... 4
Video:

9-year-old Kais experiences in South Sudan | World Vision UK .............................................. 5

Panel 1: Protection, Justice and Accountability ........................................................................................... 5


Video:

In South Sudan, child malnutrition worsens as conflict hinders response | UNICEF ............... 8

Panel 2: Humanitarian Aid, Healing and Reconciliation .............................................................................. 8


Introduction of HR 6006: The Lost Boys and Girls RISE Act by David Dau .................................................. 10
Panel 3: U.S. Policy on South Sudan........................................................................................................... 10
Video:

Displaced in South Sudan, Raymond, 18 shares his hopes for peace | UNICEF ......................... 12

Panel 4: How the U.S. Can Support South Sudan ...................................................................................... 12


Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................... 18
Group Photo................................................................................................................................................ 18
Appendix A: Leave Behind at Congressional Meetings .............................................................................. 19
Appendix B: Presentation by Former Governor Bakosoro (Panel 4) ......................................................... 21
Appendix C: CASS 2nd Annual Conference Program ................................................................................. 28

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Coalition of Advocates for South Sudan


Report of the 2nd Annual Conference
Unity and Partnership: Supporting a Just and Sustainable Peace in South Sudan
September 25-26, 2016 |Georgetown Law and the Methodist Building |Washington, DC

Summary
The CASS 2nd Annual Conference took place at a time of uncertainty for South Sudan. Fighting in Juba
during the month of July 2016 forced FVP Machar out of the country, leaving a vacancy later filled by
Taban Deng Gai, a move sanctioned by the U.S. and denounced by the SPLM-IO. The viability of the
peace agreement was in question and a return to massive violent conflict was predicted. The
conference provided a rare opportunity for stakeholders to sit together and discuss the issues, a way
forward, and how the U.S. can support peace in South Sudan. Participants in the conference included
the government, the opposition, the church, civil society, women and youth as well as a variety of
experts and friends of South Sudan. The conference was grounded by short videos played throughout
the day that underscored the tragic reality faced by most South Sudanese. While the issues that divide
South Sudan were ever present, agreement was reached on the desire for peace, the need for justice
and accountability through the hybrid court, and the importance of reconciliation, dialogue and support
from the U.S. and the international community. The CASS 2nd Annual Conference modeled a process
and opportunity that should be replicated regularly in order to support South Sudanese in their process
of securing a just and sustainable peace. The conference was followed by a day of lobbying on The Hill.
This reports attempts to capture the highlights of the conference. To experience the conference in its
entirety, videos are available.
Live Stream Video (10k live viewers): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAmaCrgmJ1E
Opening Remarks and Advocacy Training: The Basics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH3PaV6Cg0k
Panel 1: Protection, Justice and Accountability
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZ00rcjVDMI
Panel 2: Humanitarian Aid, Healing and Reconciliation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJ9VvxGHPOM
Panel 3: U.S. Policy on South Sudan and Panel 4: How the U.S. Can Support South Sudan (part
1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTLv7ZX3_Ys
Panel 4: How the U.S. Can Support South Sudan (part 2)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkkB296UCb8
CASS sincerely thanks the speakers and everyone who volunteered their time and contributed in
extraordinary ways to make the conference possible. Special thanks to our gracious hosts, George
O'Connor and the students of Human Rights Action Amnesty International at Georgetown Law.

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Opening Remarks

Kwaje Lasu, CASS Board Chair

Mr. Lasu recognized the complexities of the conflict and identified the main focus of the day to end
armed conflict and to allow humanitarian aid to be provided to the people of South Sudan. Hope for
peace in South Sudan, he explained, will be the result of individual citizens taking action, institutional
change and a shared vision for South Sudan that puts the interests of the people first.
Advocacy Training: The Basics

Mike Brand, Director of Advocacy and Programs, Jewish World Watch

What is lobbying?
Influencing and educating law makers on key issues.
How to schedule an appointment with a Member of Congress:
Call the scheduler who is the gatekeeper of the agenda. The key to getting a meeting is
following up and understanding that offices may take a while to respond.
How to prepare for a meeting with Congress:
Research existing and potential legislation and know who you are talking to and understand
their connection to the issue. Develop materials to leave behind. Plan out the meeting, assign
roles, and rehearse your talking points. Confirm the appointment. Know where you are going.
Practice and re-practice your talking points and asks. Arrive on time and be patient.
What to expect at the meeting with a Member of Congress or staffer:
Most meetings take 15-20 minutes and any location is possible including the cafeteria.
Introduce yourself and your group. There is strength in numbers. Ask how much time they have
and plan the conversation accordingly. Engage in a dialogue, not a monologue. Do not
monopolize the conversation. The person you are meeting with is not always an expert on the
issue, therefore try to discover what his/her level of understanding is, and explain whatever is
necessary to make your point. Tell a personal narrative. Why is the issue important to you?
Why should they care about the issue? Talk from a position of passion, not one of anger. Stay
on your talking points, answer questions and get back on topic. Be as clear and specific as
possible. Convey a sense of urgency and remind them that they can make a difference. At the
end of the meeting, thank them for their time.
How to follow-up after a meeting:
Send a thank you note that includes additional information that may have been requested
during the meeting and confirm if the agreed up on action was taken. Build a relationship with
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the offices you are engaging with. If they start to see you as a knowledge point, they will trust
you and listen to you.

Video: 9-year-old Kais experiences in South Sudan | World Vision UK


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqMYGds5SKA&app=desktop

Panel 1: Protection, Justice and Accountability

John Tanza, Moderator


Brian Adeba, Associate Director of Policy, Enough Project
Gabriel Swiney, Attorney Adviser, Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State
Dr. Jacqueline Wilson, Principal, Civic Fusion International

Mr. Tanzas opening remarks identified protection, justice and accountability as three important
elements for every peacebuilding strategy. The justice system is necessary to reduce violence, bring
order, and ultimately build peace, however to be effective, the institutions necessary for the
establishment of justice must be legitimate.
Dr. Wilson drew on her experience in contributing to the construction of the verification and monitoring
mechanism for the CPA to urge South Sudanese to consider four issues in the process of identifying
means for protection, justice and accountability:
1) Who is protection for? She explained that, we are talking about innocent children, we are
talking about elderly members of families, and we are especially talking about women who are
so important in the South Sudanese families and she challenged South Sudanese to consider
what can be done to protect these particularly vulnerable groups.
2) Establishment of containment sites for military forces is an important protection strategy. As
a former member of the U.S. military, Dr. Wilson feels that soldiers who do not uphold the
dignity of wearing the uniform do not deserve freedom and they are the ones who should be in
camps, not innocent civilians.
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3) South Sudanese must decide what justice means for their society. Whether a punitive,
restorative or hybrid system of justice, Dr. Wilson stated that whatever system is determined
for justice and accountability in South Sudan will be unique for that society and South
Sudanese have something to contribute in deciding that process.
4) How do you conduct transitional justice when there has been no transition in the
government? How are witnesses and evidence protected?

Mr. Adeba identified institutional reform and enforcing financial accountability as ways to address the
root cause of instability in South Sudan:
At the root of the conflict in South Sudan is the existence of a systemcalled a violent
kleptocracy Violent kleptocracy is a system in which all the institutions that are supposed to
offer accountability, to offer oversight into government functions have actually been hijacked,
stolen, put into the pockets of the officials at the helm so that these institutions are unable to
perform their functions at all. B. Adeba
Mr. Adeba acknowledged that the peace agreement talks of reform of all institutions of the
government, including the financial institutions because it recognizes that at some point, these
institutions failed to mitigate the possibility of conflict. Mr. Adeba suggested that the state was seen as
the grand prize to competing factions that intentionally hijacked government institutions in order to
access the resources of the country by (1) stealing the funds required to operate the institutions; (2)
creating conflicting legislation that made it difficult to carry out the functions of the institution; and (3)
disrupting the development of the institutions, for example, through significant changes in personnel.
Mr. Adeba encouraged support for the many good and committed people in government who want to
do their work but who are hampered by leadership that benefits financially from weak institutions.
Mr. Swiney highlighted the unique provisions within the peace agreement (ARCSS) to support
accountability in South Sudan through the hybrid court:

The jurisdiction of the court is through the transition period, not just from December 2013 to
the signing of the peace agreement.
No impunity regardless of office.
Indicted or convicted individuals lose their positions within government.

The end of impunity and the promotion of justice are not just moral imperatives; they are stabilizing
forces in international affairs. President Obama, 2010 National Security Strategy

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While the mechanisms for justice and accountability have not been implemented, the peace agreement
does provide formal forms of accountability, which were preferred by the people of South Sudan per
country-wide surveys conducted by the South Sudan Law Association and the American Bar Association
as well as expressed by the religious, women and civil society blocks during the negotiations. In addition
to the hybrid court, the mechanisms for accountability in the ARCSS include the Commission for Truth,
Reconciliation and Healing and a Reparations Committee. The U.S. government is not taking sides in a
non-international armed conflict where alleged violations have been committed by all parties. Instead,
the U.S. is focused on addressing the needs of the people, which includes helping to lay the groundwork
for accountability. For example, the U.S. is providing a grant of over $3M to the African Union to hire
staff to do substantive work on the hybrid court.
We have heard from the beginningthat accountability mattersnot only that it matters in a
moral sense but it matters in terms of pursuing peace, in terms of pursuing a resolution to the
conflict that would be durable and that can actually bring about a transition. G. Swiney
Amb. Akuong, Ambassador of the Republic of South Sudan to the U.S., responded as follows:
The mechanisms for accountability will be established by law. There is a delay in establishing
the institutions because the Parliament has just been established.
Containments are necessary for security and the integration of the armed forces into the
national army but there is a lack of resources for basic needs.
Transitional justice will take place when the country is stable.
The governments resources are meager and there is no deliberate effort to starve institutions.
U.S. funding is not going to the government but to the UN, INGOs and NGOs.
Q&A Points:

The Rapid Deployment Force is consistent with the internationally accepted doctrine of
Responsibility to Protect. (Wilson)
Incentives to stop fighting could include identification of individuals for prosecution by the ICC
and for individual sanctions. (Wilson)
Scandals such as the Al Cardinal vehicle purchase scandal, the Dura saga, letters of credit and
the Crisis Management Committee illustrate the level of corruption in South Sudan. (Adeba)
The ARCSS, a temporary arrangement, provides an incentive to stop fighting as it allows the
same groups of people that are fighting to stay in power. The international community believed
that the parties wanted peace for the benefit of the people. (Swiney)
UNMISS has a legal mandate under Chapter VII of the UN Charter to protect civilians. (Swiney)
The ARCSS intends for the processes of achieving political stability and implementing the hybrid
court to happen simultaneously. (Swiney)
JMEC is supposed to report on the implementation of the agreement and make
recommendations to IGAD, the African Union and the UNSC and all three are supposed to take
the next steps when the agreement is violated. (Swiney)
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The peace agreement calls for a restructuring of the army, security and defense sectors, and
that reform, if enacted in the right way, would result in the formation of a national army that is
devoid of the ethnic cleavages that currently define it. (Adeba)
Joint Transitional Units in the CPA were not particularly successful. South Sudan may want to
consider more of a Liberia model where the aim is to have the military that they can afford,
soldiers demobilized, and consideration for a longer term community policing model. (Wilson)
Chapter 2 of ARCSS sets out a detailed process for security, which is supposed to be
implemented by the military leaders at a technical rather than a political level. (Swiney)

Video: In South Sudan, child malnutrition worsens as conflict hinders response | UNICEF
http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/southsudan_92046.html

Panel 2: Humanitarian Aid, Healing and Reconciliation

Ayen Bior, Moderator


Jacob Atem, President, Southern Sudan Healthcare Organization
Hanna Andrew K. Dijok, Executive Director, Sisters Hope for South Sudan
Bill Andress, Member, Trinity South Sudan Ministry
Steve Hilbert, Office on International Justice and Peace at the United States Conference of
Catholic Bishops
Richard Parkins, Executive Director, American Friends of the Episcopal Church of the Sudans
(AFRECS)

Ayen Bior introduced the panel by highlighting the current humanitarian situation in South Sudan: 2.4
million South Sudanese are displaced, including 1.6M IDPs (internally displaced) and just this month,
we reached a milestone. We produced over 1 million refugees. Food insecurity is unprecedented with
4.8 million or 40% of the population food insecure.
Jacob Atem warned against the increased risk South Sudanese face for contracting rare and deadly
diseases such as ebola, which cannot be identified let alone treated effectively due to insecurity.
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Because of the conflict, healthcare facilities have been destroyed, people are dying from treatable
diseases, maternal mortality impacts 1 out of every 50 pregnant women, and South Sudan is even
further away from reaching the UNs Sustainable Development Goals. Disease knows no boundaries and
conflict is compounding the health risks South Sudanese face.
Bill Andress:
Starvation is not a lack of resources right now. Starvation is a lack of access and access is being
denied by armed groups.
Reconciliation is the end product of a process that has to begin with forgiveness.
National reconciliation is best facilitated by the South Sudan Council of Churches, because they
are the only functioning institution with the capacity and the desire.
Three things we can do: we can pray, we can act and we can give.
Hanna Andrew K. Dijok encouraged the realization of Dr. John Garangs vision of taking the city to the
villages so that every South Sudanese child can enjoy the right to education. Needed are more
schools, teacher training and professional development, a national curriculum, and trauma counseling.
The conflict has destroyed schools and children. Some are forced to be child soldiers.
We have to stop this war in South Sudan because when we take those children and give them
guns, what do they learn? Violence. And what will be the future? They will think that the only
solution for any problem is fighting and killing one another. So without education, we lose this
generation and we lose the country. H. Dijok
Steve Hilbert shared a model of reconciliation created by John Paul Lederach and used by the South
Sudan Council of Churches. The four required elements for true sustainable reconciliation are:
Public truth and remorse from the perpetrator
Turning the instinct for revenge into mercy (turn the cheek)
Restorative justice (I took something from you and I will do my best to replace it)
Building structures of peace to resist the call to return to arms such as shared ceremonies and
events to bind communities together.
Richard Parkins shared the work of the South Sudan Council of Churches, which includes all of the
faith denominations.
One of the things you want to do if you are a promoter of peace and reconciliation is to show
that the divisions that exist are not hindrances to a unified strategy but instead they have an
enriching quality. R. Parkins
The South Sudan Council of Churches visited Rwanda to learn from its experience and as a result has
created a plan of action that includes advocacy to instill peace and reconciliation into the DNA of all
South Sudan institutions and creating neutral forums to bring all constituents together and to facilitate
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the process of truth telling in a safe place. The goal is to empower all citizens to be the custodians and
mobilizers of peace and reconciliation, to develop a new normative culture for youth who are burdened
with a legacy of retaliation and to take action that makes it inevitable that peace and reconciliation
becomes the alternative. The process takes time and it is costly due to the lack of resources. The
South Sudan Council of Churches recently received a USAID grant for $6M and has received an
additional $2M from Catholic Relief Services and friends in Norway toward this effort.

Introduction of HR 6006: The Lost Boys and Girls RISE Act by David Dau
Congresswoman Bass introduced legislation to encourage South Sudanese to return home as part of a
Diaspora skills transfer program. Those lobbying Congress were encouraged to ask for support of the
legislation.
Panel 3: U.S. Policy on South Sudan

Ayen Bior, Moderator


Dr. Luka Biong, Global Fellow at PRIO, Associate Professor, University of Juba
Sarah Rial, Founder and Executive Director, Global Partnership for Peace in South Sudan
David Abramowitz, Managing Director, Humanity United

Dr. Luka Biong reviewed the past, present and recommended relationship between the U.S. and South
Sudan. U.S. engagement in South Sudan has been influenced by various factors: Dr. John Garang and
other South Sudanese appealed to the hearts of Americans and in particular, evangelical Christians, who
advocated on behalf of the country, keeping it a priority for three successive U.S. Presidents who
invested billions into a hoped for success story. The country of South Sudan and its relationship with the
U.S. have faltered during the Obama administration. While Sudan is keen to ensure the failure of an
independent South Sudan, contributing factors also included a focus on the state rather than the nation,
a failure to reform the SPLM as well as the SPLA, and a lack of support for the SPLM Arusha reunification
process. Corrections to support normalization of relations between the U.S. and the people of South
Sudan could include:
U.S. support for implementation of the peace agreement;
U.S. pressure on all parties to isolate anti-peace elements;
Targeted sanctions on anti-peace elements;

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Engagement by President Bush with President Kiir to encourage implementation of the peace
agreement;
Support for institution building through the return of the Diaspora;
Support for the unification of the SPLM through support of the SPLM Arusha agreement; and
Increased pressure to expedite deployment of the regional protection force.

Ms. Rial warned against a return to war and she highlighted the role of the Government of South
Sudan in the conflict and in the overall demise of the country. She refuted the viability of the peace
agreement and she recommended that the U.S. stop appeasing the government it helped to establish
and instead take the following actions:
Tell the South Sudan government to stop killing its own people;
Urge the region to engage constructively to end war and build peace in South Sudan rather than
escalating problems;
Ensure the deployment of a well equipped and well trained protection force for the people of
South Sudan;
Provide support for the opposition;
Support an arms embargo and pass H.R. 5996, The Halt Arms and Promote Peace in South Sudan
Act;
Impose targeted sanctions again South Sudan leaders and their family members;
Empower civil society and ensure that funding reaches effective grassroots organizations;
Support a Diaspora Skills Transfer program; and
Empower women to solve the problems of South Sudan.
Ms. Rial envisioned three scenarios for South Sudanese:
Give up and tolerate a Dinka dominated state.
Pressure President Kiir to step down and open up the political space in South Sudan.
Return to war as recently announced by the SPLM-IO.
Mr. Abramowitz reviewed factors influencing U.S. policy on South Sudan. Historically South Sudan has
enjoyed a strong friendship with the U.S. but there is growing frustration with the SPLM as the
governing party and frustration with all sides in particular with regard to gender based violence. As the
Obama Administration comes to end, the focus is more on containment since the situation requires a
longer-term solution. The Administration has preferred supporting regional leadership in addressing the
crisis, recognizing the regional actors have their own interests in South Sudan. The peace agreement is a
direct result of Obamas visit to and intervention in Addis Abba; however the U.S. views the
establishment and ongoing implementation of 28 states as a divisive move by the government. At this
point, the U.S. is skeptical of the increasing calls for an international administration of South Sudan and
it is looking at how to create a more effective international force, primarily identifying commanders who
will implement the forces mandate. The U.S. supports accountability and it is providing support for the
hybrid tribunal. Support is divided for an arms embargo, however it may increase depending on
progress achieved with the Rapid Deployment Force, sanctions, and addressing issues of corruption with
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the hope that a return to war can be avoided. Concerns exist about the crisis being exploited with the
transitions of the U.S. Administration and the U.N. Secretary General in January.
South Sudan has also enjoyed the support of Congress, however recent hearings have yielded scathing
criticism and hostility towards the opposition and the government. Congressman Smith visited Juba and
secured a commitment from President Kiir for zero tolerance for gender based violence. If that
commitment is not upheld, Smith will feel undermined. Finally, Congress has introduced HR5996, The
Halt Arms and Promote Peace in South Sudan Act.
Q&A Points:

The Rapid Deployment Force is necessary but it is not enough to protect civilians throughout
South Sudan (Rial.) The force is not a threat to sovereignty as the government was consulted
and it consented to the force (Biong.) Countries have offered troops however they are waiting
for the consent of the government. Will the force be effective and will it create an environment
that impacts the rest of the country? A force in Juba is necessary because if Juba becomes an
area of conflict, organizations would pull out which has huge implications for the rest of the
country (Abramowitz.)

The peace agreement is a way to reach the people of South Sudan and to reinstates the
legitimacy of government by the voices of South Sudanese through elections and
implementation of the hybrid court. The second option for change would be for the
international community to provide an exit package to the leadership. Violence wont work
(Biong.) The U.S. does not see how the current leadership can be seen as a legitimate actor for
the long term given its inability to create an inclusive state. Legitimacy of the government
requires both a bottom up and top down approach (Abramowitz.) The peace agreement is
between the SPLM-IG and SPLM-IO and it is these two parties that must implement it even if
that doesnt include Machar. Taban Deng Gai does not represent the SPLM-IO (Rial.) The only
alternative to the peace agreement is violence, an unacceptable option that requires a high
price from the people of South Sudan (Biong.)

Video: Displaced in South Sudan, Raymond, 18 shares his hopes for peace | UNICEF
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kt-xdaicPVk&app=desktop

Panel 4: How the U.S. Can Support South Sudan

John Tanza,Moderator
H.E. Garang Diing Akuong, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, of the Republic of
South Sudan to the USA
Amb. Reath M. Tang, SPLM-IO Representative to the U.S.
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Pagan Amum, Co-Founder, South Sudan Reborn


Joseph B. Bakosoro, Former Governor, Western Equatoria
Amb. Emmanuel Aban, representing Dr. Lam Akol, Chair, National Democratic Movement

During the 4th panel, the speakers recognized and warned against the violent crisis facing the people of
South Sudan and they advocated for peace.
South Sudan is bleeding at this moment. People are dying. There are people who are refugees.
People are displaced within their own homes and most of us know about it. South Sudan is
moving towards becoming more worse than Yemen, Syria, Iran Somalia, Central Africa and the
rest. We are on the verge. We are moving towards that but then we deny the fact, but the truth
has to be said so that we find solutions.
Joseph B. Bakosoro, Former Governor, Western Equatoria
If you say that the peace agreement is dead, as it is, then what next? Are we going to allow
South Sudan to fall into a brutal war of more massacres, which is already happening and people
are preparing themselves. For the majority of South Sudan, this is a very scary alternative and
that is where the dilemma is. The agreement is dead, the alternative is horrifying.
The political organizations supported by their armies or without their armies have failed to
bring peace. What can we do? We can do one thing. Let us stop going to war becauseif we
are to go to war, it will be war continuously and perpetually, but it will be more disastrous and
more brutal. There will be more massacres and South Sudan will collapse into disorder, into
chaos and will disintegrate. We will not be one country. It will be worse than Yugoslavia.
Pagan Amum, Co-Founder, South Sudan Reborn
Now there is killing everywhere in South Sudan. Because there is killing everywhere in South
Sudan, now Salva Kiir has made it and it is spread to all over South Sudan, a situation that you
will not control. The more we do not take this decision today, the more South Sudan will be
worse than Somalia. We are calling for peace.
Amb. Reath M. Tang, SPLM-IO Representative to the U.S.
The only option that we have is the implementation of the peace agreement. Other than that is
the worse scenario and that can take us to examples of Yeman, Libya, Syria, Iraq and nobody
will be immune in the whole country of that scenario. So let me reiterate and I will also repeat
the best of the two evils, the bad peace agreement and the war. I am saying that is bad because
it is a peace agreement that has been imposed on the parties. The parties did not exhaust the
negotiations The agreement is bad but it is better than war.
H.E. Garang Diing Akuong , Ambassador of the Republic of South Sudan to the USA

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In addition, the panelists made recommendations regarding the way forward (see below.) The chart
below is not intended to imply that the speakers only agreed with the actions that are check marked.
The actions that are check marked are the actions they identified during the panel.
The Way
Forward
Hybrid court
operational
International
Intervention*
Free and Fair
Elections
Recover looted
resources
Roundtable
Conference
Implement peace
agreement
Consultative
constitution
Political leaders
step down
Address root
causes of conflict
Government of
technocrats
Regime change
by any means
Protect
foreigners
Freedom of
expression
Reconciliation

H.E. Akuong
RoSS

Amb. Tang
SPLM-IO

Pagan Amum
S.S. Reborn

Governor
Bakosoro

Amb. Aban
NDM

Separate Sudan /
So Sudan Policy

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*International intervention, for the most part, was defined differently by the panelists:

Amb. Emmanuel Aban, National Democratic Movement


We call upon the United States of America as a friend of South Sudan to work hard to recover
the stolen assets that rightly belong to the people of South Sudan.
What is required is for the U.S. government and the governments in the region to try to either
freeze the assets and recover the assets that have been stolen and freeze the accounts of those
who are suspected and especially those who have been mentioned in The Sentry report, whether
we agree or disagree with it, I think it is a good basis for fighting corruption in the country and
we, the South Sudanese, need to build on it. They have done their work.
The South Sudanese must put their house in order by making a broad opposition and this could
be done with the help of the international community as it has been done in Afghanistan, as it
has been done in Libya, as it has been done in Syria and why not South Sudan.
The hybrid court, we are for it and it has to be expedited because the agreement talks that it
should be done within the frame of the first year of the agreement, but what we are saying is
that it has to be done now because that will discourage immunity.
The constitutional conference or the roundtable for the opposition needs to be called, so that
the opposition should be called and should be asked and consulted as to what is the way
forward, because as Secretary General Pagan Amum has said and I concur with him, the
agreement is dead and therefore we need to go back to the drawing board. So what is required
is a constitution conference for the opposition needs to be called by the U.S.

Joseph B. Bakosoro, Former Governor, Western Equatoria


Nobody, no country is requesting for international force to come in, but if your behavior in your
country dictates that international force comes, what is the option?
The U.S. can play a role... The U.S. made us to get that independence, and today we have
thrown the U.S. away, even raping women. You have an interest in South Sudan, the poor
people. Government is about the people. So when we dont take care of the people, what are
we doing? Therefore, I see a few recommendations to bring to justice all the leaders of South
Sudan who have committed atrocities and war crimes. The U.S. can enforce that. Putting in
mind that some of your women have been raped, and we call it a good country, a good
government.
We request the U.S. to convene a consultative conference with all the oppositions. Bring them
to understand the root causes of South Sudans problems so that we can address them once and
for all. If you address it in piecemeal, you are addressing this one and another one is
mushrooming up. Therefore, we need the U.S. to intervene to bring the opposition leaders
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together and then let us have a consultative conference to reconcile and to understand what is
happening.
South Sudan and Sudan are combined together in U.S. policy. I think since the U.S. recognized
the sovereignty of South Sudan, the policy should be separated because we are different
countries with different activities and different policies.
We need the international community to help us. That is a given fact. Dont wait for us to
come together.
Powerpoint Presentation:
Bring to book SS leaders to account for atrocities committed against innocent civilians
Convene Conference that will bring all oppositions together to forge a new direction for
South Sudan
AU/IGAD to stick to implementation of ARCISS by the help of USA
USA to assist transforming South Sudan into a democratic, accountable and responsive
Government
Dig out the root cause of conflict in South Sudan before Reconciliation.
Assist Refugees and IDPs. Help repatriate funds of SS from Foreign Banks and freeze assets.

Pagan Amum, Co-Founder, South Sudan Reborn


We have accepted there is need for international intervention now, but international
intervention alone will not solve the problem. Therefore, there is need for IGAD, UN and African
Union, and the U.S. will contribute to this to have a twin process: intervention to stabilize the
country, but also a political process, which would be to call for a roundtable of all South
Sudanese stakeholders to discuss vital issues. As South Sudanese, we need to sit and agree. Are
we South Sudanese, do we want to be one country, do we want to be one nation, one state, and
how do we relate to each other so that we come up with a new social contract. A roundtable
conference and a constitutional conference that will adopt a transitional program to take our
country to peace and democracy, and we also have to discuss, now that the political elite in the
country have failed, to bring the country back to peace, what do we do? I believe the way would
be to look to other capabilities of South Sudanese and would be to form a government of South
Sudanese professionals, a government of technocrats, that would implement this transitional
program and ask all the political parties and political leaders, all the elites to (1) stop violence as
a means to get or to struggle for power, (2) to ask them to step aside from power and support a
government of technocrats, we will discuss this, and then (3), for them to organize themselves so
that they submit themselves to the will of the people. At the end of the transition, in a free and
fair election, where now our people will have the opportunity to elect their government in a
peaceful environment. It will be contest with ballots and not with bullets.

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Amb. Reath M. Tang, SPLM-IO Representative to the U.S.


How are we going to get the peace agreement? There is only one solution and this is where the
role of the U.S. and the Troika and the African Union and all the region should be involved. I
want the U.S. to support the decision that was taken in Addis Abba by the head of state and
government at the extraordinary session of the IGAD Plus in Addis Abba that say that because
the replacement of Dr. Riek by Taban was not legitimate there is no legality in it.
We need the U.S. and all the friends of South Sudan to support the decision that was taken in
Addis Abba calling Taban to step aside.
Let the international community support the peace agreement through what the IGAD said.
The deployment of the African Union is welcome, but it will not solve the problem because
there is no peace in Juba.
The two parties that signed the peace agreement need to be brought back together so that
they can continue the implementation of the peace agreement. That is the only way. There is no
other way.

H.E. Garang Diing Akuong, Ambassador of the Republic of South Sudan to the USA
The support of the U.S. that has been there since our war with Sudan in terms of humanitarian
support, political support, diplomatic support, everybody in South Sudan appreciate and is still
appreciating that support, and we, the government, would like to continue working with the
United States of America and the American people to meet the expectations of the American
people because at some points, we get the feeling that either the Congress or the White House
or the State Department that Americansare disappointed at the way we manage our affairs
despite all the support they give us. U.S. support has been very importantin achieving the CPA,
support of President Bush and also support of President Obama through getting our
independence and the U.S. continues to support South Sudan in terms of humanitarian affairs.
The U.S. is the biggest donor in South Sudan so this has to be acknowledged and we in the
government, we would welcome the U.S. government and other guarantors of the peace
agreement to implement the peace agreement.
The policy of the United States should continue to support the people of South Sudan in terms
of implementation of the peace agreement and in terms of the delivery of humanitarian affairs
and other development projects like the Nimule road, which is the firstroad built in South
Sudan and this is the contribution of the American people.
The only solution we have is the implementation of the peace agreement and Congress has to
continue to support the people of South Sudan to implement the peace agreement.

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Conclusion
The day ended with finalizing a paper (leave behind) that was written by CASS members, Mike Brand
and Jacob Atem, and the CASS Board. At the beginning of the day, a draft of the paper was provided to
conference participants in the conference packet. The final paper (see Appendix A) was distributed on
Monday, September 26, 2016 to the offices of 40+ members of Congress. CASS sincerely thanks Mike
Brand and Susan Brooks of Jewish World Watch for their tireless work to secure meetings with members
of Congress and for organizing the CASS lobby day on Monday.

Group Photo

Partial group photo at Georgetown Law, Sunday, September 25, 2016

Report drafted by Esther Sprague with notes provided by Basil Saen.

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Appendix A: Leave Behind at Congressional Meetings

Coalition of Advocates for South Sudan (CASS) Conference 2016


Unity and Partnership: Supporting a Just and Sustainable Peace in South Sudan
Background:
The people of South Sudan have been held hostage and put in horrible humanitarian situations since the
outbreak of war in December 2013 between the forces of President Salva Kiir and those of his former
Vice President Dr. Riek Machar. In the continuing conflict the United Nations estimates that over 2.3
million have been displaced half of them children; one million have sought refuge in adjacent nations;
and an uncounted number, probably in the hundreds of thousands, have been killed. Because the
conflict has shifted from political to ethnic-based, it has been accompanied by targeting civilians and has
included such horror as rape, castration, disembowelment, beheading, and ripping open the bellies of
live women to snatch out their unborn babies.
More of the same is the certain future for the South Sudanese people if that future is left in the hands of
these two warlords and the current government administration. The U.S. has been a key partner of the
South Sudanese people, providing humanitarian aid and development funds; and supporting past
negotiations for peace, independence and ending this very un-Civil War. U.S. policy has been driven by
both strategic and humanitarian concerns.
Current Situation:
A recent UN report states that the July 2016 resumption of violence was initiated and directed by the
governments President Salva Kiir and his armed forces Chief of Staff Paul Malong. This action was a
direct breach of the August 2015 Agreement on the Resolution of the Crisis in South Sudan (ARCISS),
which the U.S. encouraged and supported. Armed clashes, ambushes, and general insecurity continue
to prevent humanitarian aid from reaching starving people in many areas of the nation and may have
effectively announced the death of the peace process.
The return to war clearly denotes that there is no political will to implement the ARCISS. President Salva
Kiirs unilateral decision to establish 28 states in violation of the agreement, just a few weeks after
signing the agreement, further highlights this fact. The establishment of new states has exacerbated
violence and ethnic animosity in several of the newly created states including: Lol, Tonj, Terekeka and
Juba states among others and shifts the political power in favor of the dominant ethnic group. The
continued abuses by those in power, and a seeming lack of interest in peace means that South Sudan
will remain hostage to the ruling gun class.
Key Issues:
The resumption of violence in July made it clear that the ARCISS was not successful. Both sides are
continuing to fragment into multiple factions making any new peace agreement more difficult to
negotiate and implement. The governments attack on former First Vice President Riek Machar pushed
him into the safe haven of Sudan. Given Sudans interest in South Sudans resources, and Machars

Page 19 of 37

history with the Sudanese government in Khartoum, there is a great risk that Sudans leadership may
increase its military and financial support to Machar and his followers against President Kiir.
Moving forward presents only two options: Either include both President Kiir and former Vice President
Machar or include neither in the leadership. Currently, the exclusion of Riek Machar is causing
dissention amongst the opposition and potentially may cause further conflict. The appearance of
discrimination or favoritism of either side will be disastrous.
The Coalition of Advocates for South Sudan requests your assistance in ensuring:

A. Co-sponsor H.R. 5996, The Halt Arms and Promote Peace in South Sudan Act, bi-partisan
legislation that calls for additional sanctions and an arms embargo against South Sudan if peace
is not reached.
a. Imposing targeted sanctions on the leaders who are inhibiting both the deployment of
the protection force and the progress towards peace, and any individuals who violate
human rights.
B. Encourage President Obama to appoint separate Envoys for Sudan and South Sudan. Both
countries are unique in their situations and the efforts that would require peace. Additional
support that can be focused on the individual countries would improve the USs ability to
achieve its diplomatic goals.
C. Support the various US government institutions that can investigate and seize stolen assets by
South Sudans leaders. If any assets are recovered they should be used to support humanitarian
aid, survivors of gender based violence, and recovery efforts.
a. See the recent Sentry Report issued by the Enough Project.
D. Any new aid that is appropriated for South Sudan should, in addition to humanitarian aid,
prioritize supporting civil society, media, and diaspora-led organizations that are providing
humanitarian support in South Sudan.
We appreciate your meeting with us and hearing our concerns. Furthermore we appreciate that the
United States Congress has been a steadfast friend of the people of South Sudan for many years.
Signed: On behalf of the Coalition of Advocates for South Sudan and the Attendees of the Second
Annual Unity and Peace Conference held Sunday, September 25, 2016.

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Appendix B: Presentation by Former Governor Bakosoro (Panel 4)


*GRAPHIC IMAGES*

South Sudan Faces Continuous Conflict That is Mainly Suffered


by Innocent Civilians
The killings, executions, the beheading of civilians, abduction of children as child
soldiers, displacements of the civilian population, and the destruction of properties are
all happening in South Sudan at an imaginable magnitude. It is ethnically targeted to
dehumanize tribes that are non-Dinka specifically the Nuer, Equatorians, and the feretit
and the killings in many cases are used as a retaliation tool against innocent civilians.
Although it is argued, that the opposition party may be responsible for some killings, the
majority of atrocities and executions are authorized directly by the top government officials
and are committed by government soldiers,
The most horrendous acts against human rights are the continuous mass killings and sexual
assaults, rapes and gang rapes on women including small girls and elderly women, and in some
cases, men. This has been happening and continue to occur in South Sudan. Some of a huge
number of these incidents happen in broad daylight. It is irrefutable that war crimes are being
committed in South Sudan.

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How can you believe what you dont see?


Many international and South Sudanese news sites report on atrocities committed but
the International Community and u.s.a government officials do not know the
magnitude of the death in South Sudan
A Report from Amnesty International states People forced to eat human flesh and to
disembowel dead bodies during South Sudans civil war that began in 2013 are among
thousands suffering from trauma and psychological distress amid a chronic shortage of
mental healthcare services in the country. (amnesty, 2016, July 6)
The most clear fact is that the authorities, security agents, and soldiers do not see the
value in human lives. People are dispensable in South Sudan, and the countrys natural
resources are exploited to fuel the conflict and for personal gains by the people in power.
The Atrocities are being committed in Upper Nile State, Western Bahr El Ghazal State, the
whole of Equatoria States, Jongolei State, and Unity State.
Some of the pictures presented here are graphic. However, these are everyday sights that
many children and the public are exposed to.

REAL ATROCITIES HAPPENING IN SOUTH SUDAN

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Some Examples
Brutal killings and slaughtering in Yei town

Children, pregnant women, mothers, and unarmed men are not spared
the gruesome killings

The little boy hacked to death happened in Wau town by troops loyal to the government in
2016 and other ones occur in CES same year.

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SOME OF THE KILLINGS AND ASSAULTS ARE COMMITTED


WITHOUT REGARD TO HUMAN DIGNITY

This is an Example of a Raped and burned alive


man by the government forces in South Sudan

Man from Central Equatoria was literally


skinned alive by the South Sudan tribal army

Dead BBodies and Dead Children litter streets in South Sudan.


They Receive No Decent Burials nor Attention from Authorities

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WHERE IS THE COUNTRY HEADED?

Towns and Villages Are Extensively Destroyed and Mostly Empty


Because Terrified Residents Fled the Area. Agriculture is mostly
Suspended Due to Fear of Being Killed in Fields

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CURRENT EVENTS ARE WELL PLANNED


CONTINUATION OF 2013 MASSACRE KILLINGS OF
NUER IN SOUTH SUDAN

The Nuers massacred in Juba on 16-17, 12/2013;


hundred of innocent Nuers in Gudella, 107 area,
New side area, Jebel and Loklogo areas

mass killings of Nuer by government armies in


states and villages populated by nuer.

PLEA FOR HELP TO STOP ATROCITIES IN SOUTH


SUDAN
Bring to book SS leaders to account for atrocities committed against innocent civilians
Convene Conference that will bring all oppositions together to forge a new direction
for South Sudan
AU/IGAD to stick to implementation of ARCISS by the help of USA
USA to assist transforming South Sudan into a democratic, accountable and responsive
Government

Dig out the root cause of conflict in South Sudan before Reconciliation.
Assist Refugees and IDPs. Help repatriate funds of SS from Foreign Banks and freeze
assets.

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CONCLUSION

Salva Kirr, the current President had stated that if people dont want his leadership, he
will destroy the country to roubles and whoever will rule the country after him, would
have to rebuild the country from scratch. A press conference.
If legitimacy has moral obligations and responsibility, then there is no legitimate
government now in SS.

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Appendix C: CASS 2nd Annual Conference Program

2nd Annual Conference


Unity and Partnership:
Supporting a Just and
Sustainable Peace in South Sudan

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September 25-26, 2016


Georgetown Law, Washington, DC
Welcome to the 2nd Annual CASS Conference!
The purpose of the conference is to work towards the vision of a peaceful and prosperous South
Sudan that was articulated at the 1st Annual CASS Conference by continuing to build unity
among the Diaspora and by training the Diaspora to advocate effectively in order to strengthen
the partnership between South Sudan and the United States.
1st Annual CASS Conference Vision for South Sudan
South Sudan is a reconciled, unified and stable country, proud of its diversity as represented by
its 64 tribes and enjoying equality, peace and harmony.
The government of South Sudan is a democratic federal government whose powers are vested by
a permanent citizen-informed constitution and who leaders are qualified and committed to
serving the people of South Sudan and whose systems are efficient, transparent and free of
corruption.
The people of South Sudan are educated and healthy and they enjoy all freedoms, protection
through justice, accountability and the rule of law, and prosperity through the effective
management of the countrys resources and the empowerment of its people to realize their
unlimited potential. South Sudan is an example for the continent and it is respected by the
nations.
Conference Guidelines

We are practicing Humanity Before Politics:


o Listen
o Seek to understand
o Avoid judging
o Avoid blaming
o Take a time out if you need it
Speak only for yourself about beliefs, feelings, and responses. Refrain from generalizations
and dare to be vulnerable.
Respect and receive what others offer, even if you disagree.
Listening is more important than talking. Avoid cross-talk, interrupting, speaking for others,
or trying to fix another persons concerns.
Please do not take pictures or videos of others without their permission.
Social Media

Hashtags for the conference are #CASS and #SouthSudan.


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Program
Sunday, September 25, 2016
8:30am

Registration

9:00am

Opening Remarks and Introductions:


Kwaje Lasu, CASS Board Chair
Keni Ukabiala, Human Rights Action Amnesty International,
Georgetown Law

10:30am

Advocacy Training - The Basics: Mike Brand, JWW

11:00am

BREAK

11:15am

Panel 1: Protection, Justice and Accountability


Brian Adeba, Associate Director of Policy, Enough Project
Gabriel Swiney, Attorney Adviser, Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S.
Department of State
Dr. Jacqueline Wilson, Principal, Civic Fusion International

12:15pm

LUNCH

--------------------1:15pm

Panel 2: Humanitarian Aid, Healing and Reconciliation


John Dau, Founder, John Dau Foundation
Hanna Andrew K. Dijok, Executive Director, Sisters Hope for South
Sudan
Bill Andress, Member, Trinity South Sudan Ministry
Steve Hilbert, Office on International Justice and Peace at the United
States Conference of Catholic Bishops
Richard Parkins, Executive Director, AFRECS

2:15pm

Advocacy Training: Practice Makes Perfect: Mike Brand, JWW

3:00pm

BREAK

--------------------Page 30 of 37

3:30pm

Panel 3: U.S. Policy on South Sudan


Dr. Luka Biong, Global Fellow at PRIO, Associate Professor, University
of Juba
Sarah Rial, Founder and Executive Director, Global Partnership for Peace
in South Sudan
David Abramowitz, Managing Director, Humanity United

4:30pm

Panel 4: How the U.S. Can Support South Sudan


H.E. Garang Diing Akuong, Ambassador Extraordinary and
Plenipotentiary, of the Republic of South Sudan to the USA
Amb. Reath M. Tang, SPLM-IO Representative to the U.S.
Pagan Amum, Co-Founder, South Sudan Reborn
Joseph B. Bakosoro, Former Governor, Western Equatoria
Amb. Emmanuel Aban, National Democratic Movement

6:30pm

BREAK

--------------------7:00pm

Advocacy Training: Finalize Advocacy Asks for Congressional Meetings

8:00pm

END

Monday, September 26, 2016


9:00am

Methodist Building
Ground Floor Conference Room
100 Maryland Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202-488-5600

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Biographies
Advocacy Training
Mike Brand, Director of Advocacy and Programs, Jewish World Watch. Mike is an atrocities
prevention and human rights professional with a decade of experience in policy, advocacy, organizing and
informal education. Throughout his career Mike has worked for various NGOs in the US, Rwanda and
South Sudan. He holds a Masters in International Peace and Conflict Resolution from American
University and BAs in History and Political Science from the University of Connecticut. Mike authored
Preventing Mass Atrocities: A Three Pronged Approach to Comprehensive Prevention which was
featured in the Journal of International Service, has been published in The Hill, and has engaged in
countless speaking engagements. Mike was a 2010 Jewish Service Corps fellow where he spent a year
living and working at the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village in Rwanda. He currently serves on the
Advisory Board for the Carl Wilkens Fellowship and was a 2011 Fellow.

Panel 1: Protection, Justice and Accountability


Brian Adeba, Associate Director of Policy, Enough Project. Brian Adeba is a journalist by
training and was previously an Associate of the Security Governance Group, a think-tank that focuses on
security sector reform in fragile countries. Over the last few years, his research interests have focused on
the inter-linkages of media, conflict, human rights and security. He supervised the coverage of the conflict
zones of Darfur, Southern Kordofan, Blue Nile and Eastern Sudan for the Boston-based Education
Development Centers Sudan Radio Service project in Nairobi, Kenya. Prior to this, he served as a project
and publications coordinator at the think-tank, The Centre for International Governance Innovation in
Waterloo, Canada. In the media, Brian edited Tech Media Reports (Now the Wire Report) in Ottawa,
Canada, where he focused on regulatory issues in the Canadian parliament. He holds a masters degree in
journalism from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.
Gabriel Swiney, Attorney Adviser, Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State. Gabriel
Swiney is an Attorney Adviser at the U.S. Department of State. As a member of the Office of the Legal
Adviser, Mr. Swiney is responsible for legal issues involving countries in East Africa, Sudan, and South
Sudan. In this capacity, Mr. Swiney advises senior U.S. Government policymakers on issues relating to
the South Sudan peace process and international responses to atrocities. Mr. Swiney also teaches at the
College of William & Mary and at the University of Richmond, and has published on a range of
international law topics. He holds law degrees from Harvard Law School and Oxford University.
Dr. Jacqueline Wilson, Title Principal, Organization Civic Fusion International. Jacqueline Wilson
is an international peacebuilding practitioner and scholar who has worked in over 25 countries around the
world for over 3 decades including 11 years with the U.S. Institute of Peace. She has specialized in
understanding local peace efforts and at supporting initiatives by local stakeholders to maintain peace in
their communities. She has studied traditions and customs related to peacebuilding and has published on
the customary mechanism of compensation known as diya or blood money, on transitional justice, and on
local peace processes. She is currently drafting a book chapter on Legitimacy to be published by Rutledge
in 2017. She received her doctorate from Georgetown University in 2014. She is also a retired U.S. Air
Force Lieutenant Colonel.
Page 32 of 37

Panel 2: Humanitarian Aid, Healing and Reconciliation


John Dau, Founder, John Dau Foundation. John Dau, is one of the Lost Boys of Sudan who was
featured in the 2006 award-winning documentary God Grew Tired of Us. Today, he is a father himself
and a human rights activist for the people of South Sudan. In 2007, he founded the John Dau
Foundation which aims to transform healthcare in South Sudan. (Source: Wikipedia)
Hanna Andrew K. Dijok, Executive Director, Sisters Hope for South Sudan. Hanna Andrew Kong
Dijok, lived in France for 19 years and graduated from the University of Nantes (France) with a diploma
in languages, French culture and civilization. She worked for the French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc
Ayrault and she worked in the South Sudan Embassy in Paris, France. She came to the U.S. in 2013 and
has been involved activities to empower women. She is the co-founder of the African Peace Meditation
and Reconciliation Institute and she is the Founder of Sisters Hope For South Sudan.
Bill Andress, Member, Trinity South Sudan Ministry. Bill holds a Bachelors Degree from United
States Naval Academy, a Masters Degree in Physics from Duke University and a Masters Degree in
Business Administration from Averett University. He has 30 years in the United States Navy and for 12
years he was the owner/operator of an American Express Franchise. For 16 years he has dedicated
himself to a just and lasting peace in Sudan and South Sudan. Bill is a Co-founder of CASS and serves as
its Corresponding Secretary. Bill has been married for 53 years and is the father of three adult children.
Steve Hilbert, Office on International Justice and Peace at the United States Conference of Catholic
Bishops. Steve holds a Bachelors Degree from Haverford College and a Masters Degree in International
Affairs from Columbia University. He served 3 years as Peace Corps Volunteer as an English Teacher
and Consultant in Gabon (1977-1980) and worked for 24 years with Catholic Relief Services
Mauritania, Rwanda, Morocco, The Gambia, Cameroon, India and Headquarters (1983-2007). Steve has
been with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops for 9 years. He has been married for 33 years and is
the father of three children.
Richard Parkins, Executive Director, AFRECS. Richard Parkins began his career as an academician
and then served as a civil rights specialist in the US Government. He subsequently accepted overseas
assignments with the Ford Foundation in India. the Asian Development Bank in Malaysia, and the UNDP
in Jamaica. From 1980 - 1986, Richard was Director of Operations for the newly created Office for
Refugee Resettlement in the Department of Health and Human Services. From 1986 forward, Richard
worked for several private refugee resettlement agencies: American Council for Nationalities Services
(now Immigration and Refugee Council of America) and subsequently as Director of Refugee Policy for
the US Conference of Catholic Bishops. From 1994 until 2008, Richard was Director of Episcopal
Migration Ministry - the resettlement and immigration services and advocacy arm of the Episcopal
Church. During that time, he served as Chair of the Refugee Council USA. Since retiring, Richard has
served as Executive Director of AFRECS (the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of the Sudans).
In that capacity, he has visited Sudan and South Sudan on several occasions.)

Page 33 of 37

Panel 3: U.S. Policy on South Sudan


Dr. Luka Biong, Global Fellow at PRIO, Associate Professor, University of Juba. Luka Biong Deng
Kuol (PhD) is a Global Fellow at Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) Associate Professor at College of
Social and Economic Studies, University of Juba, South Sudan, and a fellow at Rift Valley Institute. He
was a resident senior fellow at Carr Centre for Human Rights Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and
visiting fellow at Institute of Development Studies at University of Sussex, UK. He served as a Director
of Centre for Peace and Development Studies at University of Juba, a Minister in the Office of the
President of Southern Sudan and a National Minister of Cabinet Affairs of Sudan until he resigned in May
2011 after Government of Sudan invaded Abyei, his home area. He also worked as a senior economist for
the World Bank and a member of teaching staff of Faculty of Economics and Rural Development at
Gezira University, Sudan. He received his PhD from the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at
University of Sussex, UK and earned a Master of Arts in Economics and a Master of Business
Administration from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium and BSc from Faculty of Economics
and Social Studies at University of Khartoum, Sudan. He has published scholarly articles in a wide array
of international journals and contributed with many chapters in various books. He is a recognized expert
on the affairs of Sudan and South Sudan.
Sarah Rial, Founder and Executive Director, Global Partnership for Peace in South Sudan. Sarah
Cleto Rial, 2014 Rotary Peace Fellow, a women human rights and humanitarian advocate, and recipient
of the 2010 Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Human Rights, is a native of South Sudan, who headed an
unprecedented peacebuilding initiative, Sisterhood for Peace. She is the founder and president of Global
Partnership for Peace in South Sudan, a non-profit organization founded exclusively for civic,
educational, and development purposes, and in particular for the purpose of engaging the South Sudanese
communities across the globe to work collectively for dialogue, lasting peace, social justice, and gender
equality, as well as respect of human rights. Sarah is currently the Senior Executive Assistant to the CEO
and President of Management Sciences for Health and she has served as the program director of My
Sisters Keeper. Sarah holds a BSc. Degree in Statistics and Demography from Juba University, Sudan;
MA in Political Science Professional Development from American University in Cairo, Egypt; and a
Graduate Certificate on Women in Politics and Public Policy from University of Massachusetts, USA.
She was awarded Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Leadership, Community Service, and was
honored as one of the Unsung Heroines of Massachusetts in 2007.
David Abramowitz, Managing Director, Humanity United. David is Managing Director at Humanity
United, overseeing HUs Public Policy & Government Relations portfolio. Prior to joining HU, David
served as Chief Counsel to the House Foreign Affairs Committee, where he was responsible for advising
the committee on such matters as international law, international justice, and global human rights and
democracy issues, including trafficking in persons and promoting democracy assistance. He has worked
on legislation ranging from the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 and the Wilberforce
Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 to legislation implementing the U.S.-India
Nuclear Cooperation Agreement and the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission. Prior to joining the
committee staff in 1999, David worked at the Office of the Legal Adviser of the Department of State for
10 years on arms control, the Middle East, and legislation relating to foreign relations. David holds a
bachelors degree from Kalamazoo College and a juris doctor degree from the University of Michigan.

Page 34 of 37

Panel 4: How the U.S. Can Support South Sudan


H.E. Garang Diing Akuong, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, of the Republic of
South Sudan to the USA. Amb. Akuong presented his credentials to H.E. President Barack H. Obama
on February 23, 2015. Amb. Akuong has a Masters of Art in International Studies and Diplomacy from
the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and he has a Bachelor of Arts from
Faculty of Arts in Alexandria University, Egypt. He served as a Member of the National Legislative
Assembly (2010 up to date), and as the National Minister of Commerce, Industry and Investment (201113) and the National Minister of Mining (2010-11). Amb. Akuong also served as a Member of the NorthSouth (of Sudan) Boundary Demarcation Committee (2006-07) and he worked for the United Nations
World Food Program and Catholic Relief Services. (Abbreviated bio.)
Amb. Reath M. Tang, SPLM-IO Representative to the U.S. Amb. Tang completed his undergraduate
work in Electrical Engineering at Juba University. He became a Member of the National Legislative
Assembly in the Republic of South Sudan after independence in 2011. In the Parliament Hon Reath
became a Chairperson of the Sub-committee for Energy and Mining at the National Legislative
Assembly. He served as the Chairperson of Upper Nile State SPLM Caucus in the National Legislative
Assembly and as the Chairperson of South Sudan Youth Forum for Referendum Upper Nile State in 2010
to 2011. He worked as the Deputy Director for distribution and sales from 2008 to 2011 at Southern
Sudan Electricity corporation before becoming a member of Parliament. He was the President of South
Sudan Student Association in the University of Juba (2006 to 2007).
Pagan Amum, Co-Founder, South Sudan Reborn. Pagan Amum Okiech is the co-founder of South
Sudan Reborn and is its primary spokesperson. In 1982, he left law school and a promising academic
career in Khartoum to join the Sudan Peoples Liberation Movement (SPLM). He was part of Dr.
Garangs team that negotiated the comprehensive 2005 peace agreement (CPA). After the South Sudan
referendum, Pagan continued his service as Secretary General of the SPLM, the countrys chief
negotiator on the outstanding post referendum issues with Sudan, and Minister for Peace and CPA
implementation. Pagan remains strongly committed to the creation and growth of a powerful, pluralistic
democracy in South Sudan, as visualized by Dr. Garang. Pagan is forced to live in exile now, but he is
committed to one day to return home. (Source: South Sudan Reborn website.)
Joseph B. Bakosoro, Former Governor, Western Equatoria. Hon. Joseph Bakosoro has a Masters
Degree in Security and Strategic Studies Uganda and a Bachelor Degree in International Relation and
Diplomacy from Nkumba University, Entebbe, Uganda. Hon. Bakosoro served was elected Governor of
Western Equatoria State in 2010. Under his leadership, the UN honored the state with the title The
Green State because the state was stable in terms of security and food security. Every individual was
encouraged to cultivate, produce food for the family and surplus for the market. He initiated the Go-toSchool campaign and enrollment climbed from 25% in 2010 to 65% in 2015. Hon. Bakosoro served as
the SPLM Deputy Secretary from 2008 to 2010 and worked as a UNICEF Security Officer from 2007-08.
He also served as the County Commissioner in Tambura County Western Equatoria State South Sudan
from 2002-05. (Partial Bio)
Amb. Emmanuel Aban, National Democratic Movement. Amb. Aban is a former senior diplomat
with the South Sudan Permanent Mission to the United Nations. He is a former SPLM Member of the
Page 35 of 37

Sudan Constitution Review Commission that drafted Sudan's Interim Constitution after the signing of
CPA.

Moderators
Ayen Bior is a reporter for South Sudan in Focus, a radio program that reaches over 11 million listeners
each week. She studied journalism and human rights at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, TX,
where she grew up. Ayen lives and works in Washington D.C. where she covers the South Sudanese
diaspora, think tanks and congressional politics as they apply to South Sudan.
John Tanza, Media Expert. John Tanza is a South Sudanese media expert who has been covering the
conflict in Sudan and South Sudan since 2003. He has a lot of experience and knowledge of the drivers
of conflict in Sudan and South Sudan. Tanza was heavily involved in media development projects for
Sudan (Darfur) and South Sudan. He managed USAID first media project for Sudan implemented by
Education Development Center in Nairobi. Tanzas interests are in media development in conflict areas.
He currently works a contractor with the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), a federal agency
overseeing U.S international broadcast.

Masters of Ceremonies
Kwaje Lasu, MPH. RCP. Kwaje serves as the CASS Board of Directors Chair and the President of the
Equatoria South Sudanese Community Association-USA (ESSCA-USA). He is a Public Health
Epidemiologist with a clinical background as Pediatric and Neonatal Respiratory Care Specialist.
Dr. Isaac Gang is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Mary
Hardin-Baylors College of Humanity & Sciences (UMHB), department of Computer Science &
Engineering (CSE). He joined the UMHB CSE faculty in the fall of 2011 from the University of Southern
Mississippi (USM) where he taught as an Adjunct Professor of computer science at the USMs School of
Computing. Dr. Gang earned an Associate of Arts (AA) degree in computer science from Hinds
Community College in 2000, Bachelor of Art (BA) degree in history from the University of Southern
Mississippi in 2004, a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in computer science from the University of
Southern Mississippi in 2004, Master of Science degree in computer science from the University of
Southern Mississippi in 2008, and Doctor of Philosophy in computational science from the University of
Southern Mississippi in 2010. Dr. Gang is the founding member of the Coalition of Advocates for South
Sudan (CASS), Jonglei Peace Initiative North America (JPINA), and the Alliance for South Sudanese in
Diaspora (ASSD). Dr. Gang is also a former Secretary General of Leadership Institute of New Sudan
(LIONS).

Conference Co-Chairs
Kwaje Lasu, MPH. RCP. Kwaje serves as the CASS Board of Directors Chair and the President of the
Equatoria South Sudanese Community Association-USA (ESSCA-USA). He is a Public Health
Epidemiologist with a clinical background as Pediatric and Neonatal Respiratory Care Specialist.

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Esther Sprague has been a Sudan activist since 2003 after meeting one of the Lost Boys of Sudan. She
is the Founder and Director of Sudan Unlimited, which seeks to support Sudanese and Southern Sudanese
in their efforts to secure and enjoy freedom, justice, equality, democracy, peace and prosperity; she is a
co-founder of Act for Sudan, an alliance of American citizen activists and Sudanese U.S. residents who
advocate for an end to genocide and mass atrocities in Sudan; and she is a co-founder of South Sudan
Women United, a movement dedicated to ending violence, supporting healing and reconciliation, and
building peace in South Sudan.

Special Thanks
The 2nd Annual CASS Conference would not be possible without the generous support of the
following individuals and organizations. We extend to them our most sincere thanks!

Basil Saen
Church of the Pilgrim
Conference Speakers
Eugene and Chi Soo Kim
George O'Connor
Georgetown University Law Center (GULC)
Human Rights Action - Amnesty International (HRA-AI) at GULC
Jewish World Watch
Marilyn Griep
South Sudan Women United: Nyakan Gile, Rachel Mogga, and Mary Mogga
Sudan Evangelical Alliance Partners
Sudan Sunrise
You thank you for joining us!

For more information about CASS, please contact:


Kwaje Lasu
Board Chair, CASS
kwaje@me.com

Bill Andress
Corresponding Secretary, CASS
BillAndress@ureach.com
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