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Contents
Introduction
What does Chess Vision consist of?
Useful Techniques
Our Approach
Terminology
The Games
Game 1: Anderssen v Kieseritsky The Immortal Game, 1851
Game 2: Anderssen v Dufresne The Evergreen Game, 1852
Game 3: Mayet v Anderssen, 1859
Game 4: Anderssen v Staunton, 1851
Game 5: Morphy v Duke Karl / Count Isouard, The Opera House Game, 1858
Game 6: Meek v Morphy, 1855
Game 7: Bird v Morphy, 1858
Game 8: Morphy v Anderssen, 1858
Game 9: Paulsen v Morphy, 1857
Game 10: Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883
Game 11: Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889 "The Double Bishop Sacrifice"
Game 12: Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892
Game 13: Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895
Game 14: Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895
Game 15: Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899
Game 16: Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907
Game 17: Capablanca v Marshall, 1918
Game 18: Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921
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Game 19: Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922


Game 20: Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923

Introduction

The purpose of this book is to develop the readers ability to see ahead in chess
games. This is a very important skill that is used to analyse the consequences of this or
that move and so help us find the strongest move that we can.
Beginner-level players o en ask how far ahead Grandmasters can see and are met by
varying answers. Alekhine was known for his long, complicated varia ons the result of
which he claimed to know when he made his original move. Capablanca famously
quipped, I see only one move ahead, but it is always the correct one. Garry Kasparov
says that he once saw a varia on that went on for 14 or 15 moves and that this was
probably the longest series he analysed.
Whilst it is considered to be generally true that the ability to see ahead increases
with chess strength, much of this is down to the individual player, their style and
par cular strengths analy cal players with strong memory being at an advantage.
However, many Grandmasters are able to play games blindfold, that is, without being
able to see the posi on on the board. There have been many instances where top chess
players have played mul ple games simultaneously, keeping all of the posi ons in their
head, upda ng each when they hear their opponents move and following their usual
processes for finding their reply.
If some Grandmasters can play whole games in their head, why do they only look
ahead a few moves as they play? The reasons are largely prac cal. It is only necessary for
the player to consider a few lines (varia ons, or sequences of moves) and evaluate the
posi on a few moves deep along these lines. The number of possible replies at every
stage makes this process lengthy enough and the constraints of me and mental energy
mean it is best not to go deeper than is necessary.
The important point, however, is that these players could see further ahead if the
posi on required it. The skill of looking ahead in chess, whilst dierent from the skills of
nding the best move and evalua ng a posi on, is one that should be developed. This
happens naturally as we play more games and become stronger at chess think of
beginner players who fall for the bait of winning a Queen with their Rook only to nd
that the Rook move left them open to a back-rank mate - but can be trained also.
Strengthening our ability to see the chessboard and think ahead will help us avoid
tactical mistakes.

What does Chess Vision consist of?

The ability to see the board exists in all players to some degree. To prove this point,
think of the beginning posi on, before Whites rst move. You could recreate this
position on a board with ease, we do it before every game.
What square is Whites Queen on? Blacks King? What colour is the bo om-right
square, h1?
This is an example of chess vision. We know the pa ern, we have it imprinted on our
minds. Maybe when we rst learned the game, we were taught dierent rules to help us
remember the position:
White on the right for the correct board orienta on (h1 being a White
square).

Rooks in the corners, Knights next to the Rooks and Bishops next to the
Knights

The Queen and King next to each other, with the Queen on her own colour

A pawn on the square in front of every piece

A er seeing this posi on a number of mes, we do not have to consciously think


about how to set it up, we know and just do it. Through pa ern recogni on and
repe on the posi on has become knowledge and the process of recrea ng it is
automatic. This can be compared to the skills of walking or riding a bike. We are not born
with the skill but develop it until it becomes automatic.
The same occurs with our chess vision. I imagine that the reader can see the positions
a er the moves 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 or 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6. They occur so frequently
that we know the pattern.
Largely, that is how we develop our ability to see ahead in chess. Through repe on, we
begin to remember and recognise more chess pa erns and are able to think about them
clearly without having to refer to them on a physical chessboard. To help us bridge the
gap between our current level of pa ern memory and the next level, we can help
ourselves by thinking of the posi on a piece at a me and making mental notes about
it.

Useful Techniques
Square Colours
Knowing the square colours is also useful for keeping track of lines (of a ack) and
possible threats on the board. We might nd it easy to remember that the Bishop on b7
is our light-squared Bishop but can it move to d2 in an endgame? To work out the colour
of a square, consider the co-ordinates. Take the le ers of the les and think of their
place in the alphabet, so a=1, b=2, c=3 and so on. Now consider the rank number of the
square whose colour we are nding. If the two numbers are both odd or both even, then
the colour is black. If one is odd and the other even, then the colour is white.
And if you forget this rule, check it against the h1 square. H (8) is even, 1 is odd,
dierent and we know the square is white so the rule is dierent = white squares. This
should be easy to know as h1 is usually the square that is checked to make sure that the
chessboard is the correct way around we set it up with white on the right.
Another way of thinking about this is by adding up the rank and le co-ordinates. If
you get an even number then the square is black, if you get an odd number then it is
white H(8) + 1 = 9 so h1 is a white square.

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Mental Notes
When calcula ng and considering moves, we need to keep in mind not just the
loca on of each piece in terms of squares but also which moves are legal. To aid us in
this, we can make mental notes and amend them as necessary. An example of this is
when a piece is pinned against a King we can remind ourselves that this piece cannot
be moved by mentally telling ourselves Re1 and the Bishop is pinned against the King.
Then, when the situa on changes we update the mental note, for instance, Rook takes
the Knight on d1 and the Bishop is no longer pinned.

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Pins and piece placement weaknesses


A par cularly useful mental note to make is on pins, threats and weaknesses. Note
that the pieces can be weak along the lines they cannot a ack. For instance, Rooks can
return re if they are a acked by a Queen or another Rook along a rank or le (unless
pinned) but are suscep ble to a acks along diagonals. Bishops and Knights are weak
when attacked along a rank or file and a Queen has to watch out for Knight forks.
So, in an endgame where White has a Bishop and Knight and Black a Rook, White will
have to be wary of posi ons where his Knight and Bishop (and King) are situated along
the same rank or le and Black would have to watch out for his Rook and King being
caught by a Knight fork or Bishop pin/skewer.
It is an oddity of Chess that when a weaker piece a acks a stronger piece, if it cannot
be captured, then it is the stronger piece that must give way. Remember these points
when considering where to place your pieces.

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The 5 4x4s
To help our memory of the board, we can consider it in chunks by making the 8x8
board a collec on of 5 4x4 boards. We have the square housing the diagonal a1-d4,
Whites Queenside; e1-h4, Whites Kingside; a5-d8, Blacks Queenside and e5-h8, Blacks
Kingside. Then we have another important 4x4 square, the centre, from c3-f6.

During the course of a game, the ac on may take to one of these squares and so we
can focus greater a en on upon them. Of course, we s ll have to consider the board as
a whole and be aware of long-distance attacks on squares from other areas.
However, the smaller squares can make our task of nding moves and remembering
piece placement simpler. We refer to these as:

White Queenside 4x4


White Kingside 4x4
Black Queenside 4x4
Black Kingside 4x4
The Centre 4x4

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Our Approach

Our approach in this book is to play through a collec on of famous chess games a
few moves at a me. The next few pages have games where we discuss the posi ons and
the moves together, prac sing some of the thought processes. A er this, you will play
through the games in your head and be responsible for your own way of thinking about
the moves and the positions.
There will be ques ons at each step about the resul ng posi on. These will help you
test your success at visualising the board and remembering the posi on. There are
usually 3 ques ons, a to c. These can be answered all at once of you can play through a
game answering just the a ques ons, then replay the game later answering the b
questions and so on as the b and c questions are designed to be more of a challenge.
As we go through the game collec ons, the main idea is to know the posi on, see it,
and be able to accurately think about what legal moves could be made, what the threats
are for either side etc. This will help hugely in your own games, with analysing ahead
over the board. The bonus of this method is that you will be adding some of the greatest
games ever played to your memory and absorbing pa erns, piece placements and tac cs
as you do so!

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Terminology

Material Balance: What is the dierence in material value for the two sides using the
traditional values below?

King
Queen
Rook
Bishop
Knight
Pawn

Not counted
9
5
3
3
1

So, in this position, White has

Queen and 2 Rooks


3 minor pieces
6 pawns

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9
6

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9
7

And Black has

Queen and 2 Rooks


3 minor pieces
7 pawns

Black has 1 pawn advantage so we describe the material as -1. If White was a Knight
up, we would describe the material balance as +3.

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Piece and posi on: Pieces on the board are some mes referred to by the square they
inhabit (the Nf3), some mes by the side of the board they are on (Queens Knight)
and other times by the diagonal/rank/file they inhabit (dark-squared Bishop).
Diagonal: any of the diagonal lines that a Bishop can travel along. For instance, the
a1-h8 diagonal or the a2-g8 diagonal.
Empty squares: any square without a piece or pawn occupying it.
En passant (ep.): the special pawn capture that is allowed when the opponent
moves his pawn 2 squares and is captured as though it had only moved one square.
En prise: A piece is said to en prise if it can be taken.
The Exchange: this refers to one side having a Rook in exchange for either a Knight
or a Bishop. The side with the Rook is said to be up the exchange and the opponent is
said to be the exchange down. A material difference of 2.
Eye: we talk about a piece eyeing a square. This means that the piece is in line
with a square according to its movement. It includes squares that are not currently
threatened because, for instance, there is a piece in the way. In the following picture, the
Bishop on d4 eyes the squares marked with an X including those with pieces of either
colour on.

File: the vertical lines of the board from a-h. The a-file runs from a1-a8.
Legally: is the move allowed by the Laws of Chess? In this book, we ask if the move
is legal in situations where it might place the King in check (and, therefore, is not legal).
Major piece: A Rook or a Queen
Minor piece: A Bishop or a Knight
Open le: a le without pawns on it, is said to be open. Some mes used when the
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only pawn is the opponents as the openness refers to a major pieces ability to a ack
along it (a pawn of the same colour as the Queen/Rook would restrict its mobility along
the file).
Rank: the horizontal lines of the board from 1 to 8. The White pieces occupy the 1st
rank at the beginning of the game.
Safely: we use this term meaning can a move be played without allowing the loss of
material or checkmate.
X-ray: an a ack (or defence) by a piece that looks through another piece. In the
position below, the Bf3 attacks the b7 pawn through the Bd5 allowing Nxb7!

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Game 1: Anderssen v Kieseritsky The Immortal Game, 1851

Perhaps the most famous game ever played, this was an informal game played
between rounds of a compe ve tournament (London 1851). Adolf Anderssen, who won
the tournament bea ng Kieseritsky and Howard Staunton on the way, was considered
the strongest player in the world at the me and was well known for his aggressive,
sacricial play. This game certainly displays that style with White giving up a huge
amount of material to checkmate his opponent. The tle of The Immortal Game was
coined by Ernst Falkbeer 4 years later.
1. e4 e5
Starting position. E pawns on e4 and e5.
2. f4 exf4
Blacks e-pawn is now on f4, White has no f-pawn.
3. Bc4 Qh4+
Whites Bishop is on c4 attacking f7. Blacks Queen is on h4, White is in check.

Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 3Qh4+


4. Kf1 b5
The King moves to the Bishops square and can no longer castle. Black a acks the c4
Bishop with an undefended b-pawn.
5. Bxb5 Nf6
Bishop is on b5, material is level, Black now has no pawn on b7 and the d7 pawn is
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pinned. Blacks Knight is on f6 attacking Whites e4 pawn.


6. Nf3 Qh6
Whites Knight is on f3 attacking the Queen. The Queen retreats down the file to h6.

Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 6Qh6


7. d3 Nh5
The d-pawn protects the e4 pawn and opens the line for the dark-squared Bishop. F4
pawn is now a acked but s ll defended by the Queen. Black moves the Knight to h5, the
f4 pawn is defended twice and the Queen can move along rank 6. The Knight on h5 can
check on g3.
8. Nh4 Qg5
White moves his Knight to the square in front of Blacks Knight. Note: if Black moves
his Nh5 then his Qh6 would be a acking the Knight. Black moves his Queen to g5, it now
a acks 2 undefended pieces, Whites Bb5 and the Nh4. The Black f4 pawn is pinned to
the Qg5.
9. Nf5 c6
White puts his Knight on f5 where it Is protected by the e4 pawn. This blocks the
Black Queen from a acking the Bb5 and a acks g7. There are now 4 pieces on the 5th
rank: the Bb5, Nf5, Qg5 and Nh5. C-pawn moves 1 square, the Bb5 is under a ack and
the d7 pawn is no longer pinned. The Nf5 could move to d6 with check if the Bf8 moved
away.

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Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 9c6


10. g4 Nf6
The g-pawn moves 2 squares, a acking the Nh4. It is protected by Qd1 and cannot be
taken en passant as the f4 is pinned. The Bb5 is s ll threatened by c6. Blacks Knight is
now on f6 and the g4 pawn is attacked twice, defended once.
11. Rg1 cxb5
The Rook moves 1 square to g1, protec ng the g4 pawn along with the Queen. Black
now has a pawn on b5, none on the c- or e-files, one on f4. White is a piece down.
12. h4 Qg6
White has pawns on e4, g4 and h4. Blacks Queen is under a ack. The h4 pawn is
protected by Nf5. The Queen moves to g6, the only square not under attack.

Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 12Qg6


13. h5 Qg5
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The h-pawn is now on h5 a acking the Queen. The h5 pawn is protected by the gpawn. The Queen only has one square to move to. The Queen moves back to g5, it now
has no safe squares.
14. Qf3 Ng8
The Queen moves to f3 and the f4 pawn is now a acked twice, defended once.
Blacks Nf6 goes back to its original square. Blacks Queen can now move to f6 or d8
safely.
15. Bxf4 Qf6
White takes the f-pawn and a acks the Black Queen and the d6 square. There are no
Black pieces on Whites side of the board. Blacks Queen is on f6 with the White Nf5 and
Bf4 separa ng it from his Qf3 which is undefended. The Qf6 a acks b2. Posi on check:
Whites Queenside 4x4 as star ng posi on with d-pawn on d3, Bishop on f4 and Queen
on f3. Whites Kingside 4x4 e1 empty, King on f1, Rook on g1, h1 empty, e2-h3 empty
apart from Qf3, pawns on e4 and g4, Bishop on f4. Blacks Queenside 4x4 as star ng
posi on with Queen on f6, b-pawn on b5, no c-pawn. Blacks Kingside 4x4 as star ng
posi on with no e-pawn, Queen on f6, White Knight on f5 and pawn on h5. Centre 4x4
White has pawns on d3 and e4, Qf3 Bf4 and Nf5, Black has Qf6.

Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 15Qf6


16. Nc3 Bc5
The Nb1 moves to c3, obstruc ng b2, a acking the b5 pawn and eyeing the empty d5
square. Blacks Bf8 moves to c5 attacking the g1 Rook. G7 is defended only by the Qf6.
17. Nd5 Qxb2
White has 2 Knights in the centre 4x4 on d5 and f5, Blacks Queen is a acked, the b2
pawn is now a acked again. The Queen takes the b2 pawn, the a1 Rook is under threat
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of capture with check and the g1 Rook is s ll a acked by Bc5. The Queen s ll protects g7,
only a1 and b2 are safe squares for the Queen to protect it from.
18. Bd6 Bxg1
The Bf4 moves to d6 where it a acks and is under a ack by Blacks Bc5. It is
protected by the Nf5. Blacks King now only has 1 square (d8) to move to. The Bishop
takes the Rook on g1, the a1 Rook is still attacked.

Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 18Bxg1


19. e5 Qxa1+
Whites e-pawn is now on e5, protected by the Bd6. The e5 pawn blocks the long
diagonal from the Black Qb2. If the Nd5 moves then Whites Qf3 would threaten the a8
Rook. Blacks Qb2 takes the a1 Rook with check.
20. Ke2 Na6
The King moves to the square in front of his star ng posi on and cannot be checked
next move. Black moves his Nb8 to a6, protecting the c7 square.
21. Nxg7+ Kd8
Whites Nf5 is on g7, Black has no g-pawn. Black has one legal move and moves Ke8
to d8. Black now has no squares for his King to move to as his Bc8 and d7 pawn block
those squares, c7 and e7 are attacked by the Bd6 and Nd5 and e8 is attacked by the Ng7.

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Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 21Kd8


22. Qf6+ Nxf6
The Queen is on f6 giving check to d8. There are 2 legal moves. Black takes the Queen
on f6 with his Ng8.
23. Be7#

Anderssen Kieseritsky, 1851 Final Position

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Game 2: Anderssen v Dufresne The Evergreen Game, 1852

Played just one year a er The Immortal Game, Anderssens opponent here was a
strong chess master and student of Anderssen. This was also an informal game. It was
Wilhelm Steinitz who described the game as the evergreen in Anderssens laurel
wreath. The fantas c combina on that concludes the game was described by
Tartakower as second to none in the literature of the game.
1.e4 e5
Starting position. E pawns on e4 and e5.
2.Nf3 Nc6
Blacks e5 pawn is now attacked by Whites Nf3 and defended by Blacks Nc6.
3.Bc4 Bc5

Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 3Bc5


White has an undefended Bishop on c4 a acking f7 and the way is clear for castling
kingside. Black places his Kings Bishop on the same le, making 3 minor pieces in a row
from c4-c6.
4.b4 Bxb4
White gambits a pawn, material now -1 and Blacks Bishop one square to the le of
Whites.
5.c3 Ba5
c3 pawn a acks Blacks Bishop which moves to the edge of the board, defended by
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the Nc6.
6.d4 exd4
D-pawn advances 2 squares a acking the e5 pawn, the c3 pawn is now pinned
against the King by Ba5. Black captures the d4 pawn, material -2. White is a acking this
d4 pawn with Nf3 and Qd1, Black defends it once with Nc6. The d4 pawn a acks the c3
pawn, as does the Ba5, it is defended by the Nb1.

Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 6exd4


7.00 d3
White castles kingside and the c3 pawn is no longer pinned. The d4 pawn is now on
d3 and can be taken by the Bc4 or Qd1.
8.Qb3 Qf6
The Queen moves to b3 forming a ba ery with the Bc4 and threatening to take on f7.
Qf6 defends f7 and eyes the a1 Rook if the c3 pawn was to move.
9.e5 Qg6
The e4 pawn moves to e5, attacking the Qf6. It is attacked twice, defended once.

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Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 9Qg6


10.Re1 Nge7
Whites Kingside Rook moves to e1, defending the e5 pawn a second me and giving
the White King an extra square to move to (f1). The e5 pawn is the only piece stopping
the Re1 from checking the Black Ke8. Black moves his Kingside Knight to e7, providing
cover for his King and further defending the Nc6. Black has cleared the way to castle
Kingside.
11.Ba3 b5
White develops his Bishop to the a3-f8 diagonal, a acking the Ne7. Black places the
b7 pawn on b5, a acking the Bc4. The pawn is undefended and can be captured by
either the Bc4 or Qb3.
12.Qxb5 Rb8
White captures the b5 pawn with his Queen. Material is now -1 and the d3 pawn is
a acked twice (by Qb5 and Bc4) and defended once (by Qg6). Black moves his Queenside
Rook to b8 attacking the Qb5 and occupying the open file.

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Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 12Rb8


13.Qa4 Bb6
The Queen goes to a4 and is no longer attacked. Black moves the Bishop to b6, eyeing
f2 and reducing the threat of his Rb8.
14.Nbd2 Bb7
White develops his Queenside Knight in front of the passed pawn on d3, blockading
it. This Knight now protects, and is protected by, the Nf3. Black develops his lightsquared Bishop to b7 so the Rb8, Bb7 and Bb6 are all next to each other on the b-file.
15.Ne4 Qf5
White moves his Nd2 to e4 where it is protected by the Re1 and threatens poten al
checks on d6 and f6. It also interferes with the Qg6s protec on of the d3 pawn, which is
now undefended. Black moves Qg6 to f5 attacking the e5 pawn for the second time.

Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 15Qf5


16.Bxd3 Qh5
White captures the d3 pawn, material is now level and the Bishop is threatening a
discovered a ack on the Qf5 by moving the Ne4. Black moves the Queen to h5 where it is
unguarded.
17.Nf6+ gxf6
White sacrices the Ne4 and Black captures it with the g7 pawn. Material is now -3,
the g-file is open for Black and there are doubled pawns on f7 and f6.
18.exf6 Rg8
White captures the pawn on f6. Material is now -2 and the e-le is open with the Re1
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pinning the Ne7 to the King. The f6 pawn is threatening the Ne7, which cannot legally
move. Black occupies the g-le with his Rook and can no longer castle as both Rooks
have moved. The g2 pawn is now pinned to the White King.

Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 18Rg8


19.Rad1 Qxf3
White brings his Queenside Rook to d1, eyeing d7. Black captures the Knight on f3
and threatens mate with Qxg2# as well as a acking the undefended Bd3. Material is now
-5.
20.Rxe7+ Nxe7
White captures the pinned Ne7 with his Re1. Material is now -7. Black has 3 legal
moves, a King move to either side or recapture with the Nc6. Black recaptures with the
Knight, this opens the diagonal a8-h1. The g2 pawn is now a acked 3 mes (by Bb7, Qf3
and Rg8) and defended once (by Kg1). The move g2-g3 by White would allow Qh1#.
21.Qxd7+ Kxd7
White sacrices his Queen for the d7 pawn. Material is now -15 and the Rd1 is
undefended and a acked by the Qf3. Black has 2 legal moves, to capture the Queen or
play Kf8. Black captures the Queen and his King is now on d7 with 6 empty squares
around it. The Black King is in line with the Rd1.

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Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, 21Kxd7


22.Bf5+ Ke8
White gives double-check and the King must move. Both checking pieces are en prise.
There are 2 legal moves for Black, Kc6 or Ke8. Black moves Ke8 from where he has only 1
escape square (f8).
23.Bd7+ Kf8
White checks on d7 giving Black 2 squares to move to. Black moves Kf8 and has no
escape squares as g7 is attacked by the f6 pawn.
24.Bxe7#
The dark-squared Bishop captures the Knight, moving alongside the Bd7 and giving
checkmate.

Anderssen Dufresne, 1852, Final Position

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Game 3: Mayet v Anderssen, 1859

Anderssens next vic m was a barrister and judge, one of the so-called Berlin
Pleiades, the seven stars of chess. He played a number of matches, losing the vast
majority of them but was able to win some individual games including 6 against
Anderssen in their 1855 match. The match this game is taken from saw Anderssen win 7
to his opponents 1, this being the most crushing.

1.e4 e5
2.Nf3 Nc6
3.Bb5 Bc5

3.1a: How many pieces/pawns are there in the Centre 4x4?


3.1b: Can White legally castle on the next move?
3.1c: How many times does Black attack the d4 square?

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Mayet v Anderssen, 1859, 3Bc5

3.1a: 5
3.1b: Yes
3.1c: 3 times

4.c3 Nf6
5.Bxc6 dxc6
6.O-O Bg4

3.2a: How many pieces/pawns are there in the Centre 4x4?


3.2b: Can Black legally castle on the next move?
3.2c: Which of Whites pieces is pinned?

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Mayet v Anderssen, 1859, 6Bg4

3.2a: 7
3.2b: Yes
3.2c: Nf3

7.h3 h5
8.hxg4 hxg4
9.Nxe5 g3
3.3a: How many of Whites pieces (excluding pawns) are on their original
squares?

3.3b: Can White legally play fxg3 on the next move?

3.3c: What is the material balance?

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Mayet v Anderssen, 1859, 9g3

3.3a: 4
3.3b: No
3.3c: +3

10.d4 Nxe4
11.Qg4 Bxd4
12.Qxe4 Bxf2+

3.4a: How many legal moves does White have?


3.4b: What is the material balance?
3.4c: Could Black legally castle Queenside on the next move?

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Mayet v Anderssen, 1859, 12Bf2+

3.4a: 1
3.4b: +3
3.4c: No

13.Rxf2 Qd1+
14.Rf1 Rh1+
15.Kxh1 Qxf1#

Mayet v Anderssen, 1859, Final Position

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40

Game 4: Anderssen v Staunton, 1851

A compe ve game from the London 1851 tournament, where Anderssen took on
Howard Staunton, who had been regarded as the strongest player in the world before
this compe on. Anderssen begins a Kingside onslaught rapidly, whilst Staunton uses his
me to grab material with his Queen. When Staunton realises his King is in real trouble,
its too late.

1. e4 c5
2. d4 cxd4
3. Nf3 e6

4.1a: With which pieces could White legally capture on d4 on the next move?
4.1b: Is Blacks d4 pawn protected?
4.1c: Could Black play Qa5 on the next move?

41

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 3e6

4.1a: Queen or Knight


4.1b: No
4.1c: Yes

4. Nxd4 Bc5
5. Nc3 a6
6. Be3 Ba7

4.2a: Can White castle on his next move?


4.2b: Which of Blacks pieces/pawns are undefended?
4.2c: Which 3 empty squares are protected by Blacks Queen and a minor
piece?

42

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 6Ba7

4.2a: No
4.2b: The 2 Rooks and the g7 pawn
4.2c: b6, e7 and f6

7. Bd3 Ne7
8. O-O O-O
9. Qh5 Ng6

4.3a: What pieces are on the 5th rank?


4.3b: Can White play Bxh7+ on his next move?
4.3c: Which of Whites pieces (excluding pawns) are undefended?

43

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 9Ng6

4.3a: Whites Queen


4.3b: No
4.3c: The Queen

10. e5 Qc7
11. Rae1 b5
12. f4 Bb7

4.3a: Can White legally play Ne4 on his next move?


4.3b: Can White legally play Nf5 on his next move?
4.3c: How many pieces (either colour, excluding pawns) are on their original
square?

44

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 12Bb7

4.3a: Yes
4.3b: Yes
4.3c: 2 Blacks Ra8 and Nb8

13. Ne4 Bxe4


14. Bxe4 Nc6
15. Nxc6 dxc6

4.4a: Can Black play Nb8-e7?


4.4b: How many squares can Whites Rooks move to?
4.4c: Which pieces/pawns are undefended?

45

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 15dxc6

4.4a: No, there is no Nb8


4.4b: 7; a1-d1, e2 and f2-f3
4.4c: Be4 and pawns on a2, a6, b2

16. g4 Rad8
17. Kh1 c5
18. Rf3 Qa5
4.5a: What is threatened by Blacks last move?
4.5b: How many pieces (excluding pawns and King) does Black have on the
Queenside?

4.5c: How many pieces (excluding pawns and King) does White have on the
Kingside?

46

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 18Qa5

4.5a: Qxe1+
4.5b: 3
4.5c: 5

19. Ref1 Qa4


20. Bd3 Qxa2
21. Rh3 h6

4.6a: Which pieces (excluding pawns, either colour) are undefended?


4.6b: How many pawns are there in Whites Queenside 4x4?
4.5c: If Black could move again, would Qd5+ followed by c4 trap the white
Bishop?

47

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 21h6

4.6a: Ba7 and Qa2


4.6b: 2 b2 and c2
4.6c: No White would have Be2 or Bxg6

22. g5 Rxd3
23. cxd3 Qd5+
24. Rff3 Ne7

4.7a: Would 24Qd1+ have been a legal move?


4.7b: How many times is the h6 pawn attacked & defended?
4.7c: Can White legally play Rfg3?

48

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 24Ne7

4.7a: No, the d3 pawn blocks the file


4.7b: Attacked 3 times & defended once
4.7c: No, the Rook is pinned

25. gxh6 g6
26. h7+ Kh8
27. Qg5 Nf5

4.8a: How many pieces/pawns (either colour) are in the centre 4x4?
4.8b: How many times is the f6 square defended by Black?
4.8c: What is the material balance?

49

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 27Nf5

4.8a: 9: 5 pawns, 4 pieces


4.8b: None
4.8c: +2

28. Qf6+ Ng7


29. f5 Qb3
30. Bh6 Qd1+

4.9a: Could Black have legally played 30Kxh7?


4.9b: How many legal moves does White have?
4.9c: If Black could remove 1 of his pieces/pawns from the board, which would
it be and why?

50

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, 30Qd1+

4.9a: Yes
4.9b: 2 Kg2 or Rf1
4.9c: The c5 pawn as it would allow a mate on the next move

31. Kg2 Qe2+


32. Rf2 1-0

Anderssen v Staunton, 1851, Final Position

51

52

Game 5: Morphy v Duke Karl / Count Isouard, The Opera


House Game, 1858

Paul Morphy, the American chess prodigy and genius, was invited to play against the
consul ng German Duke Karl of Brunswick and French Count Isouard at a Parisian Opera
House. Morphys rapid development soon es up the Black posi on and the owing
moves result in an a rac ve combina on. It is said that Morphy was sat with his back to
the stage and wished to win the game as quickly as possible so that he could enjoy the
Opera. He certainly deserved to after producing this beautiful and memorable game.

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 d6
3. d4 Bg4

5.1a: How many pawns are in the centre 4x4?


5.1b: Can White play 4. Bd3?
5.1c: Could Black play Qa5 on the next move?

53

Morphy v Duke & Count, 1858, 3Bg4

5.1a: 4 pawns
5.1b: Yes
5.1c: No, the c7 pawn blocks the move

4. dxe5 Bxf3
5. Qxf3 dxe5
6. Bc4 Nf6

5.2a: How many pieces have each side developed?


5.2b: Can White castle on the next move?
5.2c: Could Black castle if it was his move again?

54

Morphy v Duke & Count, 1858, 6Nf6

5.2a: 2 (Queen & Bishop) for White and 1 (Knight) for Black
5.2b: Yes, Kingside
5.2c: No

7. Qb3 Qe7
8. Nc3 c6
9. Bg5 b5

5.3a: How many pieces/pawns are there on the 6th rank?


5.3b: Could Black legally check Whites King if it was his move again?
5.3c: How many empty squares does Blacks Queen eye?

55

Morphy v Duke & Count, 1858, 9b5

5.3a: 2
5.3b: No
5.3c: 9 squares

10. Nxb5 cxb5


11. Bxb5+ Nbd7
12. O-O-O Rd8

5.4a: How many squares can Blacks King move to?


5.4b: How many times is Blacks Nd7 attacked and defended?
5.4c: How many ways does White have to check Blacks King?

56

Morphy v Duke & Count, 1858, 12Rd8

5.4a: None
5.4b: Attacked twice (Bb5 & Rd1), defended 4 times (Rd8, Ke8, Qe7, Nf6)
5.4c: 2 Bxd7+ and Qxf7+

13. Rxd7 Rxd7


14. Rd1 Qe6
15. Bxd7+ Nxd7
5.5a: How many pieces/pawns are in the centre 4x4?
5.5b: How many pieces (either colour, excluding Kings/pawns) are on their
original squares?

5.5c: Is Whites Bishop en prise?

57

Morphy v Duke & Count, 1858, 15Nxd7

5.5a: 3 Qe6 and e4/e5 pawns


5.5b: 2 Blacks Bf8 and Rh8
5.5c: No

16. Qb8+ Nxb8


17. Rd8#

Morphy v Duke & Count, Final Position

58

59

Game 6: Meek v Morphy, 1855

Meek by name but not by nature as White brings Morphys King out with a Bishop
sacrice early on. The ini a ve soon changes hands however and the game ends with
Blacks King back on his original square, and Whites King on f2, under heavy onslaught.
1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. d4 exd4

Meek v Morphy, 1855, 3exd4


4. Bc4 Bc5
5. Ng5 Nh6
6. Nxf7 Nxf7

6.1a: Could White have played 6. Bxh6?


6.1b: Could Black have played 6Kxf7?
6.1c: How many pieces/pawns are in the centre 4x4?

60

Meek v Morphy, 1855, 6Nxf7

6.1a: No, the Ng5 blocks the move


6.1b: No, the Bc5 protects the Nf7
6.1c: 5 Nc6, Bc5, Bc4 and the d4/e4 pawns

7. Bxf7+ Kxf7
8. Qh5+ g6
9. Qxc5 d6

6.2a: What is the material balance?


6.2b: How many checking moves does White have?
6.2c: Could Black legally play Bg7 if it was his move again?

61

Meek v Morphy, 1855, 9d6

6.2a: Material is level


6.2b: 3 Qc4+, Qd5+ and Qf5+
6.2c: No

10. Qb5 Re8


11. Qb3+ d5
12. f3 Na5
6.3a: How many squares can Whites Bc1 move to where it wouldnt be en
prise?

6.3b: Can White legally play 13. exd5?

6.3c: How many White pieces (not pawns) are en prise?

62

Meek v Morphy, 1855, 12Na5

6.3a: 3 d2, f4 and h6


6.3b: No, the pawn is pinned
6.3c: 1 the Qb3

13. Qd3 dxe4


14. fxe4 Qh4+
15. g3 Rxe4+

6.4a: Can White play 16. fxe4?


6.4b: Which squares can Whites King move to?
6.4c: Is Blacks Knight en prise?

63

Meek v Morphy, 1855, 15Rxe4+

6.4a: No, there is no f-pawn


6.4b: d1, d2, f1 or f2.
6.4c: No

16. Kf2 Qe7


17. Nd2 Re3
18. Qb5 c6

6.4a: Which squares can Whites Queen move to where it will not be en prise?
6.4b: Which pieces can White legally take Blacks Re3 with?
6.4c: How many White pieces (not including King/pawns) are in Whites
Kingside 4x4?

64

Meek v Morphy, 1855, 18c6

6.4a: a4, a5 and f1


6.4b: None
6.4c: 1, Rh1

19. Qf1 Bh3


20. Qd1 Rf8
21. Nf3 Ke8
0-1

Meek v Morphy, 1855, Final Position

65

66

Game 7: Bird v Morphy, 1858

More Morphy. In this famous game against the respected English Master Henry Bird,
the American shows great crea vity to track down his opponents King. If his Rook
sacrice was a bolt from the blue, the next move is indescribable. A wonderful a ack
and an idea to remember forevermore.

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 d6
3. d4 f5

7.1a: Can White play 4. Qh5+?


7.1b: How many Black pawns are en prise?
7.1c: How many pieces/pawns are in the centre 4x4?

67

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 3f5

7.1a: No, Nf3 blocks the diagonal


7.1b: 2, e5 and f5
7.1c: 6

4. Nc3 fxe4
5. Nxe4 d5
6. Ng3 e4

7.2a: How many White pieces/pawns are en prise?


7.2b: Can White legally check Black on the next move?
7.2c: How many empty squares do Whites Knights eye?

68

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 6e4

7.2a: 1, Nf3
7.2b: Yes, with Bb5+
7.2c: 8 e5, f5, g5, h5, h4, g1, e2 and d2

7. Ne5 Nf6
8. Bg5 Bd6
9. Nh5 O-O
7.3a: How many pawns/pieces are in the centre 4x4?
7.3b: Which White minor pieces could Black legally have captured on his 9th
move?

7.3c: Can White check Black on the next move?

69

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 90-0

7.3a: 6
7.3b: The Ne5 and Nh5
7.3c: Yes, with Nxf6+

10. Qd2 Qe8


11. g4 Nxg4
12. Nxg4 Qxh5

7.4a: What is the material balance?


7.4b: How many times is the Ng4 attacked?
7.4c: Can White legally castle on his next move?

70

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 12Qxh5

7.4a: -1
7.4b: Twice, by the Qh5 and Bc8
7.4c: Yes, Queenside

13. Ne5 Nc6


14. Be2 Qh3
15. Nxc6 bxc6
7.5a: Can White legally castle Kingside on his next move?
7.5b: How many of Whites pieces (not pawns) could legally be taken if it was
Black to play?

7.5c: How many empty squares does Blacks Queen eye?

71

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 15bxc6

7.5a: No
7.5b: None
7.5c: 16

16. Be3 Rb8


17. O-O-O Rxf2
18. Bxf2 Qa3

7.6a: How many of Blacks pieces (not pawns) are en prise?


7.6b: What is the material balance?
7.6c: How many White pieces (not pawns) are in the centre 4x4?

72

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 18Qa3

7.6a: 1, Qa3
7.6b: +3 (Rook for 2 pawns)
7.6c: None

19. c3 Qxa2
20. b4 Qa1+
21. Kc2 Qa4+

7.7a: How many legal moves does White have?


7.7b: How many times is b4 attacked/defended?
7.7c: How many pieces/pawns (either colour, any type) are on the c-file?

73

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 21Qa4+


7.7a: 3 Kb1, Kb2 and Kc1
7.7b: A acked 3 mes (by Qa4, Rb8 and Bd6) and defended 2 mes (once
directly by c3 pawn and once by Qd2s x-ray protection)

7.7c: 5

22. Kb2 Bxb4


23. cxb4 Rxb4+
24. Qxb4 Qxb4+

7.8a: How many legal moves does White have?


7.8b: What is the material balance?
7.8c: How many White pieces (not King/pawns) are en prise?

74

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 24Qxb4+

7.8a: 4 Ka1, Ka2, Kc1 and Kc2


7.8b: -1
7.8c: None

25. Kc2 e3
26. Bxe3 Bf5+
27. Rd3 Qc4+

7.9a: Can White play 28. Rc3?


7.9b: Is Blacks Queen en prise?
7.9c: Can White legally play 28. Kd1?

75

Bird v Morphy, 1858, 27Qc4+

7.9a: No, the Rook is pinned


7.9b: No
7.9c: Yes

28. Kd2 Qa2+


29. Kd1 Qb1+ 0-1

Bird v Morphy, 1858, Final Position

76

77

Game 8: Morphy v Anderssen, 1858

The two a acking greats came together for a match in Paris in 1858 and it is no
surprise that there were some very entertaining games. This miniature shows how
masterfully Morphy exploited a weak move and quickly converted advantages. The
match was won by Morphy (7 wins, 2 draws and 2 losses) despite being ill during the
event. Anderssen conceded that Morphy deserved his victory and gave his opinion that
Morphy was probably the strongest player ever. This is the 10th game of their match.

1. e4 c5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. d4 cxd4

8.1a: How many times is the Nc6 protected?


8.1b: Can White safely play 4. Nxd4?

78

Morphy v Anderssen, 1858, 3cxd4

8.1a: Twice, by b7 and d7 pawns


8.1b: Yes

4. Nxd4 e6
5. Nb5 d6
6. Bf4 e5

8.2a: How many of Whites pieces (not pawns) are en prise?


8.2b: How many ways can White check Black on the next move?
8.2c: How many ways could Black check White if he had the next move?

79

Morphy v Anderssen, 1858, 6e5

8.2a: One, Bf4


8.2b: 2, Nc7+ and Nxd6+
8.2c: 1, Qa5+

7. Be3 f5
8. N1c3 f4
9. Nd5 fxe3

8.3a: What is the material balance?


8.3b: How many pieces/pawns are in the centre 4x4?
8.3c: Which 2 squares do both White Knights eye?

80

Morphy v Anderssen, 1858, 9fxe3

8.3a: -3
8.3b: 6
8.3c: c3 and c7

10. Nbc7+ Kf7


11. Qf3+ Nf6
12. Bc4 Nd4

8.4a: Could Black have legally played 12Qa5+?


8.4b: How many of Blacks pieces are en prise?
8.4c: How many of Whites pieces are en prise?

81

Morphy v Anderssen, 1858, 12Nd4

8.4a: No, the Nc7 blocks the move


8.4b: 2 - Ra8 and Nf6
8.4c: 3 Nc7, Nd5 and Qf3

13. Nxf6+ d5
14. Bxd5+ Kg6
15. Qh5+ Kxf6

8.5a: What is the material balance?


8.5b: How many squares can Blacks King move to?

82

Morphy v Anderssen, 1858, 15Kxf6

8.5a: -2, a Bishop for a pawn


8.5b: 1, e7

16. fxe3 Nxc2+


17. Ke2 1-0

Morphy v Anderssen, 1858, Final Position

83

84

Game 9: Paulsen v Morphy, 1857

Paul Morphys next vic m is the German Louis Paulsen, at the American Chess
Congress of 1857. Paulsen was a very strong player of the me and contributed theories
regarding chess defence, later picked up on in wri ngs by Nimzowitsch and Steinitz.
Against Morphy, defence is not so easy however and the American won 5 games to
Paulsens 1 in the final of this New York tournament.

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Nc3 Nf6

9.1a: Which file has more minor pieces on it, c or f?


9.1b: How many pieces are on the a8-h1 diagonal?

85

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 3Nf6

9.1a: Neither, both have 4 minor pieces


9.1b: 4 Ra8, Nc6, Nf3 and Rh1

4. Bb5 Bc5
5. O-O O-O
6. Nxe5 Re8

9.2a: How many pieces are there on the 5th rank?


9.2b: How many pieces are there on the c-file?
9.2c: How many times is the Ne5 attacked and defended?

86

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 6Re8

9.2a: 3 Bb5, Bc5 and Ne5


9.2b: 5 Bc1, Nc3, Bc5, Nc6 and Bc8
9.2c: Attacked twice (by Nc6 and Re8) and defended zero times

7. Nxc6 dxc6
8. Bc4 b5
9. Be2 Nxe4

9.3a: How many times is the Ne4 attacked and defended?


9.3b: Which of Blacks pawns are undefended?
9.3c: How many times is f2 attacked and defended?

87

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 9Nxe4

9.3a: Attacked once (by Nc3) and defended once (by Re8)
9.3b: The c6 pawn
9.3c: Attacked twice (by Bc5 and Ne4) and defended twice (by Rf1 and Kg1)

10. Nxe4 Rxe4


11. Bf3 Re6
12. c3 Qd3

9.4a: Can White safely play 13. Be2?


9.4b: Can White safely play 13. Re1?
9.4c: How many squares can Blacks light-squared Bishop move to?

88

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 12Qd3

9.4a: No
9.4b: Yes
9.4c: 3 a6, b7 and d7

13. b4 Bb6
14. a4 bxa4
15. Qxa4 Bd7

9.5a: How many safe squares can Whites Queenside Rook move to?
9.5b: How many safe squares can Whites Kingside Rook move to?
9.5c: How many safe squares can Blacks Queenside Rook move to?

89

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 15Bd7

9.5a: 2 a2 and a3
9.5b: 1 d1
9.5c: 5 b8, c8, d8, e8 and f8

16. Ra2 Rae8


17. Qa6 Qxf3
18. gxf3 Rg6+

9.6a: What is the material balance?


9.6b: How many legal moves does White have?

90

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 18Rg6+

9.6a: +6 (Queen for a Bishop)


9.6b: 1

19. Kh1 Bh3


20. Rd1 Bg2+
21. Kg1 Bxf3+

9.7: How many legal moves does White have?

91

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 21Bxf3+

9.7: 1, Kf1

22. Kf1 Bg2+


23. Kg1 Bh3+
24. Kh1 Bxf2

9.8a: What is Blacks biggest threat?


9.8b: Can White legally play 25. Qxc6?

92

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, 24Bxf2

9.8a: Bg2#
9.8b: Yes

25. Qf1 Bxf1


26. Rxf1 Re2
27. Ra1 Rh6
28. d4 Be3
0-1

Paulsen v Morphy, 1857, Final Position

93

94

Game 10: Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883

1883 saw another London tournament, won by this games hero, Johannes Zukertort,
who began the compe on with 22 wins in his rst 23 games. This game was described
by Steinitz as one of the most brilliant games on record and s ll features in all- me
top 100 games list in a book published over 100 years later. Sacrices appear one a er
another but they cant be accepted and they cant be ignored.

1. c4 e6
2. e3 Nf6
3. Nf3 b6
4. Be2 Bb7
5. O-O d5

10.1a: How many pawns can White take with one of his pawns?
10.1b: Could Black play Bxf3 if it was his move again?
10.1c: Can White legally check Black?

95

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, 5d5

10.1a: 1 with cxd5


10.1b: No, the d5 pawn blocks it
10.1c: Yes, with Qa4+

6. d4 Bd6
7. Nc3 O-O
8. b3 Nbd7
9. Bb2 Qe7

10.2a: Which minor pieces (either colour) are undefended?


10.2b: Can White safely play Ne5?
10.2c: How many times is d5 attacked and defended?

96

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, 9Qe7

10.2a: 2 Bb7 and Bb2


10.2b: No, it loses a pawn
10.2c: Attacked twice and defended 3 times

10. Nb5 Ne4


11. Nxd6 cxd6
12. Nd2 Ndf6
13. f3 Nxd2

10.3a: How many ways can White recapture on d2?


10.3b: Could Black legally have played 13Bxh2+?
10.3c: How many pawns (either colour) are on the c-file?

97

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, 13Nxd2

10.3a: 1 Qxd2
10.3b: No, the dark squared Bishop is off the board
10.3c: 1 c4

14. Qxd2 dxc4


15. Bxc4 d5
16. Bd3 Rfc8
17. Rae1 Rc7
18. e4 Rac8

10.4a: Could Black safely play Rc2 if it was his move again?
10.4b: Can White legally check Black?
10.4c: Can White safely play 19. Ba3?

98

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, 18Rac8

10.4a: No, c2 is protected by the Bd3


10.4b: No
10.4c: No, the d6 pawn moved to d5 and the Queen attacks a3

19. e5 Ne8
20. f4 g6
21. Re3 f5
22. exf6ep Nxf6
23. f5 Ne4

10.5a: Can White legally play 24. f6?


10.5b: Would 23exf5 have been a safe move?

99

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, 23Ne4

10.5a: Yes
10.5b: No, the pawn is pinned against the Qe7

24. Bxe4 dxe4


25. fxg6 Rc2
26. gxh7+ Kh8
27. d5+ e5
28. Qb4

10.6a: How many White pieces are en prise?


10.6b: Which Black pieces are undefended?
10.6c: Can Black legally play 28Kxh7?

100

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, 28. Qb4

28.

10.6a: 2 Qb4 and Bb2


10.6b: The Qe7
10.6c: Yes
R8c5

29. Rf8+ Kxh7


30. Qxe4+ Kg7
31. Bxe5+ Kxf8
32. Bg7+ Kg8
33. Qxe7 1-0

Zukertort v Blackburne, 1883, Final Position


101

102

103

Game 11: Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889 "The Double Bishop


Sacrifice"

Emanuel Lasker, the second (and s ll the longest reigning at 27 years) World
Champion, made many contribu ons to the chess world - his Manual of Chess is
considered a classic book. In this game, he introduces a tac cal mo f that tears down his
opponents defence. Watch where those Bishops are looking!

1. f4 d5
2. e3 Nf6
3. b3 e6
4. Bb2 Be7
5. Bd3 b6

11.1a: Can White legally play 6. Qg4?


11.1b: Can White legally play 6. Qa4+?
11.1c: How many pieces/pawns (either colour) are in the centre 4x4?

104

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, 5b6

11.1a: Yes
11.1b: No, the b3/c2 pawns block the move
11.1c: 6 Bd3, Nf6 and pawns on d5, e6, e3 and f4

6. Nf3 Bb7
7. Nc3 Nbd7
8. O-O O-O
9. Ne2 c5
10. Ng3 Qc7

11.2a: Which squares are Whites Knights on?


11.2b: Which minor pieces (either colour) are undefended?
11.2c: Which Black pawns are only protected once?

105

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, 10Qc7

11.2a: f3 and g3
11.2b: Bb2 and Be7
11.2c: a7, e6 and g7

11. Ne5 Nxe5


12. Bxe5 Qc6
13. Qe2 a6
14. Nh5 Nxh5
15. Bxh7+

11.3a: How many legal moves does Black have?


11.3b: How many safe squares does Blacks Queen have available?

106

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, 15. Bxh7+

11.3a: 2 Kh8 and Kxh7


11.3b: 4 b5, c8, d7 and e8

15.

Kxh7

16. Qxh5+ Kg8


17. Bxg7 Kxg7
18. Qg4+ Kh7
19. Rf3 e5
20. Rh3+

11.4a: How many legal moves does Black have?


11.4b: What is the material balance?
11.4c: Which Black pieces are undefended?

107

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, 20. Rh3+

20.

11.4a: 2 Qh6 and Bh4


11.4b: -4 (2 Bishops for 2 pawns)
11.4c: The Be7
Qh6

21. Rxh6+ Kxh6


22. Qd7 Bf6
23. Qxb7 Kg7
24. Rf1 Rab8
25. Qd7 Rfd8
26. Qg4+ Kf8

11.5a: Can White legally play 27. Qd6+?


11.5b: What is the material balance?
11.5c: How many moves can the 2 Black Rooks make?

108

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, 26Kf8

11.5a: No, the Queen cannot move to d6 from g4


11.5b: +3 (Queen and 2 pawns for a Rook and Bishop)
11.5c: 7

27. fxe5 Bg7


28. e6 Rb7
29. Qg6 f6
30. Rxf6+ Bxf6
31. Qxf6+ Ke8
32. Qh8+ Ke7

11.6a: Are there any undefended Black pieces?


11.6b: How many pawns (either colour) are on the board?
11.6c: Could Black move a Rook to f7 if it was his move again?

109

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, 32Ke7

11.6a: Yes, Rb7


11.6b: 12 pawns
11.6c: No

33. Qg7+ Kxe6


34. Qxb7 Rd6
35. Qxa6 d4
36. exd4 cxd4
37. h4 d3
38. Qxd3 1-0

Em. Lasker v Bauer, 1889, Final Position

110

111

Game 12: Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892

This game comes from the rematch for the World Chess Championship between the
Champion, Wilhelm Steinitz and challenger, the great Russian Mikhail Chigorin, o en
credited as being the founder of the Soviet School of chess. Steinitz has been wri en
into history as one of the great chess theorists, sugges ng and proving in prac ce many
posi onal concepts. S ll, he was more than capable of erce a acking play and had
been called the Austrian Morphy earlier in his career. This is a great example of that
style.

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bb5 Nf6
4. d3 d6
5. c3 g6

12.1a: How many empty squares does Whites dark-squared Bishop eye?
12.1b: How many pieces/pawns are in the centre 4x4?

112

Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892, 5g6

12.1a: 5 (d2-h6)
12.1b: 8 Nc6, Nf6, Nf3 and pawns on d6, e5, e4, d3 and c3

6. Nbd2 Bg7
7. Nf1 O-O
8. Ba4 Nd7
9. Ne3 Nc5
10. Bc2 Ne6
11. h4 Ne7

12.2a: Can White safely play 12. Ng4?


12.2b: Which squares in the centre 4x4 do Whites Knights eye?
12.2c: Which squares in the centre 4x4 do Blacks Knights eye?

113

Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892, 11Ne7

12.2a: Yes
12.2b: c4, d5, f5, d4 and e5.
12.2c: c6, d5, f5, c5, d4 and f4

12. h5 d5
13. hxg6 fxg6
14. exd5 Nxd5
15. Nxd5 Qxd5
16. Bb3 Qc6
12.3a: How many pieces (either colour, including Kings) are on the d- and efiles?

12.3b: Can White legally play Qg4 on his next move?

114

Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892, 16Qc6

12.3a: 2 Qd1 and Ne6


12.3b: No, the Nf3 blocks the move

17. Qe2 Bd7


18. Be3 Kh8
19. O-O-O Rae8
20. Qf1 a5

12.4a: How many ways can Black put White in check?


12.4b: How many ways can White put Black in check?

115

Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892, 20a5

12.4a: 1 Qxc3+
12.4b: 1 Rxh7+

21. d4 exd4
22. Nxd4 Bxd4
23. Rxd4 Nxd4
24. Rxh7+

12.5a: How many legal moves does Black have?


12.5b: What is the material balance?

116

Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892, 24. Rxh7+

24.

12.5a: 1 Kxh7
12.5b: -4 (a Rook for a pawn), soon to be -9
Kxh7

25. Qh1+ Kg7


26. Bh6+ Kf6
27. Qh4+ Ke5
28. Qxd4+ 1-0

Steinitz v Chigorin, 1892, Final Position

117

118

Game 13: Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895

The winner of the Brilliancy Prize at the Has ngs 1895 tournament, this game ended
on move 25 with a combina on that forced mate. On seeing the move, von Bardeleben
le the board without resigning, meaning Steinitz had to wait un l his opponents me
ran down and he won on me. No longer World Champion having been beaten by Lasker
in the previous year, Steinitz demonstrated the ma ng sequence to the audience a er
the game, to great applause.
1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bc4 Bc5
4. c3 Nf6
5. d4 exd4
6. cxd4 Bb4+

13.1a: How many minor pieces (either colour) are in the centre 4x4?
13.1b: If White played 7. Nc3 would the Knight be protected?
13.1c: What colour square is b4?

119

Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895, 6Bb4+

13.1a: 4 Nc6, Nf6, Bc4 and Nf3


13.1b: Yes, by the b2 pawn
13.1c: Black/dark square

7. Nc3 d5
8. exd5 Nxd5
9. O-O Be6
10. Bg5 Be7

13.2a: How many times is the Nd5 attacked and defended?


13.2b: How many times is the Nd5 attacked and defended?
13.2c: Would 11. Re1 pin the Be7 against the Black King?

120

Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895, 10Be7

13.2a: Attacked twice and defended twice


13.2b: Attacked twice (by Be7 and Qd8) and defended once
13.2c: No, the e-file is also blocked by the Be6

11. Bxd5 Bxd5


12. Nxd5 Qxd5
13. Bxe7 Nxe7
14. Re1 f6
15. Qe2 Qd7
16. Rac1 c6
17. d5

13.3a: What squares are the minor pieces (both colours) on?
13.3b: Can Black legally castle Queenside?
13.3c: How many times is the d5 pawn attacked and defended?

121

Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895, 17. d5

13.3a: e7 and f3
13.3b: Yes
13.3c: A acked 3 mes (including the Knight, twice is correct if you saw it but
excluded it because of the pin), defended 0 times

17.

cxd5

18. Nd4 Kf7


19. Ne6 Rhc8
20. Qg4 g6
21. Ng5+

13.4a: Can Black legally capture the Knight?


13.4b: What is Whites threat?

122

Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895, 21. Ng5+

13.4a: Yes, with fxg5


13.4b: To capture Blacks Queen with Qxd7

21. Ke8
22. Rxe7+ Kf8
23. Rf7+ Kg8
24. Rg7+ Kh8
25. Rxh7+ 1-0

Steinitz v von Bardeleben, 1895, Final Position


(25...Kg8 26.Rg7+ Kh8 27.Qh4+ Kxg7 28.Qh7+ Kf8 29.Qh8+ Ke7 30.Qg7+ Ke8 31.Qg8+ Ke7 32.Qf7+ Kd8
33.Qf8+ Qe8 34.Nf7+ Kd7 35.Qd6#)

123

124

Game 14: Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1896

Harry Nelson Pillsbury, the very strong American who won the Has ngs tournament
in 1895, was a rival of Laskers and it has been said that a win at this tournament, St.
Petersburg 1895-6, could have earned him a World Championship match. He suered
from poor health and this impacted on some of his performances. Lasker won the
tournament, and this crucial game, in some style though, producing a Morphy-esque
sacrifice not once but twice.

1. d4 d5
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Nf6
4. Nf3 c5
5. Bg5 cxd4

14.1a: How many ways can White recapture on d4?


14.1b: Could Black play Bb4 if it was his move?

125

Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895, 5cxd4

14.1a: 2, Nxd4 or Qxd4


14.1b: Yes

6. Qxd4 Nc6
7. Qh4 Be7
8. O-O-O Qa5
9. e3 Bd7
10. Kb1 h6
11. cxd5

14.2a: Which of Blacks Knights are protected by a Bishop?


14.2b: Which White piece is attacked by a pawn?
14.2c: Can it be safely taken?

126

Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895, 11. cxd5

11.

14.2a: Both
14.2b: Bg5
14.2c: No, because of Qxh8+
exd5

12. Nd4 O-O


13. Bxf6 Bxf6
14. Qh5 Nxd4
15. exd4 Be6
16. f4 Rac8
17. f5

14.3a: What is threatened by Whites last move?


14.3b: Is the f5 pawn protected?
14.3c: In this position, what purpose is the Rd1 serving?

127

Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895, 17. f5

14.3a: fxe6
14.3b: Yes, by the Qh5
14.3c: Protecting the d4 pawn

17. Rxc3
18. fxe6 Ra3
19. exf7+ Rxf7
20. bxa3 Qb6+
21. Bb5 Qxb5+
22. Ka1 Rc7
23. Rd2 Rc4

14.4a: What is the material balance?


14.4b: Can White safely check Black on the next move?
14.4c: What is Blacks immediate threat?

128

Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895, 23Rc4

14.4a: +2 (White is up the exchange)


14.4b: No, f7 and e8 are protected
14.4c: Capturing the d4 pawn

24. Rhd1 Rc3


25. Qf5 Qc4
26. Kb2 Rxa3
27. Qe6+

14.5a: Could White legally have played 27. Kxa3?


14.5b: How many legal moves does Black have?

129

Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895, 27. Qe6+

14.5a: Yes
14.5b: 3 Kf8, Kh8 and Kh7

27. Kh7
28. Kxa3 Qc3+
29. Ka4 b5+
30. Kxb5 Qc4+ 0-1

Pillsbury v Em. Lasker, 1895, Final Position

130

131

Game 15: Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899

A game between the current and former World Champion, this took place at the
London 1899 tournament, won by Lasker in domina ng fashion with a 4 point lead
over second-place. It was a sad event for Steinitz, the rst me hed not won a prize in a
tournament, he finished 10th out of 15. Lasker provides instruc on on how to carve open
a defence and bring reinforcements into play in this ne game against a fellow chess
legend.

1. e4 e5
2. Nc3 Nf6
3. f4 d5
4. d3 Nc6
5. fxe5 Nxe5

15.1a: What squares are Blacks Knights on?


15.1b: Can White safely play 6. Nxd5?

132

Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899, 5Nxe5

15.1a: e5 and f6
15.1b: Yes

6. d4 Ng6
7. exd5 Nxd5
8. Nxd5 Qxd5
9. Nf3 Bg4
10. Be2 O-O-O
11. c3 Bd6
12. O-O Rhe8

15.2a: How many pieces (either colour) are on their original squares?
15.2b: Can White safely play Ng5?

133

Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899, 12Rhe8

15.2a: 3 Whites Ra1, Bc1 and Qd1


15.2b: No because of Bxe2 (or Rxe2)

13. h3 Bd7
14. Ng5 Nh4
15. Nf3 Nxg2
16. Kxg2 Bxh3+

15.3: How many legal moves does White have?

134

Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899, 16Bxh3+

15.3: 4 Kxh3, Kh1, Kg1 and Kf2

17. Kf2 f6
18. Rg1 g5
19. Bxg5 fxg5
20. Rxg5 Qe6
21. Qd3 Bf4

15.4a: What is the material balance?


15.4b: Which White pieces are en prise?
15.4c: Which Black pieces are en prise?

135

Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899, 21Bf4

15.4a: Material is level


15.4b: The Rg5 and Be2
15.4c: None

22. Rh1 Bxg5


23. Nxg5 Qf6+
24. Bf3 Bf5
25. Nxh7 Qg6

15.5a: Which pieces are in the White Kingside 4x4?


15.5b: Could Black safely capture the Nh7 if it was his move again?
15.5c: Which is Blacks least active piece (excluding the King)?

136

Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899, 25Qg6

15.5a: The Bf3, Rh1 and Kf2.


15.5b: No, it is guarded by the Rh1
15.5c: His Rd8

26. Qb5 c6
27. Qa5 Re7
28. Rh5 Bg4
29. Rg5 Qc2+
30. Kg3 Bxf3 0-1

Steinitz v Em. Lasker, 1899, Final Position

137

138

Game 16: Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907

Akiba Rubinstein, a Polish Grandmaster, was due to play Lasker for the World
Championship in 1914, but the match didnt take place because of the outbreak of the
First World War. A ne endgame player, here he demonstrates fantas c harmony
amongst his minor pieces, with laser-like Bishops and a suppor ng Knight allowing him
to give up his Queen in exchange for his opponents King. A true classic.
1. d4 d5
2. Nf3 e6
3. e3 c5
4. c4 Nc6
5. Nc3 Nf6

16.1a: How many times is the c4 pawn attacked and defended?


16.1b: Can White play 6. Bg5?
16.1c: What colour is the e6 square?

139

Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907, 5Nf6

16.1a: Attacked once (by the d5 pawn) and defended once (by the Bf1)
16.1b: No, the e3 pawn blocks the move
16.1c: White/light square

6. dxc5 Bxc5
7. a3 a6
8. b4 Bd6
9. Bb2 O-O
10. Qd2

16.2a: Could White legally have played Bxf6?


16.2b: How many pieces/pawns are there between the two Queens?
16.2c: Can Black safely play 10Ne4?

140

Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907, 10. Qd2

10.

16.2a: No, the Nc3 blocks it


16.2b: 2 the d5 pawn and Bd6
16.2c: Yes
Qe7

11. Bd3 dxc4


12. Bxc4 b5
13. Bd3 Rd8
14. Qe2 Bb7
15. O-O Ne5

16.3a: How many pieces does the Ne5 attack?


16.3b: How many pieces are only protected by the White Queen?

141

Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907, 15Ne5

16.3a: 2 the Nf3 and Bd3


16.3b: 2 the Bd3 and Bb2

16. Nxe5 Bxe5


17. f4 Bc7
18. e4 Rac8
19. e5 Bb6+
20. Kh1 Ng4

16.4a: How many times is the Ng4 attacked and defended?


16.4b: How many times is the f2 square attacked and defended?
16.4c: How many times is the Bd3 attacked and defended?

142

Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907, 20Ng4

16.4a: Attacked once (by Qe2) and undefended


16.4b: Attacked twice (by Bb6 and Ng4) and defended twice (by Rf1 and Qe2)
16.4c: Attacked once (by Rd8) and defended once (by Qe2)

21. Be4 Qh4


22. g3 Rxc3
23. gxh4 Rd2
24. Qxd2 Bxe4+
25. Qg2 Rh3
0-1

Rotlewi v Rubinstein, 1907, Final Position


143

144

145

Game 17: Capablanca v Marshall, 1918

Defence meets a ack and wins. Frank Marshall plays the gambit that came to bear
his name in the Ruy Lopez opening against the third World Champion and brings on a
ferocious a ack. Capablanca keeps nding accurate defensive moves and sustains
incredible pressure against Marshalls inven ve play. When the dust se les, the Cuban
has an advantage that he converts clinically.

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bb5 a6
4. Ba4 Nf6
5. O-O Be7
6. Re1 b5

17.1a: How many of Whites pieces are on their original squares?


17.1b: Could Black have castled on his last move?
17.1c: How many safe squares can Whites only attacked piece move to?

146

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, 6b5

17.1a: 4 Ra1, Nb1, Bc1 and Qd1


17.1b: Yes, Kingside
17.1c: 1 the Ba4 has b3

7. Bb3 O-O
8. c3 d5
9. exd5 Nxd5
10. Nxe5 Nxe5
11. Rxe5 Nf6
12. Re1 Bd6

17.2a: Which minor pieces (either colour) are still on their original squares?
17.2b: Which of Blacks pieces is undefended?
17.2c: How many pieces (either colour) are in Whites Kingside 4x4?

147

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, 12Bd6

17.2a: Nb1, Bc1 and Bc8


17.2b: Ra8
17.2c: 2 Re1 and Kg1

13. h3 Ng4
14. Qf3 Qh4
15. d4 Nxf2
16. Re2 Bg4
17. hxg4 Bh2+

17.3a: How many legal moves does White have?


17.3b: How many of Blacks pieces are completely undefended?
17.3c: What is the material balance?

148

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, 17Bh2+

17.3a: 1 Kf1
17.3b: None
17.3c: +3 (up a Bishop)

18. Kf1 Bg3


19. Rxf2 Qh1+
20. Ke2 Bxf2
21. Bd2 Bh4
22. Qh3 Rae8+
23. Kd3 Qf1+

17.4a: How many legal moves does White have?


17.4b: How many of Blacks pieces are completely undefended?
17.4c: What is the material balance?

149

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, 23Qf1+

17.4a: 1 Kc2
17.4b: 1, the Bh4
17.4c: +1 (2 minor pieces for a Rook)

24. Kc2 Bf2


25. Qf3 Qg1
26. Bd5 c5
27. dxc5 Bxc5
28. b4

17.5a: How many empty squares is Whites King next to?


17.5b: Which of Blacks pieces (excluding pawns) are en prise?
17.5c: How many times is the f7 pawn attacked and defended?

150

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, 28. b4

17.5a: 5
17.5b: The Bishop on c5
17.5c: Attacked twice (by Bc4 and Qf3) and defended twice (by Rf8 and Kg8)

28.

Bd6

29. a4 a5
30. axb5 axb4
31. Ra6 bxc3
32. Nxc3

17.6a: How many pawns (either colour) are in Whites Queenside 4x4?
17.6b: What is the material balance?
17.6c: What is Whites immediate threat?

151

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, 32. Nxc3

32.

17.6a: None
17.6b: +1 (2 minor pieces for a Rook)
17.6c: To capture the Bishop with Rxd6
Bb4

33. b6 Bxc3
34. Bxc3 h6
35. b7 Re3
36. Bxf7+ 1-0

Capablanca v Marshall, 1918, Final Position

152

153

Game 18: Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921

Game 10 of the World Championship match between these two Champions. Which
one was the Champion and which the Challenger is vague. Lasker had been Champion up
un l this match but resigned the tle to Capablanca in response to the la ers results
versus the rest of the chess world. The Cuban s ll wished to play Lasker in a match so
there could be no dispute as to his worthiness of the tle. The German agreed, on the
condition he was viewed as the Challenger.
Either way, the match was played and Capablanca won (4 wins, 10 draws, 0 losses).
This game showcased Capablancas strong posi onal play, a ne demonstra on of how
to face an isolated Queens pawn, and endgame technique.

1. d4 d5
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Nf6
4. Bg5 Be7
5. e3 O-O
6. Nf3 Nbd7

18.1a: How many times is Whites c-pawn attacked and defended?


18.1b: How many of the centre 4x4 squares are eyed by the White Knights?
18.1c: How many of the centre 4x4 squares are eyed by the Black Knights?

154

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 6Nbd7

18.1a: Attacked once (by the d5 pawn) and defended once (by Bf1)
18.1b: 4 d4, d5, e4 and e5
18.1c: 5 f6, c5, d5, e5 and e4

7. Qc2 c5
8. Rd1 Qa5
9. Bd3 h6
10. Bh4 cxd4
11. exd4 dxc4

18.2a: Which side has an isolated pawn?


18.2b: How many pieces/pawns are on the 5th rank?
18.2c: Could White legally play 12. Ne4?

155

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 11dxc4

18.2a: White, the d-pawn


18.2b: 1 Blacks Qa5
18.2c: No, the Nc3 is pinned to its King

12. Bxc4 Nb6


13. Bb3 Bd7
14. O-O Rac8
15. Ne5 Bb5
16. Rfe1 Nbd5

18.3a: How many times is the Nc3 attacked and defended?


18.3b: How many pieces (either colour) are on the 5th Rank?
18.3c: How many pieces (either colour) are on the a1-h8 diagonal?

156

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 16Nbd5


18.3a: A acked 3 mes (by Qa5, Rc8 and Nd5) and defended twice (by the b2
pawn and Qc2)

18.3b: 4 Qa5, Bb5, Nd5 and Ne5

18.3c: 3 Nc3, Ne5 and Nf6

17. Bxd5 Nxd5


18. Bxe7 Nxe7
19. Qb3 Bc6
20. Nxc6 bxc6
21. Re5 Qb6

18.4a: How many isolated pawns (either colour) are there on the board?
18.4b: How many minor pieces (either colour) are there on the board?

157

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 21Qb6

18.4a: 3 a7, c6 and d4


18.4b: 2 Nc3 and Ne7

22. Qc2 Rfd8


23. Ne2 Rd5
24. Rxd5 cxd5
25. Qd2 Nf5
26. b3 h5
27. h3 h4
18.5a: Could Black have safely a acked the d4 pawn with his Rook on the last
move?

18.5b: Can White play 28. Rc1 without losing material?

158

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 27h4

18.5a: No, the b3 pawn guards against Rc4


18.5b: No, the exchange of Rooks would remove a defender of d4 and Black
would win the pawn

28. Qd3 Rc6


29. Kf1 g6
30. Qb1 Qb4
31. Kg1 a5
32. Qb2 a4
18.6a: Could Black have safely a acked the d4 pawn with his Rook on the last
move?

18.6b: How many Queen moves can White make without losing material?

159

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 32a4


18.6a: Yes, Rc4 was playable as the b3 pawn is pinned against the
unprotected Qb2

18.6b: 2 Qd2 and Qb1

33. Qd2 Qxd2


34. Rxd2 axb3
35. axb3 Rb6
36. Rd3 Ra6
37. g4 hxg3ep
38. fxg3 Ra2

18.7a: What is Blacks immediate threat?


18.7b: How many pawn islands does each side have?

160

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 38Ra2

18.7a: To capture the Knight with Rxe2


18.7b: 1 for Black, 3 for White

39. Nc3 Rc2


40. Nd1 Ne7
41. Nc3 Rc1+
42. Kf2 Nc6
43. Nd1 Rb1
44. Ke2 Rxb3

18.8a: How many of Blacks pieces are unprotected?


18.8b: How many legal moves can White make with his Knight?

161

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 44..Rxb3

18.8a: 2 Rb3 and Nc6


18.8b: 4 Nd1 to a2, c3, e3 or f2.

45. Ke3 Rb4


46. Nc3 Ne7
47. Ne2 Nf5+
48. Kf2 g5
49. g4 Nd6
50. Ng1 Ne4+

18.8a: How many pawns (either colour) are unprotected?


18.8b: How many pieces (either colour) are unprotected?

162

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 50Ne4+

18.8a: None, they are all protected


18.8b: 2, the Rb4 and Rd3

51. Kf1 Rb1+


52. Kg2 Rb2+
53. Kf1 Rf2+
54. Ke1 Ra2
55. Kf1 Kg7
56. Re3 Kg6

18.9a: How many legal King moves can White make?


18.9b: How many checks could Black have played on his last move?

163

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 56Kg6

18.9a: 1, Ke1
18.9b: 4 Ra1+, Rf2+, Nd2+ and Ng3+

57. Rd3 f6
58. Re3 Kf7
59. Rd3 Ke7
60. Re3 Kd6
61. Rd3 Rf2+

18.10a: How many pieces/pawns (either colour) are in the centre 4x4?
18.10b: Which of the 4x4s has the most pieces in it?

164

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, 61Rf2+

18.10a: 4 pawns and 3 pieces (including the Kd6)


18.10b: Whites Kingside 4x4

62. Ke1 Rg2


63. Kf1 Ra2
64. Re3 e5
65. Rd3 exd4
66. Rxd4 Kc5
67. Rd1 d4
68. Rc1+ Kd5 0-1

165

Em. Lasker v Capablanca, 1921, Final Position

166

167

Game 19: Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922

The following game is another lauded by chess luminaries such as Botvinnik.


Kasparov and Fischer, who reportedly declared it one of the great masterpieces of the
chessboard having analysed it as a young player. Alexander Alekhine, the fourth World
Champion, cramps his, very strong, opponents posi on, switches play between Kingside,
Queenside and back again and we have 3 Queen sacrifices to enjoy too.
1. d4 f5
2. c4 Nf6
3. g3 e6
4. Bg2 Bb4+
5. Bd2 Bxd2+
6. Nxd2 Nc6

19.1a: How many minor pieces (either colour) are in the centre 4x4?
19.1b: What does Blacks last move threaten?
19.1c: What colour is the g8 square?

168

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 6Nc6

19.1a: 2, Blacks Nc6 and Nf6


19.1b: Nxd4
19.1c: White

7. Ngf3 O-O
8. O-O d6
9. Qb3 Kh8
10. Qc3 e5
11. e3 a5
12. b3 Qe8
13. a3 Qh5

19.2a: Are both sides Rooks connected?


19.2b: How many squares can the Nd2 move to safely?

169

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 13Qh5

19.2a: No, Black has the Bc8 in the way


19.2b: 1 b1

14. h4 Ng4
15. Ng5 Bd7
16. f3 Nf6
17. f4 e4
18. Rfd1 h6

19.3a: How many White pawns are undefended?


19.3b: How many Black pawns are undefended?
19.3c: How many pieces (either colour) are undefended?

170

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 18h6

19.3a: 1, g3
19.3b: 2, b7 and c7
19.3c: 1, Whites Qc3

19. Nh3 d5
20. Nf1 Ne7
21. a4 Nc6
22. Rd2 Nb4
23. Bh1 Qe8

19.4a: How many pieces does White have on his first rank?
19.4b: How many outposts does Black have in Whites pawn structure?
19.4c: How many squares can Whites Queen move to safely?

171

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 23Qe8

19.4a: 3, (or 4 including the King)


19.4b: 4 b4, d3, f3 and g4.
19.4c: 2, b2 and c1.

24. Rg2 dxc4


25. bxc4 Bxa4
26. Nf2 Bd7
27. Nd2 b5
28. Nd1 Nd3

19.5a: How many squares can Whites Bishop move to?


19.5b: Which 2 files are most likely to be opened?
19.5c: How many squares can Whites Queen move to safely?

172

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 28Nd3

19.5a: None!
19.5b: Files a and b.
19.5c: 2 - a3 and c2.

29. Rxa5 b4
30. Rxa8 bxc3
31. Rxe8 c2
32. Rxf8+ Kh7
33. Nf2

19.6a: What is the material balance?


19.6b: How many pieces (either colour) are there on the Queenside?
19.6c: What defends the e3 pawn?

173

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 32. Nf2

19.6a: +10 White is up 2 Rooks.


19.6b: 2- the Nd3 and Bd7.
19.6c: It is undefended the Knight move Nd1-f2 removed its protection.

33.

c1=Q+

34. Nf1 Ne1


35. Rh2 Qxc4
36. Rb8 Bb5
37. Rxb5 Qxb5
38. g4 Nf3+
39. Bxf3

19.7a: What is the material balance?


19.7b: How many squares can the Nf1 move to?
19.7c: How many undefended pieces and pawns (both colours) are there?

174

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 39. Bxf3


19.7a: +2 (Rook, Bishop & Knight for Queen) soon to be -1 (Rook and Knight
for Queen)

19.7b: 2 d2 and g3

19.7c: 2 the c7 pawn and the, soon to be taken, Bf3.

39.

exf3

40. gxf5 Qe2


41. d5 Kg8
42. h5 Kh7
43. e4 Nxe4
44. Nxe4 Qxe4
45. d6

19.8a: How many minor pieces (either colour) are there and where are they?
19.8b: How many squares can each King legally move to?

175

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 45. d6


19.8a: 1, Whites Nf1.
19.8b: 2 each. f2 and h1 for White, g8 and h8 for Black.

45.

cxd6

46. f6 gxf6
47. Rd2 Qe2
48. Rxe2 fxe2
49. Kf2
19.9a: What is the minimum number of moves for Black to get his King to

f5?

19.9b: What square would Whites King have to be on to protect his


remaining pawns?

176

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, 45. d6

49.

19.9a: 4 (Kh7-g7-f7-e6-f5).
19.9b: g4
exf1=Q+

50. Kxf1 Kg7


51. Kf2 Kf7
52. Ke3 Ke6
53. Ke4 d5+ 0-1

Bogoljubow v Alekhine, 1922, Final Position

177

178

Game 20: Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923

Played in Karlsbad, Czechoslovakia, Alekhine nished this tournament in


joint 1st, sharing with Bogojubov and Maroczy. Grunfeld nished a place
below, with 10 /17 compared to the winners 11 . This match won one of
the brilliancy prizes for Alekhines strong pressure and ne combina onal
ending.

1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 d5
4. Bg5 Be7
5. Nf3 Nbd7
6. e3 O-O

20.1a: Can White castle on his next move?


20.1b: How many times is the c4 pawn attacked and defended?
20.1c: Which pieces/pawns (either colour) eye the e5 square?

179

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, 60-0

20.1a: No, the Qd1 and Bf1 are in the way on either side.
20.1b: Attacked once by d5 pawn and defended once by the Bf1.
20.1c: The Nf3 and d4 pawn for White and the Nd7 and Re8 for
Black.

7. Rc1 c6
8. Qc2 a6
9. a3 h6
10. Bh4 Re8
11. Bd3 dxc4
12. Bxc4 b5

20.2a: How many safe squares can White move his Bc4 to?
20.2b: How many times is the c4 pawn attacked and defended?
20.2c: Which pieces/pawns (either colour) eye the e5 square?

180

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, 12b5

20.2a: 5 a2, b3, d3, e2 and f1.


20.2b: There isnt a pawn on c4.
20.2c: For White, the Nf3 and pawn on d4, for Black, the Nd7.

13. Ba2 c5
14. Rd1 cxd4
15. Nxd4 Qb6
16. Bb1 Bb7
17. O-O Rac8
18. Qd2 Ne5
20.3a: How many undefended minor pieces (either colour) are on
the board?

20.3b: How many open files are there?

20.3c: Which minor piece (either colour) eyes the most empty
squares?

181

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, 18Ne5

20.3a: 2, Whites Bh4 and Blacks Ne5


20.3b: 2, the c- and d-files
20.3c: Whites Bb2 and Blacks Ne5 both eye 7 empty squares

19. Bxf6 Bxf6


20. Qc2 g6
21. Qe2 Nc4
22. Be4 Bg7
23. Bxb7 Qxb7

20.4a: How many safe squares can Whites minor pieces move to?
20.4b: How many safe squares can Blacks minor pieces move to?
20.4c: How many times is each Queen protected?

182

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, 23Qxb7


20.4a: 5 Nc3 to a2 or b1 and Nd4 to c2, b3 and f3 (4 is correct if
you saw Nc2 allows Nxb2)

20.4b: 8 Nc4 to a5, b6 or e5 and Bg7 to f8, h8, f6, e5 or d4


capturing the Knight

20.4c: Whites Queen is protected twice (by Nc3 and Nd4) and
Blacks Queen is unprotected

24. Rc1 e5
25. Nb3 e4
26. Nd4 Red8
27. Rfd1 Ne5

20.5a: Can either side check the other from this position?
20.5b: How many safe squares does Whites Queen have?

183

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, 27Ne5

20.5a: Yes, Black with Nf3+.


20.5b: 4 c2, d2, e1 and f1

28. Na2 Nd3


29. Rxc8 Qxc8
30. f3 Rxd4
31. fxe4

20.6a: What is the material balance?


20.6b: How many Black pieces are en prise?
20.6c: Which White pieces are undefended ?

184

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, 31. fxe4

31.

20.6a: -2 (Black is a Bishop for pawn up)


20.6b: 2, the Nd3 and Rd4
20.6c: The Na2 and Qe2
Nf4

32. exf4 Qc4


33. Qxc4 Rxd1+
34. Qf1 Bd4+ 0-1

Gruenfeld v Alekhine, 1923, Final Position

185

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