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http://www.realliving.com.

ph/homes/a-two-storey-house-with-proud-filipino-design
By Samito Jalbuena | June 08, 2015
Original article: Tisha Alvarez | Photography: Jun Pinzon | Pictorial Direction: Carlo
Vergara | Styling: Issa Villar | Architect: Angelo Manosa

A TWO-STOREY HOUSE WITH PROUD


FILIPINO DESIGN

INDEGENOUS MATERIALS AND DYNAMIC SPACES COMPLETE A CONTEMPORARY


FILIPINO HOME

Making a house feel lived in can often be a daunting task, especially


if the space can be easily taken over by the look of generic modernity. But for
homeowner Jimmy and architect Angelo Gelo Maosa of A. Maosa +
Architects, the challenge was how to incorporate a distinct Filipino identity
into the space as well as how to bring the outdoors in.

The result is an intelligently-designed space that takes advantage of the


natural view corridors, garden backdrops, good ventilation, and natural light,
while displaying a penchant for homegrown materials and a respect for
traditional Filipino architectural details.
Original article by Tisha Alvarez. Styling by Issa Villar. Pictorial Direction by
Carlo Vergara. Photographed by Jun Pinzon.

FACADE
The house looks modern and majestic from the outside. Architect Angelo
Maosa created a high pitched roof and wide overhangs, which he says are
ideal for our hot and humid climate.

FACADE DETAIL
Long overhangs are needed to protect window and wall openings from the
effects of "heat gain" better known as the amount of energy a material
absorbs.

FACADE DETAIL
Architect Maosa also made use of a Maosa trademark, which his father
Arch. Francisco Maosa popularized: the finial. This was placed on top of the
roof apex as a symbol of the Philippine salakot," he shares.

ENTRANCE
Buffed yet unpolished, slip-resistant floor tiles ensure safety during all kinds
of weather.

DOOR DETAIL
As one of the first statements that guests will notice, the front door of a
house can be designed as a foretelling of things to come. In this case, the
Lagdameo door was inlaid with wood in vertical configurations.

LIVING AREA
Rather than creating one structure, the house was broken down into two
pavilions by cutting a pond between the den and the living room. The pond
can be seen on the extreme right. The narra floor in the living room is
actually recycled wood from the old Philippine National Bank building in
Escolta. The furniture in the living area is from Diretso in LRI Design Plaza, N.
Garcia St., Makati. The pieces make use of Cebu abaca which does not
darken unlike other abacas. Other interesting items in the living area are an
old Muslim baul, overrun with a mother-of-pearl inlay, and a smiling blueand-white Buddha on the shelf, a travel find.

DEN
When making a house design, it's important to consider how to let light and
the outdoors enter the interior spaces. The den is one of two rooms one
would step into upon entering the house. Both living room and den are
bathed in sunlight owing to the many windows and glass doors.

DEN DETAIL
Artworks featuring Philippine rural scenes adorn the walls. Drawings on the
wall are by National Artist Jose Joya.

STORAGE TIP
Shelves display some of the resident's travel finds. They also act as nifty
storage solutions.

DEN DETAIL
The ceiling height allows air to circulate more within the rooms. Too add
visual texture, the ceiling is lined with banig.

DCOR DETAIL
In the passageway between the den and the living area is a glass etching of
a cross-section of the Gloria Maris, a Philippine shell.

DINING AREA
As a means to entertain guests, an island bar can be constructed midway
between the dining and living rooms. This not only delineates spaces but
provides another lounge area where guests can transfer before feasting.

DINING AREA DETAIL


The refurbished dining table is from the family home in Paco, Manila. The
chairs are newly custom-made to go with the vertical slats of the dining
table. The artwork on the wall is by Cesar Buenaventura.