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The Secretary of Health (Filipino: Kalihim ng Kalusugan) is the Cabinet of the Philippines member in

charge of the Department of Health.


The current Secretary is Paulyn Ubial, who assumed office on June 30, 2016.
Under the Office of the Secretary are the following centers, offices and services:

Administrative Service

Finance Service

Knowledge Management and Information Technology Service (formerly Information Management


Service)

Integrity Development Committee

Internal Audit Service

Legal Service

Health Promotions and Communications Service (formerly National Center for Health Promotion)

National Center for Pharmaceutical Access and Management

Philippine Blood Center

Procurement and Logistics Service

Center for Health Development (CHD - Regional Offices) in each of the 17 regions of the
Philippines.

Bureaus
The DOH is composed of bureaus, namely:

Epidemiology Bureau (formerly National Epidemiology Center)

Bureau of Health Devices and Technology

Bureau of Health Facilities and Services

Bureau of International Health Cooperation

Bureau of Local Health Systems Development

Bureau of Quarantine

Disease Prevention and Control Bureau (formerly National Center for Disease Prevention and
Control)

Food and Drug Administration

Health Emergency Management Bureau

Health Facility Development Bureau (formerly National Center For Health Facilities Development)

Health Human Resources Development Bureau

Health Policy Development and Planning Bureau

Attached Agencies
The following agencies and councils are attached to the DOH for policy and program coordination:

Commission on Population (POPCOM)

Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA)

National Nutrition Council (NNC)

Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC; PhilHealth)

Philippine Institute for Traditional and Alternative Health Care (PITAHC)

Philippine International Trading Corporation - Pharma (PITC - Pharma)

Philippine National AIDS Council (PNAC)

Retained Hospitals[
he following hospitals are directly under the DOH:[4]
DOH Hospitals

Amang Rodriguez Medical Center

Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital

Corazon Locsin Montelibano Memorial Regional Hospital

East Avenue Medical Center

Specialty Hospitals

Jos R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center

National Center for Mental Health

National Children's Hospital (Philippines)

Philippine Orthopedic Center

Quirino Memorial Medical Center

Research Institute for Tropical Medicine

Rizal Medical Center

San Lazaro Hospital

Tondo Medical Center

Lung Center of the Philippines

National Kidney and Transplant Institute

Philippine Children's Medical Center

Philippine Heart Center

ADOLESCENT AND YOUTH HEALTH PROGRAM (AYHP)

A Situationer on Adolescents Health


Non-communicable diseases account
for more than 40% of the deaths in young people (10-24 years old) and injuries are the
causes of death in almost one third of people in this age group. Assault and transport
accidents are the leading causes of mortality among young people with a mortality rate
of 9.7 and 5.8 deaths per 100,000 populations, respectively (Philippine Health Statistics,
2003). Other significant causes of death among the 10-24 years old Filipinos include
complications related to pregnancy, labor and puerperium; epilepsy; chronic rheumatic
heart disease; intentional self harm; and accidental drowning and submersion (Philippine
Health Statistics, 2003).Of the 1.67 M live births registered in 2003, 35.7% (596, 076 LB)
were by women 24 years old. Teenage pregnancy accounted for 8% of all births
(National Demographic Health Survey, 2003). Of the 1,798 maternal deaths registered
for the same year, 22.3% were women 24 years old. The proportion of malnutrition
among those 11 19 years of age (underweight and overweight) were noted to increase
from 1993 to 2003 (FNRI Survey 1993, 1998 and 2003).About 4% of Filipinos 10 24
years of age have some form of disability. The most common of this are speaking and
hearing disabilities.
MOST COMMON CAUSES OF DEATH AMONG 10-24 YEARS OLD
PER 10,000 POPULATION. Philippine Health Statistics, 2003
Male
Ran
k

Cause of Death

No.

Female

Both

Rat No Rat
Rat
No.
e
.
e
e

Asssault

2,24
18
2,42
17.6
1.5
9.7
0
3
3

Transport Accidents

1,14
30
1,44
9.0
2.5
5.8
6
3
9

Event of undetermined intent

570 5.3

Symptoms, signs & abnormal clinical findings not elsewhere


classified

602 4.7

35
2.9 954 3.8
2

Pneumonia

527 4.1

35
2.9 882 3.5
5

Tuberculosis of the Respiratory System

537 4.2

34
2.8 877 3.5
0

Chronic Rheumatic Heart Disease

447 3.5

42
3.5 873 3.5
6

Accidental drowning and submersion

596 4.7

21
1.7 811 3.2
5

Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis

385 3.0

33
2.7 717 2.9
2

518 4.1

11
0.9 631 2.5
3

10 Other accidents & late effects of transport/other accidents

30
2.5 970
0

3.9

Leading Threats to Adolescents Health


Accidents and other inflicted

injuries

Among 10- 24 age groups, this threat caused 27% of the total deaths (2003 data). Young
males always exlusively succumb to injuries and females have the increasing mortality
due to complications of pregrancy, labor delivery and puerperium. These data have been

on the uptrend, a challenge to community-based or DOH-led programs. The threat is


caused by the adolescents exposure to poorly maintained roads and poorly managed
traffic systems. Adolescents increased mobility to urban areas needs a correspondidng
physical and infrastructre support in their quest for better opportunities and education
pursuits. Another is the inability of the state to provide adequate number of police
personnel leading to an increasing number of assault and transport accidents among the
young males.
Tubercolusis, Pneumonia, and Accidental drowning
Close to 6% of young Filipinos who died in 2003 died of various forms of tuberculosis,
followed by pneumonia that caused 4% of deaths. This health issue among the young
has been declining through the years due to sustained nationwide programs that
began in 1987 and has somehow caused to keep deaths down, hence efforts to
continue sustaining becomes the challenge.
The threat of HIV and other sexually related diseases
Reported cases increased substantially increased over the past year.Among the 15-24
year olds, reported HIV infections nearly tripled between 2007 and 2008 from 41 cases
to 110 per year, which is substantial cause for alarm. In 2009, 15-24 year olds make 29%
of all new infections; in 2009, the number of new infections among 20-24 equals the
number of new infections among 25-29; with 10 cases see July DoH AIDS Registry
Report. The substantial increase from the past year can be traced from the
adolescents early engagement in health risk behaviour, due to serious gaps of the
knowledge on the dangers of drugs, as well as the cause as well as causes on the
transmission of STD and HIV AIDS , dangers of indiscriminate tattooing and bodypiercing and inadequate population education. Under this threat, young males are
prone to engaging in health risk behaviour and more young fermales are also doing
the same without protection and are prone to aggressive or coercive behaviours of
others in the community such that it often results to significant number of unwanted
pregrancies,septic abortion and poor self-care practices.
In addition, there are also other
deaths namely;

less common but significant causes of disease and

Intentional self- harm the 9 leading cause of death among 20-24 years old. In this
age group, seven out of 10 who died of suicide were males. In age group of 10-24 years
old took up 34% of all deaths from suicide in 2003
th

Substance Abuse - 15-19 years old group has the claim of drug use; more males
than females who are drug users and drug rehabilitaiton centers claim that majority of
clients belong to age group of 25-29 years old. According to the SWS survey, 19961.5M youth Filipinos and 1997- grew into 2.1M youth Filipinos are into substance abuse
Nutritional Deficiencies there are no specific rates for adolescent and youth, but
there is the prevalence of anemia and vitamin A deficiency which may be also high
for the adolescents and youth as those known for the younger and pregnant women.

Disability Filipinos aged 10-24 years old has an overall disability prevalence of 4%.
The most common disability among this age group affected are speaking (35%), hearing
(33%) and moving and mobility (22%)
There are also vulnerable Filipino adolescents which can be classified in their respective
areas of vulnerability
VULNERABLE YOUNG FILIPINOS
Sub-groups

Vulnerability areas

Young among the street- Common infections, physical abuse or assault, sexual exploitation, drug
dwellers
use, road accidents
Out- of- school
adolescents and youth

High risk behaviour; smoking, alcohol use, drug abuse, high risk sexual
behaviour, risky work conditions leading to injuries and diseases

Urban based male


youth

High risk behaviour; transport accidents , other inflicted injuries

Female adolescents

Sexual abuse, sexual exploitation , unwanted pregranancies, abortion,


unsafe pregnancy and insecure motherhood

Not living with parents


or family

Nutritional disorders, substance use and risky sexual behaviour, other


inflcited injuries

Factors Causing Threats to Adolescents Health


The alarming patterns of health issues affecting adolescents health is caused by the
following factors operating in a systemic manner reinforcing further complexities in
the health issues affecting adolescents .
Socio-Cultural Factors
Demographic Factors
Continuing Rapid Population Growth
The rapid population growth of the youth creates pressure to the state to expand
education, health and employment FO rhtis age group. The pressure creates an
imbalance to the distribution and allocation of resources to various sectors especially the
youth. The imbalance reinforces deeper the marginalization and deprivation of some
sectors to basic services. A viscious cycle is created and more are having difficulties to
access provision on health service delivery.
Increased population movement
The scarctiy of local employment has triggered the participation of the youth in
overseas work. The movemente of the sector has caused displacement from families
and love ones increase youths vulnerability to exploitation, low paying jobs. According
to a study in 2001, there were more tha 6,000 workers in the teenage group overseas
workers and it is most likely that they would land in overseas low paying work.
Attitudes, Lifestyles, Sense of Values, Norms and Behaviours of Adolescents

Health Risk Behaviors


A significant proportion of young people engage in high-risk behaviors 23% ever had
pre- marital sex, 57% of first sex experience was unplanned and unplanned. About 70% 80% of their most recent sexual experiences were unprotected (YAFS, 2002).
The 2002 Young Adult Fertility and Sexuality Survey showed that the proportion of 15-24
year olds who were currently smoking, drinking and using drugs were 20.9%, 41.4% and
2.4%, respectively. The proportion is higher among males compared to females. A
comparative data (1994 and 2003) showed that among 15 24 year olds, smoking
increased by 23%; drinking increased by 10%; drug use increased by 85%; and pre
martial sex increased by 30% (YAFSS, 2003). The likelihood of engaging in pre-marital
sex is higher among those who smoke, drink alcohol or take drugs. As a consequence of
substance and alcohol abuse, some have mental and neurological disorders; others
spend the productive years of their life behind bars with hardcore lawless adults.
Health Seeking Behavior
Adolescents are more likely to consult the health center (45%) or government physician
(19%) for their health needs (Baseline Survey for the National Objectives for Health,
2000). The most common reasons for not consulting were the lack of money, lack of
time, fear of diagnosis, distance and disapproval of parents. Dental examination and BP
monitoring were the most common reasons for consultation (62.4% and 37.8%,
respectively).Similalry, Conditions relating to pregnancy, childbirth and post partum were
among the leading reasons for utilization of in-patient, emergency room and out patient
health services at DOH-Retained Tertiary General Hospitals.
Low Contraceptive Use
The overall use of contraception among sexually active adolescents is at 20%. Nondesire for pregnancy and high awareness of contraceptive methods were not enough to
encourage adolescents to use contraceptives. Among the reasons cited for the low
contraceptive use were:

Contraceptives were given only to married individuals of reproductive age


Even if they were made available to adolescents, the culture says that it is
taboo for young unmarried individuals to avail of contraceptive services and
commodities.
Condom use is perceived mainly for STIs, HIV/AIDS prevention rather than
contraception

The practice Abortion and Unmet need for Contraception


In 2000, induced abortion among adolescents reached 319,000. This is due to the
inadequate knowledge on preventing unwanted pregnancies. Consequences of teen-age
pregnancies among young mothers include not being able to finish school and reduced
employment options and opportunities. In addtion, the social stigma and fear brought
about by unwanted pregrancy pushes the young mother to resort to abortion. Although
the disapproval rating for abortion remains to be high, there is an increasing trend
among those who approve of it (from 4% to 6% in males and 3.5% to 4% in females).On

contraceptive use , adolescents also don't use condoms for prevention of HIV,it's not only
that they don't use them for contraception.
Risk of HIV/AIDS due to Unprotected Sex
Adolescents including children living in exteme conditons and great exposure to sexual
exploitation and abuse belong to high-risk categories threatened by unprotected sex.
Latest data on these shows that majority of people engaged in sex work are young and
70 % of HIV infections involve male-to-male sex. The proportion of young people
reported to have STDs/HIV and AIDS is increasing. The YAFS survey showed that although
awareness about STDs is increasing, misconceptions about AIDS appear to have the
same trend. The proportion of those who think AIDS is curable more than doubled (from
12% in 1994 to 28% in 2002). Many adolescents also resort to services of unqualified
traditional healers, obtain antibiotics from pharmacies or drug hawkers or resort to
advices from friends (e.g. drinking detergent dissolved in water) without proper diagnosis
to address problems of STDs. Improper or incomplete treatment may mask the
symptoms without curing the disease increasing the risk of transmission and
development of complications. The limited use of condoms to protect adolescents from
risk of HIV is an issue to reflection for condom use is not only to prevent pregranancy but
also preventing sexually transmitetd disease. r The YAFS 2002 survey showed that
Filipino males and females are at risk of STIs, HIV/AIDS. It was reported that 62 % of
sexually transmitted infections affect the adolescents while 29 % of HIV positive Filipino
cases are young people. In addition, it was revealed that thirty seven percent (37%) of
Filipino males 25 years of age have had sex before they marry with women other than
their wives. Some will have paid for sex while others will have had five or more partners.
Political and Economic Factors
Marginalization and Poverty
The disturbing poverty situation of households and families where majority of the
adolescents belong brings in difficulties to meet adolescents.needs. Poverty is closely
link to adolescent health
issues. It reinforces to the situation of adolescents
vulnerability to health risks due to the lack of access to various services and
unsupportive social, political and economic environment. The following are some of the
consequences of poverty faced by the youth.

Limited Access to Information -among the greatest challenges for Filipino


youth is access to correct and meaningful information on sexual and
reproductive issues.
Limited access to services and commodities-The lack of access to
contraceptive services and supplies was among the most frequently
articulated concerns with regard to adolescent SRH. Programs such as the
AYHDP do recognize adolescents need for access to contraception.
Limited awareness of pertinent policies-While the AYHP Administrative
order was issued in 2000, few key informants knew of its existence. In fact,
many key informants said that no ARH policy existed at the time they were
interviewed

Technological Factors

Rapid

Advancement of Communication

The value of technological advancement could never be discounted. However, to


the curious and adventurous adolescents various modes of communications are
oftentimes abused and misused such as the use of internet and mobile phones.
Adolescents then become vulnerable to exploitation, in cybersex and pornography
exposing them deeper into risky behaviour. In addtion the digital dependence and
addiction causes alienation of
adolescetns to
personal and closer mode of
communciation resulting to a distorted image of the adoelscents relationships to the
social environment. This also deprives the adolescents from productive activities
where they can develop themselves fully grown up and mature e conomic and socail
being Moreover, communcation advantcement has also produced adverstisements and
television commercials whose image are not adoelsent- friendly are paving the way for
so much consumerism, distorted personal and family values
THE ADOLESCENTS HEALTH PROGRAM IN THE PHILIPPINES
8. International Policies, Passages and Laws as anchors
In International Laws

UN Convention on the Rights of Children


UN Convention the Action for the Promotion and Protection of the health of
adolescents

Convention on the Elimination of all forms of discrimination againts


women

1994 International Conference on Populaiton and Development ( ICPD)

1995 Fourth World Conference on Women

World Programme of Action for Youth 2000

MDG Goals :

Goal 2:Achieve Universal Primary Education

Goal 3:Promote Gender Equality

Goal 4 : Reduce Child Mortality

Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health

Goal 6:Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases


National Laws and Policies
o National Objectives for Health
o Fourmula One for Health
o Adolescent and Youth Health Policy (AYH)
o Adolescent and Youth Health and Develoment Program
o National Directional Plan for reaching the Un reahced Youth Population
o Reproductive Health Program AO#1 s1998
o Local Government Code
WHO, together with countries and areas in the Region and partner agencies, are working
to promote healthy development of adolescents and reduce mortality and morbidity. In
the Western Pacific Region, several technical units are working to implement
interventions that improve adolescent health in the Region. The Philippines belong to
the Western Pacific Region and is committed to:
Recognize adolescents as vulnerable and a group in need

o Address Issues that have an evidence base


o Socio- Cultural perspectives
o Develop Innovative mechanisms to reach out to adolescents.
o Encourage collaboration and partnerships
o Program implementation is monitored and evaluated.
The Adolescent Health Program
The Adolescents Youth and Heath Development Programs was established in 2001
under the oversight of the Department of Health in partnership with other government
agencies with adolescent concerns and other stakeholdres. The program is targeting
youth ages 1024, and the program provides comprehensive implementation guidelines
for youth-friendly comprehensive health care and services on multiple levelsnational,
regional, provincial/city, and municipal.
The program is solidly achored on International and laws, passages and polices meant to
address adolescents health concerns. It is operating then within the facets and
adolescents and youth health that includes disability, mental and environmental health,
reproductive and sexuality, violence and injury prevention and among others.
It employed strategies to ensure integration of the program intothe health care system in
addition, broader society such as building a supportive policy environment, intensifying
IEC and advocacy particularly among teachers, families, and peers, building the technical
capacity of providers of care, and support for youth; improving accessibility and
availability of quality health services, strengthening multi-sectoral partnerships, resource
mobilization, allocation and improved data collection and management.
The program to address sexual and reproductive health issues likewise adopts gendersensitive approaches. The primary responsibility for implementation of the AYHDP, and
its mainstreaming into the health system, falls to regional and provincial/city sectors.
Guidelines cover service delivery, IEC, training, research and information collection,
monitoring and evaluation, and quality assurance.
Program Manager:
Dr. Minerva Vinluan
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control - Family Health Office

BELLY GUD FOR HEALTH


Contact Person:
Rosemarie Holandes
Telephone Nos.:
651-7800 loc. 1750-1754

Overnutrition such as overweight and obesity is a serious health concern especially in the light of its strong
association with the development of non-communicable diseases which are among the leading causes of
mortality, morbidity and disability in the country today. These NCDs include cardiovascular diseases,
cancer, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, renal diseases, and degenerative arthritis, gout and gallbladder
diseases. With the various medical consequences associated with overnutrition, this weight problem
contributes to decreased productivity and economic growth retardation.
In the Department of Health Office, from a total of 779 personnel taken waist circumference in 2012 prior
to the conduct of Belly Gud for Health, 362 or 46.5% have waist circumference above desirable levels.

Waist circumference (WC) is a simple and easy measure of central obesity among adults and a significant
indicator of risk for non-communicable diseases particularly heart disease and stroke.
In the effort to promote and protect the health of the DOH personnel, the National Center for Disease
Prevention and Control, Degenerative Disease Office in partnership with the National Center for Health
promotion will repeat the conduct of Belly Gud for Health (BG for Health) 2012 as an advocacy strategy for
healthy lifestyle this 2013. This time , it will challenge the executives namely Secretary, Undersecretaries,
Assistant Secretaries and Directors and employees of the Department of Health Central Office with high
waist circumference (HCW), to be fit by attaining and maintaining a desirable waist circumference (DWC)
of <80 cms for females and <90cms for males.
Other Activities

Hataw Exercise
Where: DOH Gym
When: Tuesday and Thursday
Time: 8:00-9:00 AM

Jogging / Walking
Where: DOH Compound
When: Before and after office hours

Ala Stress
When: Respective Office
Where: Everyday
Time: 3:00-3:15PM

Free use of Gym Facilities


Where: DDO and Gate I
When: Daily

BOTIKA NG BARANGAY (BNB)


Botika ng Barangay

I. What is Botika ng Barangay?


Botika ng Barangay (BnB) - refers to a drug outlet managed by a legitimate
community organization (CO) / non-government organization (NGO) and/or the Local
Government Unit (LGU), with a trained operator and a supervising pharmacist specifically
established in accordance with this Order. The BnB outlet should be initially identified,
evaluated and selected by the concerned Center for Health Development (CHD),
approved by the PHARMA 50 Project Management Unit (PMU) and specially licensed by
the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD) to sell, distribute, offer for sale and/or make
available low-priced generic home remedies, over-the-counter (OTC) Drugs and two (2)
selected, publicly-known prescription antibiotics drugs (i.e. Amoxicillin and
Cotrimoxazole).
The establishment of the Botika ng Barangay (BnB) in the communities, including
the insurgent areas, ensures accessibility of low-priced generic over-the-counter drugs
and eight (8) prescription drugs as recommended by the National Drug Formulary
Committee. Under Memorandum # 31 and its amendment, as much as 40 essential
medicines that address common diseases can be made available in BnBs depending on
the morbidity and mortality profiles of the community. And the policies surrounding the
BnB (AO 144) ensure that such can be sustained in the medium term.

II. Objectives. The objectives of this Order are as follows:


1. To promote equity in health by ensuring the availability and accessibility of
affordable, safe and effective, quality essential drugs to all, with priority for
marginalized, underserved, critical and hard to reach areas.
2. To integrate all related issuances of the DOH that provides rules and regulations in
the establishment and operations of BnBs; and
3. To define the roles and responsibilities of the different units of the DOH and other
partners from the different sectors in facilitating and regulating the establishment
of BnBs.
III. Status of the Program
Variants of the BnBs include Botika Binhi (funded by the members of the Peso for Health
with counterpart from the local government unit), Health Plus (funded by the GTZ),
Botika sa Parokya (funded by DOH and Office of the President) and the Botika ng Bayan
(BNB) express under PITC/ PITC Pharma Inc. At present, about 16,350 BnB outlets have
been established in the country.The initial target was to establish 1 BnB to serve 3
adjacent Barangays. However, due to the immensity of Barangays, and the need for
more than 1 BnB in some poor adjacent barangays to better provide for the service, the
target were changed to 1:1.Since absorptive capacity for the DOH-CHDs to establish
BnBs is also limited due to resource and time constraints, the initial phasing of the target
to achieve 1:1 is being done. Thus, for the next two (2) years, the target would be
initially 1:2 except for select areas that have high poverty incidence, conflict or
Geographically isolated areas, and the like where the target would be 1:1.
Sourcing of medicines for the initial seed capital of these medicines is done through PITC
Pharma Inc.
Issuances about Botika ng Barangay
Issuances

Date

Title

Department
January 26, Moratorium on the Establishment of Botika ng Barangay (BnB)
Memorandum No.
2011
Nationwide
2011-0022
Department
February
Memorandum No.
12, 2010
2010-0033

Submission of Reports for the Impact Assessment of Maximum Drug


Retail Price (MDRP) / Government

Department
February
Memorandum No.
21, 2008
2008-0038

Amendment to Memorandum No. 31 s. 2003 dated 17 February 2003


re: Drugs to be sold in Botika ng Barangays (BnBs)

Department
April 5,
Memorandum
2005
No. 2005-0046

Utilization of Slow-Moving Pharma 50 Botika ng Barangay (BnB)


Drugs and Medicines

Administrative
Order No. 20050011

Supplemental Guidelines to Administrative Order No. 144 series


2004, entitled: "Guidelines for the Establishment and Operations of
Botika ng Barangays (BnB) and Pharmaceutical Distribution
Network (PDNs)" relative to the inclusion of other drugs which are
classified as Prescription Drugs and other related matters

April 4,
2005

Department
November Botika ng Barangay Performance Monitoring Reports and Routine
Memorandum
22, 2004
Schedule of Submissions
No. 118 s. 2004
Administrative
Order No. 144 s.
2004

April 14,
2004

Memorandum No. February


31 s. 2003
17, 2003

Guidelines for the Establishment and Operations of Botika ng


Barangays (BnB) and Pharmaceutical Distribution Network (PDNs)
Drugs to be sold in Botika ng Barangays (BnBs)

Program Manager:
Fernando E. Depano
Health Education Promotion Officer IV
National Center for Pharmaceutical Access and Management (NCPAM)
Contact Number: 651-7800 local 2554/2555
Alice C. Laquindanum
Senior Health Program Officer
National Center for Pharmaceutical Access and Management (NCPAM)
Contact Number: 651-7800 local 2554/2555

BLOOD DONATION PROGRAM


Republic Act No. 7719, also known as the National Blood Services Act of 1994, promotes
voluntary blood donation to provide sufficient supply of safe blood and to regulate blood banks. This act
aims to inculcate public awareness that blood donation is a humanitarian act.
The National Voluntary Blood Services Program (NVBSP) of the Department of Health is
targeting the youth as volunteers in its blood donation program this year. In accordance with RA No. 7719,
it aims to create public consciousness on the importance of blood donation in saving the lives of millions of
Filipinos.
Based from the data from the National Voluntary Blood Services Program, a total of 654,763
blood units were collected in 2009. Fifty-eight percent of which was from voluntary blood donation and the
remaining from replacement donation. This year, particular provinces have already achieved 100%
voluntary blood donation. The DOH is hoping that many individuals will become regular voluntary unpaid
donors to guarantee sufficient supply of safe blood and to meet national blood necessities.
Mission:

Blood Safety
Blood Adequacy
Rational Blood Use

Efficiency of Blood Services


Goals:
The National Voluntary Blood Services Program (NVBSP) aims to achieve the following:
1. Development of a fully voluntary blood donation system;
2. Strengthening of a nationally coordinated network of BSF to increase efficiency by centralized testing
and processing of blood;
3. Implementation of a quality management system including of Good Manufacturing Practice GMP and
Management Information System (MIS);
4. Attainment of maximum utilization of blood through rational use of blood products and component
therapy; and

5. Development of a sound, viable sustainable management and funding for the nationally coordinated
blood network.
Program Manager:
Dr. Ponciano Limcangco
Department of Health-National Voluntary Blood Services Program (DOH-NVBSP)
Contact Number: 651-78-00 local 2900, 731-7578, 731-8475
Mr. Salvador Avdante, Jr.
Department of Health-National Voluntary Blood Services Program (DOH-NVBSP)
Contact Number: 651-78-00 local 2900, 731-7578, 731-8475

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
Contact Person:
Franklin C. Diza, MD, MPH
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), cancers chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes (DM)
are among the top killers in the Philippines, causing more than half of all deaths annually.
Hypertension and diseases of the heart are among the ten leading causes of illnesses
each year. These diseases are collectively known as Lifestyle Related Non-communicable
diseases (NCDs), as defined in the National Objectives for health, particularly because
these diseases have common risk factors which are to large extent related to unhealthy
lifestyle.
POLICY STATEMENT
The prevention and control of chronic lifestyle related non-communicable diseases shall
be guided by the following policy statements.
1. The country shall adopt an integrated, comprehensive and community based response
for the prevention and control of chronic, lifestyle related NCDs.
2. Health promotion strategies shall be intensified to effect changes that would lead to
significant reduction in mortality and morbidity due to chronic lifestyle related NCDs.
3. Complementary accountabilities of all stakeholders must be ensured and actively
pursued in the implementation of an integrated, comprehensive and community based
response to chronic lifestyle related NCDs.
OBJECTIVE

1. Decrease of morbidity and mortality

2. Decrease in the economic burden of CVDs to the individual, family and community
STRATEGIES IMPLEMENTED
Adopted in the context of health promotion in order to decrease the chances of the
targeted population to adopt high risk behaviours and habits that may lead to the
development of cardiovascular disease

Will be implemented by setting:


Community-based
School-based
Industry-based
Hospital-based
Training, research, environmental support system are important components of the
progress
STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION / ACTION
Program is well in place and its implementation is continuous. Focus of implementation is
in the community level and other settings.
Development of Administrative Order on the National Policy on the integrated chronic
non-communicable disease registry system (cancer, stroke, DM and COPD).
1st public hearing on the Administrative Order on the National Policy on the integrated
chronic non-communicable disease registry system with CHD-NCR, government and
private hospitals and non-government agencies.
Trained hospitals for the registry system entitled Users training for the Unified
Registry System.
Trained CHDs for the Registry system.
Establishment of Philippine Coalition on the prevention and control of NCD.
A training manual for health workers on promoting healthy lifestyle.
Healthy lifestyle advocacy campaign.
Manual of operations on the prevention and control lifestyle related non-communicable
diseases in the Philippines.

Training manual for Health workers: WHO/ DOH smoking cessation clinic: Helping
smokers quit.
FUTURE PLAN/ACTION
Implement the program through the institutionalized integrated program of NCDlifestyle related diseases control program.
Development of service package for cardiovascular diseases.
Development of clinical practice guideline for cardiovascular disease.
Development of strategic framework and five year strategic plan for cardiovascular
disease (2012-2016).
MISSION
To ensure that quality prevention and control and LRD services are accessible to all,
especially to the vulnerable and at-risk population.
VISION
A nation of Filipinos with healthy lifestyle and habits, living and working in clean and safe
environment and with access to adequate medical care for CVD.

CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE


Contact Person:
Franklin c. Diza, MD, MPH
Respiratory conditions impose an enormous burden on society. According to the WHO World Health Report
2000, the top five respiratory disease account for 17.4% of all deaths and 13.3% of all Disability Adjusted
Life Years (DALYs). Lower respiratory tract infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),
tuberculosis and lung cancer are among the leading 10 causes of death worldwide. Based partly on
demographic changes in in the developing world, but also on the changes in health care systemss
schooling, income and tobacco use, the burden of communicable diseases is likely to lessen while the
burden of CRDs including asthma, COPD and lung cancer will worsen because of tobacco use.
POLICY STATEMENT:
The prevention and control of chronic lifestyle related non communicable diseases shall be guided by the
following policy statements:
1.
The country shall adopt an integrated, comprehensive and community based response for the
prevention and control of chronic, lifestyle related NCDs.
2.
Health promotion strategies shall be intensified to effect changes that would lead to a significant
reduction in mortality and morbidity due to chronic lifestyle related NCDs.
3.
Complementary accountabilities of all stakeholders must be ensured and actively pursued in the
implementation of an integrated, comprehensive and community base response to chronic lifestyle related
NCDs.

OBJECTIVES
1.
Decrease of morbidity and mortality
2.
Decrease in the economic burden of CVDs to the individual, family and community.
STRATEGIES IMPLEMENTED BY THE DOH

Adopted in the context of health promotion in order to decrease the chances of the targeted
population to adopt high risk behaviours and habits that may lead to the development of COPD.

Will be implemented by setting:


Community-based
School-based
Industry-based
Hospital-based

Training, research, environmental support system are important components of the progress
STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION / ACTION
1.
Development of Administrative Order on the National Policy on the integrated chronic noncommunicable disease registry system (cancer, stroke, DM and COPD).
2.
1st public hearing on the Administrative Order on the National Policy on the integrated chronic noncommunicable disease registry system with CHD-NCR, government and private hospitals and nongovernment agencies.
3.
Trained hospitals for the registry system entitled Users training for the Unified Registry System.
4.
Trained CHDs for the Registry system.
5.
Establishment of Philippine Coalition on the prevention and control of NCD.
6.
A training manual for health workers on promoting healthy lifestyle.
7.
Healthy lifestyle advocacy campaign.
8.
Manual of operations on the prevention and control lifestyle related non-communicable diseases in
the Philippines.
9.
Training manual for Health workers: WHO/ DOH smoking cessation clinic: Helping smokers quit.
FUTURE PLAN/ACTION

Implement the program through the institutionalized integrated program of NCD-lifestyle related
diseases control program.

Development of service package for cardiovascular diseases.

Development of clinical practice guideline for cardiovascular disease.

Development of strategic framework and five year strategic plan for cardiovascular disease (20122016).
MISSION: To ensure that quality prevention and control and LRD services are accessible to all, especially
to the vulnerable and at-risk population.
VISION: Improved quality of life for all Filipinos.

CLIMATE CHANGE
Ano ang CLIMATE CHANGE?
Ang climate change ay ang pagbabago ng klima o panahon dahil sa pagtaas ng mg greenhouse gases na nagpapainit sa
mundo. Nagdudulot ito ng mga sakuna kagaya ng heatwave, baha at tagtuyot na maaaring magdulot ng pagkakasakit o
pagkamatay. Kapag tumaas ang temperatura ng mundo, dadami ang mga sakit kagaya ng dengue, diarrhea,
malnutrisyon at iba pa.
Sanhi ng CLIMATE CHANGE
Ayon sa pag-aaral, ang dalawang sanhi ng climate change ay ang:

1. Natural na pagbabago ng klima ng buong mundo nitong mga nagdaang matagal na panahon. Ito ay sama-samang
epekto ng enerhiya mula sa araw, sa pag-ikot ng mundo, at sa init na nagmumula sa ilalim ng lupa na nagpapataas ng
temperatura o init sa hangin na bumabalot sa mundo.
2. Mga gawain ng tao na nagbubunga ng pagdami o pagtaas ng carbon dioxide at iba pang greenhouse gases )GHGs).
ANg GHGs ang nagkukulong ng init sa mundo. Ang pagbuga ng carbon dioxide ng mga sasakyang gumagamit ng
gasolina, ang pagputol ng mga puno na siya sanang mag-aalis ng carbon dioxide sa hangin, at pagkabulok ng mga bagay
na organic na nagbubunga ng methane (isa pang uri ng GHGs) ay ilan sa mga dahilan ng climate change.
Epektong Pangkalusugan ng CLIMATE CHANGE
Mga epekto sa tao ng matinding init, tagtuyot at bagyo.

Pagtaas ng bilang ng kaso ng mga sakit na:


- Dala ng tubig o pagkain tulad ng choler at iba pang sakit na may pagtatae.
- Dala ng insekto tulad ng lamok )malaria at dengue) at ng daga (Leptospirosis).
Dulot ng polusyon (allergy)
Malnutrisyon at epektong panglipunan dulot ng pagkasira ng mga komunidad at pangkabuhayan nito.

DENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM


Oral disease continues to be a serious public health problem in the Philippines. The prevalence of
dental caries on permanent teeth has generally remained above 90% throughout the years. About
92.4% of Filipinos have tooth decay (dental caries) and 78% have gum diseases (periodontal
diseases) (DOH, NMEDS 1998). Although preventable, these diseases affect almost every Filipino at
one point or another in his or her lifetime.
Table 1: Prevalence of the Two Most Common Oral Diseases by Year, Philippines
YEAR

Prevalence
Dental Caries

Peridontal Disease

1987

93.9%

65.5%

1992

96.3%

48.1%

1998

92.4%

78.3%

The oral health status of Filipino children is alarming. The 2006 National Oral Health Survey (Monse B. et al,
NOHS 2006) investigated the oral health status of Philippine public elementary school students. It revealed that 97.1% of
six-year-old children suffer from tooth decay. More than four out of every five children of this subgroup manifested
symptoms of dentinogenic infection. In addition, 78.4% of twelve-year-old children suffer from dental caries and 49.7% of
the same age group manifested symptoms of dentinogenic infections. The severity of dental caries, expressed as the
average number of decayed teeth indicated for filling/extraction or filled permanent teeth (DMFT) or temporary teeth
(dmft), was 8.4 dmft for the six-year-old age group and 2.9 DMFT for the twelve-year-old age group (NOHS 2006).
Table 2 - Dental caries Experience (Mean DMFT/dmft), per age groups, Philippines

Age in Years NMEDS 1982 NMEDS 1987 NMEDS 1992 NMEDS 1998
6

NMEDS 2006
8.4 dmft

12

6.39

5.52

5.43

4.58

8.51

8.25

6.3

14.82

14.42

15.04

15-19
35-44

14.18

2.9

Filipinos bear the burden of gum diseases early in their childhood. According to NOHS, 74% of twelve-year-old
children suffer from gingivitis. If not treated early, these children become susceptible to irreversible periodontal disease as
they enter adolescence and approach adulthood.
In general, tooth decay and gum diseases do not directly cause disability or death. However, these conditions
can weaken bodily defenses and serve as portals of entry to other more serious and potentially dangerous systemic
diseases and infections. Serious conditions include arthritis, heart disease, endocarditis, gastro-intestinal diseases, and
ocular-skin-renal diseases. Aside from physical deformity, these two oral diseases may also cause disturbance of
speechsignificant enough to affect work performance, nutrition, social interactions, income, and self-esteem.
Poor
oral health poses detrimental effects on school performance and mars success in later life. In fact, children who suffer
from poor oral health are 12 times more likely to have restricted-activity days (USGAO 2000). In the Philippines, toothache
is a common ailment among schoolchildren, and is the primary cause of absenteeism from school (Araojo 2003, 103-110).
Indeed, dental and oral diseases create a silent epidemic, placing a heavy burden on Filipino schoolchildren.
VISION:

Empowered and responsible Filipino citizens taking care of their own personal oral health for an

enhanced quality of life


MISSION:
GOAL:

The state shall ensure quality, affordable, accessible and available oral health care delivery.
Attainment of improved quality of life through promotion of oral health and quality oral health care.

OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS:


1.

The prevalence of dental caries is reduce

Annual Target : 5% reduction of the prevalence rate every year


2.

The prevalence of periodontal disease is reduced

Annual Targets : 5% reduction of the prevalence rate every year


3.

Dental caries experience is reduced

Annual Target : 5% reduction of the mean dmft/DMFT for 5/6 years old and 12 years old children every year
4.

The proportion of Orally Fit Children (OFC) 12-71 months old is increased

Annual Targets : Increased by 20% yearly

The national government is primarily tasked to develop policies and guideline for local government units. In 2007,
the Department of Health formulated the Guidelines in the Implementation of Oral Health Program for Public Health

Services (AO 2007-0007). The program aims to reduce the prevalence rate of dental caries to 85% and periodontal
disease by to 60% by the end of 2016. The program seeks to achieve these objectives by providing preventive, curative,
and promotive dental health care to Filipinos through a lifecycle approach. This approach provides a continuum of quality
care by establishing a package of essential basic oral health care (BOHC) for every lifecycle stage, starting from infancy
to old age.
The following are the basic package of essential oral health services/care for every lifecycle group to be provided
either in health facilities, schools or at home.

TYPES OF SERVICE
LIFECYCLE
(Basic Oral Health Care Package)

Mother(Pregnant
Women) **

Neonatal and Infants


under 1 year old**

Oral Examination
Oral Prophylaxis (scaling)
Permanent fillings
Gum treatment
Health instruction

Dental check-up as soon as the first tooth erupts


Health instructions on infant oral health care and
advise on exclusive breastfeeding

Dental check-up as soon as the first tooth appears


and every 6 months thereafter

Supervised tooth brushing drills

Oral Urgent Treatment (OUT)

Children 12-71 months


old **

- removal of unsavable teeth


- referral of complicated cases
- treatment of post extraction complications
- drainage of localized oral abscess

School Children (6-12


years old)

Adolescent and Youth


(10-24 years old)**
Other Adults (25-59
years old)

Application of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment


(ART)

Oral Examination
Supervising tooth brushing drills
Topical fluoride theraphy
Pits and Fissure Sealant Application
Oral Prophylaxis
Permanent Fillings

Oral Examination
Health promotion and education on oral hygiene, and
adverse effect on consumption of sweets and sugary
beverages, tobacco and alcohol

Oral Examination
Emergency dental treatment
Health instruction and advice

Older Person (60 years


old and above)**

Referrals

Oral Examination
Extraction of unsavable tooth
Gum treatment
Relief of Pain
Health instruction and advice

STRATEGIES AND ACTION POINTS:


1. Formulate policy and regulations to ensure the full implementation of OHP
a. Establishment of effective networking system (Deped, DSWD, LGU, PDA, Fit for School, Academe and others)
b. Development of policies, standards, guidelines and clinical protocols
- Fluoride Use
- Toothbrushing
- Other Preventive Measures
2. Ensure financial access to essential public and personal oral health services
a. Develop an outpatient benefit package for oral health under the NHIP of the government
b. Develop financing schemes for oral health applicable to other levels of care ( Fee for service, Cooperatives,
Network with HMOS)
c. Restoration of oral health budget line item in the GAA of DOH Central Office
3. Provide relevant, timely and accurate information management system for oral Health.
a. Improve existing information system/data collection (reporting and recording dental services and
accomplishments )
- setting of essential indicators
- development of IT system on recording and reporting oral health service accomplishments and indices
- Integrate oral health in every family health information tools, recording books/manuals
b. Conduct Regular Epidemiological Dental Surveys every 5 years
4. Ensure access and delivery of quality oral health care servicesa.
a. Upgrading of facilities, equipment, instruments, supplies
b. Develop packages of essential care/services for different groups (children, mothers and marginalized groups)
-revival of the sealant program for school children
- toothbrushing program for pre-school children
- outreach programs for marginalized groups

c. Design and implement grant assistance mechanism for high performing LGUs
- Awards and incentives
- Sub-allotment of funds for priority programs/activities
d. Regular conduct of consultation meetings, technical updates and program implementation reviews with
stakeholders
5. Build up highly motivated health professionals and trained auxilliaries to manage and provide quality oral
health care
a. Provision of adequate dental personnel
b. Capacity enhancement programs for dental personnel and non-dental personnel

Current FHSIS Indicators/parameters:


a)
Orally Fit Child (OFC) Proportion of children 12-71 months old and are orally fit during a given point of
time. Is defined as a child who meets the following conditions upon oral examination and/or completion of treatment a)
caries- free or carious tooth/teeth filled either with temporary or permanent filling materials, b) have healthy gums, c) has
no oral debris, and d) No handicapping dento-facial anomaly or no dento-facial anomaly that limits normal function of the
oral cavity
b)

Children 12-71 months old provided with Basic Oral Health Care (BOHC)

c)

Adolescent and Youth (10-24 years old) provided with Basic Oral Health care (BOHC)

d)

Pregnant Women provided with Basic oral Health Care (BOHC)

e)

Older Persons 60 years old and above provided with Basic Oral Health Care (BOHC)

Policy/Standards/Guidelines formulated/developed:
a.

AO. 101 s. 2003 dated Oct. 14, 2003 National Policy on Oral Health

b.
AO 2007-0007 Dated January 3, 2007 Guidelines In The Implementation Of Oral Health Program For
Public Health Services In The Philippines
c.
AO 4-s.1998 Revised Rules and Regulations and Standard Requirements for Private School Dental
services in the Philippines
d.

AO 11-D s. 1998 Revised Standard Requirements for Hospital Dental services in the Philippines

e.
AO 3 s. 1998 - Revised Rules and Regulations and Standard Requirements for Occupational Dental
services in the Philippines
f.

AO 4-A s. 1998 Infection Control Measures for Dental Health Services

Trainings/Capacity Enhancement Program:

a.

Basic Orientation Course on Management of Public Health Dentist

The training program was designed with the Public Health Dentists (PHDs) as the main recipients of the Basic Course
on the Management of Oral Health Program. The training is expected to provide an in-depth understanding of the
different roles and functions of the PHDs in the management and delivery of Public Health Services. A training module
was developed for the basic course.

Researches:
a.

National Monitoring Evaluation Dental Survey (NMEDS).

The Department of Health (DOH) has been conducting nationwide surveys every five years (1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, and
1998) to determine the prevalence of oral diseases in the Philippines. Data gathered provide continuous information that
enables planners to update data used in planning, implementation and evaluation of existing oral health programs. The
latest NMEDS was conducted in 2011. Results will be available on the 1 st quarter of 2012.

Existing

Working Group for Oral Health:


National Technical Working Group (TWG) on Oral Health (DPO 2005-1197)
Member Agencies:

Department of Health (NCDPC, HHRDB, NCHP)

DOH- Center for Health Development for NCR, Central Luzon and Calabarzon
Philippine Dental Association
Department of Education
Up- College of Public Health
Department of Interior and Local Government
Department of Social Welfare and Development
Local Government Units ( Makati, Quezon City)

Print materials:
1.

Leaflets (Malakas ang dating Buo ang Ngipin) for Children, Adolescent, Pregnant Women and Older Person

2.

Training Module on Basic Course on Management of Oral Health Program

Non-Government Organization Major Partners:


Philippine Dental Association
Fit for School, Inc.

Program Managers/Coordinators:
Dr. Manuel F. Calonge
Chief Health Program Officer
National Oral Health Program Coordinator
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control
Department of Health
Manila, Philippines
(632) 651-7800 loc. 1726-1730
E-Mail : mfcalonge@yahoo.com

REGIONAL DENTAL COORDINATORS

REGION

CHD DENTAL COORDINATORS

CHD FOR CORDILLERA


BGMC Compound, Baguio City

Dr. Flora B. Pelingen

(CAR)

dayemanfbp@yahoo.com

CHD FOR ILOCOS


Dr. Artemio R. Licos
San Fernando, La Union
licosddm@yahoo.com
(Region 1)

CHD FOR CAGAYAN VALLEY


Dr. Josefino Flores
Tuguegarao, Cagayan
jess1958@yahoo.com
(Region 2)

CHD FOR CENTRAL LUZON

Dr. Blessilda Sanchez

San Fernando, Pampanga


bdsanch@yahoo.com
(Region 3)

CHD FOR SOUTHERN TAGALOG


(Calabarzon-A)

Dr. Edwina Go

Project 4, Quezon City

Dr_edwina_go@yahoo.com

(Region 4)

CHD FOR SOUTHERN TAGALOG


Dr. Maria Gracia S. Gabriel
(Mimaropa-B)
dental.chd4b@yahoo.com
Project 4, Quezon City

CHD FOR BICOL


Dr. Elena Cortez
Lagaspi City, Albay
drelenacortez@yahoo.com
(Region 5)

CHD FOR WESTERN VISAYAS


Dr. Clodualdo B. Divinagracia Jr.
Mandurriao, Iloilo City
drcdjr_10@yahoo.com
(Region 6)

CHD FOR CENTRAL VISAYAS

Dr. Expedito Medalla/Dr. Phillip Yray Jr.

Cebu City

paddymedalla@yahoo.com.ph

(Region 7)

CHD FOR EASTERN VISAYAS


Dr. Ma. Vilma Estorba
Tacloban City
Mavill7@yahoo.com.ph
(Region 8)

CHD FOR ZAMBOANGA PENINSULA


Dr. Manuel Isagan
Zamboanga City
09172063878
(Region 9)

CHD FOR NORTHERN MINDANAO


Dr. Fe Paler
Carmen, Cagayan de Oro City
febpaler_52@yahoo.com.ph
(Region 10)

Dr. Memory Padua


CHD FOR DAVAO REGION
mems_bryan@yahoo.com
Bajada, Davao
Ms. Ma. Theresa Ronquillo
(Region 11)
matetrequillo@yahoo.com

CHD SOCCKSARGEN
Dr. Anna Liza Alo
Cotabato City
annaliza71@yahoo.com
(Region 12)

CHD FOR CARAGA


Dr. Ma. Carmela Mary Beltran
Butuan City
Maria_carmelamary@yahoo.com
(CARAGA)

CHD FOR METRO MANILA

Dr. Alexander Alberto

Welfareville Subd., Mandaluyong City

09158801332

(NCR)

AUTONOMOUS REGION FOR MUSLIM


MINDANAO
(ARMM)

Dr. Shalmalynne Ampatuan


Shall_dent@yahoo.com.ph

Cotabato City

DIABETES PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROGRAM


Contact Person:
Rosemarie P. Holandes

Diabetes is a global concern that cuts across geographical boundaries regardless of race, sex,
status and age. Diabetes and its complications impose a heavy burden to the individual, his family and
society in general. Some of its serious effects are disability, poor quality of life and premature death. These
impact not only on health care cost but more significantly on national growth and development.
GOAL
To reduce morbidity, mortality and disability rates due to chronic lifestyle related non-communicable
diseases through an integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of lifestyle
related diseases.
OBJECTIVES
1.
To develop and promote an integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of
lifestyle related diseases in the country.
2.
To engage all province-wide or city-wide health systems to adopt an integrated and comprehensive
program on the prevention and control of lifestyle related diseases.
3.

To achieve improvement in the following key performance indicators from 2011-2016.

INTERVENTIONS / STRATEGIES IMPLEMENTED BY DOH


The action framework has seven (7) action areas as follows: (1) Environmental Interventions (2) Lifestyle
interventions (3) Clinical interventions (4) Advocacy (5) Research, surveillance, monitoring and evaluation
(6) Networking and coalition building (7) Health system strengthening
STATUS IMPLEMENTATION/ ACCOMPLISHMENT

Policy/standard/ Guidelines Development

Development of clinical practice guidelines on diabetes and other NCDs are on-going

Promotion and Advocacy

Conduct of healthy lifestyle to the MAX campaign- this advocacy focuses on clear health priorities such as
consumption of healthy diet, promoting physical activity, curbing the use of tobacco, alcohol and illegal
drugs, proper weight and stress management, early detection and control of hypertension.

Coalition Building

Also known as healthy lifestyle coalition, the DOH encourages the fast food establishments to offer
healthier food choices by reducing the fat, sugar and salt content as well as trans-fatty acids in the food
they serve.

Future Plan/ Action

Printing and dissemination of clinical practice guidelines on diabetes- Orientation/forum will be conducted
among NCD coordinators in CHDs and hospitals to discuss details of the CPG. Experts from diabetes
societies will be invited as speakers.
Continue conduct of promotion and advocacy activities and partnership with specialty societies and other
stakeholders on NCD prevention and control including diabetes.
Ensure implementation of diabetes registry
Together with National Center for Health Promotion and other experts on diabetes, develop various
information-education materials on the prevention and management o diabetes for dissemination to
various clients.

DENGUE PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROGRAM


The National Dengue Prevention and Control Program was first initiated by the
Department of Health (DOH) in 1993. Region VII and the National Capital Region served
as the pilot sites. It was not until 1998 when the program was implemented nationwide.
The target populations of the program are the general population, the local government
units, and the local health workers.
Vision:

Dengue Risk-Free Philippines

Mission:
To improve the quality of health of Filipinos by adopting an integrated
dengue control approach in the prevention and control of dengue infection.
Goal:
Reduce morbidity and mortality from dengue infection by preventing
the transmission of the virus from the mosquito vector human.
Objectives:
The objectives of the program are categorized into three: health status objectives; risk
reduction objectives; and services & protection objectives.

Health Status Objectives:

Reduce incidence from 32 cases/100,000 population to 20 cases/100,000


population;
Reduce case fatality rate by <1%; and
Detect and contain all epidemics.

Risk Reduction Objectives:

Reduce the risk of human exposure to aedes bite by House index of <5 and
Breteau index of 20;
Increase % of HH practicing removal of mosquito breeding places to 80%; and
Increase awareness on DF/DHF to 100%.

Services & Protection Objectives:

Establish a Dengue Reference Laboratory capable of performing IgM capture


ELISA for Dengue Surveillance;
Increase the % of 1 and 2 government hospitals with laboratory capable of
platelet count and hematocrit; and
Ensure surveillance and investigation of all epidemics.

Partner Organizations/Agencies:
The following organizations/agencies take part in the achievement of the programs
objectives:

World Health Organization (WHO)


United Nations childrens Fund (UNICEF)
Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
Department of Education (DepEd)
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth)

Program Manager:
Dr. Lyndon L. Lee Suy
Department of Health-National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (DOH-NCDPC)
Contact Number: 651-78-00 local 2353
Email: donleesuymd@yahoo.com

EMERGING AND RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASE


PROGRAM

Emerging and re-emerging infections (e.g., SARS, meningococcemia, Avian Influenza or bird flu, A
(H1N1) virus infection) threaten countries all over the world.
In 2003, SARS affected at least 30 countries with most of the countries from Asia. In response to its
sudden and unexpected emergence, quarantine and isolation measures and rapid contract tracing were
carried out. The Philippines was able to minimize the impact of SARS through effective information
dissemination, risk communication, and efficient conduct of measures.
The unexpected and unusual increase in cases of meningococcal disease (meningococcemia as the
predominant form) in the Cordillera Autonomous Region resulted to at least 50% of cases in the early stage
of occurrence.
In 2009, the influenza A (H1N1) virus infection led to global epidemic, or most popularly known as
pandemic. On June 11, 2009, a full pandemic alert was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO).
However, some local health offices from many provinces were not able to respond effectively and
rapidly. With the lack of strong linkages and coordinating mechanisms, the Department of Health (DOH)
hopes to further improve the functionality and effectiveness of local response systems.
Efforts to prepare for emerging infections with potential for causing high morbidity and mortality are
being done by the program. Applicable prevention and control measures are being integrated while the
existing systems and organizational structures are further strengthened.

Goal:
Prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging infectious disease from becoming public
health problems.

Objectives:
The program aims to:
1. Reduce public health impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; and
2. Strengthen surveillance, preparedness, and response to emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

Program Strategies:
The DOH, in collaboration with its partner organizations/agencies, employs the key strategies:
1. Development of systems, policies, standards, and guidelines for preparedness and response to emerging
diseases;
2. Technical Assistance or Technical Collaboration;
3. Advocacy/Information dissemination;
4. Intersectoral collaborations;
5. Capability building for management, prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging diseases that
may pose epidemic/pandemic threat; and

6. Logistical support for drugs and vaccines for meningococcemia and anti-viral drugs and vaccine for
Pandemic Influenza Preparedness.

Partner Organizations/Agencies:
The following organizations/agencies take part in achieving the goal of the program:

World Health Organization (WHO)


United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF)
Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
Department of Education (DepEd)
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
Philippine Health Insurane Corporation (PhilHealth)
Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Animal Industry (DA-BAI)

Program Manager:
Dr. Lyndon L. Lee Suy
Department of Health-National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (DOH-NCDPC)
Contact Number: 651-78-00 local 2353
Email: donleesuymd@yahoo.com

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Health is concerned with preventing illness through managing the
environment and by changing people's behavior to reduce exposure to biological and
non-biological agents of disease and injury. It is concerned primarily with effects of the
environment to the health of the people.
Program strategies and activities are focused on environmental sanitation,
environmental health impact assessment and occupational health through inter-agency
collaboration. An Inter-Agency COmmittee on Environmental Health was created by
virute of E.O. 489 to facilitate and improve coordination among concerned agencies. It
provides the venue for technical collaboration, effective monitoring and communication,
resource mobilization, policy review and development. The Committee has five sectoral
task forces on water, solid waste, air, toxic and chemical substances and occupational
health.
Vision: Health Settings for All Filipinos
Mission: Provide leadership in ensuring health settings

Goals:
Reduction of environmental and occupational related diseases, disabilities and deaths
through health promotion and mitigation of hazards and risks in the environment and
worksplaces.
Strategic Objectives
1. Development of evidence-based policies, guidelines, standards, programs and
parameters for specific healthy settings.
2. Provision of technical assistance to implementers and other relevant partners
3. Strengthening inter-sectoral collaboration and broad based mass participation for the
promotion and attainment of healthy settings
Key Result Areas

Appropriate development and regular evaluation of relevant programs,


projects, policies and plans on environmental and occupational health
Timely provision of technical assistance to Centers for Health Development
(CHDs) and other partners
Development of responsive/relevant legislative and research agenda on DPC
Timely provision of technical inputs to curriculum development and conduct of
human resource development
Timely provision of technically sound advice to the Secretary and other
stakeholders
Timely and adequate provision of strategic logistics

Components

Inter- agency Committee on Environmental Health


IACEH Task Force on Water
IACEH Task Force on Solid Waste
IACEH Task Force on Toxic Chemicals
IACEH Task Force on Occupational Health Environmental Sanitation
Environmental Health Impact Assessment Occupational Health

EXPANDED PROGRAM ON IMMUNIZATION


I.

Rationale

The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) was established in 1976 to ensure that infants/children and
mothers have access to routinely recommended infant/childhood vaccines. Six vaccine-preventable
diseases were initially included in the EPI: tuberculosis, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and
measles. In 1986, 21.3% fully immunized children less than fourteen months of age based on the EPI
Comprehensive Program review.

II.

Scenario

Global Situation
The burden
In 2002, WHO estimated that 1.4 million of deaths among children under 5 years due to diseases that
could have been prevented by routine vaccination. This represents 14% of global total mortality in children
under 5 years of age.

Source: Weekly Epidemiological Record, WHO: No.46,2011,86.509-520)


Burden of Diseases
The immunization coverage of all individual vaccines has improved as shown in Figure 1: (Demographic
Health Survey 2003 and 2008). Fully Immunized Child (FIC) coverage improved by 10% and the Child
Protected at Birth (CPAB) against Tetanus improved by 13% compared to any prior period. Thus, the
Philippines has nowhistorically the highest coverage for these two major indicators.

Figure 1: Comparison of the 2003 and 2008 EPI indicators, Source: NDHS

III.

Interventions/ Strategies

Program Objectives/Goals:

Over-all Goal:
To reduce the morbidity and mortality among children against the most common vaccine-preventable
diseases.

Specific Goals:
1. To immunize all infants/children against the most common vaccine-preventable diseases.
2. To sustain the polio-free status of the Philippines.
3. To eliminate measles infection.

4. To eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus


5. To control diphtheria, pertussis, hepatitis b and German measles.
6. To prevent extra pulmonary tuberculosis among children.

Mandates:
Republic Act No. 10152MandatoryInfants and Children Health Immunization Act of
2011Signed by President Benigno Aquino III in July 26, 2010. The mandatory includes basic
immunization for children under 5 including other types that will be determined by the
Secretary of Health.

Strategies:

Conduct of Routine Immunization for Infants/Children/Women through the Reaching


Every Barangay (REB) strategy

REB strategy, an adaptation of the WHO-UNICEF Reaching Every District (RED), was introduced in
2004 aimed to improve the access to routine immunization and reduce drop-outs. There are 5 components
of the strategy, namely: data analysis for action, re-establish outreach services, , strengthen links between
the community and service, supportive supervision and maximizing resources.

Supplemental Immunization Activity (SIA)

Supplementary immunization activities are used to reach children who have not been vaccinated or have
not developed sufficient immunity after previous vaccinations. It can be conducted either national or subnational in selected areas.

Strengthening Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Surveillance

This is critical for the eradication/elimination efforts, especially in identifying true cases of measles and
indigenous wild polio virus

IV.

Procurement of adequate and potent vaccines and needles and syringes to all health facilities
nationwide

Status of implementation/ Accomplishment

All health facilities (health centers and barangay health stations) have at least one (1) health
staff trained on REB.

Polio Eradication:

The Philippines has sustained its polio-free status since October 2000.
Declining Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) third dose coverage since 2008 from 91% to 83%. A least
95% OPV3 coverage need to be achieved to produce the required herd immunity for
protection.

Figure 2 OPV1 and OPV3 Coverage, Philippines, 2005-2010

There is an on-going polio mass immunization to all children ages 6 weeks up to 59 months old
in the 10 highest risk areas for neonatal tetanus. These areas are the following: Abra, Banguet,
Isabela City and Basilan, Lanao Norte, Cotabato City, Maguindanao, Lanao Sur, Marawi City
and Sulu.

Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) reporting rate has decreased from 1.44 in 2010 to 1.38 in 2011.
Only regions III, V and VIII have achieved the AFP rate of 2/100,000 children below 15 years
old. (Source: NEC, DOH). A decreasing AFP rate means we may not be able to find true cases
of polio and may experience resurgence of polio cases

Measles Elimination

Conducted 4 rounds of mass measles campaign: 1998, 2004, 2007 and 2011.
Implemented the 2-dose measles-containing vaccine (MCV) in 2009
MCV1 (monovalent measles) at 9-11 months old
MCV2 (MMR) at 12-15 months old.

Implemented and strengthened the laboratory surveillance for confirmation of measles. Blood
samples are withdrawn from all measles suspect to confirm the case as measles infection.
A supplemental immunization campaign for measles and rubella (German measles) was done
in 2011. This was dubbed as Iligtas sa Tigdas ang Pinas 15.6 million (84%) out of the 18.5
million children ages 9 months to 8 years old were given 1 dose of the measles-rubella (MR)
vaccine between April and June 2011.

Rapid coverage assessment (RCA) were conducted in selected areas to validate immunization
coverage, assess high quality and that there are NO missed child in every barangay. Overall
RCA results showed that 70,594 (97.6%) out of 72,353 9 months to 8 years old living in the
randomly selected barangays were vaccinated. There are 3,494 barangays with a population
of 1000 and above that were randomly selected. 97.6% of all eligible children were given the
MR vaccine during the immunization campaign.

The Government of the Philippines spent PhP 635.7M for the successful conduct of the MR
campaign.ss high quality and that there are NO missed child in every barangay. Overall RCA

results showed that 70,594 (97.6%) out of 72,353 9 months to 8 years old living in the
randomly selected barangays were vaccinated. There are 3,494 barangays with a population
of 1000 and above that were randomly selected. 97.6% of all eligible children were given the
MR vaccine during the immunization campaign.

As of Morbidity Week 8 of 2012, there were 92 confirmed cases: 60 cases were laboratory
confirmed, 5 cases were epidemiologically-linked and 27 clinically confirmed. This means we
have at least 60 true measles at present. Measles is said to be eliminated if we have 1 case
per million or below 100 cases in a year

Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination

10 areas were classified as highest risk for neonatal tetanus (NT). Figure 3 shows the areas
categorized as low risk, at risk and highest risk based on the NT surveillance, skilled birth
attendants and facility based delivery and the tetanus toxoid 2+ (TT 2+) vaccination.

Figure 3: Level of Risk for NT, Philippines

Three (3) rounds of TT vaccination are currently on-going in the 10 highest risk areas. An
estimated 1,010,751 women age 15 - 40 year old women regardless of their TT immunization
will receive the vaccine during these rounds. This is funded by the Kiwanis International
through UNICEF and World Health Organization.

Control of other common vaccine-preventable diseases (Diphtheria, Pertussis, Hepatitis B and


Meningitis/Encephalitis secondary to H. influenzae type B)
Continuous vaccination for infants and children with the DPT or the combination DPT-HepB-HiB Type B.
Annex1 EPI Annual Accomplishment Report. DOH procures all the vaccines and needles and syringes for
the immunization activities targeted to infants/children/mothers.
Hepatitis B Control

Republic Act No. 10152 has been signed. It is otherwise known as the Mandatory Infants and
Children Health Immunization Act of 2011, which requires that all children under five years old
be given basic immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases. Specifically, this bill
provides for all infants to be given the birth dose of the Hepatitis-B vaccine within 24 hours of
birth.
One strategy to strengthen Hepatitis B coverage is to integrate birth dose in the Essential
Intrapartum and Newborn Care Package (EINC). In 2011, 11 tertiary hospitals are already EINC
compliant.
The goal of Hepatitis B control is to reduce the chronic hepatitis B infection rate as measured
by HBsAg prevalence to less than 1% in five-year-olds born after routine vaccination started
100% Hepatitis B at birth vaccination.

Figure 4

Hepatitis B Coverage. Philippines, 2001-2011

Timing of administration/dose

2009

2010*

2011*

<24 hours

34%

38%

14%

>24 hours

62%

55%

24%

Hep B 3rd dose

86%

81%

30%

*both 2010 and 2011 data are as of October 2011

Vaccines and cold chain management

Upgraded the cold chain equipment in the 80 provinces, 38 cities and 16 regions since 2003.
An effective vaccine management assessment was conducted last December 2011 and
revealed cold chain capacity gaps from the national up to the implementers level.
A total of PhP 267 million is required to address the gaps identified during the assessment.

Introduction to New Vaccines

V.

For 2012, Rotavirus and Pneumococcal vaccines will be introduced in the national
immunization program. Immunization will be prioritized among the infants of families listed in
the National Housing and Targeting System (NHTS) for Poverty Reduction nationwide.
The Government of the Philippines has allocated PhP 1.6 billion for the procurement of these 2
vaccines.

Future Plan/ Action

Strengthening the Cold Chain to support the Immunization Program


Capacity Building for Health Workers for the Introduction of New Vaccines
Advocacy for the financial sustainability for the newly introduced vaccines for expansion.
Development of the comprehensive multi-year plan for immunization program.

VI. Other Significant information worth mentioning

One significant milestone is that the budget allocation for the immunization program has
continued to increase year by year
The Government of the Philippines allocated budget for the immunization of all
infants/children/women/older persons nationwide. For 2012, the budget for EPI is PhP1.8
billion and another P1.5 Billion for the immunization for senior citizen and children for the
NHTS families. This is great leap towards universal access to quality vaccines for the
prevention of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases.

Program Managers:

Dr. Joyce Ducusin


Medical Specialist IV
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control - Family Health Office
Telephone Number: 651-7800 locals 1726-1730

Ms. Luzviminda Garcia


Supervising Health Program Officer
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control - Family Health Office
Telephone Number: 651-7800 locals 1726-1730

ESSENTIAL NEWBORN CARE


Profile/Rationale of the Health Program
The Child Survival Strategy published by the Department of Health has emphasized the need to strengthen
health services of children throughout the stages. The neonatal period has been identified as one of the
most crucial phase in the survival and development of the child. The United Nations Millennium
Development Goal Number 4 of reducing under five child mortality can be achieved by the
Philippines however if the neonatal mortality rates are not addressed from its non-moving trend of decline,
MDG 4 might not be achieved.

Vision and Mission: None to mention as these are inclusive in the MNCHN Strategy and NOH 2011-2016
Goals: To reduce neonatal mortality rates by 2/3 from 1990 levels
Objectives:

1. To provide evidence-based practices to ensure survival of the newborn from birth up to the first 28
days of life

2. To deliver time-bound core intervention in the immediate period after the delivery of the newborn
3. To strengthen health facility environment for breastfeeding initiation to take place and for
breastfeeding to be continued from discharge up to 2 years of life

4. To provide appropriate and timely emergency newborn care to newborns in need of resuscitation
5. To ensure access of newborns to affordable life-saving medicines to reduce deaths and morbidity
from leading causes of newborn conditions

6. To ensure inclusion of newborn care in the overall approach to the Maternal, Newborn, Child Health
and Nutrition Strategy

Stakeholders:

1. Both public and private sector at all levels of health service delivery providing maternal and newborn
services
2. Health Professional Organizations and their member health professionals
a. Pediatricians/neonatalogists of the Philippine Pediatric Society (PPS) and the Philippine Society of
Newborn Medicine (PSNbM)
b. Obstetrician-Gynecologists of the Philippine Obstetrical and Gynecological Society (POGS)
c. Perinatologists of the Perinatal Association of the Philippines, Inc., (PAPI)
d. Anesthesiologists and obstetric anesthesiologists of the Philippine Society of Anesthesiologists (PSA) and
the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia of the Philippines (SOAP),
e. Family medicine specialists of the Philippine Academy of Family Physicians (PAFP)
f. Nurses, Maternal and child nurses, intensive care nurses of the Philippine Nurses Association and its
affiliate nursing societies
g. Midwives of the Integrated Midwives of the Philippines (IMAP), Philippine League of Government and
Private Midwives, Inc. (PLGPMI), Midwives Foundation of the Philippines (MFP) and Well Family Midwives
Clinic
3. Government regulatory bodies e.g. Professional Regulations Commission
4. Academe - professors and instructors from members schools and colleges of:
a. Association of Philippine Medical Colleges (APMC)
b. Association of Deans of Philippine Colleges of Nursing (ADPCN)
c. Association of Philippine Schools of Midwifery
5. Hospital, health care administrator and infection control associations
a. Philippine Hospital Association (PHA)
b. Private Hospitals Association of the Philippines (PHAP)
c. Philippine College of Hospital Administrators
d. Philippine Hospital Infection Control Society
6. Local government units - local chief executives and LGU legislative bodies

Beneficiaries:
a. Newborns all over the country
b. Parents
c. communities

Program Strategies:
1. Health Sector Reform
a. Policy and Guideline Issuance
i) Administrative Order 2009-0025 - Adopting Policies and Guidelines on Essential Newborn Care December 1, 2009
ii) Clinical Pocket Guide on Essential Newborn Care
b. Aquino Health Agenda and Achieving Universal Health Care - Administrative Order 2010-0036
c. PhilHealth Circular 2011-011 dated August 5, 2011 on Newborn Care Package
d. Development of Operationalization of Essential Newborn Care Protocol in Health Facilities
2 Identification of Centers of Excellence
- Adoption of essential newborn care protocol(including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy)
3. Curriculum Reforms
- Curriculum integration of essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy) in
undergraduate health courses
- Integration and revision of board exam questions in licensure examinations for physicians, nurses and
midives
4. Social Marketing
- Development of social marketing tools - Unang Yakap MDG 4 & 5

Major Activities and its Guidelines:


a. Conduct of one-day orientation-workshop on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the
MNCHN Strategy)
b. Regional MNCHN Conference for CHDs and LGUs including DOH-retained hospitals and LGU hospitals

Current Status of the Program


A. What have been achieved/done
1. Policy was issued in December 1, 2009
2. DOH/WHO Scale-up Implementation was done in 11 hospitals
3. Advocacy Partners Forum on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN
Strategy)

4. One-day orientation-workshop on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN
Strategy) among health workers in different health facilities
5. Inclusion of dexamethasone and surfactant as core medicines in the essential medicines list for children
in the Philippine National Formulary

B. Statistics
Early outcomes of EINC implementation has shown reduction on neonatal deaths in select DOH-retained
hospitals including deaths from neonatal sepsis and complicatons of prematurity

Partner organizations/agencies:

National Nutrition Council


Population Commission
WHO
UNICEF
UNFPA
AusAID
USAID
health professional and academic organizations mentioned above.

Program Manager:
Dr. Anthony Calibo
Supervising Health Program Officer
Direct Line: (63 2) 7392-956; (63 2) 6517800 local 1726, 1728, 1729
Telefax (Director IV's Office): (63 2) 711-7846
Mobile: 09174810661 or 09237764870

FAMILY PLANNING
Brief Description of Program

A national mandated priority public health program to attain the country's national
health development: a health intervention program and an important tool for the
improvement of the health and welfare of mothers, children and other members of the
family. It also provides information and services for the couples of reproductive age to
plan their family according to their beliefs and circumstances through legally and
medically acceptable family planning methods.
The program is anchored on the following basic principles.

Responsible Parenthood which means that each family has the right and duty
to determine the desired number of children they might have and when they
might have them. And beyond responsible parenthood is Responsible Parenting
which is the proper ubringing and education of chidren so that they grow up to
be upright, productive and civic-minded citizens.

Respect for Life. The 1987 Constitution states that the government protects
the sanctity of life. Abortion is NOT a FP method:

Birth Spacing refers to interval between pregnancies (which is ideally 3 years).


It enables women to recover their health improves women's potential to be
more productive and to realize their personal aspirations and allows more time
to care for children and spouse/husband, and;

Informed Choice that is upholding and ensuring the rights of couples to


determin the number and spacing of their children according to their life's
aspirations and reminding couples that planning size of their families have a
direct bearing on the quality of their children's and their own lives.

Intended Audience:

Men and women of reproductive age (15-49) years old) including adolescents

Area of Coverage:
Nationwide

Mandate:
EO 119 and EO 102

Vision:
Empowered men and women living healthy, productive and fulfilling lives and exercising
the right to regulate their own fertility through legally and acceptable family planning
services.

Mission
The DOH in partnership with LGUs, NGOs, the private sectors and communities ensures
the availability of FP information and services to men and women who need them.

Program Goals:
To provide universal access to FP information, education and services whenever and
wherever these are needed.

Objectives:

General
To help couples, individuals achieve their desired family size within the context of
responsible parenthood and improve their reproductive health. Specifically, by the end
of 2004:
Reduce

MMR from 172 deaths 100,000 LB in 1998 to less than 100 deaths/100,000 LB

IMR from 35.3 deaths/1000 livebirths in 1998 to less than 30 deaths/1000 live
births

TFR from 3.7 children per woman in 1998 to 2.7 chidren per woman

Increase

Contraceptive Prevalence Rate from 45.6% in 1998 to 57%

Proportion of modern FP methods use from 28>2% to 50.5%

Key Result Areas


1. Policy, guidelines and plans formulation
2. Standard setting
3. Technical assistance to CHDs/LGUs and other partner agencies
4. Advocacy, social mobilization
5. Information, education and counselling
6. Capability building for trainers of CHDs/LGUs
7. Logistics management
8. Monitoring and evaluation
9. Research and development

Strategies

1. Frontline participation of DOH-retained hospitals

2. Family Planning for the urban and rural poor


3. Demand Generation through Community-Based Management Information System
4. Mainstreaming Natural Family Planning in the public and NGO health facilities
5. Strengthening FP in the regions with high unmet need for FP: CAR, CHD 5, 8, NCR,
ARMM
6. Contraceptive Interdependence Initiative

Major Activities
I. Frontline participation of DOH-retained hospitals

Establishment of FP Itinerant team by each hospital to respond to the unmet needs for
permanent FP methods and to bring the FP services nearer to our urban and rural poor
communities

FP services as part of medical and surgical missions of the hospital

Provide budget to support operations of the itenerant teams inclduing the drugs and medical
supplies needed for voluntary surgical sterilization (VS) services

Partnership with LGU hospitals which serve as the VS site

II. Family Planning for the urban and rural poor

Expanded role of Volunteer Health Workers (VHWs) in FP provision

Partnership of itenerant team and LGU hospitals

Provision of FP services

III. Demand Generation through Community-Based Management Information System

Identification and masterlisting of potential FP clients and users in need of PF services


(permanent or temporary methods)

Segmentation of potential clients and users as to what method is preferred or used by clients

IV. Mainstreaming Natural Family Planning in the public and NGO health facilities

Orientation of CHD staff and creation of Regional NFP Management Committee

Diacon with stakeholders

Information, Education and counseling activities

Advocacy and social mobilization efforts

Production of NFP IEC materials

Monitoring and evaluation activities

V. Strengthening FP in the regions with high unmet need for FP: CAR, CHD 5, 8, NCR, ARMM

Field of itinerant teams by retained hospitals to provide VS services nearer to the community

Installation of COmmunity Based Management Information System

Provision of augmentation funds for CBMIS activities

VI. Contraceptive Interdependence Initiative

Expansion of PhilHealth coverage to include health centers providing No


Scalpel Vasectomy and FP Itenerant Teams

Expansion of Philhealth benefit package to include pills, injectables and IUD

Social Marketing of contraceptives and FP services by the partner NGOs

National Funding/Subsidy

VIII. Development /Updating of FP CLinical Standards

IX. Formulation of FP related policies/guidelines. E.g. Creation of VS Outreach team by


retained hospitals and its operationalization, GUidelines on the Provision of VS services,
etc.
X. Production and reproduction of FP advocacy and IEC materials
XI. Provision of logistics support such as FP commodities and VS drugs and medical
supplies

Other Partners
1. Funding Agencies

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

United Nations Funds for Population Activities (UNFPA)

Management Sciences for Health (MSH)

Engender Health

The Futures Group

2. NGOs

Reachout foundation

DKT

Philippine Federation for Natual Family Planning (PFNFP)

John Snow Inc. - Well Family Clinic

Phlippine Legislators Committee on Population Development (PLPCD)

Remedios Foundation

Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP)

Institute of Maternal and Child Health (IMCH)

Integrated Maternal and Child Care Services and Development, Inc.

Friendly Care Foundation, Inc.

Institute of Reproductive Health

3. Other GOs

Commission on Population

DILG

DOLE

LGUs

FOOD AND WATERBORNE DISEASES PREVENTION


AND CONTROL PROGRAM
The program covers diseases of a parasitic, fungal, viral, and bacteria in nature,
usually acquired through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water or food. The more
common of these diseases are bacterial in nature, the most common of which are
typhoid fever and cholera. These two organisms had been the cause of major outbreaks
in the Philippines in the last two years. Parasitic organisms are also an important factor,
among them capillariasis, Heterophydiasis, and paragonimiasis, which are endemic in
Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. Cysticercosis is also a major problem since it has a
neurologic component to the illness. The approaches to control and prevention is
centered on public health awareness regarding food safety as well as strengthening
treatment guidelines.

Goal and Objectives:


The program aims to:
1. Prevent the occurrence of food and waterborne outbreaks through strategic
placement of water purification solutions and tablets at the regional level so that the
area coordinators could respond in time if the situation warrants;
2. Procure Intravenous Fluid solutions, venosets and IV cannula for adult and pediatric
patients in diarrheal outbreaks and to be stockpiles at the 17 Centers for Health

Development (CHD) and the Central Office for emergency response to complement the
stocks of HEMS;
3. Place first line and second line antimicrobial and anti-parasitic medicines such as
albendazole and praziquantel at selected CHDs for outbreak mitigation as well as
emergency stocks at the DOH warehouse located at the Quirino Memorial Medical Center
(QMMC) compound;
4. Increase public awareness in preventable food-borne illnesses such as capillaria,
which is centered on unsafe cultural practices like eating raw aquatic products;
5. Increase coordination between the National Epidemiology Center (NEC) and Regional
epidemiology surveillance Unit (RESU) to adequately respond to outbreaks and provide
technical support;
6. Procure Typhidot-M diagnostic kits for the early detection and treatment of typhoid
patients;
7. Procure Typhoid vaccine and oral cholera vaccine to reduce the number of cases seen
after severe flooding;
8. Provide training to local government unit (LGU) laboratory and allied medical
personnel on the Accurate laboratory diagnosis of common parasites and proper culture
techniques in the isolation of bacterial food pathogens; and
9. Provide guidance to field medical personnel with regard to the correct treatment
protocols vis--vis various parasitic, bacterial, and viral pathogens involved in food and
waterborne diseases.

Beneficiaries/Target Population:
The Food and Waterborne Disease Control Program targets individuals, families, and
communities residing in affected areas nationwide. For parasitic infections, endemic
areas are more common.

Strategies/Management:
Case monitoring is maintained through the Philippine Integrated Disease Surveillance
and Response (PIDSR) framework of NEC and the sentinel sites of the RESU. To add to
that, quarterly reports of the regional coordinators supplement the data and the regular
updating from NEC Outbreak Surveillance.
Outbreaks are being prevented though public education in print and radio stations. The
need for safe food and water intake by adequate cooking and boiling of drinking water is
inculcated to the public.

Multi-drug resistant cases of typhoid are monitored through reports from the hospital
sentinel site and the data from the Research Institute of Tropical Medicines Antibiotic
Resistance & Surveillance Program.

Partner Organizations/Agencies:
The following organizations and agencies take part in the achievement of program
objectives:

University of the Philippines-National Institutes of Health (UP-NIH)


Department of Agriculture-National Meat Inspection Service (DA-NMIS)
Asia Centric Disease Bureau
World Health Organization-Western Pacific Regional Office (WHO-WPRO)
World Health Organization-Southeast Asia Regional Office (WHO-SEARO)

Program Manager:
Dr. Lino Y. Macasaet
Department of Health-National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (DOH-NCDPC)
Contact Number: 651-78-00 local 2353
Email: macasaetmd@yahoo.com

FOOD FORTIFICATION PROGRAM


Objectives:
1. To provide the basis for the need for a food fortification program in the Philippines:
The Micronutrient Malnutrition Problem
2. To discuss various types of food fortification strategies
3. To provide an update on the current situation of food fortification in the Philippines
Fortification as defined by Codex Alimentarius
the addition of one or more essential nutrients to food, whether or not it is normally
contained in the food, for the purpose of preventing or correcting a demonstrated
deficiencyof one or more nutrients in the population or specific population groups
Vitamin A, Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) and its Consequences

Vitamin A - an essential nutrient as retinol needed by the body for normal


sight, growth, reproduction and immune competence
Vitamin A deficiency - a condition characterized by depleted liver stores &
low blood levels of vitamin A due to prolonged insufficient dietary intake of vit.
A followed by poor absorption or utilization of vit. A in the body
VAD affects childrens proper growth, resistance to infection, and chances
of survival (23 to 35% increased child mortality), severe deficiency results to
blindness, night blindness and bitots spot
Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency:
1993, 1998, 2003, 2008
(DOST FNRI, NNS)
Physiological State

1993

1998

2003

2008

6 months - 5 yrs.

35.3

38.0

40.1

15.2

Pregnant

16.4

22.2

17.5

9.5

Lactating

16.4

16.5

20.1

6.4

WHO Cut off Point to be considered a public health problem = >15%


Iron and Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) and its consequences

Iron - an essential mineral and is part of hemoglobin, the red protein in red
blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the cells
Iron Deficiency Anemia - condition where there is lack of iron in the body
resulting to low hemoglobin concentration of the blood
IDA results in premature delivery, increased maternal mortality, reduce ability to fight infection
and transmittable diseases and low productivity

Prevalence of anemia by age, sex and physiologic state: Philippines, 2008

Source: NNS:FNRI
Iodine and Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD)

Iodine -a mineral and a component of the thyroid hormones


Thyroid hormones - needed for the brain and nervous system to develop &
function normally
Iodine Deficiency Disorders refers to a group of clinical entities caused by
inadequacy of dietary iodine for the thyroid hormone resulting into various
condition e.g. goiter, cretinism, mental retardation, loss of IQ points
Progress in the Philippines towards the Elimination of IDD, 1998-2008
Indicator

Goal*

Achievements

1998 2003 2008


Proportion of Households using Iodized Salt, %

>90

9.7

56.0 81.1

6-12 yrs.

100-200

71

201

132

Lactating Women

100-200

111

81

Pregnant Women

150-249

142

105

35.8

11.4

19.7

Lactating Women

23.7

34.0

Pregnant Women

18.0

25.8

Median Urinary Iodine, ug/L

Proportion < 50g/L, %

< 20

6-12 yrs.

*ICC-IDD 2007
Policy on Food Fortification

ASIN LAW

Republic Act 8172, An Act Promoting Salt Iodization Nationwide and for other purposes,
Signed into law on Dec. 20, 1995

Food Fortification Law

Republic Act 8976, An Act Establishing the Philippine Food Fortification Program and for
other purposes mandating fortification of flour, oil and sugar with Vitamin A and flour
and rice with iron by November 7, 2004 and promoting voluntary fortification through the
SPSP, Signed into law on November 7, 2000

Status of the Philippine Food Fortification Program


Status and Recommendations for the Sangkap Pinoy Seal Program

There are 139 processed food products with SangkapPinoySeal with 83% with vitamin A, 29%
with iron and 14% with iodine (2008)
37% of the products are snack foods
Most of the products FDA analyzed are within the standard
Based on 2003 NNS Households awareness of SPS- and FF-products is 11% and 14%,
respectively, in 2008 awareness is 11.6%
Although awareness is low, usage of SPS-products is 99.2%

Recommendations:

Review voluntary fortification standards as standards were developed prior to mandatory


fortification
Conduct in-depth analysis of the coverage of SangkapPinoySeal of the 2008 NNS

Update list of Sangkap Pinoy Seal products as some companies have stopped using the seal in
their products
Intensify promotions of Sangkap Pinoy Seal

Status and Recommendation on Flour Fortification with Vitamin A and Iron


Status:

Based on FDA monitoring all local flour millers are fortifying with vitamin A and iron
94% and 92% of all samples tested by FDA in 2009 were fortified with vitamin A and iron
respectively while 77% and 99% were fortified with vitamin A and iron
respectively. In 2010 decrease in vitamin A due to non-fortified imported and
market samples flour.
58% of samples from local mills for vitamin A and 67% of imported flour for iron were
fortified according to standards.

Recommendations:

Review fortificantsfor iron and possible other micronutrients to be added to wheat flour
Continue monitoring wheat fortification
Assist flour millers to improve quality of fortification
Need to show impact of flour fortification

Status and Recommendations on Mandatory Fortification of Refined Sugar with


Vitamin A
Status:

Non fortification by industry due to the unresolved issue of who will bear the cost of
fortification brought about by the quedansystem of transferable certificates of
sugar ownership.
Lack of premix production
Fortification of refined sugar would benefit mainly those in the high income group.

Recommendations:

Continue discussions with sugar industry to explore a compromise for fortification ie.
fortification of washed sugar
Review policy on mandatory fortification of refined sugar
Status and Recommendations on Rice Fortification with Iron

Status:

NFA is fortifying 50% of its rice in 2009 and 2010


With the non fortification of NFA rice, private sector has an excuse for non fortification of its
rice.
There is limited commercial/private sector iron rice premix and iron fortified rice production and
distribution mostly in Mindanao (Region XII and XI) with Gen San having the

only commercial iron rice premix plant in the Philippines and Davao City
implementing mandatory rice fortification in food outlets
NFA conducted communications campaign for its iron fortified rice thru the so called Irice campaign though issues remain on the acceptability of its product

Recommendation:

Review of mandatory fortification of rice with iron

Status and Recommendations on Cooking Oil Fortification with Vitamin A


Status:

Based on the samples analyzed by FDA in 2009 and 2010, more than 90% are fortified (91% in
2009 and 94% in 2010)
Samples monitored were labeled and packed
FDA is not monitoring "takal"

Recommendations:

To increase frequency of monitoring by FDA and other agencies such as PCA


and LGUs, to ensure all oil refiners and repackersare monitored at least once a
year
Monitoring of takal oil, use of test kit
Monitoring imported oil, FDA and BOC to coordinate
Review policy of mandatory fortification of oil to possibly limit to those mostly used by at risk
population (coconut and palm oil)
Status and Recommendations on Salt Iodization

Status:

Based on the 2008 NNS, 81.1% of households were positive for iodine using
Rapid Test Kit (RTK)
In the same survey for Region III, 55.7% were positive for RTK but only 34.2%
and 24.2% have iodine content >5ppm and >15ppm respectively using WYD
Tester
For FDA monitoring in 2010, 88% were >5ppm while 44% were >15ppm
FDA started implementing localization of ASIN Law with General Santos City as
the 1stto have a MOA with FDA on localization

Recommendation:

FDA to expand localization of ASIN Law


Set up iodine titration for testing iodine in salt
Continue to intensify monitoring particularly imported and takal salt

Food Fortification Day Theme 2010:

EO 382 declares November 7 as the National Food Fortification Day

Program Coordinator:
Ms. Liberty Importa
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control - Family Health Office
Phone: 651-7800 local 1726-1728
Email: limporta@yahoo.com

FILARIASIS CONTROL PROGRAM


Contact Person:
Leda M. Hernandez, MD, MPH
Telephone Nos.:
651-7800 loc. 2350-2354
The elimination program started in 2001 after a pilot study using combination drugs in 2000 in five
selected municipalities in five provinces. To date, the Mass treatment has been going on province wide in
2003 targeting the eligible population ( 2 yrs old, 7 above) since its pilot study in 2000 using the
combination drug Diethylcarbamazine Citrate and albendazole. In support to the program, an
admonostrative Order declaring November as Filariasis Mass Treatment Month was signed by the
Secretary of Health on July 2004 and was disseminated to all endemic regions. In addition to, an evidence
of support was the Executive Order signed by our President in support to the Administrative Order which
contains the different roles and responsibilities of each government and attached agencies in the
campaign. Elimination strategies and activities are still on-going and will continue until 2016 (elimination
target). Integration of the mass treatment scheme to other existing parasitic control programs like Soil
transmitted Heminthiasis control program and Schistosomiasis Control program is being advocated.
BASELINE DATA
Prevalence Rate (1997): 9.7% per 1,000 population
Endemic in 44 provinces however, 7 provinces have reached elimination level namely: Southern Leyte,
Sorsogon, Biliran, Bukidnon, Romblon, Agusan del Sur & Dinagat Island.
TARGET POPULATION / CLIENTS / BENEFICIARIES
Individuals, families and communities living in endemic municipalities in 43 provinces in 11 regions.

AREA OF COVERAGE : 44 Provinces in 12 Regions

REGION

PROVINCES

REGION

PROVINCES

4A

Quezon

4B

Marinduque

Zamboanga Norte
Zamboanga Sur
Zamboanga

Mindoro Oriental

Sibugay

Mindoro Occidental
Romblon

10

Palawan

Bukidnon
Misamis Occidental
Misamis Oriental

Albay
Davao del Sur
Catanduanes

11

Davao del Norte

Catanduanes Norte
Davao Oriental
Catanduanes Sur

Compostela Valley

Masbate
Sorsogon

South Cotabato
12
North Cotabato

Iloilo

Saranggani

Capiz
Sultan Kudarat
Aklan
Antique
Agusan del Sur
CARAGA
7

Agusan del Norte

Negros Oriental
Surigao Sur
Surigao Norte

South Leyte
North Leyte
East Samar

Maguindanao
ARMM
Basilan

West Samar
North Samar

Sulu

Biliran

PROGRAM MANDATES:

AO #24 s. 1998 = elimination of diseases

EO # 369, 2004 = Filariasis Mass Treatment Month

WHA#: Filariasis Elimination as a priority

Global Situation

INTERVENTION OF DOH
Vision: Healthy and productive individuals and families for Filariasis-free Philippines
Mission: Elimination of Filariasis as a public health problem thru a comprehensive approach and universal
access to quality health services

Goal: To eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis as a public health problem in Philippines by year 2017
General Objective: To decrease Prevalence Rate of Filariasis in endemic municipalities to <1/1000
population

Specific Objectives:
The National Filariasis Elimination Program specifically aims to:
1.

Reduce the prevalence rate to elimination level of <1%

2.

Perform mass treatment in all established endemic areas

3.

Develop a filariasis disability prevention program in established endemic areas

4.

Continue surveillance of established endemic areas 5 years after mass treatment

TARGET POPULATION / CLIENTS/ BENEFICIARIES


The program targets individuals, families and communities living in endemic municipalities in 44 provinces
in 12 regions (30 million targeted for mass treatment or 1/3 of the total population in the country).
PROGRAM STRATEGIES
1.

Endemic Mapping

2.

Capacity Building

3.

Mass Treatment (integrated with other existing parasitic programs)

4.

Support Control

5.

Monitoring and Supervision

6.

Evaluation

7.

National Certification

8.

International Certification

MANAGEMENT BEING USED


1. Selective Treatment- treating individuals found to be positive for microfilariae in nocturnal blood
examination
Drug: Diethylcarbamazine Citrate
Dosage: 6mg/kg body weight in 3 divided doses for 12 consecutive days (usually given after meals)

2. Mass Treatment- giving the drugs to all population from aged 12 years and above in all established
endemic areas
Drug: Diethylcarbamazine Citrate (single dose based on 6mg/kg body weight plus Albendazole 400
mg given single dose once
annually to people 12 years and above living in established endemic areas.
3. Disablility Prevention- thru home-based or community-based care for lymphedema & elephanthiasis
cases. Surgical management for hydrocele patients.

CURRENT STATUS, PROGRAMS AND UPDATES


Provinces that reached elimination stage: Southern Leyte, Sorsogon, Biliran, Bukidnon, Romblon, Agusan
del Sur, Dinagat Island, Cotabato Province and COMVAL.
FUTURE PLANS
1.
Assist low performing areas to increase the MDA coverage in order to interrupt the transmission of
the LF.
2.

Assist implementing Units to reach the goal of elimination.

3.

Strengthen integration with other NTD programs.

4.
Strengthen the disability prevention strategy thru community-based or home based care & thru
integration with leprosy.
5.

Implement an integrated vector management

6.

Implement a sustainability plan for provinces that have reached elimination level.

PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS / AGENCIES:

World Health Organization


GlaxoSmitheKline Foundation
U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
Family Health International
Coalition for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis
Culion Foundation, Inc.
Peace and Equity Foundation, Inc. (PEF)
Iloilo Caucus of Development NGOs. Inc. Iloilo (ICODE)
Marinducare Foundation, Inc.
Lingap para sa Kalusugan ng Sambayanan, Inc. (LIKAS)
Del Monte Foundation, Inc.
Ang-Hortaleza Foundation (Splash Foundation)
Belo Medical Group
Center for Social Concern and Action (COSCA) with Theology Religious Education Department
(TREDTWO)-De La Salle
University-Manila

UP Open University- Manila


UP Manila- National Institutes of Health (UP Manila-NIH)
UP-College of Public Health

FAMILY PLANNING
Population/Family Planning Issue
Senate Bill No. 1546: "Reproductive Health Act of 2004"
House Bill No. 16: "Reproductive Health Act of 2004"
The Truth About the P50M CFC Contract with DOH
CFC-DOH Partnership
Letter to the Editor: Philippine Daily Inquirer

FAMILY PLANNING
Brief Description of Program
A national mandated priority public health program to attain the country's national health development: a
health intervention program and an important tool for the improvement of the health and welfare of
mothers, children and other members of the family. It also provides information and services for the
couples of reproductive age to plan their family according to their beliefs and circumstances through
legally and medically acceptable family planning methods.
The program is anchored on the following basic principles.
* Responsible Parenthood which means that each family has the right and duty to determine the desired
number of children they might have and when they might have them. And beyond responsible parenthood
is Responsible Parenting which is the proper ubringing and education of chidren so that they grow up to be
upright, productive and civic-minded citizens.

FILARIASIS ELIMINATION PROGRAM


Filariasis is a major parasitic infection, which continues to be a public health problem in the
Philippines. It was first discovered in the Philippines in 1907 by foreign workers. Consolidated field reports
showed a prevalence rate of 9.7% per 1000 population in 1998. It is the second leading cause of
permanent and long-term disability. The disease affects mostly the poorest municipalities in the country
about 71% of the case live in the 4th-6th class type of municipalities.
The World Health Assembly in 1997 declared Filariasis Elimination as a priority and followed by
WHOs call for global elimination. A sign of the DOHs commitment to eliminate the disease, the programs
official shift from control to elimination strategies was evident in an Administrative Order #25-A,s 1998
disseminated to endemic regions. A major strategy of the Elimination Plan was the Mass Annual Treatment
using the combination drug, Diethylcarbamazine Citrate and Albendazole for a minimum of 2 years &
above living in established endemic areas after the issuance from WHO of the safety data on the use of the

drugs. The Philippine Plan was approved by WHO which gave the government free supply of the
Albendazole (donated b y GSK thru WHO) for filariasis elimination. In support to the program, an
Administrative Order declaring November as Filariasis Mass Treatment Month was signed by the Secretary
of Health last July 2004 and was disseminated to all endemic regions.

Vision: Healthy and productive individuals and families for Filariasis-free Philippines
Mission: Elimination of Filariasis as a public health problem thru a comprehensive approach and
universal access to quality health services
Goal: To eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis as a public health problem in the Philippines by year 2017
General Objectives:
population.

To decrease Prevalence Rate of filariasis in endemic municipalities to <1/1000

Specific Objectives:
The National Filariasis Elimination Program specifically aims to:
1. Reduce the Prevalence Rate to elimination level of <1%;
2. Perform Mass treatment in all established endemic areas;
3. Develop a Filariasis disability prevention program in established endemic areas; and
4. Continue surveillance of established endemic areas 5 years after mass treatment.

Baseline Data:
Prevalence Rate (1997): 9.7% per 1,000 pop.
Endemic in 43 provinces in 11 regions with a total population at risk of 30,000,000

Target Population/Clients/Beneficiaries:
The program targets individuals, families and communities living in endemic municipalities in 44 provinces
in 12 regions (30 million targeted for mass treatment or 1/3 of the total population of the country).
However, 9 provinces have reached elimination level namely: Southern Leyte; Sorsogon; Biliran; Bukidnon;
Romblon; Agusan Sur; Dinagat Islands; Cotabato Province; and COMVAL.

Program Strategies:
STRATEGY 1. Endemic Mapping
STRATEGY 2. Capability Building
STRATEGY 3. Mass Treatment (integrated with other existing parasitic programs)

STRATEGY 4. Support Control


STRATEGY 5. Monitoring and Supervision
STRATEGY 6. Evaluation
STRATEGY 7. National Certification
STRATEGY 8. International Certification

Management Being Used:


1. Selective Treatment treating individuals found to be positive for microfilariae in nocturnal blood
examination.
Drug: Diethylcarbamazine Citrate
Dosage: 6 mg/kg body weight in 3 divided doses for 12 consecutive days (usually given after meals)
2. Mass Treatment giving the drugs to all population from aged 2 years and above in all established
endemic areas.
Drug: Diethlcarbamazine Citrate (single dose based on 6 mg/kg body wt) plus Albendazole 400mg given
single dose given once annually to people 2 yrs & above living in established endemic areas
3. Disability Prevention thru home-based or community-based care for lymphedema & elephantiasis
cases. Surgical management for hydrocele patients.

Status of the Program:


PROVINCES THAT REACHED ELIMINATION STAGE: Southern Leyte, Sorsogon, Biliran, Bukidnon, Romblon,
Agusan Sur, Dinagat island, Cotabato Province and COMVAL

Partner Organizations/Agencies:
The following are the organizations/agencies that take part in achieving the objectives of the National
Filariasis Elimination Program:

Coalition for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis


Culion Foundation, Inc.
Peace and Equity Foundation, Inc. (PEF)
Iloilo Caucus of Development NGOs, Inc. Iloilo (ICODE)
Marinducare Foundation, Inc.
Lingap Para sa Kalusugan ng Sambayanan, Inc. (LIKAS)
Del Monte Foundation, Inc.
Ang-Hortaleza Foundation (Splash Foundation)
Belo Medical Group

GlaxoSmitheKline Foundation
Center for Social Concern and Action (COSCA) with Theology Religious Education Department
(TREDTWO) De La Salle University-Manila
UP Open University-Manila
UP Manila National Institutes of Health (UP Manila-NIH)
UP-College of Public Health

Program Manager:
Dr. Leda M. Hernandez
Division Chief, Infectious Disease Office
Department of Health-National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (DOH-NCDPC)
Contact Number: 651-78-00 local 2353
Email: dr_ledamher@yahoo.com

Files and Links:

Administrative Order No. 25-A s. 1998


Administrative Order No. 2010-0009