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Ashley Font

LEI 4724 Activities Portfolio Submission #3

Facilitation Technique Category: Therapeutic Massage


Activity Title: Get Your Roll On
Source: Keller, C. (2015, March 17). The Ultimate Foam Rolling Routine. Retrieved
September 22, 2016, from http://www.rodalewellness.com/fitness/how-use-foamroller?ocid=Soc_Pinterest_GetFit_UltimateFoamRollingRoutine#_a5y_p=3533094
Equipment: Foam roller and a mat (optional)
Activity Description: Therapeutic massage benefits the body in numerous ways. There are
also different techniques and tools when it comes to Massage Therapy, for example, foam
rolling. Foam rolling is a self-myofascial release. It improves mobility of the fascia which
surrounds all of the muscles in the body. Similar to a massage, foam rolling increases blood
flow, range of motion, and improves flexibility, resulting in better movement of the body.
The purpose of the activity is to learn how to utilize basic foam rolling movements to reap
its benefits and upkeep with body maintenance. Each rolling motion will be done no more
than three times and at a slow pace. First, we start with the hamstrings. While on the floor
the participant will sit on the foam roller with legs out in front; the right leg on roller, with
left knee bent crossed over and hands on floor behind them. Participant will then start
rolling just above the knee to right below the glute. After the participant has rolled the
hamstring, switch legs and repeat. After the hamstrings comes the gluets. Participant will sit
on the roller and cross right leg over left knee, leaning towards the right hip, hands on the
floor behind them and proceed to roll right cheek. Switch sides and repeat. The participant
will proceed to the quads where they will lie face down on the floor, roller under hips,
leaning on right quad with left foot crossed behind right foot and begin to roll between hip
and right above the knee. Switch legs and repeat. Next are the calves, while sitting on the
floor with legs out and hands on the floor behind, participant will place the roller under the
knees and roll along both claves to ankles and back again. Following is the iliotibial
band or the IT band. Participant will lie on right side, roller just below the hip. Bend left
leg, placing left foot on floor in front of the right leg. Roll side of right leg between hip and
knee. Switch legs, position right foot on the floor in front of the left leg and repeat. Lastly
the back is rolled by sitting with roller behind the participant. Lace fingers behind head and
lean upper back onto roller. Abs and glutes tighten while the individual rolls up and down
the back. Conclude the session by reviewing foam rolling techniques and benefits and
discuss the steps, difficulties and other techniques that can be used.
Leadership Considerations: A CTRS or Massage Therapist functions as an instructor for
this activity. The therapist is to be well educated on foam rollings proper technique and
body mechanics. Before starting the foam rolling session the therapist must be aware of any
contraindications the participant may have. Proper body mechanics should be discussed
prior and during the activity. During the activity the therapist should be aware of all non-

Ashley Font

LEI 4724 Activities Portfolio Submission #3

verbal cues to determine if proper assistance is needed. Do not let participant experience
excruciating pain when rolling a certain muscle. Modify numbers of rolls if needed and
make sure it is a 1:1 activity to further the participants experience.
Adaptations:
Participants Post-stroke: Individuals who have experienced a stroke may be experiencing
spasticity of the muscle due to the brain blocking messages between the muscles. Spasticity
could cause strong contractions in major muscle groups. If the foam roller is too hard for
the participant, a noodle could be used as an alternative or simply the therapists hands
performing long strokes on major muscles. If massage strokes are still too much to bear,
simple stretching is recommended. Foam rolling can be performed lying down or sitting.
All techniques help improve circulation and overall tissue health, decrease spasticity and
increase range of motion.
Participants with Cerebral Palsy: Cerebral palsy causes hypertonicity, the state of
abnormally high muscle tension. Participants with CP who experience muscle rigidity can
successfully participate in this activity. Certain techniques can be modified or replaced by
another muscle depending on the participants ability. If the participant is not able to
perform these movements on the foam roller alone due to difficulty with bodily movement,
the therapist is to perform these techniques on the participant as they lie on a massage table.
Depending on their ability to lie down, therapist is suggested the individual sit on a chair or
be placed prone on a therapy ball. If the therapist is performing the myofascial releases with
the foam roller, they are able to determine how much pressure is being used. Depending on
the stiffness of the muscle it is recommended to use lighter pressure than normal. An
alternative for a foam roller is a pool noodle, which is much softer.
Adaption References:
S. (n.d.). 4 Things You Need to Know about Trigger Points. Retrieved September 22, 2016,
from http://sparta-pt.com/2011/10/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-trigger-points/
Whisler, S. L., Lang, D. M., Armstrong, M., Vickers, J., Qualls, C., & Feldman, J. S.
(2012). Effects of Myofascial Release and Other Advanced Myofascial Therapies on
Children With Cerebral Palsy: Six Case Reports. EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and
Healing, 8(3), 199-205. doi:10.1016/j.explore.2012.02.003