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The

Issue 16
Price R30
Sept/Oct/Nov/Dec 2011

ANTIQUES

Collector

EXPERT ADVICE DESTINATIONS INSPIRED LIFESTYLE

Dear Collector

SAS ONLY ANTIQUES, COLLECTABLES AND DECORATIVE ARTS MAGAZINE

Showcasing

Pierneef
Collecting

Susie Cooper
Dotty about Dolls

As we head towards the end of another year, we look back


on a trying time when investors have had to contend with the
threat of another double-dip recession. It is in times like this that
it pays to be a collector who has seen the benefits of investing
in antiques, art and collectables.

Vintage Cars
WIN R30 000 WORTH OF PRIZES IN YOUR FAVOURITE THINGS COMPETITION
See Page 18 -19

ART DECO SHOWCASE PAGE 6 -9


PAGE 20 - 23

LOUIS VUITTON

LIGHTING UP A STORM

MONTBLANC -

COLLECTORS CHOICE
OF GIFTS
PAGE 24 - 25

CREATIONS OF
PASSION
SION

NAADA

Celebrating 10 years

FESTIVE TABLE
SETTINGS

PAGE 43
CARTIER - THEN AND NOW
PAGE 30 - 31

NAADA
2010

THE ALLURE OF
PERFUMES
FURNITURE & ITS
FUNCTIONALITY
PAGE 8

PAGE 10 - 11

The Collector Templates.indd 1

2009/08/31 5:04 PM

PAGE 14 - 15

Supplement in
this issue!

PAGE 10 - 11

The Collector Templates.indd 1

Tours to

Herbert Baker

Heritage Homes

2009/11/25 9:33 PM

The Collector issue 12.indd 1

Publisher/Editor

Clyde Terry

Advertising Sales
Tel:
E-mail:
Subscriptions &
Distribution

Yolanda Gibbon
082-972-3393
yolanda@cardilogix.co.za
The Collector
P.O. Box 795
Gallo Manor
Sandton
2052
(011) 482-4259
thecollector@mweb.co.za
www.thecollector.co.za
Cardilogix Pty Ltd
www.cardilogix.co.za
(011) 363-0227/363-3260

Tel:
E-mail:
Website:
Design,
Production &
Photography
Printing

2010/06/01 1:53 PM

Our feature on Tretchikoff is a case in point. For those who


remember the days when this eccentric painter used to exhibit
and sell his prints at stores such as Ansteys, John Orrs and
Stuttafords, you will remember that he was often derided for
being too kitch and commercial. Well, if you were one of
those who didnt listen to the critics but rather looked at the
talent of this painter and bought one of his original paintings,
you will be sitting pretty. Our feature on the first ever Tretchikoff
exhibition at a national museum honours a man who has
become famous throughout the world.
The National Antiques & Decorative Arts Faire which was held
in July at the Sandton Convention Centre was another event
that saw collectors bucking the recessionary trend and investing in tangible assets. With some of the rarest antiques ever on
show in South Africa in the form of a pair of Buddhistic Ming
Dynasty lions and other 17th & 18th Century antiques, the
NAADA Faire proved once again to be the place to find not
only those unique and rare investment pieces but also the more
affordable collectables and decorative arts that not only bring
joy in our lives but will be tomorrows treasures.

Supreme Printers
rkiley@supremeprinters.co.za
(011) 402-4933

ISSN 2221-4100
9772221410005

We urge you all to continue your collecting journey by visiting


the various fairs around the country and keep up the quest to
find that elusive piece to complete your collection; that unique
piece that grabs your fancy or that investment piece that will
ensure you have a worthwhile alternate asset.
Antique
al UES ARE G s

DISCLAIMER

The
Issue 15
Price R30
June/July/August 2011

ANTIQUES

The Collector issue 15.indd 1

Keep collecting!
Love
Clyde Terry

NAADA
W

W. N

A ADA.C

O.

Collector

EXPERT ADVICE DESTINATIONS INSPIRED LIFESTYLE

2011/05/23 9:01 PM

Subscribe to

The Collector Magazine &


stand a chance to win a 2
night stay at the
to the value
of R10 080

Question: Which is the famous artist featured


on the cover of this issue of The Collector ?
Email your name and number to
yolanda@cardilogix.co.za
use Oyster Box competition in the subject line.

The

RE

IQ
NT

d Decorati
anEN

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to: The Collector P.O. Box 795, Gallo Manor, Sandton 2052. Manuscripts,
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material as deemed necessary. No part of The Collector can be reproduced
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ensure accuracy on visuals and information all of which have been confirmed
by the advertisers, and their views are not necessarily those of The Collector.
All rights reserved. Articles and images published in The Collector have been
taken from a variety of sources including the public domain on the internet
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June/July/August 2010

E G EE
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December 2009 January/February 2010

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September/October/November 2009

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Issue 16 September/October/November/December

THE OYSTER BOX THE LEGEND...LIVES ON


tanding majestically on Umhlangas prestigious beachfront,
with sweeping views of the
Indian Ocean and direct
beach access, the new Oyster
Box is one of South Africas most
distinguished hotels.
The luxurious accommodation includes 86
individually-decorated rooms, suites and
exquisite villas. Each is equipped with the
latest state of the art amenities and facilities.
Villas, boast their own private plunge pool
and overlook the exotic, tropical gardens.
Renowned for generous hospitality, passionate service and excellent cuisine, guests
can dine in one of six venues. The casual
Ocean Terrace, with pizza and Tandoori
ovens, serves the finest seafood and an
authentic Curry Buffet. The legendary,
award-winning fine-dining Grill Room, is
perfect for celebrating a special event, enjoying a romantic evening, or the regular
Saturday evening, Dine & Dance with the
resident band. The glass-ceilinged sunken
wine cellar, boasts an impressive wine list
and can accommodates private functions

for up to 10 guests. Inspired by the hotels


original colonial architecture, The Palm
Court serves a lavish, traditional High
Tea, with live piano accompaniment, daily.

Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve and


Wellness Retreat in the Cederberg and The
Twelve Apostles Hotel and Spa in Cape
Town.

The award-winning, world class Spa, set


in lush tropical surroundings, offers the
widest range of wellness and beauty treatment options and includes South Africas only
authentic Turkish Hammam, and an in-house
fitness centre.
The Oyster Box is KZNs premiere wedding
and honeymoon destination, as well as being a favourite venue for conferences, workshops, and business travellers. It includes a
business centre with complimentary Wi-Fi
and high-speed internet access, a 24-seater
cinema, valet and secure parking.
A spell at The Oyster Box
will leave you with magical
memories to last a lifetime.

The Oyster Box is part of the family-run Red


Carnation Hotels Collection, that includes

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The Clock Library at The Oyster Box

The

Collector 3

In this issue
Collecting

TRETCHIKOFF

ASK
THE
EXPERTS
Page 8
Showcasing

TOOL
COLLECTING

Page 16-19
The

Collector 4

Page 10-13
Showcasing

AFRICANA

Page 24-29
Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 6

Issue 15 June/July/August/September

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

With over 70 antique dealers from all corners of South Africa converging on
the Upper and Lower Levels of Nelson Mandela Square on the rst Sunday of
every month, this Antiques Fair is without doubt the biggest and most
prestigious antiques and collectables fair in the country.

The Antiques fair at Nelson Mandela Square


for the best gifting ideas.
Upper & Lower Levels - Nelson Mandela Square
09h00 - 16h00

THE FUN OF THE FAIR IS IN THE FORAGING


Perhaps it has something to do with us being essentially hunter/gatherers but it is quite a phenomenon how
people love to rummage through a table top fair looking for that elusive antique or that item that could start them
off on another collecting trail.
You might be that collector who has only one collecting passion lets say you collect Royal Doulton Bunnykins or
Character Jugs. Your quest is to not miss one antiques fair just in case one of the many dealers has that rare Bunnykins that will
complete your set or a rare jug that youve been looking for. You might, on the other hand, have a wonderful Wedgwood
dinner set and it has been bugging you for ages that the set is incomplete as two of the plates are broken. Your quest is to find
that particular design and to finally have a complete dinner service.
You might be a collector who just loves old things and has an eclectic taste in antiques. You love the smell and feel of old things
and are a romantic at heart often transporting yourself back in time imagining yourself as a grand Victorian dame having
high tea, using porcelain teacups and silver teapots and dabbing your delicate mouth with an embroidered napkin.
You might, on the other hand, be a collector who believes that one mans trash is another mans treasure and are out to find
that pot at the end of the rainbow which might come in the form of a long-lost treasure or rare item. For you it is all about
having a keen eye for a bargain that might turn into a fortune.
Then there is the serious collector and investor. You know exactly what you want to invest in and
you will only buy the very best. For you, collecting is serious business you research your subject
thoroughly and plan your collection as stringently as you plan your financial future.
Getting to know the dealers who exhibit at monthly fairs like the Antiques Fair at Nelson
Mandela Square is the first step to being a successful collector whichever type you are. Many
of the dealers who exhibit at the Fair on the Square have established shops and bring a portion
of their collections from their stores to the antique fair to introduce their wares to new buyers.
Others are private dealers who dont have retail outlets but have a large collection of antiques.
They all have one thing in common: they are very knowledgeable about their merchandise and are there to be of assistance not only in finding you what you want but
in giving you the best possible advice and support in furthering your collecting hobby.
THE ANTIQUES FAIR TAKES PLACE ON THE FIRST SUNDAY OF EVERY
MONTH FROM 9AM TO 4PM ON THE UPPER AND LOWER LEVELS
OF NELSON MANDELA SQUARE WHICH IS CLOSE TO THE NEW
GAUTRAIN SANDTON STATION GIVING ACCESS TO PEOPLE WHO
WANT TO MAKE THE TRIP FROM PRETORIA.
THE NEXT FAIRS TAKE PLACE ON:
SUNDAY 4TH SEPTEMBER 2011
2ND OCTOBER 2011
6TH NOVEMBER 2011
4TH DECEMBER 2011VISIT www.ssaf.co.za for more details.

Receive The Collector email newsletter monthly for FREE by visiting www.ssaf.co.za and subscribe.
This way you will be kept up to date with antique trends and the latest industry news in South Africa.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 7

COLLECTING

ASK
THE
EXPERTS

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

The moustache cup, is an invention by Englishman Harvey Adams. Moustache cups have a unique
inner lip, designed to protect the user from being left with a soiled moustache.
Originally they were called Napoleons or Saucers presumably because at that time men wore a
small moustache such as Napoleon.
Materials such a Earthenware, tin, silver plate and porcelain were used to manufacture these
cups.
Dresden, Majolica, Imari, Belleeek, Crown Devon, Wedgwood and Meissen are some of the
favourites that manufactured moustache cups.
Top tips on collecting Moustache cups:
The quality of the painting work determines the price of a moustache cup.
Make sure cups and saucers are a matching pair, with the same back stamp or pattern number.
Ask the Collector experts about your treasures or collecting discipline queries. All queries should
be accompanied by photographs that clearly & accurately show both the piece and particular
markings. Email thecollector@mweb.co.za

Regards, Roger

Yours sincerely, Sophie

At auction I purchased this


wonderful chess set. Could
you perhaps tell me more about my
purchase?

Dear Roger

This is a fine example of a Travel Chess


set with fat and squat Bakelite pieces.
Bakelite was first discovered in 1872,
but it was rediscovered in 1907 by LH
Bakeland. Its an unmountable, transparent easily coloured resin.
Top Tips for collecting Bakelite:
Colour variations will make items more
collectable.
Pink mottled Bakelite is highly collectable.
Bakelite is almost impossible to repair
and damage will reflect the price a
piece fetches. Hold the item up in a
strong light to check for evidence of
repairs or cracks.
Bakelite was used to craft pieces such
as radios, tea sets, light switches,
Jewellery etc.

I collect watches and recently added


a funky pink Swatch watch to my
collection. What can you tell me about
Swatch watches?

Dear Sophie

Launched in 1983, the Swatch was originally


designed to be an inexpensive, throwaway
item.
Swatches werent throwaways at all, with 2
new styles released per annum, bright colours
and unique designs, they became an instant
hit and are highly collectable. You know you
have a unique Swatch if the shape of the face
is elongated, shaped or has limited edition
inscribed on it. Swatches are a great investment especially if they come in their original
packing, along with paperwork relating to the
watch.
Regards
Jeremy Stephen Antiques

At a recent market I
purchased this lovely enamel
pill box- does it hold any value?
Regards Sheryl

Dear Sheryl

First produced in Europe in the early


19th century, snuff or patches (beauty
spots) or pill boxes were also used as
tokens of love and souvenirs. Early
18th Century pill boxes were hand
painted, but the introduction of transfer
printing in the mid 18th century lead to
increased production.
Bliston in Staffordshire was the main
centre for enameling and the snuff boxes with these markings have become
very collectable.
Enamel boxes depicting sporting events
especially hot air ballooning are
highly prized by collectors.
Any chips or cracks to the enamel will
negatively affect its value.
Clyde on 4th

Vivien
Schrder
Moonstruck
Experience

The

Collector 8

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

h a i r

d e s i g n

Vision Passion Perfection


Tel: (012) 346-4335
(012) 460-8641
Shop 1a,
Groenkloof Forum,
57 George Storrar Drive
Groenkloof

T H E

A R T

O F

C O

H E A L T H Y

H A I R

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

CHINESE GIRL

MUST VISIT

THE PEOPLES PAINTER

I like his work so much,


I find him daring and antiestablishment. Anyone who
said that he wasnt a great
artist can now see that he was.
Mariame Fassler

by Clyde Terry

TRETCHIKOFF

Possibly the best known of all


Tretchikoffs paintings,
lithographs of this painting can be seen in
all corners of the world.

When I heard that renowned fashion


designer Marianne Fassler was the brainchild behind the Tretchikoff Exhibition in
Cape Town I made sure I was one of the
lucky ones to be at the opening night of this
historic event.
Cape Town was abuzz with the kitch fever
of Tretchikoff (1913 2006) at the opening of the first ever complete exhibition at
the Iziko National Art Museum. People had
flown in from far and wide and it made
one once again feel proud of being South
African. I had not been to the National Art
Museum in many years and forgotten the
splendor of the architecture and the sheer
beauty of the museum.
Walking through the double doors into the
exhibition space, I was pleasantly surprised
at the extensive collection of Tretchikoff
paintings on show and I, like many people who attended, felt that, whether a fan
or not of his works one simply could but
appreciate this superb collection of his
works. Many people, Im sure, questioned
why he was the artist people loved to hate
and many more, Im sure, wished they had
some of his works in their own collections.
It seems ironic really that an artist who, at
the close of the 20th Century, had broken
all records for art sales and gallery attendance, should, only after his death, finally
have an exhibition in a national gallery. Despite being South Africas most prolific and
famous artist and the most widely collected,
no South African museum or national gallery has ever purchased any of his works.
Tretchikoff painted for the people and not
for art institutions and showed artists that an
artist could be successful and make money
while alive. In an ironic twist his works,
which in their heyday were copied at a
dime a dozen are now prized works of art
and he is getting the accolades he truly deserves.
On entering the main gallery the iconic
Chinese Girl greets you a solitary image on the wall and though her gaze is
averted the painting captures your attention immediately and welcomes you into a
world that represents a life time of unique
Tretchikoff talent.

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

FLOWER SELLER

FIGHTING COCKS

Painted in Cape Town

Painted in Java

onica Pon Su San, who posed for the portrait, was among
the 500 or so distinguished guests at the opening. A coup
for Andrew Lamprecht, the museums curator in showcasing this original work in South Africa for the first time, but in also
having the subject of the Chinese Girl in person at the launch.
He pointed out that this iconic portrait was indeed South Africas
Mona Lisa as more prints of her have been sold than of the Mona
Lisa. The story goes that a nineteen year old girl bought the painting from Tretchikoff in the 50s having not only emptied her bank
account but also came to an agreement with Tretchikoff to pay the
balance off in monthly installments.

In 1961, in a BBC interview, Tretchikoff was


posed this rhetoric question:

oing beyond Miss Wong, each and every art work enticed me to explore the exhibition more and more. I was
impressed with the number of people at the opening but
soon realized that they were all there to celebrate and honour this
diverse representation of this unique mans life. The exhibition did
not let me down for one second in fact, around every corner I
was more amazed at what the curators had managed to assemble
under one roof many of his earliest works as well as the works he
created whilst imprisoned in Java to his last works, dating from the
70s. Perhaps it was the prolific abundance of the printed versions
of his iconic works that endeared him to the masses or the sheer
honesty of his portraits, but whatever his magic, we all knew of the
phenomenal peoples painter Tretchikoff.

Which painting do you think is the most famous in the world?


Leonardo Da Vincis Mona Lisa? Botticellis Birth of Venus, Gainsboroughs Blue Boy?.... Before you answer, let me tell you youre
wrong. It is the green-faced Chinese Girl by Tretchikoff (Tretchikoff
and Hocking, 1973:279)

o which Tretchikoff replied, I cannot explain the mystery of my


painting, Chinese Girl. I would never have believed anyone
who told me in advance I would paint a picture that would
appeal literally internationally not only to the European races but
to the Orientals and Africans as well. (Tretchikoff and Hocking,
1973: 241-42)

THE DYING SWAN

Tretchikoffs second attempt to capture the


grace of this famous ballet interpreted by
Prima Ballerina, Alicia Markova.
Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 11

COLLECTING

FEATURE

THE MAN AND THE


ARTIST BEHIND
TRETCHIKOFF

SELF PORTRAIT

First started 1934 in Java,


repainted twice in
South Africa - completed 1950.

retchikoffs story reads like that of a


romantic novel, a story he portrayed
in his romantic art. Tretchikoff who
lived until the age of 92 once said that the
major difference between himself and Van
Gogh and is that Van Gogh starved and he
became very wealthy. In fact after Picasso
it is believed that he was the wealthiest
artist in the world. Born in Russia on December 13 1913, Vladimir Griegorovich
Tretchikoff spent more than 60 years of his
life in South Africa, but he never gained the
recognition in South Africa or among arts
elite that he did internationally. At the tender
age of 5 his family fled with their 8 children
to Harbin in the Chinese port of Manchuria
during the Russian Revolution. At the age of
16 he was commissioned by the ChineseEastern Railway to draw portraits of its executives. He then left for Shanghai to be a
cartoonist for the Shanghai Evening Post. It
was here where he met and married Natalie Telpregoff. The Japanese invaded Singapore in 1941, Natalie and his daughter
Mimi were evacuated. A week later he was
also evacuated and after the ship he was
on was torpedoed by the Japanese he was
reported missing. Trechikoff had managed to board a life boat and after 21
days the survivors made it to Java only to
be imprisoned as the Japanese had taken
occupation of the area. Tretchikoff was held
in solitary confinement for three months for
upholding his rights as a Soviet National.
It was after his release that he discovered
his talent for portraiture and he met Lenka.
He encouraged her to model for him and

The

Collector 12

DECOR

they soon became lovers. Lenkas involvement in spiritualism led her to having visions
of Natalie and Mimi. She encouraged
Tretchikoff to seek help in searching for
them and it was established that they were
alive and living in Cape Town. Lenka encouraged him to leave for Cape Town to
become reunited with his family. Tretchikoff
pursued his artistic career once settled in
South Africa and in 1948 he held his first
exhibition which was a huge success. In
1961 Harrods cleared an exhibition space
for him, and his show pulled in more than
200,000 visitors. Tretchikoff invited Lenka
to attend his London exhibition. They met up
again in Cape Town some 30 years later
when both were in their eighties. She was
delighted with his success.

MUST VISIT
Said curator Andrew Lamprecht at the
launch, Everyone has his own opinion
about Tretchikoff but he evokes an instinctive response from people. So many of us
only know him for his prints. Come and see
his original works, come with a fresh eye
and decide for yourself.
The final words came from his daughter. It
is wonderful to see his work together like
this, it is sad that it never happened in his
lifetime, said Mimi Mercorio, daughter
of artist Vladimir Tretchikoff.

THE HERB

Herb sellers of the Cape

His reputation grew and in 1968 his 11


day exhibition attracted 34,000 people
in Durban. Tretchikoff specialized in portraits; he worked in oil, watercolour, ink,
charcoal and pencil on paper, board and
oil on canvas as well as canvas on board.
The first series of high-quality reproductions, by Frost and Read in London, were
sold to department stores, where they
adorned the walls of the lingerie sections.
I eat critics for breakfast, he used to boast,
dismissing them as envious, failed artists.
Tretchikoff coined the phrase laughing all
the way to the bank. He measured artistic
success above all in financial terms. At his
death he was reputed to have sold more
reproductions than any other artist in history and to have made more money in his
lifetime than any other artist bar Picasso.
After The Green Girl, his best known pictures include Weeping Rose, Blue Monday
and The Dying Swan, which features the
dancer Alicia Markova and then there
were the bestselling flower pieces. I dont
do portraits, he said, explaining that portraits were of real people, but his people,
his women, were symbols of womanhood
summoned from the riches of his own imagination and at most inspired by a model or
a passing face in the street.

ALISCIA MARKOVA

The Dying Swan

He was self-taught and a brilliant businessman gaining success through sheer number
of sales. Late in his life the prices of his originals began to soar.
Tretchikoff, the icon of the late 1980s,
found a new rather hip audience and with
it a favourable change in perception of his
art. This new-found enthusiasm for his work
surprised Tretchikoff as he always believed
in the artistic merit of his works. In 2002
he suffered a stroke and was forced to stop
painting. As the British fashion designer
Wayne Hemmingway put it, Tretchikoff
had achieved everything that Andy Warhol stated he wanted to do but could never
achieve because of his coolness.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

tion Nation
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Antiques
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& Collectables

A N T I Q U E S

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Antique
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/
C O L L E C T A B L E S
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S I L V E R
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P O R C E L A I N
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D O U L T O N

Tretchikoff Chrysanthemums on table 1913 -2006


Height 50cm, Width 62cm

MUST VISIT

d Decorati
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ASSOCIATED ART GALLERY

Antique
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NAADA
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FEATURE

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Arts Asso
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COLLECTING

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Specialists in Fine Art / SA Masters / Silver / Collectable Glass / Art Deco / Art Nouveau / Antique Furniture
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e m a i l : b a b o o a n t i q u e s @ g m a i l . c o m / a y e s h a g a l l e r y @ g m a i l . c o m

Dear Collector
YOU ARE INVITED !
Lorenzl Dancer
with Short skirt

In the leafy suburb of Parktown North, a hidden gem, filled


with Arts, Antiques, Collectables and upmarket furniture is
waiting to be discovered.
If you are a discerning collector looking for a unique piece
of silver, new art to adorn your home or a piece to add to
an existing collection, pop in and visit Ayesha & Boboo
Moola who will cater for your every collecting need.
Management at Associated Art Gallery would be
privileged if you would join us in our Spring Celebration at the Gallery from Saturday 17 September 2011 to
Saturday 24 September 2011(Heritage Day). We will be
open from 10:00am to 6:00pm everyday.
Join us for a lovely cool drink and snacks in our beautiful
rose garden. All our stock will be on display at a reduced
price.
On Saturday 24 September 2011 (Heritage Day) there
will be an Antique Faire, Fashion Show and Food Stalls to
commemorate the 100 year anniversary of the house. The
Fashion Show will start at 11:00am.
Come and spend some time with us. Looking forward to
seeing you.

The

Collector 14

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

To list an Art Piece contact Clyde 082-883-4933

FOR SALE
1

Art Exhibition:
Tretchikoff: The Peoples Painter
Date : 26 May - 25 September 2011
Time : 09h00 - 17h00
Iziko South African National Gallery
Queen Victoria Street
Cape Town City Centre
Cape Town
Western Cape
South Africa

1. EM Ngatane
(South Africa 1938 - 1971)
Oil on Canvas
Woman & Child
Signed Size: 60cm x 45cm
Clyde on 4th (011) 482-4259
2. Frans David Oeder
(South Africa 1867 - 1984)
Oil on Board
Grazing Horses, Elands River Valley
Signed Size: 89cm x 50cm
Clyde on 4th (011) 482-4259

3. Christian Peter Nice


(South Africa 1939)
Oil on Board
District 6 - 1987
Signed Size: 44cm x 59.5cm
Clyde on 4th (011) 482-4259
4. Christopher Coetzee
(South Africa 1929 - 2001)
Enamel on board
Three profiles and Roses
Signed and dated 97
Size: 120cm x 120cm
Associated Art (011) 880-8092

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 15

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MAHLAHS ANTIQUES AND COLLECTABLES


160 Long Road, Greymont
Contacts - Tom 0823201712 / Jane 0833055154
Tel: (011) 672-2744 email: tomjane@vodamail.co.za

Our opening times are Mon - Thurs 9am to 5pm,


Fri - Saturday 9am to 3pm.
The life of antique dealers sometimes takes on a life of its own and
Tom and Jane Howden are a perfect example of how a combination of a general love of antiques has turned into a successful
business with a specialist angle.
The Howdens started out in 2001 at weekend fairs, selling excess
inheritance items they had brought from the UK. When that stock
was all sold the couple started buying privately and at auctions.
Toms ability to restore old and broken items resulted in lights,
scales, tools and other items receiving a second life. It was his
interest in antique tools that saw him specialize in this field and he
soon built up a clientele of collectors who either needed something
fixed or were looking for specific pieces.
When the opportunity arose to open a shop, they grabbed it and after trading for 20 months decided to invest in an old house in Greymont
which they transformed from a three bedroomed house into a Cape farmhouse style antique shop.
Their selection of stock includes period lighting from Victorian gas Chandeliers to Art Deco. Their collection of scales range from egg scales
to bankers scales with sovereign weights.
You can also see the Howdens at the many fairs they do including the Antiques Fair at Nelson Mandela Square on the first Sunday of every
month and the second Sunday of the month at Uncle Tims Cabin.
Marples Ultimatum
Brace, c1900.

Millers Patent Plough


Plane, c1870.

Value R 13,000

Value R 20,000

Sargent Lady Bug


Bench Plane,
c1930.

Value
R 5,500

With the largest selection of tools from trades such as blacksmiths, coopers, engineers, cabinet makers and joiners and
stock tools from ordinary working tools at R50 to collectors tools at many thousands of rands, visiting Mahlahs is a must
if you want to add to your tool collection.
If you have tools you would like to sell or a special piece you would liked sourced, contact Tom for expert advice.

The

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Issue 16 September/October/November/December

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Collecting Tools

With thanks to the following website: http://www.tooltimer.com

EVERY MASTERPIECE STARTED LIFE WITH A TOOL:

A Beginners Guide
to Collecting Antique
Tools
Tools are the father of all other antiques.
Master paintings, the great statues, the finest pottery, the most decorative furniture, the
most colorful tapestries -- all of these would
have been nothing more than someones
momentary idea without the tools needed
to create them. Every manmade object depends on the use of tools for its existence,
and mankinds greatest creativity and intelligence is reserved for the creation of newer
and better mousetraps to solve the production problems of the day. Tools were the first
expression of human cognition.

ollecting antique tools is a little like


learning chess -- at first it is a bit
confusing as the wide assortment
of tools presents itself, then with a small
amount of experience you gain confidence
in your ability to make the right moves and
collect interesting pieces, and as you become more and more the experienced
collector you begin to realize that there is
an ever richer and increasingly interesting
realm of knowledge and speciality waiting
to be discovered. Because of this richness,
people who seriously begin collecting tools
will probably be tool collectors for life, and
the friendships made across long distances
(and short ones!) in the world of tool col-

lecting are legendary. Once you are a tool


collector, you can travel the globe and everywhere find kindred spirits with which to
share a hearty meal, a cold mug, and a
good-natured debate over the peculiarities
of your respective specialties.

Tool Collecting
Categories
Tools, obviously, come in all shapes, sizes,
and sorts. Each tool was designed for a
different job and so the variety is endless.
In fact, even longtime experienced tool collectors and dealers will often run into something they havent seen before (toolies call
these unidentified tools whatsits). In the
face of all this variety, tool collectors have
established categories of tools to help them
focus their collections. In the broadest categorization, tools are divided into groups
by the material they work -- woodworking
tools, metalworking tools, basket making
tools, leather working tools, etc, etc. Within
each of these categories tool types can be
further refined. For example, in the woodworking tool category, we have edge tools,
boring tools, measuring tools, woodworking machines, and so on. In the machinist tool world, we have calipers, gauges,
indicators, etc. With such a wide range of
collectables within the broad discipline of
collecting tools, it is advisable to do your

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

research and source the many books and


websites that specialize in specific tools that
might interest you.

ools can also be categorized in


ways outside their intended purpose
- such as tool makers, patented
tools, aesthetic tools, tools from a particular
era or generation, tools made in a particular geographical area, tools made from a
certain material, and miniatures. These categories are definitely not the only ways into
which the tool population can be sliced, but
they are among the more common ways.
Dont view this categorization at all as the
right way to collect, but only as examples
of some of the possible ways to collect old
tools.

Tool Makers
This is probably the most common way of
making sense of the huge world of tool collecting. Find a tool maker you like (Stanley
is a popular choice) and gather up all tools
by that maker. You can make this hard on
yourself (as with the Stanley example, as
they made thousands of tools over dozens
of years) or easy on yourself (by choosing
to collect, say, Windsor beaders -- of which
3 types are known). Often collectors specializing in a specific maker also tend to
further cull the crop by adding in another of

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major limitation is that not all tools have had


type studies performed on them - recognize
type studies for the knowledge they are, but
be aware of their limitations also.

Tool Aesthetics

the categories listed here, for example by


collecting Stanley tools with aesthetic qualities like the Millers Patent planes (which
are also patented tools). Search references
to the multitude of tool manufacturers and
by combing through these you will be able
to find a maker who suits your collecting
fancy.

Tool Patents
Patented tools have long been a favorite of
tool collectors, and are especially enjoying
a renaissance in the tool collecting world
now. The popularity of various tools seems
to go in cycles, and currently the primitive tools (rusty broadaxes from Germany,
for example) are at a low point and patented tools are at a high point. Patented
tools interest collectors because they almost
always have a story that goes along with
their manufacture. Doing the research to investigate the patentee, the date of patent,
whether the patent and the manufactured
models match, etc. is a lot of fun and is like
traveling back through time to find somebody and relate them to their nearby tool
manufacturers, the ironmongers supplying
the raw materials for their tools, the local
wood supply, and so on.

Type Studies
Type studies are attempts by tool affectionados to track the development of a specific
tool through the years of its manufacture.
For example, the Stanley #45 combination
plane has been subjected to numerous type
studies. The type study allows a collector
to say that his #45, having a flowered
fence but no inscription thereon, must be a
Type 1 and was therefore manufactured in
either 1884 or 1885. Often, in catalogs
of old tools for sale, you will see the tool
described as (for example) Stanley #45,
type 13.
Type studies are very handy for identifying a tools vintage, for trying to track
down missing parts, and
for affixing a value to a
tool. But they have
some limitations
and some
problems
too. The

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In this category tools are, regardless of intended function, pieces of art or sculpture.
The definitive examples of this class of tools
are found in The Art of Fine Tools by Sandor
Nagyszalanczy and Classic Hand Tools
by Garrett Hack. Most assuredly there are
other equally nice pieces to be had.
Aesthetic tools may include painting in floral
or pinstriped design, carving on the tool,
fancy castings, striking graphic forms, or
exotic materials. Tools in this class you will
know when you see, and these are usually the tools that bring top-dollar at the big
tool events. In this category, it is probably
even more important than usual to judge
condition fairly harshly -- a lot of the beauty
of the tool may be removed in a rusty, broken version, even if you can still make out
some pin striping.

Tool Evolution
For many people, especially those with an
interest in history, collections are formed by
gathering together samples of tools from a
specific era in human development. This
may be primitive man, and the collection
would consist of axes, spear points, and
flint knives. Or, this may be Civil War-era
man, and may consist of wooden molding
planes, early patented marking gauges,
etc. Or perhaps tools from the WWII era.
Many collectors prefer to collect items pre1900 over those manufactured after that
date. Another aspect of this is to collect
tools from a company that was later absorbed into another or went bankrupt, such
as rules from the Acme Rule Company. Several tools from different companies but from
the same era set side by side can show
interesting design details in common and
can spark debates about who thought of
something first. It also makes for a fascinating display to show a tools evolution over
time from the patent model (in the case of
patented tools) to a present day example.

Tool Geography
Tools were made all over the world, and
tools grouped by specific regions tend to
make interesting collections. Makers from a
region tended to choose the same materials
for their tools, from the availability of
specific local trees to a centrally
located blacksmith to forge
irons for chisels and planes.
Once makers marks became
popular, it is interesting to put
together a set of tools from the
same locality, or to trace one

MUST VISIT
makers career as he (usually it was a he)
moved from town to town. Almost always
before 1900 these moves were not too far
in the scope of todays world usually a
village or two removed from the original
shops location. Some collectors prefer the
tools of England, others like Japanese tools.
Some like to collect tools made in the area
in which they reside, or in which they grew
up. With the wide diversity of tools out
there, the choice is yours!

Tool Materials
Tools were made from just about anything
-- wood, steel, ivory, bone, cast iron, brass,
etc. etc. The more tactically conscious
breed of tool collector will often attempt to
assemble a set of tools showing the great
diversity in materials used to make tools. A
display exhibiting this diversity can often be
a stunning look at how tools were really,
at least in the early days, designed to be
beautiful things as well as functional ones.
Other collectors use the choice of tool materials as a restraining factor in their collections, to help define the boundaries of
their interests. Rule collectors, for example,
will often concentrate on boxwood or ivory
rules, and the grand prize for these collectors is the rare ebony rule!

Miniature Tools
Some tools are large, and others are small.
Sometimes the size differentials are a matter
of fitting the intended purpose, and other
times miniaturists have taken a normal- sized
tool and shrunk it down to a smaller scale
both as a demonstration of their toolmaking
prowess and because having a large collection of miniature tools takes up a lot less
room than having the originals. Collecting
miniature tools is a popular way of indulging your love of the creative aspect of tools
while limiting your investment in square feet.
There are a number of miniaturists making
scale models of tools both in the U.S. and
England (and probably in other countries).
Another interesting angle on this part of
the hobby is collecting salesmans samples
or advertising samples. Often companies
would make small scale versions of their
tools that their salespeople could fit in a
suitcase and travel with to shows. Other
tools are just small to begin with, as in small
plumb bobs or trammel points.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

Collecting Tools as an
Investment
What makes a collectible tool valuable? In
two words, condition and rarity, and these
two factors are interrelated. Rare tools increase in value as their condition is better,
with the top tool prices going to those tools
that combine rarity and condition to the top
degree. These tools can exceed $25,000
in value. Condition affects value in all rarity
ranges -- even common tools in spectacular
condition bring much higher prices than any
guide book suggests. Essentially, a common
tool can be elevated to the rare tool category when it is mint in the box. A rare
level can be worth thousands more than a
more common example of a tool that does
the same job.
You might see on eBay a Stanley #4 that
sold for $350, and wonder why -- book
value is around $25? Perhaps the $350
#4 was a type 1, which would put that
plane in the rare category. Perhaps it was a
type 1 in the original box in mint condition,
in which case Id say the buyer got a bargain. Rarity can have this great an effect on
value. Now lets look at an example of how
condition effects value -- well take a Stanley
#20 circular plane as our focus of attention.
The Walters price guide shows this plane
being worth $50-$125. These are pretty
common planes. On eBay you might get
a number of examples, one of which was
mint (100% jappanning, but no box) and
sold for $225 and the other which had all
its parts, was well-used, a bit rusty, and with
50% jappanning sold for $41. If the mint
#20 had also had its original box, its price
may have tripled. A Phillips plow plane
with the original pin striping may be worth
five times what another example is worth
without the paint, but in essentially the same
condition otherwise. There are hundreds of
examples like this.

Provenance
Provenance is the history of a tools ownership, and I consider provenance the accelerant of tool value. If it is known who
owned the tool previously, especially if that

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person was considered to have a good tool


collecting eye and was not a refinisher/repairer, the tools value may be even higher
than another equally rare example in similar condition. Some of this has to do with
the fact that certain collectors are known
for preserving the state of the tool, which
makes the tool more valuable for historical
research. Some of it also has to do with the
buddy factor, which is that an old tool
collectors friends will want to try and collect a memento from his estate to remember
him/her by. You frequently see in auction
catalogs that the tool being offered is from
the so- and-so collection. If you buy a tool
with known provenance, keep that information with the tool as its value will continue to
be enhanced when you get around to selling it. One point the advent of the internet
has made abundantly clear is that the top
condition items are soaring way over book
values, while the midrange to low- end examples are falling at the low end or under
book values.
So, how do you tell when something is in
excellent condition? For starters, you can refer to the Fine Tool Journal rating system. This
system takes several factors into account including finish remaining, wear, repairs, and
rust. However, there are also other things to
consider. Are the parts original, or at least
the proper type? Are there stains or other
discolorations in the wood or metal? Is the
finish original, or a modern job? Is the original box present, and if so what is its condition (a box can more than double the value
of rarer tools, and can add significantly to
the value of almost all tools). Disassemble
the tool as much as possible to determine
condition of all parts whether externally visible or not. Check to see if owners initials
or other modifications have happened to
the tool -- some owners would add paint or
scratches to mark their tools for easier identification. Also consider the previous owners
cleanliness habits -- has the tool been over
cleaned, removing the valuable patina of
age? A bright and shiny tool may catch the
eye quicker, but for serious collectors a tool
a hundred and fifty years old is NOT bright
and shiny. Any and all of these non- factory
changes detract from the value of the tool,
some more than others

Where to Buy Antique


Tools
Finding antique tools is really not difficult,
unless you restrict the inquiry to just finding
historically significant, truly rare or unique
antique tools. At one time, from the 1930s
through the 1980s, the main way thousands of people became involved in tool
collecting was to build sets of planes, levels, axes, rules, and other specialties by
looking through garage sales. Today in the
2000s few older pieces are seen in everyday bargain hunting, therefore this is no
longer a viable option except for relatively
modern tools.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

MUST VISIT

Dealers
Antique tool dealers can be divided into two
categories -- those that advertise themselves
as dealers and all other tool collectors who
also sell stuff out of their collections - individuals who realized their love for old tools
and decided to make hunting for these
treasures their main source of income. Two
large antique dealers overseas, Martin J.
Donnelly in the States and Tony Murland in
the UK, have auctions which just deal in
specialist antique tools.
Before you buy anything, learn the following:
What is the tools true condition?
Considering its condition, rarity, and aesthetic appeal, is it an
outstanding example of its kind?
What have comparable pieces sold for recently?
Once you have this information, you are an
informed buyer and will be able to make a
decision you wont later regret. You should
have a general idea of what to pay and
how rare a tool is before you take out your
wallet. Take all the time you need to check
a sellers references carefully. With relatively
few exceptions, tools available today will
still be available at the same price next
month. Dont buy in haste, and if you are
just beginning your interest in rare tools, by
all means dont buy anything on someones
investment recommendation unless you independently verify the price, condition, and
market potential. On the positive side, once
you have found someone with which you
want to do business you have the opportunity to build a fine relationship which can
last many, many years.

Quality Pays
If you consider yourself a tool collector, I
recommend that you always purchase premium quality pieces. Time and again it has
been demonstrated that the finer quality
pieces retain and increase their value better
than run-of- the-mill pieces. If you are a user,
you still want to find complete tools with
most of their finishes remaining. Tools of
special quality often sell for special prices,
and scarce and rare tools typically bring
over market prices. No great collection was
ever formed by someone who tried to buy
the most tools for the cheapest prices.
Collecting tools can be one of the most rewarding pastimes. If you spend some time
researching the line of old tools you are interested in, you can avoid some mistakes
and youll make your tool collecting hobby
much more fun. Remember, tool collecting
knowledge is something to gain before you
start buying tools, not afterwards.

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NATIONAL ANTIQUES FAIRE 2011

E G EE
R

O.

Arts Asso
ve
W. N

A ADA.C

tion Nation
cia
A

IQU

AR

NAADA

NT

ES

d Decorati
anEN

Antique
alTIQUES ARE GREs

Left: Templars Antiques

hilst the National Antiques & Decorative Arts


Faire prides itself in showcasing a wide range
of antiques, collectables and decorative arts
to suit every pocket, this years NAADA Faire stood out
for two reasons:
- The tribute to Nelson Mandela on his 93rd birthday with a
unique exhibition and sale of some of his works and memorabilia. Taking pride of place were two statues one of
him as a young boxer, the other of him and Mohamed Ali
created by sculptor Des Khoury. Paintings signed by Mandela and limited edition autobiographies were also on
sale.

Above: Bancroft Antiques

- Some of the most exquisite and earliest antiques were on


show at the Templars Antiques stand where two enormous
iconic Buddhistic glazed tilework lions from the late Ming
Dynasty period stood guard surrounded by antiques
that took everyones breath away. These included a pair
of mid-18th Century Portuguese Ormolu Rosewood &
Fruitwood Marquetry Commodes and a rare and distinguished stinkwood and corromandel bureau with original
silver handles from the Roux family of Libertas and
exhibited at the International Art Fair in Cologne in 1986.

Above: Validtrade Antiques

For the thousands who came through the doors at the


Sandton Convention Centre, there was something for
everyone.

Above: Jeremy Stephen Antiques

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Collector 20

Above & Left:Yesterdays Dreams

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

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SHOWCASED THE BEST OF THE BEST

Above: Ardmore Potteries

Above: The Mandela Exhibition

locks took pride of place with two specialist clock


dealers exhibiting and many other dealers doing brisk
business in carriage clocks and mantelpiece clocks.

Above: Dornoch Clocks

Oriental antiques are all the rage and the range, both local
and international of Chinese antiques attracted great interest.
Collectable furs were the pick of the fashionistas who were
happy to wrap themselves in luxurious furs from yesteryear
knowing they were recycled rather than new and endangered.
For those hooked on collecting English porcelain the Pascoe
Ceramics stand with its hundreds of pieces, both old and
collectable, brought to South Africa by Ed Pascoe, was a
delight for visitors.
Interior decorator Stephen Falcke once again wove his magic
wand to create a unique and very eclectic living space at
the entrance to the Faire showing how to mix the old and
the new.

Above: Moonstruck Experience

Above: Templars Antiques

Collectors who attended the talks by Louise Irvine, author and


ceramics expert, from Pascoe Ceramics were enthralled with
her presentation on collecting Royal Wedding memorabilia
where she shared some interesting snippets and photographs
of great moments and wonderful pieces.

Above: Holtzhausen Clocks & Music Boxes

Above: Clyde on 4th Antiques

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

Above: Kunsthandel Dutch Antiques

The

Collector 21

Live In Air You Love

Fragrance that purifies the air you live in ...

LAMPE

BERGER
P A R I S

Clyde on 4th
Antiques & Collectables
Official Stockists of Lampe Berger
75 4th Ave, Melville, Jhb
Tel: (011) 482-3266
e-mail: clyde4th@mweb.co.za
www.clydeon4th.co.za

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For more information


regarding our auctions or to go
onto our mailing
lists please contact us on
(011) 782-1896 or email:
info@dunnesafrica.co.za

Mappin & Webb 94 piece


cutlery set in oak box

Clay Face by
Ben Macala

Wakaba Mutheki painting


of a Soloist

Dunnes Africa Auctioneers Moves Up in the World!


From the rather cold and cavernous basement, Dunnes Africa have moved to sunnier premises on the Ground Floor of Northcliff
Corner Shopping Centre - and judging by the increase in attendance our customers are finding our auction space much more
welcoming! The shaky economy is also affecting the auction industry as people are turning more and more to auctions to buy and
sell goods. On the one hand, it is the ideal place for those wanting to liquidate assets and on the other hand, quality goods are
holding their own as savvy investors are scouring auctions to find those special items - be art, antiques, gold and silver. The art world
continues to be buoyant with modern day artists coming to the fore.
As a result of the move, our Toy Auction was postponed to the 20th August where
we will be combining it with a large collection of stamps from around the world. For
all toy fanatics, watch this space as we are planning another Toy Auction before the
end of the year (date to be confirmed.).

John Oldert Road


through Avenue
of Bluegums near
Pretoria

Here are some of the prices realized on some of the latest auctions:
19th century pictorial Bible
Hardy Split cane Fly fishing road
Silver coffee pot (c1918 Sheffield)
Early 20th century walnut sideboard
Tag Heuer Carrera Calibre gents wristwatch
(limited edition)
Rolf Rousseau oil painting of Fishermen & their Boats
Phillip Britz Fishermens Cottages
Johan Oldert Avenue of Bluegums near Pretoria
Wakaba Mutheki Soloist painting
Art deco walnut sideboard
Hill & Sons violin bow

R7 000,00
R3 750,00
R2 000,00
R10 500,00
R15 000,00
R15 000,00
R6 260,00
R12 000,00
R5 000,00
R4 000,00
R5 000,00

Phillip Britz oil painting of


Fishermen Cottages

Watch the press for details of future auctions!

Victorian prayer chair

DATES FOR OUR ANTIQUE & COLLECTABLES AUCTIONS FOR 2011


19th century
pictorial Bible

Saturday 27 August @ 11am


Saturday 24 September @ 11am
Saturday 29 October @ 11am
Saturday 26 November @ 11am
(These dates are subject to change)

Royal Doulton

Basement Level, Northcliff Corner Shopping Centre Corner Beyers Naude Drive & Milner Street, Northcliff
Tel: (011) 782-1896/8 Fax (011) 782-1897 Paul Brown Auctioneer 082-565-8899

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 23

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LOCAL IS LEKKER COLLECTING

SOUTH AFRICAN
ANTIQUES

Stinkwood Bureau

Storage Seat

South Africa, with its English, Dutch, French and German heritage, has a wealth of antiques and collectables
that have been handed down from generation to generation and have become highly sought after by collectors.
- From the local craftsmen who created local furniture that could be easily transported during the great trek,
- To the French Huguenots and German settlers who brought their own craftsmanship.
- From the early Dutch settlers who brought down furniture from their native Holland,
- To the many commemorative items commissioned by the English Queen such as Royal Doultons Loving Cup
or Boer War memorabilia to commemorate colonial events ....
South African antiques offer a rich tapestry of collecting intrigue.

AFRIKANER FURNITURE

According to Christiaan Scholtz of Die Ossewa in Melville there


is definitely a move towards preserving our heritage, and early
Afrikaner antiques have become highly collectable and are not
easy to find. In some of the more rural areas of South Africa,
especially those with a strong Afrikaans heritage, you can often
still pick up exquisite pieces such as yellowwood and stinkwood
furniture, an unusual bathroom cupboard or a miniature of a Cape
Armoire. Avid collectors are scouring the country for Early Afrikaner
and Pioneer furniture, the more modern Cape and Transvaal furniture of the thirties and forties and even imbuia furniture which
is fast reaching its 100-year mark and becoming the new old
collectable.
Pieces with a provenance, like a Koffee Confoer set, made up of
a coffee pot with a filter bag and coal burner, each individually
inscribed with the makers name F J Staal, dated 2nd February
1921 was probably given as a wedding gift. Getting your hands
on a dop beker, which was traditionally given with wine to slaves
working in the vineyards in lieu of payment, also has immense
historical value. To complement Afrikaner furniture look out for
Afrikaner accessories such as copper pots, tools and old kists.

ANTIQUES WITH A
PROVENANCE
Bringing a totally unique perspective and a strong link to South
Africa is Ricus Dullaert, the renowned Dutch dealer who has been
showcasing some of the best antiques at the NAADA Faire for the

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Collector 24

past couple of years. He has, over the years showcased some


incredible antiques including.
- A rare Woltemade Clock by Douwe de Vries made shortly after
1775 in Amsterdam. This long case clock, oak veneered with
Burr walnut and inlaid with rosewood depicts the heroic deed by
Wolraad Woltemade who rescued 14 sailors from the wrecked
VOC de Jonge Thomas in Table Bay on the 1st June 1773. Beautifully preserved and restored, this one-of-a kind clock was sold for
an undisclosed amount by Ricus Dullaert, of Kunsthandel H.W.C
Dullaert, a well-known antiques dealer from Amsterdam who is a
regular exhibitor at the National Antiques Faire and who has made
it his mission to source antique items that have a strong Dutch/
South African provenance.
- A 17th century Dutch oak kussenkast veneered with ebony and
kingwood of the period of Jan van Riebeeck circa 1660. High
218 cm, Wide 175 cm, Deep 68 cm, on ball feet with four doors
with so called kussen decoration and a drawer with three heads
of lions.
- Compagnie Kists massive
chests that were produced in Batavia (Dutch East Indies) to store and
transport porcelain from the East.
These kists, with their massive brass
handles and mounts can be seen
in important collections such as
those at the Castle in Cape Town
and at Groot Constantia.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

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BIBLES CONNECTING
FAMILIES
For people who are interested in the links between the Cape colony and
the Dutch motherland, Ricus Dullaert has two rare Bibles that are proof of
the close relationship between our two countries.
- The first is a book with the psalms and songs for the Dutch Reformed
Church printed in 1834 in Haarlem, the Netherlands. This book, bound
in a handsome green Moroccan leather neo gothic binding, is embellished with gold clasps by the Cape goldsmith Peter Clarke Daniel. The
book was given to Susana Maria Blanckenberg who later married the
mayor of Cape Town, Kotze van Leeuwenhof. The book was given to her
by her father J.G. Blankenberg on the 1st July 1835. The gold clasps are
engraved with a dedication from Mr. Blankenberg to his daughter.

A Collection of vintage Bibles

- The second Cape Dutch Bible in the Dullaert collection is a Statenbijbel printed in 1864 by Swaan in Arnhem, The Netherlands.
This Bible is embellished with heavy silver clasps by the famous Cape
silversmith Johannes Marinus Lotter who was active in Cape Town in the
19th century.

BOER WAR MEMORABILIA


Anglo-Boer War memorabilia
is also attracting great interest from collectors keen
to preserve that part of our
countrys heritage. Depending
on whether you are partial to
the Boers or support the English
colonists, there is a wealth of
memorabilia available which
avid collectors are snapping up.

A Collection of hardwood chairs

Highly collectable washstand

From the Boer perspective the Anglo-Boer War (1899 -1902) saw
as many as 26 000 soldiers taken prisoners
and sent to POW camps both in the country and later
abroad to St Helena, Bermuda, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and India. To combat boredom, many prisoners of war started making hand crafts which, in some cases, turned into a way to make extra
money. Walking sticks, boxes, pens, clips, serviette rings and paper
knives were common items made but the more rarer pieces involved great
craftsmanship in the way of carvings, be they of boxes or walking sticks
with a representation of a Boer War hero carved into it. Coming across a
collection of prisoner of war memorabilia, made by craftsmen, of a walking stick, officers baton, cufflink holder, carved tobacco jar and wooden
pipe all with the carved head of Paul Kruger, is quite a unique find.
From the English perspective, collectors look to collect memorabilia which
depicted the English military leaders such as Buller, Baden-Powell, Roberts, Kitchener, French, White or MacDonald either in porcelain figures
or depicted on tea-ware by ceramic houses such as Staffordshire and
Royal Doulton. Even rarer are the tins of chocolate given by Queen Victoria to the troops serving in South Africa finding one complete with
original chocolates is a real find! Picture postcards and cigarette cards
are other popular War collectables whilst prints and memoirs on the war
often produced as supplements to magazines such as Vanity Fair and
The Sphere are also highly collectable. Maps, posters, ration tickets,
letters, photographs and autographs are also highly collectable as are
military artefacts from that period.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 25

COLLECTING

FEATURE

THE COTTAGE
42 Main Rd Cnr 10th Avenue, Melville
Tel: (011) 726-7506/1705

Originally opened by Helen de Leeu in Melville in the


1960s and known as the oldest antique shop in and
around Melville, 1978 saw new ownership and today
Mannie Liebmann is still the proud owner of this antique
shop.
In 1999 The Cottage moved to larger and bigger
premises, incorporating Mannys other two shops,
to form time walk trails - a trail of three intriguing
specialists shops. As you take a leisurely stroll through
the trail different periods are showcased.
The Cottage - which focuses on Cape & Transvaal
Africana, with the widest range and selection of Stink
wood chairs, collectable kists and classic Africana tables
and artifacts reflecting the finest of this heritage.

DECOR
Africana furniture is often misconstrued by the public and dealers as
somewhat scruffy country furniture.
Nothing could be further from the
truth. In order for furniture to be
seen as Africana it must in general
have some indigenous timber in it
and show some unique adaptations
to local conditions. A good example
is the wagon chest. Although chests
originate in Europe the wagon chest
in the Cape and interior developed in
construction (because of the unique
local wood quality) and function (on
the wagon). Chests developed - the
wagon was home and the chests
were used for various functions with
various shapes to be accommodated
on the wagon for ease of use and
access. Therefore, the front wagon
chest doubling up as a seat with a
unique design, wagon securing hook
and shape for securing it to the wagon developed. Similarly the tool kist
has a sloping top (so that tools cannot be left behind) and is attached to
the side of the wagon by means of
a rear aperture or hole. The interior
side chest was attached to the interior side of the wagon and had a
more square shape but still showed
the unique dovetailing and side slope
that developed in the Cape tradition
of crafmanship. The rear chest in the
wagon was generally the biggest
and squarest as it contained household goods and needed to be most
accessible. Even the positioning of
the handles displays unique functionality for ease of use and movements on the wagon. Chests have
other dimensions for example the

MUST VISIT
painted chest show European origins
but were adapted locally to indicate
district of origin , family etc.
The same general principal of adaptation to local conditions, timber
supply and craftsmanship for local
conditions applies for all Africana
furniture. In terms of dimension - for
example where one still found grand
furniture in the Cape Dutch homes,
smaller proportions and rougher
craftmanship began to emerge in
the outlying rural homes. What did
emerge was a style and approach
to furniture which was uniquely and
distinctively, Cape-Dutch and which
also incorporated the German French
and English traditions where the settlers had their origins. Unfortunately
a fair amount of imported furniture
from these countries of origin is often
mistaken for Africana.
When buying Africana one should
take reasonable precaution that the
piece can be described within the
parameters of definition which would
make the majority of its features
uniquely Africana. The availability
of Africana is very limited because
of the small population and therefore the collecting of this furniture
makes aesthetic as well as financial
sense as the value of good Africana
has shown a remarkable growth in
the last five years. Not only is it truly
rare but it is also truly interesting historically, aesthetically, and relates to
by comparison to other cultures, to
a very short span of time before it
stopped being made.

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The

Collector 26

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

ntiques
dieossewaantiques

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Melville
Cnr 8th Avenue and Main Road
Tel: (011) 482-9785
Fax: (011) 482-7855
Shop Hours:
Monday Friday: 09:00 am 17:00pm
Saturday: 09:00 am 15:00pm
Sunday: 10:00 am 13:00pm

Warehouse
31 Village Road, Selby
Jhb
Tel: (011) 836-1650
Frikkie 082-560-3611
Warehouse Hours:
Monday Friday:
08:00am 16:00pm

19th Century Butchers Block

Rare Yellow Wood Cupboard


Circa 19th Century

Bronze Statue by Carl Smit

Die Ossewa is situated in Melvilles Main Street at the corner


of 8th Avenue. Inside the historic 1903 building, you will
find an eclectic mix of rare Africana furniture, 18th century
French country styles, vintage industrial designs and bespoke
tables crafted from re-cycled wood or wrought iron. If you
are looking for an eye-catching piece thats destined to be
a talking point in your home then youre sure to find it at
Die Ossewa in Melville or at their massive warehouse and restoration workshop in central Johannesburg.
Christiaan travels all over Europe and the Americas sourcing interesting and unusual pieces for Die Ossewa, a name that means
Ox Wagon. Nowadays their stock arrives by sea container,
rather than on the back of a wagon, and after expert restoration
they deliver their international discoveries to satisfied customers
all over Gauteng. They work with South Africas finest interior
designers and decorators and they exhibit annually at the
National Antiques & Decorative Arts Faire in Sandton.

Rare Wit Els & Stinkwood Regency Riempies


bench circa 19th Century

Africana small Yellow Wood kist circa 1880s

You may recognize Christiaans name as one of the rugby players


who represented South Africa in the 1995 Rugby World Cup
winning squad.
With his combined passion for art and antiques, Christiaan
has built a thriving business supplying furniture for all styles of
interiors together with chic accessories, decorative objects and
collectables. Paintings by South African artists, ceramic art from
Ardmore in KwaZulu-Natal, and vintage Moorcroft art pottery
made in England in the early 1900s are just some of their
specialities.
Why not pay a visit to Die Ossewa, you never
know what you will find today.
For more information, phone Christiaan Cell: 082-776-1585
Email: ossewa@iafrica.com or visit www.ossewaantiques.co.za

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Rare Africana Yellow Wood & Stinkwood


Warddope circa 1860s

Collector 27

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Dutch Furniture from 1685-1815, The French Taste


Kunsthandel H.W.C.Dullaert has a rare
17th century Diaper Cabinet in its collection from this period.

Dutch Burr Walnut show cabinet, Louis


Fifteenth, circa 1775
- height 220cm, width 165cm

rom 1685 when the Hugenot Daniel Marot, the famous French architect, designer and engraver came to
the Netherlands to work for Stadtholder
William the Third (1650-1702), the
Dutch furniture styles were been strongly
influenced by French fashions. William the
Third was Stadtholder of Holland and ruled
as King of Britain from 1689-1702. The
strong French influence on Dutch furniture
remained till the end of Napoleons Empire
in Europe in 1815. After 1815 the German Biedermeyer influence became visible
in Dutch furniture. The French taste in furniture started when Daniel Marot came to the
Netherlands and was appointed by William the Third of Orange as court architect
and designer. Amongst the numerous palaces this French architect designed for his
master Willliam and his English wife Mary,
castle Het Loo in Apeldoorn the Netherlands, was the most prominent one. Marot
not only designed the buildings, but also
the chimney pieces, the ceilings, the furniture, the fountains and all the other decorative details for his masters palaces. Marot
(1661-1752) was born in France during
the reign of the longest reigning monarch
of the European history, the Sun King, Louis
the Fourteenth. Louis the Fourteenth became
King of France when he was four years old
and reigned till he died at 76 years old.
During his lifespan Versailles was home
to the French court and the beloved style
was Late Baroque and strictly symmetrical.
Marot took his designs from France to the
Netherlands and made the Louis Fourteenth
style the big fashion in the Netherlands.

The

Collector 28

In 1715 Louis the Fifteenth, the son of the


Sun King ascended the French throne as a
5 year old boy. He reigned for 59 years
over France. During his reign the Louis
Fifteenth style was the fashion. This style
is contrary to the style of his father, strictly
asymmetrical. The highpoint of the Louis Fifteenth style was the rococo style. This asymmetrical style is fond of shell motives, is very
fluid and has a liking for natural motives.
The name of rococo style comes from a
combination of the words rocaille (a curved
shaped decoration) and coquilles meaning
shells. The rococo style was very popular
in most Catholic countries like France, Belgium, Portugal, Austria, Poland, Bohemia
and South Germany. Imposing churches
and palaces were built in the rococo style
with fluffy stucco ceilings, overwhelming
tromp doeuil panoramic paintings and
richly carved and gilt statues of numerous
angels and saints. In the Netherlands the
Louis Fifteenth style became extremely popular in mahogany and burr walnut armoires.
They have curved tops and curved bellies,
richly carved ball claw feet and doors with
carved friezes. The Cape armoires have
often a striking resemblance to the Dutch
Louis Fifteenth examples. Kunsthandel
H.W.C.Dullaert has a beautyful mahogany
Louis Fifteenth armoire in stock executed
circa 1775. Also the Louis Fifteenth show
cabinets with glazed doors to expose a
wealth in Chinese porcelain were very
popular in the Louis Fifteenth period in the
Netherlands. Kunsthandel H.W.C.Dullaert
has one in stock executed in burr walnut and filled with a lovely collection of
Chinese Kangxi (1665-1722) and Chien
Lung (1735-1796) porcelain.

doned and a stricter classical style began


to hold sway. After Louis Sixteenth and his
wife ended under the guillotine in 1793,
the Ancien Regime made place for Napoleons Empire which lasted from 18041815. Once more the Dutch followed with
fervor the French example and the Royal
Palace on the Dam in Amsterdam is filled to
the brim with empire furniture.
Once Napoleon was abandoned and lived his last
days on St.Helena the
Dutch turned to Germany
for inspiration for their furniture. Styles like Biedermeyer
and Jugendstil became
popular. But none of the later
styles could rival the beauty
of late 17th and 18th century Louis styles that were so
popular in Dutch furniture! In
the 19th century these 17th
and 18th century masterpieces were often copied, but with
lesser charm, craftsmanship
and quality.
Amsterdam 18th century
Inlaid Clock in Louis Fifteenth
style, circa 1745
- height 245cm

Ricus Dullaert invites you to visit his website:


www.chineseantiquesdullaert.com or to phone
him for an appointment on 073-152-9022.
Visit Ricus at the SAADA fair and monthly at
Nelson Mandela Square Antique Faire.

High
point
of
the
Kunsthandel
H.W.C.Dullaert Louis Fifteenth furniture collection is an armoire from the Hague with
a stunning gilt Louis Fifteenth top (circa
1745). This museum piece is fitted with
a bureau interior in the drawers. Also the
Dutch Amsterdam clocks that use to embellish the halls of the wealthy merchant houses
on the Amsterdam channels are fitted with
cases in Louis Fourteenth or Louis Fifteenth
style. Ricus Dullaert has an example in both
styles.
From 1774, when the ill fated Louis the Sixteenth and his Austrian wife Marie-Antoinette
ascended the French throne, the curves
in French and Dutch furniture were aban-

17th century Diaper Cabinet in Louis


Fourteenth - height 185cm, width 127cm

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

RIAAN BOLT CAPE AND TRANSVAAL FURNITURE

Classical pianist Riaan Bolt has been collecting and trading in fine quality Cape and Transvaal Furniture for the last 15 years,
supplying a loyal following of discerning collectors. He specializes in Africana Furniture, Cape Kitchenalia, Cape Copper and
Brass, South African Anglo Oriental Ceramics and Abstract South African Art from the 1950s to the 1980s.
Tel: 083-698-7146
Email: riaanbolt@yahoo.de
By appointment only

Right: A rare Cape Stinkwood Settee,


c1800, combining stylistic elements of
Rococo, Neo Classicism
and Queen Anne.

Above: Coetzee, Christo (SA 1929


- 2001) Coins & mixed media on
canvas board, Neo Baroque,
signed and dated Paris 1965.

KOBUS VAN DER MERWE & SONS


Tel: (011) 828-0295 Cell: 083-283-0477 E-mail: pe.vdmerwe@live.co.za

A PASSION FOR AFRICANA HERITAGE


Kobus Van der Merwe, antiques collector turned dealer, loves nothing more than to scour the platteland for interesting antiques
and collectables. Once he has picked up that blue and white vase with tabak written across the top or has loaded a babys cot
or riempiestool into his bakkie, then the fun begins. He then throws himself into researching the piece, finding out its origin, its
provenance and history and finally it takes pride of place in his house or is put up for sale.
With one of the largest private collections of Africana in the country, it was a matter of time before Kobus turned to dealing in antiques
and he and his sons exhibited for the first time at the National Antiques Faire in July this year. He admits it was a difficult step to
take as he is foremost a collector and parting with his beloved pieces was not easy. But, says Kobus, in the end, I want to share
my collection and passion with others and seeing the
enthusiasm of collectors who buy a special piece from
me gives me great satisfaction.
His other passion is collecting Boer War memorabilia.
More than the piece itself, Kobus is fascinated by the
stories attached to the pieces. Many of them were
made by prisoners-of-war and their handiwork tells the
story of war, hardship, survival and love. To him, to
find a wood table made by Anglo-Boer prisoner-ofwar Ben van den Hoven, who later became mayor
of Parys, and to connect the dots and find a picture
of the man to give the piece its rightful provenance, is
what antique collecting is all about.
Besides exhibiting at NAADA, Kobus van der Merwe
also takes part in the Voortrekker Museum Antiques
Fair and Melrose House Antiques Fair.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 29

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Collecting French Beds and Armoires


Story By Henika Gadd of Valitrade Antiques

Louis XIII Bed (solid Rosewood)


A canopy bed will completely
transform the look of your bedroom.

When choosing antique Beds or Armoires it


is a good idea to think about what type of
bed or Armoire is desired. For example, a
Louis XV era bed will be very different from
a French bed made in the 1930s. Antique
French beds and armoires come in a number of designs from many different periods.
Looking into different periods of French history can be a good way to learn about the
many different styles.

tion of the classic poster beds also widely


known as four-poster beds during the 15th
and 16th century, the canopy bed gradually evolved and this allowed for canopy bed
curtains to be hung from a structure fixed
to the four bed posts completely enclosing
the bed. Their original use was to protect
the sleeper from the substances of the typical medieval ceiling. These included plaster
and thatch debris, dirt, insects, droppings
and even parts of the ceiling itself. . Until
the 16th century, these beds, even those
of the nobles, were fairly plain and understated. During this period, carved work on
the headboard and posts became popular
and more ornate canopy beds followed.
At this time great personages were in the
habit of carrying most of their property
about with them, including beds and bedhangings, and for this reason the bedsteads
were for the most part mere frameworks to
be covered up; but about the beginning
of the 16th century bedsteads were made
lighter and more decorative, since the lords
remained in the same place.

circumstances which were thought deserving of congratulation or condolence

In the 17th century, which has been called


the century of magnificent beds, the style
a la duchesse, with tester and curtains only
at the head, replaced the more enclosed
beds in France, place for longer periods.
They were among the most splendid pieces
of furniture in a large house, and noblemen often had their emblems embroidered
on the hangings. They were a comfortable

Until the end of the 13th century, the French


armoire was decorated mainly with paintings executed on the doors panels, and
elaborated ornamental hinges. As a movable piece it was constructed of oak boards
held together with wrought iron.

HISTORY OF FRENCH BEDS:


In the 14th century the woodwork became
of less importance, being generally entirely
covered by hangings of rich materials.
During this period of history in medieval
Europe, drapes and worsted fabrics that
hung from the ceiling were used to provide
some privacy for the ruling nobles and Lords
from their attendants who often slept in the
same room as their masters. These heavy
drapes were suspended from rings that
ran along iron rods attached to a wooden
frame attached to the rafters and ceilings in
stately homes, manors and castles.
Although there were canopies and curtains,
these werent the full four poster beds with
poles at each corner which started to arrive
in the 15th century. Following the introduc-

The

Collector 30

Louis XV Rosewood
head and foot board.

place to meet for a chat, or receive guests,


while displaying an abundance of fine textiles. They could be social gathering places
at night too, as visitors of high status would
be invited to sleep in a bed even if they had
to share. At Versailles women received their
friends in their beds, both before and after
childbirth, during periods of mourning, and
even directly after marriage - in fact in any

Iron beds appear in the 18th century; the


advertisements recommend them as free
from the insects which sometimes infested
wooden bedsteads.

HISTORY OF THE FRENCH


ARMOIRE
The armoire traces its ancestry to the chest,
from a time as far back as the Dark Ages
when some clever French person turned a
chest on its end and shoved it against a wall
so that the lid would swing open as a door.
The modern term armoire comes from the
Latin word armorium, or the chest that was
used by Roman soldiers to store arms. From
a cultural standpoint, this conversion from
chest to armoire signals the beginning of a
less nomadic and more prosperous lifestyle
in which people no longer limited their furniture choices to whatever they could carry
on their backs.

Starting with the 14th century, the wood


was sculpted, and then painted, or gilded,
and the French armoire began to display
a more architectural character but during
Gothic and Renaissance times, the armoire
was less popular than its cousin, the deux
corps or two piece cabinet that also descended from a chest By the end of the
14th century, when the carpenter and the
wood carver had acquired a better mastery of their material, the taste for painted
surfaces appears to have given place to
the vogue of carving, and the rectangular
panels gradually became sculptured with
a simple motive, such as the linen-fold or
parchment patterns.
The 15th century armoire became less obviously and aggressively a thing of utility. Enriched with columns and pilasters, its panels
carved with mythology, its canopied niches
filled with sculptured statuettes
During the 16th century the armoire relapsed into plainness.
Best estimates suggest that the oldest
armoires date to the early 17th century,
armoires reasserted their dominance as the
premiere category of furniture with bold
designs.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

hand. Consumers were hungry for large, ornate and heavily carved furniture that would
impress their friends and family and show
off their newly found wealth.
It is mostly these styled beds and Armoires
that we can make investments in. Each King,
Queen or Monarch had a style unique to
the person ruling the country and to complicate matters even more, each province
had their preferred style and type of wood
that they used! In the Revival period a lot of
styles overlapped and was even combined.
It was not unusual to see Gothic and Renaissance carvings combined.
The following is guidelines that
can help one identify certain
styles:
Renaissance mirrored Walnut Armoire

In the 18th and 19th centuries, as the armoires overall design became more refined, artisans took advantage of the availability of exotic woods to distinguish their
designs with polished inlays and unique
building techniques. With war, pestilence,
floods and crime the armoire played a pivotal role in storing and protecting the possessions of its owner. In the textile business,
items such as rugs, tapestries, curtains,
clothing, tablecloths and bedding were extremely expensive and comprised the most
valuable possessions of a household. Therefore a richly carved and massive armoire
was a fitting repository to preserve and protect these trappings of wealth.
By the middle of the 18th century it was
found in every French house and throughout
a considerable part of Europe. About the
beginning of the 19th century the armoire
developed into the wardrobe, now in general use as a piece of bedroom furniture

RENAISSANCE REVIVAL
DIFFERENT STYLES:
As the middle class rose in status and
wealth with the advent of the Industrial
Revolution in the 19th century, more people
were able to afford furniture. This flattening
of society in combination with technological
advancements created a surge of furniture
production. Improved transportation meant
a greater variety of wood was available at
lower costs. For the first time, furniture became accessible and affordable to the common man. From the 1830s to the end of
the 19th century, furniture makers reached
back to earlier historical styles, and reinterpreted them with a great deal of creativity
and experimentation. Although machines
were used to increase speed and productivity, most of the carvings were still done by

Francis I: Was known as the Patron of arts.


He was the first one that started with the
Barley twist on hunting style furniture. He
also loved the Renaissance and would combine the two styles.
HenryII: Furniture was solid, square or rectangular. The columns changed from Barley
twist to plain or fluted. His most used symbol
is the plume and he started with the use of
strap work. Legs were straight. The armoires
size didnt change, it was large and heavy
but it had more fanciful rectangular panels.

MUST VISIT

the periods of Louis XIV, the Regency, Louis


XV and Louis XVI as one great period with
variations.
This style is sometimes described as Baroque which is actually incorrect since Baroque was a Italian style that influenced Louis XIV but didnt dominate the French period
Regency to Louis XV: This was a transitional period of 8 years. Asymmetrical
curved lines replaced symmetrical lines.
Where they retained there symmetry they
became more fluid. Plain wood veneer replaced Boulle and Marquetry. Inspiration
was taken from mythological themes and
the Orient, flowers, shells and dragons.
The Bombe sides were developed. Foliage and delicate bouquets wrapped with
ribbons and bows adorned the upper sections of Armoires. When Louis XV took over
the furniture was becoming more ornately
decorated and daintier. With the influence
of Louis mistress, Madame de Pompadour
furniture became more feminine and graceful. Rosewood and fruit woods replaced
darker woods. Marquetry featured and
gilt bronze. Wood was painted or enamelled and oriental lacquers were also used.

Louis XIII: He was known for Geometrical


carvings and the spiral column plain, twined
or wreathed in a vine motif appeared in
great numbers as bed posts. Two extremes
appear in beds, one emphasizing the spiral
turning, the other concealing all structural
elements. The reason being that the middle
class also had a demand for furniture but
the type of carve work depended on your
financial status. Those who could not afford
carve work made use of embroidered fabric. Cherubs, scrolls, fruit and flowers were
also used. The armoires doors had geometrical carvings and the end and centre stiles
had spiral or knobbed turnings separating
the two full length doors. It normally had
bun feet and single or double drawers at
the base. It had a narrow flared cornice.
Louis XIV: Also known as the Sun King. One
of the most famous furniture designers of all
times Andre Charles Boulle worked at the
Royal palace. This is a complete story on
its own but one cant mention the Louis XIV
era without mentioning Boulle. Armoires designed by Andre-Charles Boulle, are among
the most sumptuous and imposing pieces of
Western furniture
The hallmarks of this era were panels of
marquetry, elaborate carvings, gilding,
gold leaf, and decorations of scalloped
shells and of course the sunburst. The cabriole was used for legs.

Rosewood Louis XIII double,


spiralled carved Armoire

The Louis XIV era was the foundation of the


styles that followed. Many people look on

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 31

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

The armoires door decorations became


considerable lighter and the rail mouldings
became curved. Legs were short cabriole
or bun. The wedding armoire came into
existence.

Louis Phillipe: Until now furniture had


been sold piece by piece. Furniture had
plain simple, rounded lines and with almost no ornamentation. Mahogany and
walnut was used and marble tops.

The style featured love, music, humour,


shells, birds, serpents, nature inspired
themes and also farming motifs like corn
and wheat. Curves and c-scrolls was everywhere.

Art Nouveau and Art Deco: Flowing curved


lines and plant forms and nature inspired
shapes was used. Most common furniture
was dining and bedroom furniture. This
flowed into art deco where there was experimented with new finishes. Veneers,
mother of pearl, lacquers and plastics were
used.

This style is sometimes described as Rococo


which is actually incorrect since Rococo
was an Italian style that influenced Louis XV
but didnt dominate the French period.
Louis XVI: This style is also known as the
neo-classicism or classic revival. Straight
lines and symmetry returned, leaf or bead
mouldings. Marquetry and floral designs
were replaced by geometrical trims and medallions. Motifs included urns, bay leaves,
garlands etc. most of the work was done in
Oak. Mahogany was also imported. Corners of armoires were square instead of
rounded. The Bombe style was not used and
legs were straight, tapered or fluted.
Directoire: Was a break away from the
royal styles. Motifs like wreaths, torches
and warlike items were used because of
the influence by the Revolution. There was a
decline in furniture quality.
Empire: Typically architectural designs
such as columns and pilasters. Mahogany,
Rosewood and Ebony was used and was
decorated with brass and ormolu. There
was also a strong Egyptian influence. Decorative items such as griffins, urns, eagles
was cast in bronze and applied to symmetrical shapes.

Country French or French Provencial: This


includes all the styles but was not a historical period but more country life furniture.
It was found in Normandy, Provence and
Bordeaux and it was mostly done in Oak.

HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR


ANTIQUE BED OR ARMOIRE ?
Recent years have seen a considerable rise
in the popularity of French style bedroom
furniture, whether it is French style beds, armoires, chest of drawers or dressing tables.
These eye-catching designs are classically
elegant and are often enriched with ornate
carvings which add a real sense of sophistication and beauty.

MUST VISIT
Decide on a budget and make sure that
the price given to you includes restoration,
painting and transportation.
If you decided to go for the more the popular shabby chic end of the market style
which generally comprises of white or
cream painted pieces, often distressed to
add a vintage, homely feel, keep in mind
that if you decided on a high quality piece
these painting techniques will have an influence on the value of the piece. Rather go
for a less expensive piece and use the paint
technique to give it character.
Always remember that the frames of beds
and armoires were solid wood. Whether it
was Oak, Walnut, and Rosewood etc. On
the sides can be a veneer especially if it
was Bombay, but they didnt use Plywood!
Armoires can be used for many different
purposes. Whether for storage for electronic ware, a drink cabinet, in the kitchen or
even as a bookcase.
Most important buy from a reputable dealer.
All my Armoires and beds are hand chosen by myself for their craftsman ship and
quality.

Finding the right armoire or bed may take


some time, so before one makes any quick
decisions consider the following:
Be sure to pick the bed that suits your own
personality: although there are certain
Styles that are very fashionable the joy of
antiques is that you can choose something
that suits your personality.
After you decided on the style look at the
quality of the Bed, Armoire or Bedroom set.
The higher the quality the better is your investment. This is a very important aspect.
You know what characterizes the style, so
you can look at the quality of the carve
work, what type of wood was used. You
will pay more for certain types of wood
than others. In addition to the main bedroom furniture, you will also notice the
beautiful detailing that adds to the overall
look and feel of the pieces; brass or bronze
curved handles and knobs work alongside
the detailed carving to give your French Armoire or stunning bombe chest of drawers a
distinctive character that will only get better
with age.
Ask if there are any marks or signatures. On
very detailed pieces there are sometimes
signatures of the furniture maker and/or the
sculpture. These will only add to the value
of your investment.

Ornately Carved Head Board

INTERESTING FACTS:
1) Beds and bedding were so valuable and highly prized that it was not
unusual to find them mentioned in wills
from the 14th century onward.
2) Louis XIV was inordinately fond of
staying in bed, often holding court
in the royal bedroom. Reportedly, he
owned 413 beds and displayed a
special liking for the ultra-spacious
and ostentatious variety.
3) Many designs for these beds from
the 16th & 17th centuries used ropes
to make up the central platform of the
bed Hence what led to the expression
sleep tight as these ropes required
regular maintenance and tightening.

French triple mirrored Armoire

The

Collector 32

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COlleCTinG AnTiQUe JUDAiCA

BY JEFF M FINE.

COLLECTING

The

FEATURE

DECOR
Most families were not blessed with
having family heirlooms, and they now
are looking for the Eastern European
Judaica as was used in Der Heim.
The search for these pieces of Judaica
now becomes the hobby, a personal
statement of identification an expression of pride in their Jewish religious
and cultural heritage, a means of
finding personal roots in their Jewish
backgrounds, and a means to convey
these links to their children.

The group of objects known as Judaica includes anything used by Jews for
a religious purpose or having definite
Jewish associations.
If Wthe collecting of old objects is interesting, collecting antique Judaica
has its own unique fascination. Judaica, which includes Jewish ceremonial
art, old Hebrew books and illuminated
Hebrew manuscripts, paintings, and
objects used in the life of a Jew, is one
of the richest, most diverse, and most
unusual of all categories of collectables.
The collecting of Judaica constitutes a
search for our Jewish roots, a nostalgic
journey into our past, and an attempt
to comprehend the present through the
preservation of items of the past. What
makes Judaica so compelling for us is
the association of these objects with
our Jewish history and tradition, and
specifically with their association of
our generations and communities of
previous generations.
In South Africa, we are mostly of Eastern European and mainly Lithuanian
descent, and as in my case, have almost no Judaica heirlooms from Der
Heim (my great grandparents home)
either due to lack of finances and
space or speed of departure. For this
reason I am mainly interested in Eastern European Judaica.

WhAT JUDAiCA
TO COlleCT
AnD hOW TO GeT
sTArTeD:
This answer depends on taste, interest and certainly finances. However,
having a lot of money is not all that
important in the collecting of Judaica.
Great collections have been built with
moderate sums, and terrible collections have been amassed with unlimited resources. Of more importance is
the determination to establish a collection of fine quality pieces, needing
considerable patience, energy and a
readiness to learn.
Some collectors collect a variety of Judaica, maybe choosing a country of
origin. Some might collect an item, like
silver bechers, or even Russian silver
bechers, or, more specifically, Russian silver stetl bechers. Other categories include spice towers, chanukias
and judaica paintings. Jewish textiles
and embroidery are interesting and
colorful as well as very displayable.
Old family Judaica books, although
not very practical, can be beautifully
framed and make an old discarded
book into a piece of art and an heirloom.

graving on the bechers gives views of


the old Jewish towns called a stetl. The
same wine goblets were also made
without the Stetl scene engraving, but
these, I feel, were made for any religion. For this reason I feel that a Jew
collecting his Jewish heritage should
collect what was made for the Jews.

eAsTern
eUrOPeAn silVer
AnD silVer PlATe
shABBAT CAnDlesTiCKs:
During the late 19th century in Warsaw, Poland, there were numerous factories making and selling Judaica. The
two most well known of these were the
Norblin and Fraget Judaica factories.
They were best known for their silver
plate or brass Shabbat candlesticks.
They are easily recognized by their flat
square base or round domed base on
three bunch of grape legs. The candle holder tops were either lily flower
shape or round with loose sconces. On
the stems were either round Russian
onions or Lithuanian skirts. Again,
in my opinion, buy and use what was
made for our ancestors. (What Bobba
used in Der Heim) There are similar
silver examples made in Russia and in
Poland, while Poland was under Russian rule, these are more expensive.
Collectors in any field of antique collecting need to find experts in their
field, in order to be able to ask advice or discuss authenticity. It is always
more advantageous to buy from or exchange with a fellow collector or from
a reputable dealer.

The key to becoming a good collector


is becoming an educated collector!

The Judaica field is plagued by forgers


who supply a market hungry for old
pieces and whose expertise is impressive. So, BUYERS BEWARE!!

rUssiAn silVer
sTeTl BeChers:

Many religiously observant Jews, who


collect antique judaica, collect only for
their own ritual use. Most secular Jews
have the traditional Judaica - candlesticks, a becher (wine cup or goblet)
and maybe even a chanukia (an eight
branched candelabrum with an additional servant light). I now find the
trend amongst the younger generation
of both religious and secular Jews, is
the need to trace back to their roots.

Of the Eastern European Judaica the


Russian silver Stetl becher is one of
the easier and more affordable of the
items to collect. I feel that if you can
have an interest to collect as well as
wanting to be able to use the items
a century later, thereby justifying this
hobby, or as in my case, an obsession.
The Stetl becher was made in Eastern
Europe, mainly Russia, during the last
half of the 19th century and into the
early 20th century. Why Stetl? The en-

Collector 34

MUST VISIT

Above: 925 Sterling Silver Menorah

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Forth Coming Auction

10 November 2011 at 10:00

43 Church Street, Cape Town

Ashbeys Galleries
Established 1891

Antique & Fine Art Auctioneers, Valuers and Appraisers

Viewing starts on Wednesday


2nd November 2011
from 09h00 to 16h00

Forth Coming Auction


24 February 2011 at 10:00
43 Church Street, Cape Town

Viewing closes on Wednesday


9th November at 14h00
Saturday open from 09h00 to 12h00
Our online catalogue will be available
10 days prior to auction date.
www.ashbeysgalleries.co.za
Printed catalogues can be
purchased at our Gallery

& Music Boxes - Collector 1/4 page 148mm x 148mm


We proudly present a well balanced catalogue for the Connoisseur
We proudly present a well balanced catalogue for the
connoisseur

We
exhibit
Viewing starts on Wednesday
16 February
2011 fromthe
09:15 tovery
16:15
Viewing close on Wednesday 23 February at 14:00
Saturday 19 February from 09:00 to 12:00

Tel: (021) 423-8060


Enquiries: info@ashbeys.co.za

best in good gavel manners

Full electronic catalogue on view from 16 February at www.ashbeysgalleries.co.za


Printed catalogues can be purchased at our Gallery, tel 021 423 8060
Equiries: info@ashbeys.co.za

100

95

75

Do you have an event,


auction, fair or product
you want to advertise in

25

The Collector
Talk Antique talk Provenance talk Holtzhausen.
The South African household name in clocks and
music boxes since 1974.
In these financial times we all seek counsel from the captains of
industry. People who have proven themselves in chartering the
treacherous waters of many a recession.
A few weeks ago I was bidding in the UK for a Sayers of Dunlop,
London 5-pillar 8ft Walnut Long case clock. We won the bid for this
clock valued at GBP 25, 000.00. Its on its way to our showroom. What
should the price tag be?
Talk to us about any clock or music box purchase or sale. If we dont
know, well ask. It is in our and the industrys best interest to advise
you with integrity.

SAs only Antique and Collectables


magazine?

Email: yolanda@cardilogix.co.za
or
Tel: (011) 363-3260

The
Issue 15
Price R30
June/July/August 2011

ANTIQUES

Collector

EXPERT ADVICE DESTINATIONS INSPIRED LIFESTYLE

100

Herman Holtzhausen
95

Trade associate and SA Representative British Horological Institute


Member of NAADA
75

TEL: 011 678 7722


25

w w w. h o l t z h a u s e n . c o m

The Collector issue 15.indd 1

2011/05/23 9:01 PM

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 35
0

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

GRAN MOMS KITCHEN -KITCHENALIA

ith the popularity of TV food


channels, celebrity chefs and
all things gastronomic, it was
only time before the collecting bug bit into an area of collecting that is now called Kitchenalia
the word coined for the collecting
of kitchenware, kitchen appliances,
kitchen equipment and even cookery books - items useful and not so
useful used in and around the kitchen. The area is wide ranging from
storage jars to kettles, from salt and
pepper shakers to modern design
classics and encompasses 50s
kitchen styles and bakelite to trendy
designs by Italian design company
Alessi.
A unique collecting genre, Kitchenalia covers the full spectrum of
popular household collectibles from utensils to cooking aids, from
bakeware to equipment and appliances.
The joy in collecting kitchenalia
stems from the warm fuzzy reminder
of grandmothers kitchen, the smell
of freshly baked bread and cake
and the social interaction that cooking in your favourite kitchen brings.
Over the last few years Kitchenalia
has become extremely collectable
and in dcor circles having a retro
kitchen with original collectables
is all the rage complete with
an original Aga stove. Collecting
kitchenalia appeals to many because there is usually something to
suit every pocket and the hunt for
special and unusual pieces is what
makes this genre of collecting so
appealing.

The

Collector 36

KETTLES
The humble kettle is perhaps one of the best
examples of kitchenalia as it evolved from
the pot over the fire to the state-of-the-art
products now available. Who can forget
the ingenious whistle built into kettles that
let you go about your duties until interrupted
by the piercing shrill letting you know the
water had boiled. As with all appliances,
top-of-the-range and designer brands from
those early days are now highly collectable. Topping the list are designs by Georg
Jensen whose silver kettles, both early and
current models, fetch high prices. The Arts
& Craft Movement saw some magnificent
examples of kettle designs with stylized features which are today avidly collected by
celebrities and dcor aficionados. These
include copper examples by Dr Christopher
Dresser whose trademark handle features
make them craft collectables.

TOASTERS
Since those early
days when cooks
warmed
their
bread on fires
to create a
toasted effect,
designers have
come out with a
range of toasters to make that
perfect piece of toast. It was American
mechanic Charles Sheite who originally
developed a spring device operated by
a thermostat which brought us the familiar
pop-up toaster we still use today. Perfecting
the technique was the challenge and it was
only in the 1930s that the patented ToastO-Lator was designed and toasters became
collectors items. Serious collectors of retro
toasters will pick up any old model and, if
they are able to fix them, will have a viable
collectable item. The Rolls Royce of toasters
are the Duralit chrome toasters.

COPPER AND BRASS


ACCESSORIES
Kitchenalia accessories in copper and brass
have become highly collectable and used to
decorate modern and retro kitchens. Coal
scuttles and other fire accessories as well
as bowls and pans in copper and brass
some with ornamental detail - can fetch as
much as 600 pounds on auction and have
not only become highly collectable but are
highly sought after dcor items.

Blue & White Cornishware on display

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

A selection of vintage kitchen utensils

Antique cookery books have become highly collectable

COOKERY BOOKS
With gastronomy evolving and becoming such a key area in
our lives, collecting cookery books has become an art form
in itself. Obviously vintage cookery books have the highest
value with a first edition of Mrs Beetons book on household
management going for R5 000, a reprint for between R300
and R400. But every generation produces its own celebrity
chefs and collecting your favourite be it from the Victorian
era to Elizabeth David or an original Cordon Bleu edition
to the Delia Smiths and Jamie Olivers of today will give
enormous pleasure.

CONSUMABLE ADVERTISEMENTS
The nostalgia of an early Coca Cola Ad or the appeal of a
40s Oxo or 50s Marmite advertisement can lead to collecting consumable advertisements from eras gone by. Whether
you collect them in the form of early magazines, as posters or
as promotional items, these collectables have become very
sought after and also make for interesting dcor and display
items.

ALESSI
Kitchenware started becoming trendy when Italian design
company Alessi started producing their unique one-of-a-kind
accessories such as corkscrews, bottle openers, salt and pepper pots, cake stands, boxes and containers. Besides their
traditional clean and classic lines, they decided to design
more quirky collectable items that combined functionality with
fun humour that could become a talking point in any kitchen.
Today, collecting Alessi items designed by some of their top
designers like Stefan Giovannoni who came up with a
quirky character nutcracker called Nutty the Cracker have
become all the rage with younger collectors.

Collecting antiques is not just any worthwhile hobby but it is


also an investment..
For every beginner collector of antiques, knowledge should be
given first priority. Beginners should take the time and effort in
trying to educate themselves in the area of antique collecting
that they wish to focus on.
For the beginners - start off by visiting museums to check out
just what pieces are considered of high value. Visit auctions,
read antique pricing guides and visit the local antique fairs
in your area. The internet is another source to broaden your
knowledge.
Joining clubs or attending talks is another great idea it is
also an opportunity for beginners to meet up with fellow collectors and exchange and learn new ideas and experiences.
For beginner collectors it is important to first focus on collecting items after your own taste. Since antique collecting involves building up a considerable number of items that will
form a part of their collection beginners should at least look
for items that can inspire them.
Its important that the items you add to a collection or when
you start off a new collection are truly things you like or want
and that its not just something to acquire because they are
antiques.
Whatever you do enjoy your purchases and make them part
of your lives, whether they are on display or used on a regular
basis.

With all collecting disciplines and more so with Kitchenalia,


the condition of the item is paramount to determining its value.
As most kitchenalia was used extensively there will always be
scratches and dents but finding the very best piece should be
your goal. But the beauty and joy of collecting these items is
the fact that you know that they were used again and again
to bring love and happiness to many families. That in itself
should be a reason to collect!
A display of antique bread boards add character to a kitchen

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 37

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

APPRECIATING
LALIQUE
French born Ren Lalique born in 1860, started out as a jewellery apprentice before studying in London and then
working for the houses of Aucoc, Cartier, Boucheron and others before establishing his own art studio. He became
one of Frances foremost Art Nouveau designers and ended up as one of the most famous glass designers of the Art
Deco period. He is best known for his designs for perfume bottles vases, jewellery, figurines, chandeliers, clocks and
in his later years for his iconic car mascots.
Synonymous with creativity and quality, Lalique used some of the most modern and innovative manufacturing techniques including using pressed, mould-blown or lost wax castings for his objet darts. He was famous for creating
the walls of lighted glass and elegant glass columns for the grand salon of the SS Normandie and his work graces
both the entrance to the Coty Fragrance Company headquarters in New York and can be seen in many museums.
Collecting Lalique can be very rewarding and a collector must make sure that pieces are in pristine condition to
retain their value, with rarity, colour and finish adding to their desirability. Most of Laliques pieces were marked
R Lalique, often with France in matching script and a model number. The L was sometimes elongated and the
signature R. Lalique was also used. Pieces made after 1950 are signed in script Lalique France without the original
R which was only used during Laliques lifetime. Collectors should be watchful for damaged or chipped glass that
lowers its value and to be wary of fakes.

Jeremy Stephen Antiques

JEREMY STEPHEN ANTIQUES

Specialist dealer Jeremy Du Mughn has set a high standard


in the collecting world specialising in decorative glass,
modern design and 20th Century Art. His wider range
of antiques and collectables has attracted younger and
discerning new collectors who enjoy the finer things in life.
Jeremy Stephen Antiques takes part in the monthly Antiques
Fair at Nelson Mandela Square, The National Antiques
& Decorative Arts Faire and the annual SAADA Fair.
Be sure to visit him at these Faires, at the shop in Parktown
North, or on his website www.jeremystephenantiques.co.za You are in for a treat!

19 FOURTH AVENUE PARKTOWN NORTH 2193


TEL: (011) 880-5525 FAX: 0866003559
EMAIL: jeremy@jeremystephenantiques.co.za

Above: A collection of Lalique vases

Trading Hours: Monday - Friday 10.00 - 17.00


Saturdays 10:00 14:00
www.jeremystephenantiques.co.za

Dealers in rare coins, bank notes, medals & fine art

Having spent the past twenty years in the United States, John established various coin shops and galleries in the USA, opening an office
in Amsterdam (Netherlands) in 1994. John has spent the last 14 years
dealing thoughout the world travelling constantly between Europe and
USA.
As one of South Africas most respected dealers in coins, active with
various Numismatic Societies in different provinces and serving as
Vice President under the late Pastor JF Rowlands in the Natal Numismatic Society, John was responsible for organizing the first major
coin fair in South Africa in 1967 and thereafter every major coin
show in the country until 1976, culminating in the hugely successful
and never equaled since International Coin Fair which saw some
of the worlds top dealers attend giving the coin industry in South
Africa a major boost. He has lectured extensively on coins and collectables and produced the first and only comprehensive catalogue
on the coins of Rhodesia and Nyasaland a book for which he was
elected to the prestigious Numismatic Literary Guild in the USA. In
1981 John pushed for the founding of the South African Association
of Numismatic Dealers becoming its first and founding President a
position he held until permanently emigrating to Dallas, Texas in
1984.
Whilst coins remain the mainstay of his business, his love of art has
led him to also establish himself in the art world, specializing in investment quality and old South African masters art. With his strong links
to the international art world, John has also exposed some new and
exciting international artists to the South African market including the
work of Chinese/American artist Stephen Pan.

All transactions are private and condential


by appointment only
Tel: (012) 361-7819 Cel: 078-743-1042
email: keogh.john1@gmail.com
Get your piece of THE pie
Professionals
Integrity
Experience

Antique
alTIQUES ARE GREs
N

d Decorati
anEN

John Keogh, an internationally recognized coin and


banknote dealer, has now also established himself
firmly as a leading art dealer in South Africa. His
showing at the National Antiques Faire for the past
couple of years has been a huge success with some
impressive artworks and sculptures attracting the attention of some of the top collectors.

MUST VISIT

NAADA
W

KEOGH INTERNATIONAL

DECOR

tion Nation
cia
A

FEATURE

O.

Arts Asso
ve

COLLECTING

W. N

A ADA.C

Chairman of NAADA

Errol Boyle - Farm Scene painted 1970

Large painting by Armando Baldinelli

Although now based in South Africa, John Keogh continues to


consult to long standing clients internationally as well as publish his
hugely successful newsletter - Tangible Asset Digest. He has opened
a Boutique Gallery in Pretoria, an appointment-only establishment
specialising in Investment quality and old South African masters art
and is a permanent dealer in coins at the monthly Antiques Fair at
Nelson Mandela Square.
According to Keogh, the potential in the SA market for coins,
collectibles and art as alternate investments is growing by the day.
Says Keogh, we in the industry certainly do not regard it as alternative at all. Good quality and carefully chosen coins or a significant
artwork have proven themselves over decades as a high performing,
safe and highly portable investment and store of wealth returning a
steady 25% plus to as much as a few hundred times an investment in
short spans.

Visit John at the monthly Antiques Fair at Nelson Mandela Square.

Gold & Silver at record prices - consult me on what & how to buy now.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 39

COLLECTING

FEATURE

Chitarrone HN 2700
Modelled by Peggy Davies
1974,Limited Edition of 750

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Toinette HN1940
Modelled by Leslie Harradine
1940-49

Butterfly HN719
Modelled by Leslie Harradine
1925-40

ROYAL DOULTON
by Louise Irvine

Royal Doulton figurines are avidly collected the world over.

o other china company


has produced the quantity
and diversity of figurative
sculpture during the last
century. With more than
5,000 figurines produced to date, collectors
typically choose a particular style, whether
it be pretty ladies, character studies, cute
children or limited editions. As the first
designs were introduced more than a hundred years ago, it is not surprising that many
figurines are hard to find today. Some of the
rarest designs have survived two world wars
and the British diaspora with their treasured
possessions to countries like South Africa.

The First
Figurines
The first Doulton figures were exhibited at
the Chicago Worlds Fair in 1893. Known
today as the Vellum figures, they are made
of an ivory coloured porcelain body, often
highlighted with gold, and are similar in
style to Worcester figures of that era. Artist
Charles Noke continued to model Vellum
figures in the early 1900s but around 1910
he approached several famous British sculptors for assistance in developing a new style
figure collection, which was subsequently
named the HN series. HN stands for Harry
Nixon who was in charge of the figure
painting department and kept records of all
the designs.
The HN collection was launched in 1913
when Queen Mary visited Royal Doulton
and she was responsible for naming the first

The

Collector 40

piece, Darling HN1. The Queen was fascinated with the new figurines and regularly
acquired examples at the British Industries
Fairs during the 1920s and 30s. The earliest
HN figures were decorated in muted tones
of blue and grey, known as Copenhagen
colours and it was not until the 1920s that
brighter colours were used.

Art Deco Designs


Leslie Harradine became Royal Doultons
leading figure modeller in the 1920s and
the popularity of his Art Deco designs
assured the on-going success of the HN
series. Many of his bright young things are
dressed as clowns and jesters for the fancy
dress balls of the jazz age or sport the latest
in stylish beach wear. Hollywood movies
introduced a new concept of glamour in the
1930s and Harradines figurines continued
to reflect the fashions of his day. The first
figure painters created a variety of different
outfits for Harradines designs and each
differently coloured figurine was assigned a
new HN pattern number. The less popular
colour schemes were withdrawn from
production sooner and these are now more
challenging to find in the market-place.

Romantic Ladies & Iconic


Characters
Harradine also loved to create romantic
fantasies from bye-gone eras with crinolines,
frothy petticoats, parasols and fans and
these pretty ladies started a new collecting trend. Harradine was equally skilled at

modelling cute child studies and colourful


character figures. It was Harradine who
gave us the Old Balloon Seller, one of Royal
Doultons most iconic designs, together with
many other street vendors selling flowers
from Londons Covent Garden market.
During the 1930s, Royal Doultons best
porcelain artists transferred to the figure
painting department, using their skills to
create beautiful decorative effects on
figurines, and this quality of artistry is
exceptional in the collectibles industry. Royal
Doulton figurines were made in a huge
variety of colours and range in size
from prestige pieces up to 20 inches, to
standard around 8 inches, to miniatures at
just 3 inches tall.
Many Royal Doulton figurines were retired
from production during World War II and
withdrawals have continued on a regular
basis to make way for new designs. Over
the years, retired figurines have appreciated
in value when they change hands on the
secondary market. Generally speaking, the
shorter the production period, the rarer the
piece will be today.
Leslie Harradine retired in the 1950s but he
had two worthy successors Peggy Davies
who became the pretty lady specialist and
Mary Nicoll who excelled in character
studies. For twenty years, Mary modelled
a host of colourful personalities, including
sea-farers inspired by her Devon harbour
home and motherly old dears going
about their daily routines.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

Ann Boleyn HN3232


Modelled by Peggy Davies
1990, Limited Edition of 9500

FEATURE

DECOR

Roseanna HN1921
Modelled by Leslie Harradine
1940-49

FIGURINES
Limited Editions
Peggy Davies particularly enjoyed researching historical and literary subjects
and from the outset she favoured themed
collections, such as the Ladies from
English History which was introduced
in 1948. In the 1970s, she introduced
her first limited edition collection, a set of
twelve Lady Musicians with just 750 of
each issued world-wide. The success of
this beautiful collection led to the equally
desirable Dancers of the World, Femmes
Fatales, and Gentle Arts.

MUST VISIT

Royal Doulton embraced the talents of


new designers with different perspectives, notably Robert Jefferson with his
Myths & Maidens and Pauline Parsons
with her Wives of Henry VIII and her
Queens of the Realm. Royal Doulton
continues to create figurines of royalty
today, the most recent being Princess
Catherine in her wedding gown.

Limited edition collections continued to


be a feature of the 1980s and 90s and

Catherine Royal Wedding Day


HN5559
Modelled by Neil Welch
2011, Limited edition of 7,500

Princess Badoura HN2081


Modelled by Harry Tittensor 1952

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

Royal Doulton Figures Book

Its in the Book!


The first book about Royal Doultons
HN collection was published in
1978 with images of all the figurines
produced since 1913. Illustrations
from the HN pattern books were used
if the actual piece was not found in
time for publication. Gradually the
missing pieces were found for the
second and third editions of the book
and these elusive pieces are now
considered among the rarest of figurines. Royal Doulton introduced their
International Collectors Club in 1980
to provide information and news to
collectors and the figurine market
grew from strength to strength around
the world. A chapter of the club still
thrives in South Africa with regular
newsletters and meetings in the Johannesburg and Durban areas.
Louise Irvine is an expert in British
Art Pottery and one of the authors
of Royal Doulton Figures. You can
hear Louise talk on this subject at the
next exhibition of Royal Doulton figurines presented by Pascoe Ceramics
of Florida, which will be held at the
Southern Sun Grayston on October
22 & 23. Hundreds of Royal Doulton
figurines will be on sale at this event,
including many rarities not normally
seen in South Africa.

The

Collector 41

The Collectors
Choice of

Antiques and Collectables for Sale

1.

Louis XIII bed in solid Rosewood


Valitrade Antiques (011) 907-7252

2.

17th century Diaper Cabinet


Kunsthandel H.W.C (011) 483-2568

3.

Carved, mirrored Armoire


Valitrade Antiques (011) 907-7252

4.

1905 London Silver George V Claret Jug


Clyde on 4th (011) 482-3266

5.

Cathrine Royal Wedding Day


Pascoe & Company 0800-982-448

6.

Antique Butchers Block


Ossewa (011) 482-9785

7.

London Hallmarked Silver Tea Pot by Joseph Angel


Clyde on 4th (011) 482-3266

8.

Cornishware Milk Jug


NMS - 082-883-4933

9.

Moorcroft, Wisteria Vase under rich ruby glaze


Clyde on 4th (011) 482-3266

9
The

Collector 42

2
Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The Collectors
Choice of

Antiques and Collectables for Sale

1.

French Carved Head & Foot Board


Valitrade Antiques (011) 907-7252

2.

Bronze Statue by Carl Smit


Ossewa (011) 482-9785

3.

Africana Chests
Riaan Bolt 083-698-7146

4.

Africana Riempies Chair


Ossewa (011) 482-9785

5.

Antique Plane
Mahlahs (011) 672-2744

6. London Hallmarked Silver Coffee Pot by Joseph Angel


Clyde on 4th (011) 482-3266

7.

Rare Africana Chair


Riaan Bolt 083-698-7146

8.

Princess Badoura
Pascoe & Company 0800-982-448

9.

William Moorcroft Moonlit Blue Vase


Clyde on 4th (011) 482-3266

6
7

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 43

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

MELROSE HOUSE A JEWEL IN THE


HEART OF PRETORIA

ituated in the heart of Pretoria at 275 Jacob


Mare Street, across from Burgers Park, Melrose House harks back to the days when this
part of Pretoria housed some of the most magnificent and historical houses. The estate consists of
a magnificent homestead which is a fine example
of the architectural transitional period between the
Victorian and Edwardian times, a clay tennis court
and a stable complex. .
Named after the famous Melrose Abbey in Scotland, Melrose House was built in 1886 by prosperous Pretoria businessman George Jesse Heys
and in 1900, after the invasion of Pretoria, the
house was requisitioned by Lord Roberts to be the
headquarters of the British forces. It holds significant historical value in that it was the place where
the Peace Treaty of Vereeniging was signed on the
31stt May 1902 which ended the Anglo-Boer War
(1899 1902).
Beautifully preserved, Melrose House reflects its
Victorian and Edwardian past with stained glass
windows, ornate ceilings, original fireplaces and is
decorated with original carpets and antiques from
that period. Wandering through the elegantly appointed rooms, admiring the antique furniture and
ornaments takes one back to those more genteel
days of yore.
Today Melrose House is a museum that offers
visitors guided tours by appointment, a reference

The

Collector 44

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

COLLECTING

FEATURE

library and a Tea Garden. It also hosts temporary exhibitions, talks and workshops for children and adults
and one of the oldest antique fairs in the country is
held in the grounds on select public holidays, the most
notable one being on the 16th December the Day of
Reconciliation.
The atmosphere at the Antiques Fair at Melrose House
is one of a country fair - with antique dealers spilling
out on the lawns with their wares and visitors taking
the time to also visit the beautifully decorated rooms in
Melrose House to see the many archeological finds and
mementos from the Anglo-Boer war. A food market runs
alongside the antique fair offering home-made treats in
a tea-garden atmosphere. Entrance to the Museum is
R9.00 for adults and R6.00 for children. Guided tours
take place at 10:00, 11:00, 12:00 and 13:00.

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Come
and visit the new
look Antiques Fair in the
beautiful Melrose House Museum
grounds Friday 16th December
from 09h00 to 13h00. For further
information contact Clyde Terry
on 082 883 4933.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT MELROSE HOUSE


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

The house operated as the British Headquarters.


Boer delegates stayed in Parkzicht, a house that once stood next to Melrose House.
War strategies were planned from the large exhibition room.
Lord Kitchener furnished the small exhibition room as his bedroom.
The morning room functioned as the office of Lord Kitchener.
Queen Victoria was informed from Melrose House of the Wars progress.
The Peace Treaty of Vereeniging was signed in the dining room.
The signed treaty ended the bloodiest war of South African history.
After the war Generals Smuts and Botha were invited to parties given by the Heys family.
A photo history of the War and War cartoons are displayed in the Conservatory.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 45

CATCH THE MOONSTRUCK EXPERIENCE


The world of collecting boasts an eclectic mix of antique dealers and collectors.
The range and presentation of those antiques, collectables and decorative arts depends very much on the dealer
who has an eye for a particular collecting discipline or simply has the passion to hunt down unique and quirky
items that will catch the eye of the discerning collector.
If youre looking for that something different look no further than Moonstruck Experience, a pandoras box of
beautiful fine antiques and objects darts, tucked away on the corner of Hocky Avenue and Beyers Naude Drive
in Northcliff, Johannesburg.
Owner Vivien Schrder (Hilton) is as unique and enthusiastic as the name of her antique shop Moonstruck
Experience! Her personal attention to detail and her sixth sense when it comes to her clients preferences is
renowned and her connections and knowledge of the antiques world have made her a icon in her field.
Specialising in Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Top of the Range Art Deco (her passion) signed costume jewellery,
unusual silver jewellery, vintage clothing, hats, bags, personalised unique picture / movie star boxes,beautiful and
reasonably priced pianos - c1900s, ideal for any young girl or boy starting off. Amongst the treasures there a
stunning pair of Georgian hall chairs, collection of characterful Persian rugs and an early French Oak Court
Cupboard with original hand made locks and fittings. At Moonstruck Experience its a given that a hidden
treasure will have your name on it!
If you collect or love wearing fur, why not buy a vintage Fur and assist in curbing the endangered species from
becoming extinct?
Vivien Schrder (Hilton) also is a regular at the Antiques Fair at Nelson Mandela Square on the first Sunday of
every month.
Shop 1, Northcliff Galleries
Off Beyers Naude Drive,
Northcliff, JHB
Tel: (011) 782-9988
Cell: 082-484--2673

Trading Hours:
Monday - Friday 11 - 5pm
Saturday 10 - 2pm
www.antiques.mahoonas.co.za
www.furcoat.co.za
email: moonstruckexperience@gmail.com

Antique
alTIQUES ARE GREs

NAADA

E G EE
R

Antique Furniture Rustic Furniture

Silver

Jewellery

Porcelain

Light Fittings

Fine Art

Time Pieces

Restoration Kitchenalia

Glass

Art Deco

A ADA.C

Books

Ant i q u e De a le r s & S ho ps - J o hannes bu rg & B enoni


Res t o rer s

African Gems and Minerals Inc


Fine Minerals
Investment Gem Stones
Mining Memorabilia

WJ Leader Chandeliers & Period Lighting


(Restoration and Cleaning Service)

Contact: Rob Smith

Contact: Maureen & Julie Leader

Tel: (011) 873-6303


Cell: 076-665-1711
E-mail: gems@africangems.com
www.africangems.com

BY APPOINTMENT
Cell: 084-908-1040
Cell: 082-459-0724
E-mail: wjleader@mweb.co.za
maureenlove1@gmail.com

Cornelius Lehr
Contact: Cornelius Lehr
Antiquarian Horologist
1977 World Champion Watchmaker
Tel: (011) 726-6420
Cell: 083-377-9076
E-mail: info@corneliuslehr.com
www.corneliuslehr.com

Eves Antiques & Collectables


Contact: Eve & Ron Cowan
BY APPOINTMENT
Tel: (011) 648-9360
Fax: 086-620-4959
Cell: 084-517-8075
E-mail: everon@xsinet.co.za
Visit Eve & Ron at Nelson Mandela Antique Fair,
Melrose House and Voortrekker Fair.

Memories
Contact: John McKirdy
Address: The French Quarters
Elston Avenue, Western Ext, Benoni
Tel: (011) 425-6729

Ernest Bellingan Scott


Paper and Painting Restoration
Contact: Ernest Bellingan
BY APPOINTMENT
Cell: 073-691-7134
E-mail: scottbelling@gmail.com
www.bellinganscott.com

Ceramics Restoration
The Restorers Workshop
64 Farbairn Street
Worcester, 6850
Contact: Werner Scheepers
Cell: 082-671-7736
E-mail: werner@therestoresworkshop.co.za
www.therestorersworkshop.co.za

D.G Manson Furniture Restoration


Hand Woven Cane & Seagrass
Tel: (011) 678-8244
Cell: 082-692-0694
E-mail: info@riempiesfurniture.co.za
www.riempiesfurniture.co.za

Fax: (011) 425-6736

The

O.

Arts Asso
ve
W. N

Portfolio of Buyers and Sellers

Antique Toys

AR

tion Nation
cia
A

d Decorati
anEN

IQU
ES

NT

Collector 48

Issue 16 September/October/Novemeber/December

Antique
alTIQUES ARE GREs

NAADA

E G EE
R

AR

tion Nation
cia
A

d Decorati
anEN

O.

Arts Asso
ve

IQU
ES

NT

W. N

Portfolio of Buyers and Sellers

Antique Toys

Antique Furniture Rustic Furniture

Silver

Jewellery

Porcelain

Light Fittings

Fine Art

Time Pieces

Restoration Kitchenalia

Glass

U p comin g A n t iq u e Fa i r s

Ant i q u e S ho ps C o u nt r y Areas

Melrose House
Antique Fair

De Kraal Antiques & Collectables

V isit www.t hecollect or.co.za f or more events

16 December 2011
275 Jacob Mare Street, Pretoria
(011) 482-4259

Nelson Mandela Square


Antique Fair
1st Sunday of
Every Month 9:00am 17:00pm

Art Deco

A ADA.C

Books

Contact: Kerneels Laubscher


Address: Old JHB Road - 7km from Vereeniging on
the R82 towards Johannesburg
Tel: (016) 556-3729
Cell: 082-781-5606
E-mail: dekraal.antiques@gmail.com

TO ADVERTISE IN THE PORTFOLIO OF


BUYERS AND SELLER SECTION CONTACT:
YOLANDA GIBBON
Cell: 082-972-3393
email: yolanda@cardilogix.co.za
www.thecollector.co.za

Voortrekker Monument
Antique Fair
24th September 2011
9:00am 15:00pm

The Original Magic Wadding Polish


Used to clean and polish silver,
brass, copper etc...
For further information on how to
obtain this product
Contact: Michele
Tel: (011) 784-8991
Cell: 082-960-0502
Email:
nevr-dull@mweb.co.za
Website:
www.nevr-dullsa.co.za

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 49

If you have a
date for
The Collector Calendar of
Events, submit the details via
email to
thecollector@mweb.
co.za

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Pencil it in your diary!

Melrose House Museum Antiques and Collectables Fair


Pretoria, 16th December 2011

South African Antique Dealers Association

47th SAADA

Antiques
Fair

Friday 28th - Sunday 30th October 2011


10h00 - 18h00 Daily The Wanderers Club

Gala Opening Event


Thursday 27 October 2011 from 6pm to 9 pm
By invitation only
For enquiries contact Marylou on 011 880 0815

Monthly Antiques Fair

Last Sunday of the Month


9am - 3pm

Sleeping Beauty
30 September - 02 October 2011
Joburg Theatre
Everyones favourite magical fairytale about a beautiful princess, an evil fairy and a handsome
prince whose kiss awakens the princess from her 100-year sleep.

22 September - 25 September 2011


Sandton Convention Centre
The Joburg Art Fair, now in its fourth year has quickly
established itself as the foremost and most exciting visual
arts event on the Joburg calendar.
Come and explore the wonderous art.
Cost: Free entrance

The

Collector 50

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

Salt Visual Communications S1569

21 North Street, Illovo, Sandton

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

Huntersrest Antiques, Country


Collectables & Collectable Toys
180 Long Road, Newlands Tel: (011) 477-2328 Email: kitsadk@mweb.co.za
Cell: Deon - 083-311-7000 Cell: Kitsa - 083-311-7117 Cell: Mavis - 083-336-6044
Below: Exterior of the newly refurbished Hunters Rest

Below: The reception area & Victorian staircase

Below: One of many displays of fine antiques

Below: Dcor items and gifts for young & old

Below: Toys & dolls fill various rooms

he newly renovated Hunters Rest


in Greymont is a real gem waiting to be discovered. Visitors
who enter this charming antique
spot, are invited to sign the guest
book and can then wander through the
many rooms and spacious verandahs
filled with yesterdays treasures of
antiques and collectables. The scent of
lavender fills the air, gleaming restored
wood floors and a spiral Victorian staircase pay tribute to the buildings elegant
past and makes it one of Johannesburgs
hidden gems. As you wander from one
captivating room to the next, each with its
own unique theme, you will be enticed to
stop and marvel at the Marilyn Monroe
memorabilia in one room, doll, toy and
car collectables in another, collectable
advertising posters in yet another and
then of course all the exquisite country
antiques that make up the core of this
special shop.
For those wanting something more
contemporary there is a wonderful range
of up-market gifts, ranging from bath
products, pretty dcor items to personalized items for special friends and family. Every care has been taken in either
restoring or sourcing a formidable range
of items to cater for young and old. No
cost has been spared to transform this
fine building to its former glory bringing
back the nostalgia of yesteryear and
fond memories of the good old days
when fine things, silverware, lace and
everything gorgeous was the order of
the day.
For those parents making a morning of it,
a convenient kiddies play corner keeps
the young ones busy leaving time for you
the collector, to browse at leisure. The
friendly shop manager, Mavis is on hand
to help with any query or information on
an antique piece and plans are underway to turn the large verandah deck,
with its endless view, into a cozy coffee
bar. Judging by the positive entries in the
guest book, its no wonder that Hunters
Rest in Greymont is fast becoming one of
the most frequented antique shops in the
country and if you have not been to visit
us yet, be sure to put it on your to-do list
this holiday season.

Below: Kitchenalia & Coke memorabilia

Below: Upstairs loft filled with antique & collectables

Below: Display of a gentlemans study

South African Antique Dealers Association

47th SAADA

Antiques
Fair

Friday 28th - Sunday 30th October 2011


10h00 - 18h00 Daily The Wanderers Club

Gala Opening Event


Thursday 27 October 2011 from 6pm to 9 pm
By invitation only
For enquiries contact Marylou on 011 880 0815
Blue and White Wanli porcelain bowl (1572-1620).
Kunsthandel H.W.C. Dullaert (Below)

October is known within the antique


industry as the time that the annual
SAADA (South African Antique Dealers
Associations) fair is held at The Wanderers club in Illovo. This year the fair
runs from Friday the 28th to Sunday
30th October with the prestigious gala
opening being held on Thursday 27th by
invitation only.
As always, the SAADA fair is an event that is months in the making. Our members spend up to a year sourcing stock that is then
exhibited for the first time. Every single item on the SAADA Fair is
fully vetted by a panel of experts so you can be assured of quality and correct descriptions. We have a range of interesting and
varied products.
Reads have been members for many years and can always be
relied upon to have a range of antique jewellery of the highest quality. Pam sources most of her stock from overseas carefully choosing
interesting and rare pieces. Some of the items she will feature this
year are a Victorian garnet insect brooch, and a very beautiful 15ct
set with pearls, peridot and amethyst on a 9ct chain, circa 1900
Burr & Muir are well known for their selection of Art Deco and Art
Nouveau pieces and their collection will always feature some top
examples of Lalique and Galle. This year Burr & Muirs collection
will include a Louis Marjorelle 4 piece walnut art nouveau suite.
The ombelles, an often used Art Nouveau floral motif, is carved on
the back of all the chairs and sofa.

The

Collector 52

This year sees three top art galleries exhibiting with a selection of
modern and contemporary artworks, an example is David Hockneys Pretty Tulips from The White House Gallery.
Ricus Dullaert is well known within the industry for his Dutch armoires and Russian icons. Ricus is focusing more and more on Chinese antiques and has a superb collection of Chinese porcelain that
he will be exhibiting including porcelain from the Wanli, Kangxi
and Qianlong periods.
SAADA is proud of the
standards that it demands
of its members and exhibitors. SAADA looks forward
to welcoming you to the
fair in October 2011. We
are, in collaboration with
The Collector magazine
giving away 100 double
day tickets (valid at R100
each) to the first 100 callers. See the Events page in
this magazine for details.
For more information visit
www.saada.co.za

A collection of jewellery from


Reads (Right)

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

Salt Visual Communications S1569

21 North Street, Illovo, Sandton

Catherine
Royal Wedding Day
R2,975
Order Today

ROYAL DOULTON
MOORCROFT ROYAL CROWN DERBY
Show & Sale of Figurines & Art Pottery

22 & 23 October 2011


SOUTHERN SUN GRAYSTON
Cnr. Rivonia Rd. & Grayston Dr.
SANDTON, JOHANNESBURG

Informative talks all weekend by


British Ceramics Expert Louise Irvine
Collectors Dinner 22nd October
Hosted by Ed Pascoe
E-mail or call if you would like a
specific piece brought to South Africa

Call us toll-free in Miami 0800-982-448.


Mon-Fri 3:00pm to 11:00pm SA time
Email: ed@pascoeandcompany.com
Visit www.pascoeceramics.com

FREE ADMISSION FREE PARKING WITH PURCHASE

MEET THE ROYAL DOULTON EXPERTS


Ed Pascoe is the worlds leading dealer in Royal Doulton figurines with more than 3,000 pieces in stock at his Miami
warehouse. Ed started in the antiques business over 40 years ago and was one of the first dealers to import retired
Royal Doulton pieces from the UK to the USA. Since the mid-1970s he has helped collectors build fabulous collections of
Royal Doulton figurines one American lady aspired to finding every single HN number! Ed also found many rare pieces to
illustrate in the first Royal Doulton Figures book and the subsequent editions.
Over the years Ed has worked closely with Louise Irvine, one of the authors of the figurines book along with many other
Royal Doulton titles. Louises long association with Royal Doulton dates back to 1977 when she researched The Doulton Story
exhibition at the V&A in London. She founded Royal Doultons International Collectors Club, launched its quarterly magazine,
organized exhibitions and presented lecture events for collectors around the world. Louises latest publication is Connoisseur
magazine which she produces for Pascoe Ceramics. If you would like to receive a copy of the South African edition by post,
email Veronica@pascoeandcompany.com
Ed Pascoe and Louise Irvine are frequent visitors to South Africa where they host exhibitions of Royal Doulton figurines and
weekend events for collectors. Since 2003, Ed has been bringing lots of rare designs to South Africa, many of which have not been
seen in this country before. Ed specializes in finding elusive figurines for collectors, including prototypes and colour trials, and
currently he has the best inventory in 40 years. Let him know whats on your wish list and he will bring it to one of his South Africa shows. Call Ed toll free
from South Africa. 0-800-982-448.
Visit www.pascoeceramics.com for further details.
The next Pascoe Ceramics exhibition will be held at the Southern Sun Grayston on October 22 & 23, 2011. Ed promises an exceptional display
of Royal Doulton figurines, including many prestige pieces and rarities which have not appeared since the last figures book was published.
Louise will be talking about the history and inspiration behind Royal Doulton figurines. Admission is free and everybody is welcome.

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 53

COLLECTING

FEATURE

DECOR

MUST VISIT

MELROSE HOUSE
ANTIQUES FAIR
UPHOLDING A
LONG TRADITION
16th December 2011
Visit www.melrosehouse.co.za for more information.
As undoubtedly one of the oldest antique fairs in the country, the Antique Fair
held in the grounds of the Melrose House
Museum at 275 Jacob Mare Street in Pretoria several times a year is like no other.
From the moment you walk into the spacious
grounds, up the pathways and past the Victorian fountain, you get the sense that you
are entering another era in time.
Named after the famous Melrose Abbey
in Scotland, Melrose House was built in
1886 by prosperous Pretoria businessman
George Jesse Heys. Today this elegant
house museum stands as a superb example
of the transition of Victorian to Edwardian
architectural styles and interiors. The spacious rooms are characterised by colourful
stained glass windows, paintings by English artists, carpets in rich colours, ornate
ceilings and fireplaces, as well as valuable
porcelain ornaments, the majority of which
belonged to the Heyes family.
Of all the antique fairs that have become
popular throughout the country, says Clyde
Terry who has taken over the running of the
Fair. The Melrose House Antiques Fair is
unique in that it is set in the grounds of one of
our most important heritage sites not only
can visitors enjoy an antiques fair set in the
spacious gardens around a central fountain
and alongside the stables, but they can visit
this elegant house museum with its superb
interiors.

tours by appointment, a clay tennis court, a


reference library and a Tea Garden. Temporary exhibitions, talks, workshops for children and adults ranging from muffin mixing
in the kitchen, butter churning in the scullery
and Victorian soap making are presented
on a regular basis. Entrance to the Museum
is R9.00 for adults and R6.00 for children.
Guided tours take place at 10:00, 11:00,
12:00 and 13:00.

See
page 44-45
for
our article on
Melrose House
Museum

Antique and collectable bargain hunting for young and old is the order of the day.

The atmosphere at the Antiques Fair at Melrose House is one of a country fair - with
antique dealers spilling out on the lawns with
their wares and visitors taking the time to
also visit the beautifully decorated rooms in
Melrose House to see the many archeological finds and mementos from the Anglo-Boer
war. Melrose House offers visitors guided

The

Collector 54

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The
Issue 16
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ANTIQUES

Collector

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Collector

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The
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Price R30
June/July/August 2011

ANTIQUES

Collector

EXPERT ADVICE DESTINATIONS INSPIRED LIFESTYLE

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2011/05/23 9:01 PM

Issue 16 September/October/November/December

The

Collector 55

Once experienced, never forgotten


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A scenic 15 minute drive from King Shaka International Airport. 86 Rooms and suites of splendid
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