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STRENGTHENING DEMOCRACY THROUGH YOUTH-CENTERED,

STATE-INITIATED AVENUES FOR PARTICIPATION:


THE NAGA CITY MODEL

Introduction
Participation is essential to democracy. Dahl (in Clark, Golder & Golder, 2013)
emphasized this when he identified two dimensions of democracy contestation and inclusion.
By inclusion, he refers to who gets to participate in the democratic process. High levels of
participation translate to a healthier democracy. Beetham (1998) wrote, It is from the citizens
that democratic governments receive their authorisation, and it is to the citizens that they remain
accountable and responsive, both directly and through the mediating organs of parliament and
public opinion. The citizen is both the starting point and the focus of the democratic process
The essential counterpart to the democratic principles of popular control and political equality is
thus a publicly active citizen body which is capable of exercising tolerance.
Researches on participation and democracy have focused more on the traditional modes
of participation, specifically on elections. Spoormans (in Garcia, Macuja & Tolosa, 1993) called it
the narrow definition of participation, that which limits participation to the electoral processes.
Such definition however, is narrow and need to be expanded to include all institutions that exert
significant influence in the organization of social life, giving more attention to local government
as a school for political participation (Gauthier, 2003; Silva & de Castro, 2014). This broadening
of participation definition is important for it indicated self-government and self-realization as
citizens develop a sense of their worth and significance (Spoormans, 1993). With these,
measures of participation have also been expanded such as the inclusion of newspaper
readership and scarcity of sports and cultural association in Putnams Civic Community Index
(in Buendia, 2005).

While adult political participation has widely been explored, this paper examines the
patterns of political participation among the youth and looks into a state-initiated participation
program instituted for a healthier democracy by encouraging higher levels of participation and in
the process ensuring government accountability.
Who are the Youth?
According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO), youth is best understood as a period of transition from the dependence of
childhood to adulthoods independence and awareness of our interdependence as members of
a community.
Youth is usually defined according to age in relation to education and employment.
UNESCO uses different definitions of youth depending on the context. The UN, for statistical
consistency across regions, defines youth, as those persons between the ages of 15 and 24
years, without prejudice to other definitions by Member States. However, the meaning of youth
may depend on how the member-states of the UN define the term. For example, in the African
Youth Charter where youth means every person between the ages of 15 and 35 years.
(UNESCO, 2015)
In the Philippines, the definition of youth based on age group varies among
government agencies as shown in Table 1 (Velasco, 2005).
Agency
National Youth Commission
Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE)
Departyment of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
Department of Health (DOH)
Department of Education, Culture and Sports (now DepEd)
Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)

Definition
15-30 years
15-24 years
15-21 years
10-24 years
7-18 years
7-18 years

Why the youth?


It is said that the youth is the hope of the future, the leaders to be. The youth is
considered as assets in the community. According to the International Youth Foundation (IYF),
although young people nowadays are portrayed by the media negatively, associating them with

drugs, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse and the like, they are actually not a problem to be solved
but are problem solvers themselves. The United Nations considers the youth as active agents of
change who can contribute their energy, idealism, and insights to a communitys growth and
progress, as emphasized in treaties and declaration of the UN such as the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights, The World Program of Action for Youth and the Convention on the
Rights of the Child (UNDP, 2012).
Despite the recognized significance of the youth in the society, they have been given
little attention compared to adults. Collin (2008) cites that youth participation has been defined
to refer to youth involvement in decision-making processes from which traditionally, they have
been excluded. This recognizes that the youth as agents of change in the society has not been
given adequate attention in political science research; thus, this paper.

Patterns of Youth Participation


Literature on the political participation among the youth is seen to be a binary the
disengaged paradigm at one end and the engaged paradigm at the other (Farthing, 2010).
Some scholars see the youth nowadays to be passive and disinterested. These scholars
have equated political participation to voting and other traditional means of involvement. Voter
turn-out among the youth has shown a decline around the globe (EUYOUPART, 2015 in
Farthing, 2010; UNDP, 2012). Because of this decline, the youth has been perceived to have
become apolitical, apathetic and cynical. Kovacheva (2005) cites that this is often interpreted as
youth disenfranchisement (Adsett 2003), decline of social capital (Putnam 2000), young
peoples de-politisation (Vrcan 2002), social vulnerability (Tivadar & Mrvar 2002),
marginalisation (Svynarenko 2001), and anomie (Adnanes 2000).

However, current trend in youth political participation nowadays argue that the youth are
not as perceived, that they are not disengaged and apathetic. They argue that participation
should be broadly defined to include alternative forms of participation to understand how
participation among the youth actually increased, as they examined experience around the
globe (Gauthier, 2003; Collin, 2008; Tereshchenko, 2010; Silva & De Castro, 2014).
In Gauthiers (2003) study of youth interest in civic participation in Quebec, she found
out that young people are not passive actors; rather, they take active part in organizations which
aim to influence decision-making and power centers on a broad range of issues. Findings of her
study supported the theory of political generations, concluding that a new political generation is
emerging in Quebec as youth involvement takes new forms.
Silva and de Castro (2014) had similar findings among Brazilian youth. Their lengthy
discussion the changes in the contemporary youth collective action in Brazil showed that youth
participation when expanded to include fluid and non hierarchical collectives become active
agents of change in the society, contrary to the perception that the youth are apathetic and
politically inactive.
In Ukrain, youth participation has found to also follow the unconventional, informal
contextual political participation forms (Tereshchenko, 2010). Tereshchenko argued that
Ukrainian youth have the ability to make sophisticated judgments about various aspects of
social and political life, critically appraise their education and suggest a number of suggest a
number of practical democratic improvements to it.
Australian youth showed similar political identities active and engaged. Collin (2008)
examined young peoples experience of the internet at a platform for their political ideas and
stands. He found the youth to have been mobilized online through networks and are actually
engaged in everyday politics.

Similar findings have been found to be true in the United States. Dalton (2011) wrote,
turnout rates in elections are a poor indicator of the overall political involvement of Americans
there is more to democracy than elections. Other non-electoral modes of individualized or direct
political action have increased over time. Rather than disengagement, the repertoire of political
action has broadened. His study, just like the other researches cited, found that alternative
participation venues have widely been utilized.

Venues for Youth Participation


Aside from elections, literature shows that young people tended to participate in different
arena of social and political significance. Dalton (2011) identified several types of participation
including the following: (1) campaign activity, (2) group activity, (3) personal contact to
politicians, (4) contentious participation (i.e. protests), and (5) weird activism. Dalton further
emphasized that youth participation has been manifested in the consumption of information
which are of social and political significance through different available media including
television and the internet. Social organizations are also found to stimulate political activity.
Gauthier (2003) wrote, It could be that social participation, under certain conditions, paves the
way for (or at least conditions) an interest in political matters and he found this to be true in the
context of Quebec. Collin (2008) found the internet has allowed Australian youth to engage in
spontaneous forms of everyday politics and resulted in the mobilization of online networks
where young people share their political views.
Lauritzen (2005) notes that the shift from government to governance led to the active
role of the civil society, including the youth, in the operations of the state. There has been a
considerable effort to give the youth roles and responsibilities. UNDP placed weight not only on
participation per se, but more on the quality of participation of young people. A meaningful youth

participation is that which is transparent, respectful and rights-based, accountable, youth


friendly and relevant, inclusive and voluntary and safe. Moreover, in its attempt to ensure youth
participation, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) came up with a youth political
participation good practice guide. In this handbook, UNDP (2005) emphasized state-led
programs and interventions to guarantee youth participation at the pre-electoral, electoral and
post-electoral stages. Magstadt (2013) differentiates participating as a mere spectator and
participating as an insider. While a mere spectator simple watches from afar, an insider tries to
bring in more contribution by taking an active role in the political arena. In order to do this, there
is a need to develop the youths capacity through state-led interventions. According to UNDP, in
order for youth capacity building to be realized, there is first a need for an enabling environment.
This enabling environment is state-led as it is the state that creates legislations and policies
needed as bases for programs for the youth. Second, there is a need for what they termed, the
organizational level. This level prepares the young people for the individual level capacity
building. All these suggest that the state itself has been accorded a responsibility to ensure
youth participation.
One of the state-led venues for youth participation in western countries is youth councils.
Finlay (2010) investigated how the Auckland City Youth Council in Aotearoa, New Zeland
encouraged youth participation and youth development. She concluded that certain measures
should be put in place in order to ensure quality participation among the youth and result in their
empowerment.

Youth Participation in the Philippines


Youth participation in the Philippines is guaranteed by the 1987 Constitution. Article II,
Section 13 states, The State recognizes the vital role of the youth in nation-building and shall
promote and protect their physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual, and social well-being. It shall
inculcate in the youth patriotism and nationalism, and encourage their involvement in public and
civic affairs. This is a legal guarantee that the youth is given primacy by the Philippine
government.
The Sangguniang Kabataan
As participatory local governance rose into prominence in the country, the Local
Government Code (RA 7160) was signed into law by President Corazon Aquino in October 10,
1991. The LGC of 1991 put in place a unique system of youth representation at the grassroots
level, the Sangguniang Kabataan (SK). The SK was envisioned to be a training ground for
Filipino youth leaders and a layer of government that will attend to the needs and problems of
the youth and harness them in community development activities. As the Filipino version of the
Western Youth Council, the SK is composed of a chairman, seven members, a secretary and a
treasurer to be elected by the barangay youth aged 15-18 years. The SK chairmen in the
different barangays further elect a head known as the SK Federation Chairman who becomes
an automatic member of the municipal or city council, with the same tasks and duties as city or
municipal council members. The provisions also include a 10% allocation to the SK from the
barangay budget to implement youth welfare programs.

However, there have been several legislative attempts to abolish the SK as it has
become a training ground of trapolitos or little corrupt politicians (Velasco, 2005). The most
recent attempt was that of Rep. Edgar Erice of Caloocan who called the SK a school of
corruption (Cabacunga, G., 2013). Henrietta de Villa, chair of the Parish Pastoral Council for
Responsible Voting (PPCRV), said that the 42,000 seats for SK chair and 300,000 seats for SK
Council were being used as an entry point for political dynasties (Cabacungan, 2003). The
controversies surrounding the SK led to the passing of RA 10632 otherwise known as the AN
ACT TO POSTPONE THE SANGGUNIANG KABATAAN ELECTIONS ON OCTOBER 28, 2013,
AMENDING FOR THE PURPOSE REPUBLIC ACT NO. 9340, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.
This piece of legislation did not abolish the SK; it only placed it in an on hold status. SK
officials were required to vacate their position while 10% of Internal Revenue Allotment set aside
for SK activities and mandating the creation in each barangay shall be utilized based on the
implementing rules and guidelines set by the DILG. All these led to the freezing of state-led direct
participation of the youth in the Philippines.

Participation at the Grassroots: The Naga City Model


Naga is the countrys most awarded city, having won around 150 international awards
and more than 50 individual awards on effective urban management and good governance. The
city has been considered a model city around the globe in terms of good governance.
The Naga City governance model is illustrated by Figure 1 below (Robredo, 2003)..
Progressive
perspective
Good urban governance

Partnerships

Participation

This framework emphasized the need for people participation in ensuring good
governance in the city; both partnership and participation indicated in the framework refer to
participation of constituents only they are of different social roles and/or status. Robredo (2003)
wrote on people participation, These are mechanisms that ensure inclusion of individuals and
the community in government decision-making. They promote long-term sustainability by
generating broad-based stakeholdership and community ownership over local undertakings
Instead of confining deliberation on local government matters within a select group of elected
officials, the leadership encouraged and formalized mechanisms to enhance constituency
participation.
Naga City has instituted participatory mechanisms such as the establishment of the
Naga City Peoples Council (NCPC) which is composed of all accredited business, nongovernment and peoples organizations. The council (1) appoints representatives to local
special bodies, (2) observes, votes, and participates in the deliberation, conceptualization,
implementation and evaluation of programs, projects and activities of the city government, (3)
proposes legislation, participates and votes at the committee level of the Sangguniang
Panlungsod, and (4) acts as the peoples representatives in the exercise of their constitutional
rights to information on matters of public concern and of access to official records and
documents (Robredo, 2003). Other mechanisms instituted include continuing NGO
accreditation, multi-level consultation mechanisms, and referendum on development issues. In
December 2001, the iGovernance Program was launched. This program aimed to bring the
transparency and participatory governance of the city into world wide web.

Naga Citys Participatory Governance and the Youth


Nagas commitment to good governance through partnership and participation extends
to the youth. Ordinance No. 2007-008 dated March 19, 2007 established the Naga City Youth
Officials Program with amendments on 2008, 2009 and 2012, respectively. The program is
hinged on the assumption that personal experience in handling the city operations could help
realize the potential of the youth. Section 1 states, As the future leaders of country, the youth
have demonstrative sincerity and enthusiasm in their effort to help build the country that they
have always wanted but such involvement requires not only the sincerity and enthusiasm but a
first-hand knowledge of government functions as related to community problems and
development. The ordinance also set April 15 to May 31 each year as City Youth Month. During
this period, youth officials will be given the opportunity to handle the operations of the city
government except in areas, which are policy determining or requiring monetary disbursements.
Youth officials are selected through a two-phase selection process, including a written
and an oral examination from a pool of qualified applicants. Ordinance No. 2012-035 set the
qualifications of applicants/nominees to the City Youth Officials Program as follows:
1. He/she must be a bona fide resident of the City of naga for not less than six months prior
to the submission of applications;
2. He/she must be at least a High School graduate;
3. He/she must be 15 years old but not more than 24 years old;
4. He/she must not have been a previous City Youth Official;
5. He/she must be of good moral character, as duly certified by the school head or the
Punong Barangay as the case may be;

6. Can fully attend to official functions during Regular Office hours, and;
7. He/she must accomplish the Application form and submit the same together with other
documentary requirements as prescribed by the Committee.

The top 14 examinees in the two-phased selection process shall be proclaimed by the
committee as follows: First Placer City Youth Mayor; Second Placer City Youth Vice Mayor;
Third Placer #1 City Youth Councilor; Fourth Placer #2 City Youth Councilor; and so on up to
the Fourteenth placer as City Youth Councilors, respectively. On the other hand, the examinees
who placed 15th up to the 45th slots shall be appointed by the City Youth Mayor to the positions
of City Youth Department Heads and Chiefs of Offices, as follows:
1) City Youth Administrator
2) City Youth Secretary to the Sangguniang Panglungsod
3) City Youth Planning and Development Coordinator
4) City Youth Treasurer
5) City Youth Assessor
6) City Youth Budget Officer
7) City Youth Legal Officer
8) City Youth Agriculturist
9) City Youth Veterinarian
10) City Youth Environment and Natural Resources Officer
11) City Youth Secretary to the Mayor
12) City Youth Market Superintendent
13) City Youth Population and Nutrition Officer
14) City Youth Accountant
15) City Youth Engineer
16) City Youth Metro Peso Manager
17) City Youth Social Welfare and Development Officer
18) City Youth Human Resource Management Officer
19) City Youth Civil Registrar
20) City Youth General Services Officer
21) City Youth Health Officer
22) City Youth Librarian
23) City Youth Urban Poor Affairs Officer

24) City Youth Science and Technology Centrum Administrator


25) City Youth Public Safety Officer
26) City Youth Electronics Data Processing Officer
27) City Youth Chief of Hospital
28) City Youth NCPC Program Director
29) City Youth NCPC Chairperson
30) The rest of the slots will be designated to NCPC Sectoral Representative
The City Youth Officials (CYO) shall serve for a term of one year but shall work hand-inhand city officials for one and one-half (1 & ) months beginning April 15 to May 31, each year.
The City Youth Official is entitled to receive a daily honorarium for a period of one and a half
month, commencing from April 15 to May 31, each year which is equivalent to the minimum
wage prevailing within the City Government of Naga, based on their actual daily
accomplishment.
Aside from the CYO Program, the city government of Naga enacted Ordinance No.
2012-035 otherwise known as AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR A COMPREHENSIVE
CODE FOR THE YOUTH IN NAGA CITY AND OTHER PURPOSES AND PROVIDING FUNDS
THEREOF in June 13, 2012. This ordinance ensures that the Naga City upholds the rights and
ensures the promotion of general welfare of its youth and their protection from acts, conditions,
or influences that are prejudicial to their development. Furthermore, the ordinance sets the
guidelines for ordinances pertaining to the Citys youth sector.

Conclusion
Participation has been established to be a vehicle of democratic health and vigor.
Supranational organizations, national and local governments and political science and social
development scholars agree that participation is significant in ensuring the strength of
democratic institutions. The youth, as the future leaders are in need of understanding how they
can become the agents of change. However, youth participation is very limited in the
Philippines. The Sangguniang Kabataan, which is the only institutionalized direct participation of
the youth has been frozen and is nearing abolition. There is no provision yet as to what
mechanisms could replace its function.

A close look at Naga Citys governance model centered on partnership and participation
gives light to Philippine politics and governance. Its programs that give primacy to participation,
especially of the youth, somehow provides a glimmer of hope that participatory governance is
possible. The national government has started replicating the Naga City model through the
Memorandum Circulars issued by the DILG when Jese Robredo was instituted as secretary in
2012. However, research on its implementation and effectiveness is yet to be conducted.

References
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principles and achievement. Switzerland: Inter-parliamentary Union.
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the state of peoples participation in governance. Center for Leadership, Citizenship and
Democracy, National College of Public Administration and Governance, U.P., Diliman,
Quezon City
Cabacungan, G. (2013, July 5). SK Abolition gains support in Congress. Philippine Daily
Inquirer. Retrieved from http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/439161/sk-abolition-gains-support-incongress
Collin, P. (2008, Oct). The internet, youth participation policies, and the development of young
peoples political identities in Australia. Journal of Youth Studies, 11 (5), 527-542
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among marginalized youth. Child Development, 82 (6), 1815-1833
Finlay, S. (2010). Carving out meaningful spaces for youth participation and engagement in
decision-making. Youth Studies Australia, 29 (4), pp. 53-59
Gauthier, M. (2003). The inadequacy of concepts: The rise of youth interest in civic participation
in Quebec. Journal of Youth Studies, 6 (3), 265-276

Hollis, M. (2002). The Philosophy of the Social Science: An introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.
Lauritzen, P. (2005, March). Participation revisited. In Revisiting Youth Political Participation:
Challenges for research and democratic practice in Europe. J. Forbrig (Ed.). Europe:
Council of Publishing
Magstadt, T. (2013). Political Participation. In Understanding politics: Ideas, institutions and
issues, 10th ed. Philippines: Cengage Learning Asia Pte Ltd.
National Youth Commission website http://www.nyc.gov.ph
Naga City Government Official Website. http://www/naga.gov.ph
Robredo, J.M. (2003). Making local governance work: The Naga City model. City Publications
Group, City Development Information Office, City Hall Complex, Naga City
Silva, C.F.S. & de Castro, L.R. (2014). Brazilian youth activism: In search of new meanings for
political engagement? Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, 39 (3), 187-201.
Tereshchenko, A. (2010, Oct). Ukrainian youth and civic engagement: Unconventional
participation in local spaces. Journal or Youth Studies, 13 (5), 597-613
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). (2015). What do
we mean by youth?. Retrieved from http://www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-humansciences/themes/youth/youth-definition/
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). (2005). Enhancing youth political
participation throughout the electoral cycle: A good practice guide. Retrieved from
http://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/Democratic%20Governance/Electoral
%20Systems%20and%20Processes/ENG_UN-Youth_Guide-LR.pdf
Velasco, D. (2005). Rejecting old-style politics?: Youth participation in the Philippines. In Go!:
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79-121

ATTACHMENTS
Ordinances pertaining to the Naga City Youth Officials Program

Ordinance No. 2007-008


AN ORDINANCE INSTITUTIONALIZING THE NAGA CITY YOUTH OFFICIALS PROGRAM:Author: Aileen L. Reondanga
Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City of Naga, that:
SECTION 1. Legislative Findings As the future leaders of country, the youth have demonstrative sincerity and
enthusiasm in their effort to help build the country that they have always wanted but such involvement requires not
only the sincerity and enthusiasm but a first hand knowledge of government functions as related to community
problems and development.
Said first hand knowledge can be effectively hand by allowing intelligent, responsible, and deserving youth to take the
reins of government of the City of Naga for a certain period and perform at least, the routinary functions of the
government officials and/ or department heads and/or plan in actualize programs and project more specifically those
affecting and requiring youth involvement.
SECTION 2. Executive Committee. There is hereby created a committee which is composed of the following :
Chairman The Sectoral Youth Representative to the Sangguniang Panlungsod.
Members

City Administrator
City Human Resources Mgt. Officer
Metro Peso Manager
City Public Information Officer
Secretary to the Sangguniang Panlungsod
Immediate Past City Youth Mayor
NCPC Youth Representative
Naga City Press Corps Representative

The Secretariat shall be a staff from the Office of the Sangguniang Panlungsod duly appointed by the Secretary to
the Sangguniang Panlungsod,
SECTION 3. Function of the Committee.
1.

Five weeks before the official start of the City Youth Official Program, it shall communicate with different
youth organizations existing in each barangay, schools, colleges and universities of the City of Naga about
the City Youth Program.

2.

Cause the Dissemination of information to all radio and television station available in the locality.

3.

Prepare the conduct of written tests in English and General Information among the Official Youth
representatives to the City Youth Officials Program and after which the conduct of an oral interview;

4. City Youth Treasurer


5. City Youth Assessor
6. City Youth Budget Officer
7. City Youth Legal Officer
8. City Youth Agriculturist
9. City Youth Veterinarian
10. City Youth Environment and Natural Resources Officer
11. City Youth Secretary to the Mayor
12. City youth Market Superintendent
13. City Youth Population and Nutrition Officer
14. City Youth Accountant
15. City Youth Engineer
16. City Youth Metro Peso Manager
17. City Youth Social Welfare and Development Officer
18. City Youth Human Resources Management Officer
19. City Youth Civil Registrar
20. City Youth General Service Officer
21. City Youth Health Officer
22. City Youth Librarian
23. City Youth Urban Poor Affairs Officers

24. City Youth Science and Technology Centrum Administrator


25. City Youth Public Safety Officer
26. City Youth Electronics Data Processing Officer
27. City Youth Chief of Hospital
28. City Youth and NCPC Program Director
29. City Youth NCPC Chairperson
30. The rest of the slots will be designated to NCPC Sectoral Representatives.
SECTION 6. Oath Taking No representative/passer may become a City Youth Official unless he/she took an Oath
of Office which shall be held on the date specified by the Executive Committee.
SECTION 7. Term of Office The City Youth Officials shall serve for one (1) year which shall commence every
15th day of April of the current year and shall expire April 14 th of the following year, however, they shall serve side- byside with their official counter parts only for the period of one and a half month, commencing from April 15 to May 31,
each year.
SECTION 8. Honorarium The City Youth Official is entitled to receive a daily honorarium for a period of one and a
half month, commencing from April 15 to May 31, each year which is equivalent to the minimum wage prevailing with
in the City Government of Naga, base on their actual daily accomplishment.
SECTION 9. Limitation The City Youth Officials will be given the opportunity to handle the operations of the City
Government except in the areas which are policy determining of requiring monetary disbursements.
SECTION 10. Funding An annual appropriation sufficient to cover the honoraria as defined under section 8 hereof
shall automatically be included in the City Governments Annual Budget.
SECTION 11. Repealing Clause All ordinance, Executive Orders, Proclamations, resolutions, rules and regulations
which are inconsistent with the provisions of this ordinance are hereby repealed and modified accordingly.
SECTION 12. Effectivity This ordinance shall take effect upon its approval.
APPROVED.
Adopted: March 19, 2007
WE HEREBY CERTIFY to the correctness of the foregoing ordinance.
GIL A. DE LA TORRE
Board Secretary IV & Secretary Designate
GABRIEL H. BORDADO, JR.
City Vice Mayor & Presiding Officer
APPROVED:
JESSE M. ROBREDO
City Mayor

Ordinance No. 2008-025


AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 7 OF CITY ORDINANCE NO. 2007-008, INSTITUTIONALIZING THE NAGA
CITY YOUTH OFFICIALS PROGRAM, BY CHANGING THE TERM OF OFFICE OF THIS YEARS CITY YOUTH
OFFICIALS:Author: Hon. Ray-An Cydrick G. Rentoy
Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City of Naga, that:
SECTION 1. Section 2 of Ordinance No. 2007-008,entitled: An ordinance institutionalizing the Naga City Youth
Officials Program is hereby amended by reorganizing the composition of the Executive Committee,now with the
following composition:
SECTION 2. Executive Committee. There is hereby created a committee which is composed of the following:
Sponsor: Hon. Ray-An Cyrdrick G. Rentoy
Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City of Naga, that:
SECTION 1. Section 7 of City Ordinance no. 2007-008,Institutionalizing the Naga City Youth Officials Program is
hereby amended by changing the Term of Office of the 2008 City Youth Officials only, now to read as follows:
SECTION 7. Term of Office The City Youth Officials shall serve for one (1) year which shall commence on April 22
this year and shall expire April 14 of the following year, however, they shall serve side-by-side with their official
counterparts only for the period commencing from April 22 to June 6, 2008,with corresponding honoraria.
SECTION 2. This ordinance shall be effective only for this year 2008 and shall take effect upon its approval.
ENACTED: April 15, 2008.
WE HEREBY CERTIFY to the correctness of the foregoing ordinance.

JOSE L. GRAGEDA
Secretary to the Sanguniang Panlungsod
JOHN G. BONGAT
Acting City Vice Mayor and Presiding Officer
APPROVED:
GABRIEL H. BORDADO, JR.
Acting City Mayor

Ordinance No. 2009-017


AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2007-008, ENTITLED: AN ORDINANCE INSTITUTIONALIZING
THE NAGA CITY YOUTH OFFICIALS PROGRAM, BY RE-ORGANIZING THE COMPOSITION OF THE
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE UNDER SECTION 2 THEREOF, AND CREATING AND DEFINING THE COMPOSITION
OF AN ADVISORY COUNCIL:Author: Hon. Ray-An Cydrick G. Rentoy
Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City of Naga, that:
SECTION 1. Section 2 of Ordinance No. 2007-008, entitled: An ordinance institutionalizing the Naga City Youth
Officials Program is hereby amended by reorganizing the composition of the Executive Committee, now with the
following composition:
SECTION 2. Executive Committee. There is hereby created a committee which is composed of the following:
Representatives of the following sectors:
- National Youth Commission
- Metro Naga Chamber of Commerce and
Industry
- Naga City Peoples Council
- City Hall Press Corps
- Sanggunian Kabataan Federation
- Past Year City Youth Mayor
- Junior Chamber International (JCI)

They shall elect from among themselves a Chairman, and may create various working committees as may deemed
necessary.
SECTION 2.a An Advisory Council is hereby created for this purpose, with the following composition:
Chairman The Sectoral Youth Representative to the Sangguniang Panlungsod.
Members City Administrator
- City Human Resource Mgt. Officer
- Metro Peso Manager
- City Public Information Officer
- Secretary to the Sangguniang Panlungsod
- SP Chairman on Peace & Order
- NCPC Youth Representative
- Naga City Press Corps Representative
SECTION 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its approval.
ENACTED: March 17, 2009
AMENDED ORDINANCE: 2007-008
WE HEREBY CERTIFY to the correctness of the foregoing ordinance.
GIL A. DE LA TORRE
Secreetary to the Sangguniang Panlungsod
GABRIEL H. BURDADO, JR.
City Vice- Mayor and Presiding Officer
APPROVED:
JESSE M. ROBREDO
City Mayor

Ordinance No. 2012-030


AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2007-008, ENTITLED: AN ORDINANCE INSTITUTIONALIZING
THE NAGA CITY YOUTH OFFICIALS PROGRAM, BY ADDING ANOTHER SECTION THERETO BY INCLUDING
THE NAGA CITY YOUTH SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD MEMBERS IN THE DETERMINATION OF QUORUM IN
VARIOUS STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD:
Sponsor: Hon. Dan Paolo R. Morales
Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City of Naga, that:
SECTION 1. Ordinance No. 2007-008 is hereby amended by adding another Section therein, which shall now read
as follows:

SECTION 8.- Committee Quorum - The Naga City Youth Sangguniang Panlungsod Members shall be included in
the determination of a quorum in various Standing Committees of the Sangguniang Panlungsod.
SECTION 2. The succeeding sections after adding Section 8 thereof shall be renumbered as Section 9, 10, 11, 12
& 13;
SECTION 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its approval.
ENACTED: May 22, 2012
WE HEREBY CERTIFY to the correctness of the foregoing ordinance.
GIL A. DE LA TORRE
Secretary to the Sangguniang Panlungsod
GABRIEL H. BORDADO, JR.
City Vice Mayor & Presiding Officer
APPROVED:
JOHN G. BONGAT
City Mayor