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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response


Grade: Pre-K
Function: Physical Response
Essential Questions:

How and why are music related?


What makes movement enjoyable?
Why might some people move differently to music than others?
How do people express their emotions?

Goals /Enduring Understandings:

To understand music through movement


To be able to demonstrate musical ideas through movement
To understand how music inspires dance and movement
To be able to express music in another artistic way

Activities:
Singing and movement, responding to the questions
Listening and moving, discussing and responding to questions
Creating original music and representation based on an animal
Narrative: (350 words present tense, dissect the anatomy and use as model)
Music is often related to physical movement or represents a moving idea. In this curriculum pre-K students interpret, learn, and
create connections between music and movement. By the last week of the curriculum, the students will create a musical
zoo.The students compose, create, and represent an animal with music and should be able to also represent through
movement. In their zoo showcase, where students perform their animal piece and the other students represent their animal
through movement.We begin every class with a movement involved Hello Song to get their movement and musical
connections flowing. This also gathers their attention and lets them know it is time to make connections between music and
movement. From here the first few activities are songs and their related games. In Sally Go Round the Sun and No Bears out
Tonight the students play and sing to recognize movement along with the use of their voices. These songs and games
encourage expression of emotions while also learning musical aspects such as melodies and contrast. The song Touch your
Shoulders allows students to perform movement along with the text of a song. Using the piece Flight of the Bumble bee the
students make and use craft bees to represent the sounds heard in the piece. In the Carnival of the Animals students can find
movement through Saint-Seans representation of animals in music. Using the piece Pictures at an Exhibition, an arrangement
of pieces based off of art works, students will represent the music through movement. In the piece Ballet of the Unhatched
Chicks the students recreate the music heard while looking at the artwork inspired by the piece. To flow towards their creating
process of representing animals through movement and music, the students return to Carnival of the Animals. From this they
gain understanding and interpretation through examples of how composers represent certain things through music; in this case
animals. For the project over the course of the curriculum the students choose some of their favorite animals and create an

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response

exhibit for their zoo animal. Overall the students grow in knowledge and understanding of representation through music and
movement, while gaining the skills necessary to create musical understanding of timbre, rhythm, and texture.

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response

10 Week Curriculum Plan: Pre-K


Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Launch

Carrying out the Project

Exhibitio
n

10

Content

Process
Discuss
animals
and what
their
sounds
might be
like

Decide
favorite
animals,
instrument
s
interpreting
sounds

Let students
explore with
instruments
with given
parameters

Continue to
explore what
instruments
can depict
what
animals

Give them
animals to
depict
through
music

Review
depictions,
begin to add
movement

Finalize
exhibits

Rehearse

Preform
exhibits

Hello
Song

Hello
Song

Hello
Song

Dippidi Du

Dippidi Du

Dippidi du

Dippidi du

Review
Hello Song

Review
Hello Song

Hello
Song

Sally go
round the
Sun

Sally go
round the
Sun

No Bears
out
Tonight

No Bears
out Tonight

No bears
out tonight

Touch your
shoulders

Touch your
shoulders

Sally go
round the
sun or No
bears out
tonight

Sally go
round the
sun or No
bears out
tonight

Sally go
round the
sun or No
bears out
tonight

Creating

Anchor
standards

Performi
ng

Anchor
standards

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response

Respondi
ng

Flight of
the
bumblebee
-create
bees,
discuss
composer/
Context

Flight of
the
bumblebee
-melodic
contour

Flight of
the
bumblebee
Represent
through
form

Carnival of
the
Animalsgive context
of
composer,
one
movementKangaroo

Carnival of
the
Animalsreview
composer
and do
Elephant

Ballet of
the
unhatched
Chicks

Ballet of
the
unhatched
chicks

Return to
Carnival of
the
Animals-El
ephant

Carnival of
the
AnimalsKangaroo

Anchor
standards
Ask essential questions

Connecti
ng

Create concept map

Who

What

Where When

Why

Questions related to Function and Goals

Relate to Enduring
understandings
To be used with all songs, listening pieces, and creative work throughout.

Anchor
standards

Making personal connections

Materials

Songs / Chants

Recordings

Exhibition

Performing Beginning
Circle Games- John
Fiereraband

Sally go round the sun

Flight of the Bumblebee

Children Describe:

Carnival of
the
AnimalsKangaroo
and
Elephant

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response
No Bears out tonight
Share the Music
Kindergarten

Touch your shoulders

How music affects movement


Carnival of the Animals- Kangaroo

Hello song
Dippidi du

Carnival of the Animals- Elephant

Classroom instruments

Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks


from Pictures at an Exhibition

Bee Craft

How music can be used to


demonstrate musical concepts

Evidence of understanding:
Performing a chosen classroom
song
Performing flight of the Bumble
bee
Performing musical zoo exhibits

Teaching Strategies you should be able to describe each of the teaching strategiestheir purpose, how they
function, and in what musical learning contexts they would be employed.

Open ended questions

Direct instruction

Social

Dispositions

To improve students:

Acquire/ demonstrate music skills

collaborative/ friendship grouping

Collaboration-review and have


students self-regulate

Analysis of piece
Understanding of
context
Problem solving
solutions and
interpretations

Choice in selecting

Focused using questions and


craft

Open/closed prompts
To stimulate
imagination and generate
ideas for reflection

Cultivate curiosity-open
questions

Attentive listening

Problem Solving (for


students)

Concept Map

To create
scheme/ framework for
understanding

Critical thinking- open questions

Academic Language
Nafme anchor standards/ facets

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response
Improvisation, teacher prompts/
scaffolds interpretation, construct
representations

Musical Maps

Connecting framework

To create
scheme/ Framework for
understanding

Grade: 4th Grade


Function: Physical Response
Essential Questions:

How and why are music related?


What makes movement enjoyable?
Why might some people move differently to music than others?
How do people express their emotions?

Goals /Enduring Understandings:

To understand music through movement


To be able to demonstrate musical ideas through movement
To understand how music inspires dance and movement
To be able to express music in another artistic way

Activities:
Singing and movement, Discussing and responding to questions
Listening and movement, discussing and responding to questions
Creating original movement and music to an original culture
Narrative: (350 words present tense, dissect the anatomy and use as model)
Music is frequently related to movement and dance. How can we convey our musical ideas through movement? How can
movement be used as a means of expression? In this project, fourth graders explore the relationship between music and

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response

movement by creating their own worlds and composing and choreographing songs and dances for that world. Through a
variety of performing, responding, and creating activities, students discover music as a form of expression through movement
and dance activities. They begin by performing a variety of songs and dances from other cultures to form an understanding of
how music can be expressed through their movement. They learn dances that go along with the songs, further describing how
their movements fit. For example, students learn the song Tumbalalaika, a song with a strong waltz feel. After teaching the
song, students learn a waltz, then sing and dance along to the song. Students answer the questions, how did the dance change
the way that the song was sung? And, how was the dance a form of expression? In addition, fourth graders will listen to pieces
of music from different cultures such as Brahms Hungarian Dances and Bizets Carmen and discover how movement can relate
to the music that they hear. In addition, they discover how the music and movements are different based on the culture.
Students move and dance to the music that they listen to by themselves--why do some students move a certain way? What in
the music elicits a certain movement or feeling? Responding lessons also incorporate current popular culture songs and dances
such as the Cha Cha Slide and Electric Slide. By doing so, students incorporate their own culture into their study of other
cultures and understand how movement is incorporated in popular music as well. The study in music and movement in culture
comes together in a creating project, where students work in groups to create their own culture and their own world. Students
compose music for their culture, a dance to go along with it, and pictures to illustrate what the culture/world looks like. How do
the movements and dances go along with the pieces that they are composing? How does the music emulate the pictures?

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response
10 Week Curriculum Plan: Grade 4
Phase 1
Launch
1

Phase 2
Carrying out the Project
2

Process
Use a
video
game
without
music for
a
springboar
d-what
might the
music
sound like?

Improvise
individually
some
sounds for
the world
that groups
want to
create.

Compose
music for
the world
that they
are creating

How might
we
represent
the
composition
s through
movements
? Improvise
movements
individually

Choreograp
h
movements
to the
music that
student
groups
composed.

Finalize the
music and
the
movements
for the
worlds that
students
create

Rehearse
the music
and
movements
for the
worlds that
students
create

imagine

Break into
groups
and decide
what world
that they
want to
create
music and
dance for;
Draw
pictures to
show what
the world
might look
like
Imagine

Imagine

Plan and
Make

Analyze
and
Imagine

Plan and
Make

Evaluate
and Refine

Rehearse

Dippiduadd
clapping
game
La Raspa

Dippidu
La RaspaAdd
movement
game

Dippidu
Sandy Land

Sandy
Land/Bow
Belinda

Sandy Land
/Bow
Belinda-as
partner
song
Tumbalalaik
a-with waltz

Sandy
Land/Bow
Belinda-partner
song and
dance

Children
choose 1
song to
perform

analyze

Analyze
and
Interpret

Interpret
and
Rehearse

Analyze

Analyze
and
Interpret

Interpret
and
Rehearse

Interpret
and
Rehearse

Review La
Raspa,
Dipidu,
Sandy
Land/Bow
Belinda,
and
Tumbalalaik
a
Rehearse

Dragon
Dance-

Dragon
Dance-

Hungarian
Dance

Hungarian
Dance No.5

Hungarian
Dance No.5

CarmenMarch of

Carmen-

Carmen-

Prepare for
presentation

Anchor
standards

Dippidu

Anchor
standards

10

Content

Creating

Performi
ng

Phase 3
Exhibiti
on

La Raspa

Tumbalalaik
a

Tumbalalaik
a

Show and
Tellperform

Show and
Tell-Perform

Rehearse

Show and
Tell-

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response
Respond
ing

Movement
s and
rhythm

Anchor
standards

Connecti
ng
Anchor
standards

Movement
s, rhythm,
and form

analyze

No.5 in g
minor
(Brahms)Rhythm
and
movement
s

in g minor
(Brahms)-

in g minor
(Brahms)-

Melodic
contour,
movements

Form,
melody,
movements

analyze

Analyze
and
interpret

Analyze
and
interpret

Ask essential questions


Create concept map
Relate to Enduring
understandings

Who

What

the
TorreadorsMovements
and Mood

Analyze

Where When

Why

March of
the
Torreadors--

March of
the
Torreadors-

Dynamics
and form

Form and
Instrumenta
tion

Analyze
and
Interpret

s of the
world

Perform
and
Respond to
others
performanc
es

Rehearse

Questions related to Function and Goals

To be used with all songs, listening pieces, and creative work throughout.

Making personal connections

Materials

Songs / Chants

Recordings

Exhibition

Classroom instrumentsmallet, percussion, and


keyboard instruments

Dippidu
La Raspa
Tumbalalaika
Sandy land/Bow Belinda

Dragon Dance
Cha Cha Slide
Carmen-March of the Torreadors
Brahms Hungarian Dance No. 5

Students describe:
How music
effects music
How movements
can be used in a variety
of musical contexts
How movements
can express elements of
music
Students create their own
world
Perform original compositions
that represent that world
Perform original dances to
express the music

Streamers (dragon
dance)

Evidence of Understanding

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Curriculum Unit/Project: Music as a Function of Physical Response
Children discuss how music can
be expressed through movement
through:
Celebrations,
rituals, events, emotions,
stories, symbolic
representations, form,
melodic contour

Teaching Strategies you should be able to describe each of the teaching strategiestheir purpose, how they
function, and in what musical learning contexts they would be employed.
Open ended questions
To improve students:
Analysis of a
piece
Understanding of
context
Problem Solving
Solutions and
interpretations

Open/closed prompts
To stimulate
imagination and
generate ideas for
reflection

Direct instruction
Acquire/demonstrate music skills
Attentive listening
Focused using map.creative
using self generate map
Problem Solving (for
students)
Improvisation, teacher
prompts/scaffolds
Interpretation, construct
representations

Social
Collaborative/friendship grouping
Choice in selecting
Concept Map

To create
scheme/framework for
understanding

Musical Maps

To create
scheme/framework for
understanding

Dispositions
Collaboration-review and have
students self-regulate
Cultivate curiosity - open
questions
Critical Thinking- open questions
Academic Language
NAfME anchor standards/Facets
Model
Connecting Frameworks