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A GDYNETS ® PUBLICATION

Car Collector

A GDYNETS PUBLICATION Car Collector

© 2016, G. DAVID YAROS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Chronicles ®

Exploring:

Volume IX, Issue 12

 

Ca

s

December 2016

 Car Collecting Today Classic Rides

 

High RPMs

 



 

Well, we have survived, so

December Automotive Milestones

 Reports From the Field

far, the fiasco of the presi-

2-1927 1st Model A Ford

 

dential election. Thanksgiv-

7-1931

Last Model A

 

 Oldsmobile (1897-2004)

ing is now behind us and the

7-1950

Buick builds its six-



Cadillac (1902- )

joy of Christmas awaits us.

millionth car

 

8-1861

William Durant born,

 Allanté (1987-1993)

Then we have the events of 2017 to look forward to. It

Boston, MA

   

9-1963

Last Studebaker

 Corvair (1960-1969)

should prove to be an inter-

13-1939 1st production Lin-

13-1939 1st production Lin-
13-1939 1st production Lin-

= Clickable Link

esting year, to say the least! What with the end of 2016 and the coming of 2017, I thought that this month we would take both a look back

coln Continental 15-1861 Charles Duryea born, Canton, IL 17-1791 NYC creates 1st one-way street

and a look forward in time.

 

20-1868 Harvey Firestone born, Columbia County, OH

For those

who have

not

seen or heard of it, we shall

20-1892 Pneumatic automo- bile tire patented

also present info

on

a

car

20-1951 Sears, Roebuck &

IN THIS ISSUE:

collectors worst nightmare. As that nightmare involves

Co. debuts Kaiser-built Allstate

High RPMs

1

a Packard, it seems apropos to take a look at some other Packard related matter. We indeed shall do just that.

22-1900 1st car bearing "Mercedes" name is delivered to buyer, Emil Jellinek 29-1800 Charles Goodyear

Worst Nightmare!

2

Our December 2016 issue concludes the ninth calendar year in which CCC ® has been

born, New Haven, CT 30-1936 United Auto Work- ers strike at Fisher Body Plant

A Look Back

3

in print.

 

- A Very Merry Xmas!

 

GDYNets ® on the Web

 

Packard Death

3

 

Throes

 

Find GDYNets on the web:

SAVED 62: A website devoted

-A site de-

 

to our 1962 Oldsmobile Dy-

voted to a myriad of interests.

 

Pics to Ponder (Xmas Cars)

5

 

CCC ® -THE FORUM -A web

site to discuss the newsletter,

the hobby and our cars.

namic 88 convertible.

The site

also has a lot of information on Oldsmobile cars and the com-

pany founder, Ransom Eli Olds.

Foremost is extensive informa- tion on the “Steel City” of Gary, IN. There are also offerings on steel making, U.S. Steel-Gary

62

-Our

1962 Olds

Works, U.S. Marine Corps, M14

convertible, Ransom Eli Olds and things Oldsmobile related

THE GRAY LADY: This web- site features our 1955 Cadillac

assault rifle, of course Oldsmo- bile, and the tragic story of the

web site.

 

Coupé

de Ville,

lots

of

Caddy

The Gray Lady -1955 Cadillac

information and

an extensive

murder of Gary, IN Police Lt.

CCC® Forum EMail:

Coupé de Ville web site.

repair library.

George Yaros.

 
 
 
Car Collector Chronicles Page 2 Worst Nightmare! “Divers have to be called in to attach tow
Car Collector Chronicles
Page 2
Worst Nightmare!
“Divers have
to be called in
to attach tow
cables to your
treasured car
so that it may
be retrieved
from the
drink.”
When I first learned of this, I wanted to cry. I just cannot imagine a more tormenting
scenario.
You receive an invite to display your ride at the Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival &
Concours d’Elegance at Port Royal Plantation. The fact that you happen to own a 1938
Packard 1605 Super Eight convertible sedan, and that it is the only pre-war convertible
with a hard top, just may have something to do with receipt of the invite?
Being a car buff you happen to own 62 other Packards, but this baby is 1-of-1. You
ship your million dollar ride to Hilton Head and proudly put her on the show field.
Even though you are a renowned collector, you are more than anxious as the judges
go over your car with a fine toothed comb. When all is said and done you have been
awarded a Best of Class. You may now breathe easy while awaiting the Best of Show
competition. It has been a pretty good weekend, so far. Time to relax and have a bev-
erage of choice.
While imbibing a bit of refreshment your ride develops a mind of its own and decides
to take a little trip. Unfortunately, that trip is a short one, without power, in reverse, right
into a lagoon! Bystanders undertake a valiant effort to head off the pending disaster.
However, the weight of the car, the slope of the ground and the leather-soled dress
shoes of the volunteers all combine to nullify their best efforts. Divers have to be called
in to attach tow cables to your treasured car so that it may be retrieved from the drink.
Watch it here -
https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=gq4antm-6OY ◄
Unfortunately, this is the fate that befell Ralph Marano of NJ, on Sunday, 6 Nov. Sur-
prisingly, Marano bore up to the disaster quite well. Even though restoration of this rare
car had just recently been completed, he vowed to start the process all over again.
Good for him!
This is another of those incidents where I wonder who is the insurance company? I
would love to see the repair estimates and claim check(s) paid out in settlement!
   

Car Collector Chronicles

Page 3

 
   

A Look Back

While researching this month’s issue I ran across this 1955 quote from Robert S. McNa- mara, then G.M. of Ford Motor Co., which I found interesting:

The test of your generation will not be how well you stood up under adversity, but how well you endured prosperity.

From my perspective 60 + years later, the current state of the world is such as to justify questioning just how well we met that challenge.

Males of my generation need no reminder as to who McNamara was. For all you young- sters out there, in addition to being the “Father of the Falcon” while at Ford (reportedly, in 1957 he drew up the specs for the car on the back of a church program while attending Sun- day services), McNamara served Presidents Kennedy and Johnson as Secretary of Defense during the early years of the Vietnam War.

The 50s were good to U.S. automobile manufacturers. In 1951, 73% of American house- holds owned cars, 59% of workers used their cars to travel to work, and 68% of a l l cars were used for this purpose. 85% of inter-city travel was in private cars. As cars increased in size, some of Detroit’s larger models began to break the bound of the envelopes designed to hold them. Cadillacs began to take up two parking-meter spaces. Many cars were now too large to fit in the garages of homes built between the wars. Re- member knock/bump outs in garage back walls? It got to the point that by the late 50s may states began legislating maximum widths for cars.

“Cadillacs began to take

parking-

  • 1958 also happened to be the year the car bubble burst. As new car sales took a dive the

up two

length of time owners held on to their newly purchased cars increased. Simultaneous with this trend, foreign cars began to make a noticeable dent in the market. Volkswagen inroads are what led to the introduction of the Ford Falcon, Chevrolet Corvair and Plymouth Valiant.

Packard Death Throes

All of this is by way of background to a discussion of the death throes of Packard.

meter

  • 1954 saw the coming together of Packard and Studebaker. The merger was an effort on

spaces.

the part of Packard to avoid termination of operations. It was hoped access to the Stude- baker dealer network would revive its sales. The fate it sought to avoid with this merger came about a mere 5 years later. Before giving up the ghost however, Packard went out on a limb with the presentation to the motoring public at the Chicago Auto Show in 1956 of the Packard Predictor, a Ghia built concept car which Packard hoped to produce. The Predictor was ill-named, as it did not show the way to future sales. The car was 18 and 1/2 feet long. The length bested Cadillac by a half-foot. With 10 inch thick doors tipping the scales at 200 lbs., the Predictor weighed in at 3 ton. That bested Cadillac by a half-ton. The car cost financially strapped Packard $70K to produce; $613,080.80 2016 dollars.

Many cars were now too large to fit in the garages of homes

Some of its outstanding features were concealed quad headlamps, a variation on the trademark oxbow grille, mini- mal exterior chrome trim and a massive rear bumper with chamfered anterior exhaust ports. Their purpose was to direct noxious exhaust fumes away from car drivers trailing behind. The two most out- standing features of the car were the re- tractable roof panels and the cantilevered rear window. The roof panels retracted automatically whenever the door was opened. This feature made entry/exit easier. Addi- tionally, the panels could be opened for increased ventilation while driving. Likewise with the back win-

Some of its outstanding features were concealed quad headlamps, a variation on the trademark oxbow grille,
Some of its outstanding features were concealed quad headlamps, a variation on the trademark oxbow grille,

built between the wars.”

Car Collector Chronicles Page 4;; Packard Death Throes—Cont’d. dow. It could be partially lowered. The cockpit
Car Collector Chronicles
Page 4;;
Packard Death Throes—Cont’d.
dow. It could be partially lowered. The cockpit featured swivel seats and a maze of pushbuttons to control
the roof panels, rear window, side windows, automatic transmission and who knows what else.
The public liked what they saw. So did
Packard. It incorporated many of the
Predictor features into a 1957 mock up,
known as Black Bess. Black Bess was
used by Packard in its sales pitch to Wall
Street financiers to try and obtain operat-
ing funds. It found no buyers.
The Curtiss-Wright Corp. came
along and extended a seem-
ingly helping hand. It exerted
control and in 1958 closed
down Packard assembly op-
erations in Detroit, marking the
beginning of the end.
Interestingly, the final two
Packard vehicles produced in
Detroit were not cars at all.
Rather they were trucks, which
were exported to Argentina.
Here are some lesser known Packard facts:
During the First World War, Packard played a key role both in
the design and the production of the Liberty L-12 engine.
Between the wars, Packard built one of the world's first diesel
aviation engines, the 225-hp DR-980 radial. It powered the
Stinson SM-8D, among others. It also powered a Bellanca CH-
300 on a record endurance flight of over 84 hours, a record that
stood for more than 50 years.
The B-47 bomber was powered by Packard-built jet engines.
A listing of all Packard Motor Car aircraft engines is available
online. ◄
The Predictor did lead the way in terms of some of its styling
features. They are found on the 1957 Mercury Turnpike
Cruiser and 1958 Continental Mark III (rear window), the 1963
Corvette (hidden headlights) and the pronounced proboscis
nose/grille (Edsel and Pontiac).
Car Collector Chronicles Page 5;; Pics to Ponder (Xmas Cars)  Ok, I’ve had my say
Car Collector Chronicles
Page 5;;
Pics to Ponder (Xmas Cars)

Ok, I’ve had my say for the month. Now it’s your turn! I invite/encourage submission
of your comments, opinions and article contributions. I also ask that you please help
spread the word about our publication. Everything sent shall indeed be reviewed by
me. Submissions should be sent to CCC® at OldsD88@gmail.com.
–– Now that you have finished reading the newsletter, if so inclined, like CCC® on Face-
book® by going here. To UNSUBSCRIBE send an email to ==> OldsD88@gmail.com
_______________________________________
-- RESTORE 'EM, AND DRIVE 'EM!
COMING NEXT ISSUE:

The look forward which I mentioned in High RPMs, but never got to this month

TBD