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Regan Sawyer | Ami Changela | Laura Dodson | Darrien Wheeler

Malcolm Campbell URWT 1103-009


September 8, 2016

Student Learning Outcomes


As writing faculty, we recognize that all of the following student learning outcomes are
interwoven, and often happen simultaneously/ We also recognize that rhetorical awareness and
critical thinking happen throughout all of composing that that it's artificial to try to separate these
acts from the highly complex work of composition. We have done so to help a variety of
audiences- students, colleagues in other departments, for example- to better understand concepts
introduced and reinforced in FYW so that they will continue to be practiced and developed
throughout a students lifetime of literacy development.
Rhetorical Knowledge
Rhetorical knowledge is the ability to identify and use strategies across different types of reading
and writing situations. Writers use their own writing processes to compose with meaning, having
an understanding of how genre, audience, purpose, and context impact writing choices.
By the end of FYR, students should be able to:
Use rhetoric (ability to persuade or make a judgement) to compose a variety of writings
using various forms of technology, and appealing to multiple audiences by adapting their
work to fit each individual audience.
To see how different genres are shaped into writing for readers and writers. This will
include mechanics, grammar, structure and style of writing.
Have the ability to be able to shift voice, tone, the audience youre addressing, the
medium youre using to address these people, and to be able to accommodate different
circumstances and settings.
Critical Reading
Being able to read critically means having the skills to understand, combine, and form an opinion
about ideas, information, and pieces of text. When a writer thinks critically about what it is
theyre reading, they are able to view the claims made separately from the evidence to support
those claims, to evaluate the sources and support used, and discern how and why the author
reasoned and structured their argument the way they did. Having this ability is the foundation for
being able to write in a higher level academic setting.
By the end of the FYR, students should be able to:
To use reading for questioning, learning and discovering new texts.
To break down their own work and work of other writers with details. Including reading
different types of texts and learning new values of writers
Locate and evaluate primary and secondary research materials to produce credible and
reliable sources by using a variety of materials.
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Regan Sawyer | Ami Changela | Laura Dodson | Darrien Wheeler


Malcolm Campbell URWT 1103-009
September 8, 2016
Use a large range of texts to see how verbal and nonverbal aspects of writing affect the
audience.
Composing Processes
Writers use more than one way to formulate their ideas, further develop them, and then transform
them into the finished version. A writing process is usually not a direct path from its initial
conception to the finished product. For instance, a writer could begin drafting from their initial
research, but then revisit and redraft after coming across new evidence. Also, the writing process
varies from composition to composition depending on what medium it is, who it is intended for,
and what the context of the piece is.
By the end of the FYR, students should be able to:
To write using flexible strategies such as drafting, reviewing, collaborating, revising,
rewriting, and editing.
Allow others to make corrections to your work, and learn from other authors writing to
make your own better. Know that reading someones work is a form of language.
To use writing to deepen your knowledge and engagement with materials, different texts,
authors and ideas.
Knowledge of Conventions
Know the differences in writing styles between genres. Make sure your writing purpose
coincides with the way you write your story and the things you state within your story.
By the end of FYW, students should be able to:
Demonstrate how to change techniques in conventions by genre, from hand-written
compositions to multi-media compositions.
Understand why genre rules vary from genre to genre.
Understand and apply intellectual property laws (for example, fair use and copyright
laws) to your writing and use them to correctly cite sources in your work.
Develop linguistic abilities such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling throughout the
course.
Critical Reflection
A writers ability to explain why they wrote something and explain their thought process
throughout.
By the end of FYW, students should be able to:
To reflect on their papers and others as well.
Use writing as a way to reflect.

Regan Sawyer | Ami Changela | Laura Dodson | Darrien Wheeler


Malcolm Campbell URWT 1103-009
September 8, 2016
Display understanding and recognition of the writing process and different conventions
within your own writing.
Show that reflection is an integral part of learning, thinking, and communicating.