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Program overview

13-Sep-2016 22:22
Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Code
Omschrijving
Master Chemical Engineering 2016
Chemical Engineering Core Programme 2016
Obligatory Core Modules 2016
CH3131a
CH3141
CH3151

Applied Numerical Mathematics (ANM)


Molecular Thermodynamics (MTD)
Molecular Transport Phenomena (MTP)

ECTS

p1

p2

p3

p4

p5

6
6
3

Obligatory Track Modules 2016 Obligatory Track Modules 2015


Process Engineering 2016
CH3043a
CH3053
CH3681a

Process Dynamics & Control (PD&C)


Applied Transport Phenomena (ATP)
Reactors and Kinetics

3
6
6

Chemical Product Engineering 2016


CH3162a
CH3173a
CH3372a

Design and Synthesis of Advanced Chemical Products (DSP)


Structure/Property Relationships of Advanced Chemical Products (SPRP)
Soft Matter for Chemical Products (SMP)

6
6
3

Nuclear Science and Engineering 2016


CH3771
CH3782
CH3792

Nuclear Chemistry
Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle
Introduction to Nuclear Science and Engineering

6
3
6

Obligatory Design Modules 2016


CH3804
CH3843
WM0320TU

Product & Process Design


Design Project
Ethics and Engineering

5
12
3

MSc Thesis Work

40

Thesis Project 2016


CH3901

Scientific and Social Orientation 2016


Research and Development 2016
CH3702

Industrial Internship

18

Electives for Process Engineering 2016


AP3171 D
CH3011
CH3061
CH3073
CH3082
CH3101
CH3181
CH3301
CH3421
CH3562
CH3622
CH3622-P
CH3982
SET3041

Advanced Physical Transport Phenomena


Interfacial Engineering
Multiphase Reactor Engineering
Separation Processes, Design and Operation (SPDO)
Chemical Technology
Heterogeneous Catalysis for Chemical Engineers
Scale Up / Scale Down
Foreign Excursion Tour TG
Computational Transport Phenomena
Nanoparticle Technology
Process Intensification (PI)
Process Intensification (PI) Project
Liturature Study
Energy from Biomass

6
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
0
4

Electives for Chemical Product Engineering 2016


AP3252
CH3011
CH3101
CH3301
CH3531
CH3562
CH3582
CH3632
CH3672
CH3982
LM3311
LM3731

Electron Microscopy Characterization of the Nanoscale


Interfacial Engineering
Heterogeneous Catalysis for Chemical Engineers
Foreign Excursion Tour TG
Functional Ceramics
Nanoparticle Technology
Chemistry and Physics of Actinides
Chemistry and Physics of Solar Cells
Computational Materials Science
Liturature Study
Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology
Advanced Biocatalysis

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
0
3
6

Electives for Nuclear Science and Engineering 2016


AP3371TU D
CH3301
CH3582
CH3982

Radiological Health Physics


Foreign Excursion Tour TG
Chemistry and Physics of Actinides
Liturature Study

6
3
3
0
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Entrepeneurship 2016
Obligatory Entrepeneurship Modules 2016
MOT9610
MOT9611
MOT9612

Entrepreneurship basic course


Project entrepreneurship thesis related
Business development lab (short)

5
5
5

Electives on Entrepeneurship 2016


Technology in Sustainable Development 2016
WM0939TU

TiSD Electives
Study Abroad 2016
Education 2016
Education Basis 2016
SL3031
SL3041
SL3116
SL3132
SL3174
SL3342
SL3462

Engineering for sustainable development

Specialisation Education Basics 2016


Didactical Skills, only given in Dutch
Orienterende stage
Research Methodology in the Social Sciences for Education
Vakdidactiek Scheikunde 1
Schoolpracticum Scheikunde A
Vakdidactiek Scheikunde 2
Educational Science

3
3
3
2
9
4
6

Specialisation Education Verdieping 2016


SL3012
SL3021
SL3311
SL3381
SL3424

Professionalization in SC and SE
The designing of education or communication products and processes
Research of Education
Didactics Chemistry 3
Schoolpracticum Scheikunde B

3
6
6
3
12

Management of Technology 2016


2nd Semester MoT Modules 2016
MOT1003
MOT1435
MOT1451
MOT1531
MOT2312
MOT2421

Integration Moment
Technology, Strategy and Entrepreneurship
Inter- and intra-organisational decision making
Business Process Management and Technology
Research Methods
Emerging and Breakthrough Technologies

5
5
5
5
5
5

Page 2 of 92

1.

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Master Chemical Engineering 2016


Director of Studies
Program Coordinator
Program Title
In association with the
Faculty of
ECTS Program

Introduction 1
Program Structure 1

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Ir. A.J.W. Haket
Chemical Engineering
TNW
The Chemical Engineering programme is a two-year master programme and comprises 120 EC.
The study load of modules is expressed in European Credits (EC). This is a result of the European Credit Transfer System
(ECTS), which encourages acknowledgement of study results between higher education institutions within the European Union.
EC's give an indication of the weight of a certain part of the programme. One EC involves approximately 28 hours of study. It
includes all time spent on the course: lectures, self-study, assignments, examinations, etc.
Note: use the menu at the left for information on each subset of the programme.
The programme comprises the following tracks:
-Chemical Product Engineering,
-Process Engineering,
-Nuclear Science & Engineering.
The core programme of each track comprises 90 credits and is the same for each student:
-Obligatory core modules (15 credits),
-Obligatory track modules (15 credits),
-Obligatory design modules and design project(20 credits),
-MSc thesis project (40 credits).
Combining the core programme with 30 credits Scientific and Social Orientation (elective part) completes the master
programme. The Scientific and Social Orientation allows for a broadening of knowledge or for additional depth. The student
may opt for:
-Research and Development,
-Management of Technology,
-Education,
-Study Abroad.

PROGRAMME ADDITIONS
- Honours track: This is an individual programme of at least 20 EC on top of the full Chemical Engineering programme, which
contains specially developed modules for all TU Delft honours track students. The full Chemical Engineering programme
including the additional honours track (140 EC in total) should be completed within 2 years. Approval of the course director is
needed.
- Double degree programme: This is a three year programme Chemical Engineering & Management of Technology of the
Faculties of Applied Sciences and Technology, Policy and Management. FORMAL PERMISSION TO START A DOUBLE
DEGREE PROGRAMME IS REQUIRED IN ADVANCE !!

REGULATIONS

Fail or Pass Regulation

With Honours Regulation

See http://students.tudelft.nl/tnw (or Blackboard) for the official regulations of the programme:
- Teaching and Examination Regulations 2016-2017 ("OER")
- Implementation Regulations 2016-2017 ("UR")
- Rules and Guidelines of the Board of Examiners 2016-2017 ("RRvE")
The student meets the requirements for the degree audit once the following have been met:
a. a result has been earned for all required modules: a mark, a pass (v) or an exemption (vr);
b. none of the marks may be lower than 6.0.
The designation with distinction for Masters degree audits.
1. A student can receive the designation with distinction for the Masters degree audit if the Board of Examiners decides to grant
this distinction and the following requirements have been met:
a. the weighted average of the results of the courses not including the MSc final project is at least 8.0; passes (v) and exemptions
(vr) will not be taken into consideration;
b. the number of credits for the courses for which a pass (v) has been earned or for which an exemption (vr) has been granted
may not exceed 30 credits in total;
c. The result for the MSc final project is at least 9.0;
d. None of the marks may be lower than 7.0;
e. The students degree programme has not taken longer than two years, calculated from the date of the first examination, taking
into account any study delay that falls under the Graduation Support Scheme.
2. In special cases the Board of Examiners may decide to grant the designation with distinction to a student who does not meet
the requirements referred to in subsection 1 if the student in question has shown exceptional skills in the degree programme.

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Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering Core Programme 2016


Program Structure 1

The core programme of each track comprises 90 credits and is the same for each student:
- Obligatory core modules (15 credits),
- Obligatory track modules (15 credits),
- Obligatory design modules (20 credits),
- MSc thesis project (40 credits).

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Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Obligatory Core Modules 2016

Page 5 of 92

CH3131a
Course Coordinator
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials

Books
Assessment

Applied Numerical Mathematics (ANM)

Dr.ing. G.J.M. Koper


Dr. L. Portela
Dr. D.J.P. Lahaye
12-16/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
linear algebra; calculus;
A crash course on Matlab will be provided at the beginning of the course.
Systems of linear equations;
Solution of nonlinear equations;
Numerical differentiation and integration;
Solution of differential equations, time-integration;
Partial differential equations, boundary value problems;
Fitting functions to data;
Optimization methods.
The mandatory exercises require a minimum of Matlab skills albeit that other programming languages may be used after
consulting the lecturers.
After succesfully completing this course students will:
- be acquainted with those numerical methods that are required to solve problems in later MSc courses;
- be able to use software libraries of solvers;
- understand what goes on inside such solvers.
During 8 weeks, we will have two lectures of 2 hours and 8-12 hours hands-on Matlab practice sessions per week. The theory is
explained in the lectures, and tested during two tests (re-sit: one exam). During the Matlab sessions you learn to apply the theory,
through using Matlab, to a variety of ChemE problems. Your Matlab skills are tested in a series of mandatory assignments.
This course involves heavy use of computers and Matlab, both during computer classes and for homework assignments. Bringing
a laptop with Matlab installed is absolutely required to participate in the course.
For GMRES:
1) Section 7.3 in WI4201 Lecture Notes available on
http://ta.twi.tudelft.nl/nw/users/vuik/wi4201/wi4201.html
(Basic material)
2) Section 6.5 in Iterative methods for sparse linear systems (2nd edition)
First Edition by Youssef Saad available on
http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~saad/books.html
(Advanced Material)
Selected extra materials are made available via Blackboard (Course Documents)

G.R. Lindfield & J.E.T. Penny, Numerical Methods using Matlab, 3rd edition, Academic Publishers, 2013.
The theory exam consists of two (open book) theory tests after four weeks and after the first period. A re-sit exam that covers the
whole contents of the course is held in the second period. Only a "clean" book can be used during these exams, no lecture notes
etc.
There is a series of mandatory homework assignments. Please note that the homework has to be done in the prescribed periods,
and that homework grades cannot be improved later. Lecturers can invite students for an oral assessment of their homework.

Permitted Materials during


Tests

The grade for the exam is the mean of the grades for the two tests. The grade for the homework is the mean over the
assignments. The final grade is the mean of the grades for the exam and the homework. A passing grade can only be obtained if a
score of at least 5.0 is obtained for the theory exam and for the homework.
book (no lecture notes) and a simple calculator as accepted for VWO-exams (recent list: Casio FX-9750GII, FX-9860GII or FX9860GII SD, CG20; Hewlett Packard 39GII; Sharp EL 9900; Texas Instruments 83 plus, 84 plus silver edition of 84 plus C
silver edition; Texas Instruments TInSpire CX, the version without CAS (de TI-Nspire CAS is not permitted). TI also delivers an
orange externally assembled cradle with which communication with an external computer is possible, The cradle is not allowed.
Older types are permitted.).

Studyload/Week

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CH3141
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Molecular Thermodynamics (MTD)

Dr.ir. N.A.M. Besseling


Prof.dr.ir. T.J.H. Vlugt
8/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
BSc: Physical Chemistry, Thermodynamics, Basic Calculus (especially manipulations of logarithmic and exponential functions,
functions of several variables and their partial derivatives, differentiation of simple functions, 'chain rule', etc.)
'Introduction'
- Molecular Systems and Statistics
- Refresher of 'Classical Thermodynamics'
- Conditions for Equilibrium and Stability
- Statistical Mechanics
- The Boltzmann Distribution and the Canonical Partition Function; the connection between molecular statistical models and
thermodynamic functions.
Application to systems with independent molecules/subsystems
- Ideal Gas from Quantum Mechanical Point of View, including intramolecular degrees of freedom (vibrations, rotations)
- Adsorption (Langmuir Model)
Ensembles and Partition Functions; Microcaninical, Canonical, Grandcanonical, Generalisation
Applications to systems of interacting molecules
- Fluids of Interacting Molecules
- Classical Partition Function
- Distribution Functions
- Introduction to computer simulations
- Lattice models for fluids, mixtures, polymer solutions (Flory-Huggins Model), phase diagrams of these systems.
- If time allows: an aditional special topic (e.g electons in metals and semiconductors, potential of the mean force in complex
fluids, Debye-Huckel theory of electrolyte solutions)
After this course, the student
1.has an understanding of the statistical nature of collective molecular behaviour.
2.can relate bulk and interfacial macroscopic properties to microscopic properties such as intermolecular interactions.
3.
has basic knowledge and skills on the application of statistical thermodynamics on number of systems and phenomena
relevant for chemical engineering
4.can critically assess scientific literature in the area of statistical thermodynamics and its application in e.g. chemical
engineering
Lectures
Tutorials with assignments
Computer-simulation practicum
Molecular simulation practicum (Molecular dynamics; Monte Carlo)
Handouts will be made available.
Required book: "An Introduction to Applied Statistical Thermodynamics", by S. I. Sandler, WILEY (2011)
The final grade is determined by the combination of three intermediate short tests, computer simulation practical, tutorial
assignments and the final exam.
The tests will each consist of 10 multiple choice questions on the lecture material up to the test date.
The tests together contribute to the final grade with a weight of 20%.
Tutorials and simulation practical report contribute to the final grade with a weight of 10% each.
As the main purpose of tutorials is to practice with more complex problems, (such as will occur also at the exam), they will
mainly be appreciated for the effort that was made. This effort may include asking for advice with an instructor.
So even a not completely correct answer can earn maximal points if a serious effort was made.
So
'Total grade' = (average test grade)*20/100 + (average tutorial grade)*10/100 + (computer-simulation grade)*10/100 + (exam
grade)*60/100.
One cannot pass if the exam grade < 5.0.
If exam grade > above mentioned weigthed avarage (and > 5.0), then the final grade = exam grade.

Permitted Materials during


Tests
Studyload/Week

Tests and tutorials and computer-simulation practicum only contribute to the final grade with the exam or retake in the same
academic year.
Formulary, calculator

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CH3151
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Molecular Transport Phenomena (MTP)

Dr.ir. V. van Steijn


Prof.dr.ir. M.T. Kreutzer
8/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
BSc: Transport Phenomena, Physical Chemistry, Thermodynamics
Note: it is absolutely required to have a good working understanding of BSc level transport phenomena. We will test this in the
first class and organize several brush-up sessions in the first weeks for those that need a refresher
The classical analysis of transport phenomena finds its origin in the mass, energy and momentum balance equations.
Supplementing these balance equations with the Gibbs equation a formulation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics provides
a multi-scale approach to engineering concepts as controllability, stability and efficiency and leads to a quantitative route to
address sustainability.
1.Microscopic scale
Force-flux framework: molecular kinetic origin; Maxwell-Stefan model; entropy production rate: minimization schemes.
2.Mesoscopic scale
Heat- and mass transfer, charge transport: conduction and diffusion: free and defect-controlled; fluid mechanics: Stokes flow,
transport in flow systems; reaction-diffusion systems.
3.Macroscopic scale
Exergy: concept, minimization schemes and economy.
Controllability based on the principle of dissipation rate manipulation.
Process control based on the principle of time constant manipulation by means of dissipation rates.
Mathematical analysis methods: scaling and approximation techniques, analytical and numerical approaches.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Studyload/Week

After this course, the student can


1.assess and apply advanced descriptions of chemical processes at various length and time scales;
2.assess and apply optimization schemes for controllability, stability and efficiency;
3.analyze complex sets of (transport) equations using approximative scaling, analytical and numerical methods.
Lectures and (computer) working classes
1. Lecture notes.
2. Chapters from the book "Mass transfer in multicomponent mixtures" by Krishna and Wesselingh, made available through
blackboard.
3. Transport Phenomena Data Companion This book is not necessary (and not allowed during tests/exam), but handy to have.
Three written tests. Tests are cumulative and of increasing weight (0.15, 0.35, 0.50). To pass the course, the weight-averaged
final score should be at least a six. In case of failure, students do the full exam.
Simple calculator (no graphical one). Not permitted: data companion.

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Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Obligatory Track Modules 2016

Page 9 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Process Engineering 2016

Page 10 of 92

CH3043a
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Process Dynamics & Control (PD&C)

Prof.dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen


Dr. L. Portela
0/8/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Introduction
Overview process industry
Design and operation
Operation mode (batch and continuous)
Objectives of process control
Dynamic modeling
General procedure
Conservation, balances and constitutive equations
Examples (stirred tank reactor, furnace...)
Degrees of freedom
Numerical solution
Validation
Analysis
Steady state analysis
Non-linearity
Linearization (state space format)
Laplace transformation
Analysis in the Laplace domain (1st order transfer function, dead time...)
Model approximation (1st order plus dead time)
Interaction
Single Input Single Output (SISO) control
Proportional feedback control
Feedback and feedforward control
Feedback control in the Laplace domain
Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control (tuning, practical aspects...)
Direct synthesis
Internal Model Control (IMC)
Overview feedback control
Feedforward control
Instrumentation
Sensors
Actuators
Controllers
Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&ID's)

Study Goals

Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control


Extensions (cascade, ratio...)
Dealing with interaction (RGA and decoupling)
Plantwide control; some aspects
Batch control (sequential function charts)
1. Have a general understanding of process operation.
2. Be able to model a process system.
3. Be able to analyze process dynamics.
4. Be able to design a control system for a unit operation.
5. Understand the control system of a complete plant.
Lectures and Matlab/Simulink tutorials

Written exam and 2 HWs.


Both the exam and the HWs get their own grade. In order to pass: grade_exam >= 5.0, grade_HW >= 5.0, and grade_exam +
grade asgn >= 12.
Final grade = (grade_exam + grade_HW)/2.

Permitted Materials during


Tests
Studyload/Week

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CH3053
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Applied Transport Phenomena (ATP)

Prof.dr.ir. M.T. Kreutzer


0/16/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Transport Phenomena (on BSc level), and Molecular Transport Phenomena.
Students should know and be able to formulate conservation laws, in differential microbalance and integral macrobalance form,
for energy, mass, components, entropy, charge, etc, for reacting and non-reacting systems.

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Reader
Assessment

BSc level math skills. In particular, students should be fluent in multivariable calculus and have a firm background in differential
equations. Most of the text is in tensor notation, and students should be able to use such notation. Students that need to brush up
their math skills are advised to refresh their knowledge, e.g. using ocw.mit.edu, course 18.02 (freshman math class), especially
lectures 15-31.
In many processes in (bio)chemical industrial as well as in health and energy related applications, fluid flow, heat transfer and
mass transfer, and chemical reactions interact in a complex way. To reduce complexity, generic rules as to estimating
characteristic times, scales and regimes are dealt with. Several techniques are introduced for finding approximate solutions to
partial differential equations.
Balances - Deen Ch. 2 (recap of MTP)
Scaling - Deen Ch. 3.2, Fowler
Reductions in dimensionality - Deen Ch. 3.3
Unidirectional flow, Lubrication - Deen Ch 6, reader
Time scales - Deen Ch. 3.4
Similarity - Deen Ch. 3.5
Integral methods - reader, Deen 3.8
Perturbation methods - Deen Ch 3. 6
Forced convection heat/mass Transfer - Deen Ch. 9
The students should be able to analyse and solve practical and more advanced chemical engineering problems. We avoid
memorizing correlations and encyclopedic knowledge, and rather focus on problem solving skills by teaching several generic
methods that can successfully be applied to transport problems.
At the end of this course, the student can:
- Solve typical transport problems approximately
- Quickly get an idea about the behavior of a system
- Gauge the effect of small secondary phenomena - can you ignore them or not?
- Reduce complex problems to simpler ones with one of several techniques
Lectures, supported by exercises and homework assignments.
We hand out Study Guides - step by step guides for how to work through the text and exercises. No worked out solutions are
handed out - we have extremely poor experience with learning with the solution at hand. The homework, or rather, the work that
is to be done outside class hours, is to work through the Study Guides. On the evening before class, before 9 PM, questions
relating to the topic at hand may be posed on Blackboard in the discussion forum. These questions will be discussed in class. It is
therefore important that the students keep up with the material and study guides.
Additionally, a TA available one morning per week for face-to-face advise and questions on the course material.
No computer is required, although some of the material can be studied faster using mathematica or maple.
Deen, analysis of transport phenomena. second edition. Selected additional reading material will be made available.
A syllabus is available on Blackboard. Most of the classes will use the old-fashioned blackboard. Classes from 2011 on
collegerama.
Written exam. Typically, a small portion or the exam tests if you can reproduce (variations of) problems discussed in class.
As the main teaching goals is to apply methods to new problems, a significant portion of the exam tests if you can apply the
methods learned to new problems that you have never seen before.
Individual work on the study guides is not graded.

Permitted Materials during


Tests
Studyload/Week

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CH3681a
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Books
Assessment

Reactors and Kinetics

P.E. Boukany
Prof.dr. F. Kapteijn
0/6/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
BSc level Chemical Reaction Engineering; Numerical Methods, Matlab.
Note: it is absolutely required to have a good working understanding of Bsc (undergrad) level chemical reaction engineering,
thermodynamics and transport phenomena.
Kinetics
- Constructing Microkinetic Reaction Models
- Linear Algebra of kinetics: stoichiometry matrix, dependent/independent reactions, rank, component rates and rates of
elementary steps
- Molecular view on reactions: Transition State Theory, Collisions, gas phase vs. liquid phase, Isotope effects, Solvent effects
- Simulation of reaction models: ODE's of elementary steps, Quasi-Steady-State-Assumption, Sensitivity, component-rate to
elementary rates
- Polymerization Reactions: Anderson-Schulz-Flory, initiation, propagation, termination
- Surface Reactions: microkinetics, competitive adsorption, limiting steps, Langmuir-Hinshelwood, apparent activation
energy/apparent order
- Enzymatic Reactions: Noncovalent recognition, inhibitors, Michaelis-Menten
- Catalyst deactivation kinetics
Reactors
- Brief review of conversion and selectivity in ideal reactor types
- Diffusion-reaction in porous media: Catalyst effectiveness, heat effects, catalyst deactivation, interplay deactivation-diffusion
on selectivity.
- Fixed-bed reactors: Dispersion models, simulation of axial dispersion, upwinding, heat effects.
- Laboratory reactors-experimental techniques: catalyst testing, bioassays, lab-chip, analytics, transient methods.
This course deals with experimental and theoretical aspects of kinetics and reactor theory. After the course, the student will be
able to:
- formulate kinetic models for mechanisms of complex reactions
- interpret kinetic studies and use reactor measurements (concentrations and/or operando methods) to validate such models.
- understand modern theory underpinning kinetics.
- simulate complex reactors with diffusion, dispersion and heat effects
- propose reactor designs based on kinetic insights.
Lectures, Assignments (Theoretical and computer based, often use of Matlab).
Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design Fundamentals, James B. Rawlings & John G. Ekerdt
+ Course Handouts
The final grade is based on:
* results of three computer assignments (3*20%);
* the final written exam (40%) that is based on theory (no coding/programing).
A passing grade can only be obtained if a score of at least 5.0 is obtained for the written exam.

Page 13 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Chemical Product Engineering 2016

Page 14 of 92

CH3162a
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Design and Synthesis of Advanced Chemical Products (DSP)

Dr. R. Eelkema
Dr. W.F. Jager
Dr. A.J. Houtepen
0/8/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Organic Chemistry 1 (BSc level)
basic organic chemistry transformations and reactions, including reaction mechanisms.
e.g. from Clayden et al., "Organic Chemistry": Ch. 5-10, 12, 14, 17, 19-23.
This course provides a comprehensive overview of synthetic strategies for the preparation of advanced chemical products,
exploring current methodologies in organic, polymer, inorganic, and surface chemistry:
Organic Chemistry and Materials
Basic organic reactions (nucleophilic alkyl, acyl, and aromatic substitution, elimination, electrophilic aromatic substitution,
nucleophilic acyl addition, conjugate addition, electrocyclic reactions) including their mechanisms.
Molecular design
Synthesis design and planning, including retrosynthetic analysis
Selective chemical transformations
Convergent and divergent synthetic approaches, solid phase synthesis.
Selected organic materials (e.g. peptides, DNA/RNA, conductive polymers, liquid crystalline materials, click chemistry)
Polymer Chemistry
Basic principles of step-growth and chain-growth polymerization reactions, living polymerization reactions and the synthesis of
block copolymers
Mechanism, scope and limitations of main polymerization reactions
Design a reasonable synthetic route for a desired polymer
Inorganic Chemistry
Basic properties of inorganic nanomaterials and their applications
Strategies and methods for the production of inorganic nanomaterials and nanocrystals of specific composition and shape
Quantitative models for growing inorganic nanomaterials

Study Goals

Education Method

Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Surface Modification
Pressure-area isotherms in relation to structural properties and molecular events at the air/water interface
Basic principles on organic monolayer formation
Structure and properties of organic monolayers and polymer layers at various substrates
Differences/similarities and strengths/weaknesses between different types of surface modification
Design of monolayers and polymer surfaces with tailor-made properties
Application of organic reactions at monolayers and polymer surfaces with mechanistic implications
After succesfully completing this course students will be able to:
describe and discuss the properties of given molecular and inorganic materials and surfaces that are relevant for chemical
products.
design a synthetic approach for a molecule, molecular or inorganic material, or a functional interface.
understand the basic organic and polymerization reactions and synthesis methods as outlined in the course content, including
their mechanisms and/or quantitative description, and apply these reactions and methods in the design of synthetic routes for
organic molecules, molecular or inorganic material, or a functional interface.
identify the strengths and weaknesses of a certain synthetic route.
The course consist of a series of lectures, accompanied by exercise classes, and self-study. In the lectures the major content of
the course will be discussed using material from standard text books and contemporary examples form the literature. During selfstudy, the students will prepare for the lectures, rehearse the lectured material, and apply the lectured material by solving
problems and analyzing selected scientific papers. During the exercise hours the solutions to the problems and analysis of the
papers will be discussed.
CH3173a - Structure/Property Relationships of Advanced Chemical products (SPRP)
CH3372a - Soft Matter for Chemical Products (SMP)
Handouts, selected scientific papers.
A written exam (80% weight for final mark) and a case study (20% weight for final mark) that can be shared with the courses
SPRP and SMP, if the latter are followed as well.
Marks for the exam and the case study are given on a scale of 1 to 10, with a precision of one decimal.

Permitted Materials during


Tests

The final mark is the weighted average of the 2 marks, and will be rounded-off to half-integers. You pass the course if each of
the marks for the written exam and case study is at least 5.0, and the final mark is at least 6.0
Pen, paper, scientific calculator.

Page 15 of 92

CH3173a
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Structure/Property Relationships of Advanced Chemical Products


(SPRP)

Prof.dr. L.D.A. Siebbeles


Dr. T.J. Savenije
Dr.ir. M.A. van der Veen
0/8/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Basic knowledge of quantum mechanics and of physical chemistry.
You will be taught about ways in which material composition and structure can be adjusted for optimal use in various fields of
applications ranging from solar and fuel cells, nanoelectronics, catalysis, sensing, to bio-medical a materials. To reach this goal
you will learn how the structure of materials can be determined experimentally and understood theoretically. Material properties,
structure and dynamics will be connected to advanced products as final applications. Materials of interest include small
molecules and (in)organic nanostructured semiconductors.
The first part of the course involves the quantum mechanical description of molecules, nanostructured materials and solids, as
well as their interaction with light. Topics include molecular rotations, vibrations, electronic states and band structure of solids.
The relation of these properties to the performance of materials in photovoltaics, photocatalysis and nanoelectronics will be
demonstrated. It will also be taught how different types of optical spectroscopy and lasers can be used to characterize these
properties.
Then, the course covers the relation of the structure and interatomic or intermolecular forces. The course introduces the
background of different techniques that are used to determine the structure and functionality of materials, including magnetic
resonance, X-ray/neutron/ electron diffraction, dynamic light scattering and various kinds of microscopy (TEM, STM, AFM,...).

Study Goals

Education Method
Course Relations

Literature and Study


Materials
Assessment

1) To understand the quantum mechanical description of the structure of a material.


2) To be able to explain how different experimental techniques can be applied to determine the structure and properties of a
material.
3) To be able to describe various ways of tuning material properties for desired performance in different applications.
Lectures, classroom exercises, case study
CH3162 - Design and Synthesis of Advanced Chemical Products (DSP)
CH3372 - Soft Matter for Chemical Products (SMP)
Book: 'Physical Chemistry', Atkins & De Paula, 9th Edition.
A written exam (80% weight for final mark) and a case study (20% weight for final mark) that can be shared with the courses
DSP and SMP, if the latter are followed as well.
The final mark is the weighted average of the 2 marks, and will be rounded-off to half-integers. You pass the course if each of
the marks for the written exam and case study is at least 5.0, and the final mark is at least 6.0

Permitted Materials during


Tests

Page 16 of 92

CH3372a
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Soft Matter for Chemical Products (SMP)

Dr. E. Mendes
P.E. Boukany
0/4/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
Basic knowledge on physical-chemistry
Much of now-a-days advanced chemical products are composed of materials that are neither simple liquids nor well-ordered
solids. In reality, a large majority of chemical products relates to materials that are generally classified as soft materials or
complex fluids.
This course considers the relation between soft material composition and structure and how they can be used or modified to take
part in the development of a chemical product. The course provides core competence for students aiming at either a R&Dindustry career or an academic one. In this course you will learn the foundations underlying the behavior of soft matter, such as
polymers and polymeric materials, self-assembly structures, liquid-crystals, emulsions, and gels. Fundamental knowledge is then
related to advanced products in various fields of applications ranging from food, sensing, coatings, to bio-medical and health
care materials as well as materials for energy such as fuel cell membranes.

Study Goals

An introduction on the theories describing the structure and dynamics of soft materials will be given as well as how those
properties can be determined experimentally. The topics covered in the course provide an introduction on molecular forces,
energies, and timescales typical of soft condensed matter. Supra-molecular structures and material properties arising from those
interactions will then be considered. Those relations are in turn, illustrated with applications and you will be thought how the
control of various kinds of molecular interactions can lead to desired advanced material properties and structures.
Knowledge:
1)To be able to explain with your own words basic concepts of Soft Matter;
2)To be able to explain how different experimental techniques can be applied to determine the structure, dynamical response and
properties of a material;
Understanding:
3)To understand how various kinds of intermolecular interactions determine the structure and dynamics of soft materials at
various length scales;
Analysis (critical thinking):
4)To be able to interpret quantitatively (characterization) experimental data on soft materials;
5)To be able to calculate basic quantities related to structure and dynamics of soft materials;

Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment

Application:
6)To be able to explain how structure and dynamics of soft materials can be used for a given product or application;
7)To be able to describe various ways of tuning material properties for desired performance in different applications.
Lectures, classroom exercises, case study
CH3162 - Design and Synthesis of Advanced Chemical Products (DSP)
CH3172 - Structure/Property Relationships of Advanced Chemical products (SPRP)
Book:
Soft Condensed Matter
Oxford Master Series in Condensed Matter Physics, Vol. 6
Richard A. L. Jones
+ Course Handouts
One written exam weighting 80% of final mark, and a case study (20% weight).
Marks for the exam and the case study are given on a scale of 1 to 10, with a precision of one decimal.
The final mark is the weighted average of the 2 marks rounded-off to half-integers.
You pass the course if the final mark is at least 6.0, and the marks for the exam and the case study are at least 5.0

Page 17 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Nuclear Science and Engineering 2016

Page 18 of 92

CH3771
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Studyload/Week

Nuclear Chemistry

Dr.ir. A.G. Denkova


Prof.dr. H.T. Wolterbeek
Dr. E. Oehlke
0/8/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
This course is designed for students having either chemistry or physics backgroynd who are interested in learning more about
nuclear chemistry and applied radiochemistry. This course will investigate nuclear and radiochemistry including subjects related
to; nuclear physics, nuclear engineering, radioactivity in health science, and technical applications of radiation and radionuclides.
Students should complete this course with an in depth, practical knowledge of nuclear and radiochemistry and a certificate of
completion for the NCSV (National Center for Radiation Protection) Level 5b course.
This course is obilgatory for chemistry students doing the Nuclear Science and Engineering track.
The instruction presented in the beginning of the course is intended to provide students the necessary information to study for
and pass the NCSV Level 5b training course. The mid-term examination is composed of the Level 5b Practical Exam and the
Level 5b Written Exam. Successfully passing the mid-term examination (NCSV Level5b) is required in order to continue with
the course. Failure of the mid-term implies that students will have to repeat, and pass, the exam outside of normal class hours in
order to receive a grade for the course.
1.Identify the factors that affect nuclear stability
2. Explain the different kinds of radioactive decay
3. Interpret a radioactive decay series
4. Distinguish between different radionuclide production routes
5. Be able to calculate the specific activity of the produced radionuclides
6.Be able to use the principle of Nuclear analytical techniques
7. Describe which properties of radionuclides are important in radionuclide therapy and explain why
8. Design a nano-carrier for radionuclide therapy
9. Be able to apply radiotracer principles
10. Identify and explain the most relevant radiation-induced effects on living matter
11. Identify the best separation techniques for a specific radionuclide
Oral lectures and practical exercises.

NCSV level 5B practical and written examination, and a written final examination. NSCV level 5 B is not graded but students
need to pass to be able to complete the course of Nuclear Chemistry

This is a 6 ECTS course composed of 48 lecture hours, 110 self-study hours, a midterm examination (level 5b practical plus level
5b examination) of 8 hours, and a final examination of 3 hours.
This class will meet twice per week for four hours each day.

Page 19 of 92

CH3782
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Studyload/Week

Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Dr. D. Bykov
Prof.dr. R.J.M. Konings
0/4/0/0
2
2
2
3
English
General chemistry, basics of thermodynamics
This course is designed for both Chemical Engineering (obligatory for the Nuclear Science and Engineering track), Applied
Physics and Sustainable Energy Technology students that are interested in developing a working knowledge of the nuclear fuel
cycle. The course is about the role of chemistry in each component of the nuclear fuel cycle from the metallurgy of uranium to
the disposition of spent reactor fuel or high level waste. While the physics and engineering of controlled fission are central to the
generation of electricity by nuclear reactors, chemistry dominates all other aspects of nuclear fuel cycle. This course will not
only give students a comprehensive study of the traditional fuel cycle (the uranium once-through cycle), but it will also detail
many of the proposed nuclear fuel cycles that may very well carry nuclear power through the coming decades. As an outcome of
the course, the students will be able to compare and contrast existing and innovative fuel cycles, learning and discussing the pros
and cons of each.
1.Students can demonstrate how chemistry influences almost all aspects of the fuel cycle.
2.Students can define all stages of the traditional nuclear fuel cycle and describe the involved chemical processes.
3.Students can discuss the fundamental differences between the traditional and alternative fuel cycles.
4.Students can justify, at each step of the fuel cycle, the similarities and differences in behaviours between the different actinide
elements in view of their chemical and physical properties.
5.Students can explain the behaviour of fission products in the irradiated fuel, during the reprocessing and in geological
environment.
6.Students can perform numerical calculations based on the fundamental physical and chemical principles underpinning the
nuclear fuel cycle.
7.Students prepare an essay on a supplemental topic related to the course material, but not covered in class, in which they apply
the key concepts presented during the lectures and perform critical analysis of the information.
Oral lectures and class excursions
Main:
Course reader;
N. Tsoulfanidis. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, American Nuclear Society, 2013;
The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: from Ore to Wastes, P.D. Wilson (ed.), Oxford University Press, 1996.
Additional:
W. Loveland, D.J. Morrissey, G.T. Seaborg. Modern Nuclear Chemistry, Wiley-Interscience, 2006;
G.R. Choppin, J. Rydberg, J.-O. Liljenzin, C. Ekberg, Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry, Academic Press, 2013.
Nuclear Fuel Cycle Science and Engineering, I. Crossland (ed.), Woodhead Publishing, 2012.
Final examination and essay

This is a 3 ECTS course composed of 28 total lecture hours, 56 self-study hours, an essay and a final examination. This course
may also afford students the opportunity to travel to locations outside the TU Delft and / or The Netherlands to visit sites of
interest.

Page 20 of 92

CH3792
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Summary

Introduction to Nuclear Science and Engineering

Dr.ir. M. Rohde
Dr.ir. A.G. Denkova
0/8/0/0
2
2
Different, to be announced
English
This course is designed as an introduction for Chemical Engineering, Applied Physics and Sustainable Energy Technology
students to the broad range of topics that comprise nuclear science. These include; radioactive decay, radiation dosimetry,
neutron and positron beams, nuclear reactor physics and designs, nuclear waste disposal, radioactivity in health sciences, and
many more.
This Introductory course highlights the Nuclear Science and Engineering specialization; available as a separate certificate that
accompanies the University Diploma. For Chemical Engineering students who choose the Nuclear Science and Engineering
track, this course is compulsory.

Course Contents

The course centers on teaching the fundamental concepts that are necessary to move forward with a more in-depth exploration of
these topics. As such, this course draws on faculty and staff from all the sections within the Department of Radiation Science and
Technology (RST). Students should complete this course with a greater understanding and appreciation for the relevance of
nuclear science and technology in todays global society.
Subjects include (tentative!):

Study Goals

The history of radioactivity


Modes of decay / de-excitation
Interactions of radiation with matter
Radiation dosimetry
Applications of research reactors
Neutron beams
Neutron scattering techniques
Positron beams
Nuclear reactors
Nuclear waste disposal
Health application of nuclear science
Medical imaging
Radiotracers
Sub-goal (total % for sub-goal) : Weekly exercises(25%)/Exam(50%)/Presentation(25%)
Has insight into the nature of radiation and radioactivity and its interaction with matter (37%) : 12%/25%/0%
Understands, in a broad sense, how nuclear science is/will be applied in fields of energy, health, medicine industry and others
(38%) : 13%/25%/0%
Is able to read, understand and present a scientific paper on a nuclear science subject (20%) : 0%/0%/20%

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Studyload/Week

Is able to collaborate with another student, while preparing the presentation (5%) : 0%/0%/5%
Oral lectures, guided tours and a presentation on a subject related to nuclear science.
J. Kenneth Shultis, Richard E. Faw: Fundamentals of Nuclear Science and Engineering Second Edition
Lecture slides
Short weekly tests, written exam + presentation of a scientific paper

Page 21 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Obligatory Design Modules 2016

Page 22 of 92

CH3804
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for

Expected prior knowledge


Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Product & Process Design

Prof.dr.ir. A.B. de Haan


Dr. H.W. Nugteren
Dr.ir. G.M.H. Meesters
0/0/8/X (week 4.1 fulltime!)
3
4
3
Different, to be announced
English
This course is an obligatory preparatory course for the CDP project (CH3843) and therefore full participation - proven by
presence, making assignments and tests and sitting for the exam - is required in order to be admitted to the CDP project (see also
CH3843).
- Product Design & Material Supply Chains
- Relation between Product Performance and Composition
- Process Design Methodology
- Process Integration
- Process Flow Sheet Modelling
- Energy and Mass Integration
- Process and Product Evaluation and Optimisation
- Health, Safety and Environmental aspects of design
The student should be able to:
- understand the generic design cycle
- decompose a process design in hierarchical levels
- apply process synthesis, analysis and evaluation methods
- identify opportunities for new products
- select performance specifications
- identify relevant aspect of safety, health, environment and sustainability
- perform an economical evaluation of products and processes
Lectures and team assignments
Aspen
Seider, W.D., Seader, J.D., Lewin, D.R. and Widagdo, S., Product and Process Design Principles. Synthesis, Analysis, and
Evaluation., Ed. 3, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2010
3 Parts: Individual Product test (25%), Individual Aspen Test (25%) and Group Assignments (50%)
A peer review is conducted as part of the final assessment and used to establish individual marks (max 1 point variation on
group assignment mark)
Pass requirements:
Individual Product Test >=5.0
Individual Aspen Test >=5.0
Group Assignments >=5.0
Final PPD grade >=5.5

Permitted Materials during


Tests
Enrolment / Application
Studyload/Week

Conditions retakes:
No retakes for group assignments
Last mark counts
Individual Aspen Test <5.0 not passed, retake compulsory, >=5.0 retake after approval by lecturers
Calculator
students not enrolled in the MSc Chemical Engineering must contact the responsible instructor or Arno Haket before January 20
Required to be present during lecture days for reason of group assignments.
Presence lecture "Market Assessment" mandatory

Page 23 of 92

CH3843
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Prerequisites

Assessment

Design Project

12

Prof.dr.ir. A.B. de Haan


Dr. H.W. Nugteren
Full time during about 9 weeks.
4
4
4
English
MSc Chemical Engineering
The design project includes the generation of a conceptual design for an integrated manufacturing process and/or a chemical
product/device.
The assignments are of high practical relevance as they are mostly delivered and supervised by industry.
To offer students a realistic experience in making a conceptual product/process design and achieving a high degree of integration
of chemical engineering know-how.
Teamwork and communication skills are being trained since design projects are carried out by groups of students.
Project Team Work (5-6 students, mixed education background and nationalities) with intermediate reporting and presentations.
Seider, W.D., Seader, J.D., Lewin, D.R. and Widagdo, S., Product and Process Design Principles. Synthesis, Analysis, and
Evaluation., Ed. 3, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 201
Tassoul M., "Creative Facilitation", 3rd Edition (2009) VSSD
Course materials Product and Process Design (CH3804)
CDP Manual and other documents/references as provided on blackboard
A proof of full participation in the preparatory PPD course (CH3804) is required and at least 12 ec of other chemical engineering
master courses/electives must have been completed to be admitted to the Design Project (see also PPD). Presence, making
assignments and sitting for the exam are considered as proof for participation in the PPD course.
Students doing homologation (bridging) courses as part of their master's programme must have completed all (except at most
one) of these courses.
Based on concept design report, final design report, presentations (kick-off, concept, final) and project defence during final
presenation and for supervisors.
Divided over:
Theory and concepts (40%) = quality of design
Implementation (30%) = group performance, use of creativity tools, innovativeness, concrete result
Communication (30%) = progress meetings, reports, presentations
A peer review is conducted as part of the final assessment and used to establish individual marks (max 1 point variation)

Studyload/Week

All final reports will be screened for plagiarism.


10 weeks fulltime

Page 24 of 92

WM0320TU
Module Manager
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Ethics and Engineering

Dr. F. Santoni De Sio


Dr. F. Santoni De Sio
4/0/4/0
1
3
1
3
1
3
English
This code of this course used to be WM0320TN.
This course is identical to the initial part of the course WM0329TU.
You will explore the ethical and social aspects and problems related to technology and to your future work as professional or
manager in the design, development, management or control of technology. You will be introduced to and make exercises with a
range of relevant aspects and concepts, including professional codes, philosophical ethics, individual and collective
responsibilities, ethical aspects of technological risks, responsibility within organisations, responsible conduct of companies and
the role of law. You will analyse legal, political and organisational backgrounds to existing and emerging ethical and social
problems of technology, and you will explore possibilities for resolving, diminishing or preventing these problems.
After having completed the course you:
can better recognise and analyse ethical and social aspects and problems inherent in technology and in the work of professionals
and managers active in the design, development, management and control of technology.
have insight into how these ethical and social aspects and problems are related to legal, political and organisational
backgrounds.
are able to explore and assess possibilities for solving or diminishing existing and emerging ethical and social problems that
attach to technology and the work of professionals and managers.
are better prepared to perform your future work as a professional or manager in the design, development, production and control
of technology in an ethical and socially responsible way.
A series of 7 lectures and interactive work sessions (including role playing sessions) concluded with a written test. The last
lecture will be devoted to a Q&A session with the course manager in preparation of the exam.
Reader *and* exercise book Ethics and Engineering, available at Nextprint and as PDF files on Blackboard; Powerpoint slides
and lecture notes.
Written exam (80%), presentation and active participation during the working group sessions (20%).
Please note that this evaluation system applies to students who attend the course and working groups in the current year or have
attended the course in Q3 of the academic year 2015-2016.
If you have attended the course and the working groups in 2015-2016 Q1 or before, and you still want to sit the exam, you may
do so without attending the working group sessions again: in this case the evaluation system of the quarter in which you have
attended the working groups will apply (depending on your year of participation the exam will count for 100% of the grade, or
you may have a bonus up to 1 point added to the exam grade for your participation in the working groups).
If you are from a previous quarter/year and you prefer to have the current system of evaluation to apply (20% of the grade based
on the working group participation), then you have to attend the working groups again.

Enrolment / Application
Remarks
Category

In any case, if you attended the course in a previous year and you want to sit the exam or attend the course (again) this year,
please ask the course manager to be added to Blackboard as a guest, in order to be able to access all the updated materials and
the information about the course and the exam.
Enrolment via Blackboard is required for this course. This is needed in order to plan the workgroups. Please enroll not later than
ten days before the start of the course via Blackboard.
The course is run twice each year in the first and third quarter. The course is identical to the initial part of the course wm0329tu
(6 ects).
MSc niveau

Page 25 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Thesis Project 2016

Page 26 of 92

CH3901
Responsible Instructor
Project Coordinator
Project Coordinator
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

Remarks

MSc Thesis Work

40

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


L. van der Elst
P.A. Elshof
During a periode of 7 month, you will work fulltime in one of the research groups in het field of Chemical Engineering.
1
2
3
4
Summer Holidays
1
Exam by appointment
English
a. Literature study, problem formulation and planning.
b. Practical and theoretical work in one of the research groups
c. Oral and written presentation of the work.
The student:
- can read and understand theory and scientific literature of a specific topic
- is able to work independently on an academic level; planning is a keyword!
- is able to work in an interdisciplinary and multicultural team of experts and supporting technologists/analysts
- has to be able to present his/her results in English by means of a presentation to a professional audience and by means of a
written scientific report
Works independently on a specific Chemical Engineering research topic in one of the groups of the Department of Chemical
Engineering.
The final assessment consists of one mark, based on:
- theoretical knowledge and understanding
- method and scientific approach
- Competence in doing research work
- Report
- Presentation and defense
- General competences
The final presentation is followed by a defence/discussion about your report. The committee consists of at least of 3 academic
TU Delft staff members; one of another section or department.
Certain steps need to be taken when carrying out a Thesis Project.
Please, consult blackboard (Thesis Project Administration) for detailed information and additional forms. Enroll to this
blackboard by Organizations >> Education >> Applied Sciences >> Eindprojecten Administratie TNW.
The procedure of a Thesis Project consists of the following steps:
1.Orientation
2.Careful consideration of different research sections
3.Handing in the application form and a list of the achieved courses
4.Providing the Thesis Project Administration with the names of the review committee
5.Presentation
6.Assessment and calculation of the examination mark
!! Pay attention !! The final mark will only be registered after the Thesis Project Administration has received a digital copy of the
thesis report. A digital survey will be sent to the student shortly hereafter.
For questions & handing in the digital version of the report, contact eindprojecten-tnw@tudelft.nl

Page 27 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Scientific and Social Orientation 2016


Introduction 1

Combining the core programme with 30 credits Scientific and Social Orientation (elective part) completes the master
programme. The Scientific and Social Orientation allows for a broadening of knowledge or for additional depth. The student
may opt for:
1. Research and Development
This orientation is especially tailored for students who will work in industry after completing their master education. It consists
of:
. Industrial Internship (CH3702, 18 credits),
. Electives (12 credits). Suggested electives are the obligatory track modules from a second track, or modules from the lists
below.
It's possible to fulfil the requirements of the annotation 'entrepreneurship' (www.dce.tudelft.nl) or the annotation 'technology in
sustainable development' (www.tudelft.nl/tisd) within this orientation.
2. Study Abroad
This orientation is especially tailored for students who will do a PhD after completing their master education. It consists of a
semester, project and/or courses, at a foreign university. The programme has to be approved in advance by the board of
examiners.
3. Management of Technology
This orientation consists of the second semester of the MSc MoT programme.
4. Education (only Dutch students)
The educational programme is aimed at Dutch-speaking students only, because it is oriented towards the Dutch school system
and because it includes internships at Dutch secondary schools. Consequently the educational specialisation modules are taught
in Dutch. You should contact the education programme coordinator, M.A.F.M. Jacobs, before starting this orientation.

Special Programmes:
A. Students who opt for a double degree (second master) and have obtained prior permission are allowed to spend the Scientific
and Social Orientation on modules from the second master programme.
Double degree programmes combining chemical engineering with other master programmes, such as Management of
Technology, are always subject to the restrictions imposed by the university. The main restrictions are that the double degree
programme comprises at least 180 EC and that there are two identifiable final project reports for both degrees. Formal
permission from the board of the university is required.
FORMAL PERMISSION TO START A DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMME IS REQUIRED IN ADVANCE !!

Page 28 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Research and Development 2016


ECTS Program
Introduction 1

30
Research and Development
This programme is especially tailored for students who will work in industry after completing their master education. It consists
of:
. Industrial Internship (CH3702, 18 credits),
. Electives (12 credits). Suggested electives are the obligatory track modules from a second track, or modules from the lists of
recommended electives below. At least 6 credits must be chosen from these categories. A maximum of 6 credits can be chosen
from other TU Delft master programmes.

Page 29 of 92

CH3702
Responsible Instructor
Course Coordinator
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Industrial Internship

18

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


S. Karssen-Minekus
Full-time
1
2
3
4
Summer Holidays
1
none
English
You will be working in a Chemical Engineering related organization full-time for a period of 3 months. Your Master Chemical
Engineering knowledge is necessary for the project.
The industrial internship is guided by an internal (TU Delft) and an external (company) supervisor. The mark for the internship is
awarded by these two supervisors. The mark is based on a series of criteria, including an individual report of the student, in
which the experiences concerning the main goals, including the experience in the working environment are discussed.
During the industrial internship you are expected to get to know the organization. To do so, you need to start gathering
information about the organization of your choice prior to the start and make a list of questions you would like to have answered.
During the internship you need to make time to get acquainted with other departments within the organization and interview, for
example, a number of people in different parts of the organization.
IMPORTANT:
It is desirable for the internship to have a Chemical Engineering content. However, in some cases it may be acceptable if this
component is lacking, provided that the work requires problem solving or design skills for a chemical engineer.
The criteria formulated above do not exclude activities in a startup company (maybe initiated by the student) to be accepted as
internships. The criterion is that there should be an internship supervisor with sufficiently strong involvement to be able to act as
such.
The internship is in principle intended as a way for students to broaden their awareness of working environments outside
academia. This excludes certain organisations.
For very good students who aspire a carreer in academia, a possibility for an academic internship is through a grant from the
Justus and Louise van Effen fund, which is restricted to very good students and which provides funding for internships at top-20
engineering universities only. For more information, see http://studenten.tudelft.nl/en/students/study-and-career/studying-ordoing-an-internship-abroad/step-2-making-preparations/scholarships/beursbeschrijvingen/justus-louise-van-effen-researchgrant/.
The student is responsible for finding an internship position. The Internship Office TNW only has an assisting, coordinating and
administrative role.
We therefore advice students to start looking for an internship well in advance:
International students are advised to start the orientation process during the first year of their Master.
Dutch students are advised to start the orientation process at least 6 months in advance if planning to stay in the Netherlands,
and at least 9 months if planning to go abroad.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment

Allowed: Business, chemical engineering content; TNO (or foreign equivalents such as Fraunhofer Gesellschaft); ECN; NFI;
patent office; consultancy (provided technical / quantitative); financial analysis (provided strong quantitative, or related to
financing a chemical plant or business).
If the Board of Examiners has given permission to do the thesis project outside the university, the internship can't be done at the
same organization as the thesis project.
The goal of the internship is:
To become familiar with a professional working environment for a chemical engineer.
To use academic knowledge and skills, acquired in the degree course, to solve problems or be active in design related to
Chemical Engineering, in a professional working environment.
Skills should be acquired on the following topics:
1. Performance: Productivity, Independence, Practical skills, Theoretical knowledge, Creative thinking, Time management;
2. Communication: Reporting, Presentation, Interpersonal;
3. Competences: Motivation & enthusiasm, Critical attitude, Taking initiative.
Practical training on the job, the company supervisor is responsible for day-to-day supervision.
During the internship period the student will also report to the TU Delft instructor 2-3 times about progress made on the project.
The Blackboard page http://blackboard.tudelft.nl > organizations > education > applied sciences > Stagebureau TNW/Internship
Office Applied Sciences (enrol!) provides more information about the industrial internship. On this page you can find the step-by
-step guide explaining all procedures, forms, internship offers, experiences from other students and additional information e.g.
about grants and funding.
You can contact the Internship Office through: InternshipOffice-TNW@tudelft.nl
The mark for the internship is awarded by the two supervisors. The mark is based on a series of criteria, including an individual
report of the student, in which the experiences concerning the main goals, including the experience in the working environment
are discussed.
For the assessment you need to submit two reports:
A scientific report using the format and guidelines of the company for your TU Delft supervisor and company supervisor;
An evaluation report for the internship office.
Two weeks before the end of your internship, the Internship Office TNW will send your company supervisor and TU Delft
supervisor the internship review form.
Your company supervisor needs to assess your internship at the end of your internship period and send his review form to the TU
Delft supervisor. Your TU Delft suprevisor needs to assess your internship within two weeks after the end of your internship and
give a mark. The TU Delft supervisor will then send the assessment form (including the company supervisor review form) to the
Internship Office TNW.
In principle, the mark awarded by the company supervisor counts for 2/3 towards the final mark; that of the TU Delft supervisor
for 1/3. The TU Delft supervisor can overrule this if he/she has good reasons for it, which should be communicated to the student
and the internship office.
The Internship Grading Scheme will be used as a guideline to determine the mark. Please consult the Internship Office TNW
Page 30 of 92

Blackboard for the detailed grading scheme.


Your mark will be processed as soon as the Internship Office TNW has received:
The review form with an original signature from both supervisors. Your supervisors can request the review form by sending an
email to InternshipOffice-TNW@tudelft.nl
A digital copy of both reports.

Enrolment / Application

When the nature of the project requires so, it is possible to censor parts of the report. Details like numbers and names may be left
out of the report (or striked through), for example, as long as the report represents the achievements of the project and the TU
Delft supervisor is able to assess the internship.
Prior to the start, the internship needs to be approved by the TU Delft instructor*.
When the TU Delft instructor has approved the internship, fill out the Internship application form (you can download from the
Internship Office TNW Blackboard) and make sure both the TU Delft instructor and company supervisor have read and signed
the form. The form should be submitted prior to the start of your internship.
*A TU Delft supervisor is a member of faculty (tenured or appointed on a tenure track position within the faculty of Applied
Sciences) involved in the Chemical Engineering programme, and thus appointed as an examiner in the programme.

Page 31 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Electives for Process Engineering 2016

Page 32 of 92

AP3171 D
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Computer Use

Literature and Study


Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests

Advanced Physical Transport Phenomena

Dr.ing. S. Kenjeres
0/0/6/0
3
3
3
4
English
Fundamental Physical Transport Phenomena
Analytical/Numerical/Modelling Aspects of Advanced Physical Transport Phenomena (Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and
Turbulence):
1.Basic Equations of Transport Phenomena - Field Description;
2.Mathematical Methods for Solving Transport Equations (PDE, separation of variables, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, Bessel
functions, Laplace transformation, Error-Gamma functions, integral methods)
3.Transport in Stagnant Media
(diffusion, moving front problems, diffusion with source terms)
4.Momentum Transport (potential flows, creeping flows, boundary layers)
5.Transport in Flowing Media (stationary transport in flows with uniform velocity, heat transfer in laminar pipe flow, natural
convection)
6.Numerical Heat and Fluid Flow (discretization methods for heat conduction, convection and diffusion; differencing schemes,
numerical diffusion; steady and time-dependent convection and diffusion; calculation of flow field/velocity-pressure coupling,
SIMPLE algorithm)
7.Turbulence: Some Features and Rationale for Modelling (some generic types of turbulent flows and convective processes, wall
-bounded turbulent flows: velocity and temperature distributions/wall functions, Reynolds decomposition, RANS)
8.Turbulence Modelling (closure problem, eddy viscosity/diffusivity models, k-e model, other two-equation eddy-viscosity
models)

1. to be able to identify and to mathematically define particular physical mechanisms of the complex transport phenomena
2. to be able to specify and to analytically solve characteristic PDEs describing simplified transport phenomena
3. to be able to discretise the system of governing transport equations by using a finite volume method by performing term-byterm analysis (time-dependent, diffusive, convective, source/sink terms) for one-, two- and three-dimensional generic cases
4. to be able to understand basic mechnisms of turbulence and to derive the transport equations for fluctuating field variables
(Reynolds-decomposition)
5. to learn characteristic classes of the turbulence-models (zero-, one-, two-equations, full-stress models)
6. to be able to computationaly perform some basic generic cases of flow, heat and mass transfer (CFD) (channel flow, back-step
flow, differentilly heated enclosure, in both laminar- and turbulent-regimes)
Combination of Lectures (4 Lectures per week) (covering theoretical aspects) and practical exercises (both analytical and
computational/computer exercises, 3 Hours per week)
Computational exercises covering step-by-step solving some of basic generic cases of flow, heat and mass transfer on Linux
computers (mesh-definition, specification of the boundary and initial conditions, solving, postprocessing, analysis and critical
assessment of results)
1. Book: "Analysis and Modelling of Physical Transport Phenomena", Hanjalic K.,Kenjeres S.,Tummers M.J.,Jonker H.J.J.,
VSSD Book, ISBN-13 978-90-6526-165-8, Second Edition, December 2009.
2. Book: "Transport Phenomena", Bird R.B.,Stewart W.E.,Lighfoot E.N.,2nd edition,Wiley (2002)
3. Book: "Fysische Transportverschijnselen II", Hoogendoorn C.J. and van der Meer, Th.H., Delftse Uitgevers Maatschappij
(1991)
3. Handouts: For computational/computer exercises a reference manual and quick start manuals will be provided.
Writen Exam (2 times per year)

Page 33 of 92

CH3011
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method

Course Relations

Literature and Study


Materials
Assessment
Remarks

Interfacial Engineering

Dr.ing. G.J.M. Koper


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
Exam by appointment
English
Basic knowledge in physical chemistry
Contemporary products and processes involve micro and nanostructured materials. As a consequence they possess an incredible
amount of internal interface: of the order of a soccer field per liter! This course addresses the recently developed techniques to
study the behavior of such internal interfaces with the ultimate goal of harnessing them into new product and process
technologies. Topics include but are not limited to aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS), wet nanoparticle synthesis, green
waterborne coatings and graphene exfoliation.
At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to critically assess the current literature dealing with nanostructured
systems from fundamental knowledge to practical systems.
The course consists of 5 different topics based on recent scientific articles. For each topic, a basic introduction into the topical
field will be provided in the first lecture (1 class hour). Students are then required to work out a number of exercises that detail
the material presented in the article (1 class hour plus self-study). The answers are discussed during the final lecture and an
outlook is presented (2 class hours). Groups of students are to choose one topic to draft a basis-of-design (BOD) for a process or
product (2 class hours and self-study). These BODs are discussed at the end of the course (2 class hours).
For some of the topics, experts are invited to give a presentation at the ChemE colloquium (Monday lunch time). These colloquia
are open to all students and afterwards the expert is available for discussion.
CH3372 - Soft Matter for Chemical Products (SMP)
CH3162 - Design and Synthesis of Advanced Chemical Products (DSP)
CH3172 - Structure/Property Relationships of Advanced Chemical products (SPRP)
Introductory material:
An Introduction to Interfacial Engineering, G.J.M. Koper, VSSD 2009.
Fundamentals of Interfacial Engineering, R.J. Stokes and D.F. Evans, Wiley-VCH 1997
Written or oral exam, depending on the number of candidates, based on a relevant, recent scientific article. A complete set of
worked-out exercises has to be handed in prior to the exam.
See http://blog.gerkoper.nl/profi/another-teaching-method-advanced-interfacial-engineering/

Page 34 of 92

CH3061
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Multiphase Reactor Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
English
The student is expected to:
1. have followed a course on mass and energy balances (such as Molecular Transport Phenomena)
2. have followed a basic course in reactor engineering (such as Reactors and Kinetics)
3. is able to work with Matlab (e.g., have followed Applied Numerical Mathematics)
Multiphase reactor types: Fixed beds, trickle beds, fluidized beds, bubble columns, slurry reactors, microreactors, structured
(monolith) reactors.
Engineering aspects: Flow regimes, mass transfer, conversion models. Hatta number, reaction enhancement. Residence time
distribution. Catalytic reactors structured in time and space. Unifying concepts.
Design aspects: reactor selection, decoupling of kinetics and transport phenomena, combination of reaction and separation,
reaction coupling, separating catalytic steps, controlled energy input.
1. The student is able to describe for each of the archetypes of multiphase reactors, the various embodiments with practical
relevance.
2. The student is able to use the scientific literature to find relevant information for the various reactor types.
3. The student is able to analyse a multiphase reactor and to describe the physical and chemical process steps in words.
4. The student is able to explain the basic measurement techniques used in studying multiphase reactors.
5. The student is able to write down the mass, energy, and momentum balances for the overall system and the steps identified
under objective 3.
6. The student is able to implement customary models in the balances mentioned under 5, such that a system of equations
describing the reactor is obtained.
7. The student is able to simplify the system of equations based on a quantitative analysis and identification the rate-determining
steps.
8. The student is able to use current software packages to solve the systems of equations numerically for the basic types of
reactors.
9. The student is able to use the developed models to analyse defined cases.
10. The student is able to make a quantitative design of a multiphase reactor for a given application.
Each lecture will give a short overview of a specific multiphase reactor type (only 45 minutes). The slides available on
Blackboard (4 on 1 PDF). You will get references to papers and/or chapters from textbooks that give more information about the
reactor type. These will be made available via Blackboard.
After the lecture, an assignment (about 8 hours work) will be available via Blackboard for the specific reactor type treated. These
assignments are made in teams of three students.
You are free to choose which software package you want to use for making the assignments.You can use, e.g., Matlab, which is
available in the DCT PC rooms.
After two weeks, each team hands in a detailed solution of the problem on paper the day before the discussion before the
announced deadline. Moreover, each team prepares a summary of the solution for presentation in PowerPoint. Please bring this
presentation on a memory stick. Each week, a few teams present their solution; the instructors choose the student that is
presenting. The other teams challenge this solution.

Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

At the end, each team will make a larger final project.


You are free to choose which software package you want to use for making the assignments. You can use, e.g., Matlab.
All material is provided via Blackboard.
The final grade consists of three parts:
* the solution to the minor assignments;
* the attendance, presentation and participation;
* the final assignment.
No written or oral examination will be given for this course.

Page 35 of 92

CH3073
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Summary

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Books
Assessment

Separation Processes, Design and Operation (SPDO)

Dr.ir. H.J.M. Kramer


Dr. H.B. Eral
0/0/4/0 (together with the mass transfer lectures of course ME45165)
3
3
3
4
English
Separation processes are very important in all sectors of modern process industry. A reaction section in a chemical plant is
typically surrounded by 3-6 separation units, which perform a variety of functions (e.g. feed concentration, product purification,
solvent-recycling, off-gas treatment and water-recovery). Separation processes consume approximately 40% of the energy
consumption and 75% of the investment cost in the process industry. Consequently, you are likely to come across the design
and/or operation of separation units in your future career.
Basic principles and methods for the process and equipment design of the main thermal separation processes in the chemical
industry are discussed.
Underlying theory on thermodynamics of mixtures and mass transfer by convection and diffusion across interfaces is shortly
repeated
Characteristics and design methods for vapour liquid, liquid-liquid, solid liquid separation processes or in processes in which
mass separation agents and
physical barriers are applied are given. Equipment characteristics and design for the mentioned separation processes is shortly
discussed.
Thermodynamics of separation processes, convective mass transfer, mass transfer by diffusion, film theory.
Single equilibrium stages and cascades.
Examples of separation processes.
Basic principles and design methods for equipment used in equilibrium stage separation processes, such as distillation,
absorption, stripping (desorption), extraction, crystallization and mechanical separation processes, such as sedimentation,
filtration and membrane separations.
The student is able to make a design thermal separation processes, including the dimensioning of the equipment. More
specifically, the student:
1.Can describe the characteristics and principles of thermal separation processes,
2.Can describe and formulate thermodynamics equations and models for the selection and design of thermal separation
processes,
3.Can quantify the mass transfer rate over an interface by diffusion end convection,
4.Knows the role of mass transfer in the dimensioning of equipment for separation processes
5.Can determine the separation efficiency for single and multi-stage separations and can quantify the influence of the process
conditions and the contacting modes on the separation.
6.Can describe principles and design methods for processes and equipment used in equilibrium stage separation processes, such
as distillation, absorption, stripping (desorption), extraction, crystallization and membrane separations
7.Can use computer based process simulation tools to analyse and design separation equipment
8.Can design and analyse thermal separation process including dimensioning of the equipment.
Lectures, assignments
Separation Process Principles, J.D.Seader & E.J.Henley, John Wiley & Sons, 2nd Ed., 2006 or 3rd Ed., 2011
The developed knowledge and acquired skills are tested by means of homework assignments, which can be worked out in groups
of two students. Upon passing all assignments, an written examination on the obtained separation technology knowledge
finalizes the course.

Page 36 of 92

CH3082
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Computer Use
Literature and Study
Materials
Books
Assessment
Remarks

Chemical Technology
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English

The essentials of process technology are the integration of various disciplines. The student should be able to use the gained
knowledge in the analysis of existing processes and in the design of new conceptual conversion systems. At the end of the course
the student should have:
- Insight in the structure of chemical processes;
- Insight in processes for raw materials conversion;
- Knowledge for the major chemical conversion processes;
- Be aware of the most important concepts on the different conversion routes;
- Insight in petro-, petrochemical and chemical industry.
Fundamental understanding of the chemical and technological concepts of the major chemical processes in the oil refinery,
(petro)chemical industry, fine chemistry, food industry, and lab on a chip
Lecturing
No
Chemical Process Technology second edition by J.A. Moulijn, M. Makkee, and A.E van Diepen, Publisher John Wiley @ Sons
Ltd. ISBN 978 1 444 32025 1
Chemical Process Technology second edition by J.A. Moulijn, M. Makkee, and A.E van Diepen, Publisher John Wiley @ Sons
Ltd. ISBN 978 1 444 32025 1
Written exam
This course is scheduled only once every two years, in the even years, alternating with CH3861 "Hydro-Carbon Processing".
This course will be scheduled spring 2017, 2019...

CH3101
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Prerequisites
Assessment

Dr.ir. M. Makkee

Heterogeneous Catalysis for Chemical Engineers

Prof.dr. J. Gascon Sabate


Prof.dr. F. Kapteijn
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
History of Catalysis; Catalyst Preparation; Catalyst Performance Testing; Mechanism of Catalysis; Reaction Kinetics; Texture
and Morphology; Active Site Determination; Characterization (Infrared Spectroscopy, Temperature Programmed Techniques, XRay Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy).
Bring to life the black box that the catalyst often is to Chemical Engineers.This means gaining knowledge of:a.How catalysts are
prepared.How catalysts are tested for performance and kinetics. Which techniques can be used to characterize catalysts.
Lectures
Catalysis and Catalysts by J.A. Moulijn, F. Kapteijn, and G. Mul, Handouts Lectures
Bachelor Molecular Science and Technology; major Technology.
Written examination (80%) + assignment (20%)

Page 37 of 92

CH3181
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Literature and Study


Materials
Prerequisites
Assessment

Scale Up / Scale Down

0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
All (obligatory) courses on (bio)chemical engineering should have been finished.
General aspects of scale up: why and how. Scaling factors. Similarity. Characteristic dimensionless groups, dimensional
analysis. Scaling of balance equations. Regime analysis of processes. Scale up criteria. Physical, Chemical and Biotechnological
examples. Case study on an industrial process.
1. Knowledge on concepts that are relevant to the scaling of a process
Scaling factors
Dimensionless groups
Similarity (geometrical, mechanical, thermal, chemical)
Dimensional analysis
Pilot plants
2. Know how to analyse a complex process as a preparation to scaling that process.
A systematic inventory of subprocesses taking place in the process
Choosing the relevant scales of the process such as length and concentration scale.
Scaling the relevant balance equations using these process scales.
Relativizing study of the terms in the scaled (or dimensionless) balance equations corresponding with the subprocesses.
An estimative quantification of the maximum rates of these subprocesses (as a function of scale)
Regime analysis: determination which subprocess(es) are ruling the process at the full scale by comparing the corresponding
rates using characteristic times (such as time constants, residence time, mixing time) and characteristic rates.
3. Know about methods to determine scaling criteria (theoretical or empirical)
The Scale up scale down approach, using regime analysis to determine the limiting subprocess at full scale, to study this
subprocess with the aim to reduce or remove this limitation, and to implement it on the full scale.
Scaling factor analysis to determine which partial similarity in scaling the process is optimal.
6 lectures;
assignments and exercises;
1 case study;
final written test.
Blackboard, lecture notes, handouts; own notes
This course is primarily intended for (bio)chemical engineering students or postgraduate students with a (bio)chemical
engineering background.
The group case study (50%);
The final written test (50%).

CH3301
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Special Information

Ir. C. Picioreanu
Prof.dr. J. Gascon Sabate
Prof.dr.ir. H.J. Noorman

Foreign Excursion Tour TG

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Summer Holidays
5
none
English
BSc Chemical Engineering or equivalent
The student association TG organises a foreign excursion tour. During this tour several universities and companies are visited.
After this tour the students is able:
- to understand the involved processes of processing raw materials in to products on an industrial scale
- to give a description of the processes involved, including safety, health and environmental aspects
- to write a scientific report about the objective of the study trip i.e. subject from industry.
- to write an essay about the visit of the different institutions and/or (chemical) companies
Visit to foreign institution and companies
Assessment by written report of which the content covers the study goals.
Trip organised by TG.

Page 38 of 92

CH3421
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment
Remarks
Elective
Tags

Location

Computational Transport Phenomena

0/0/8/0
3
3
none
English
Transport Phenomena
An introductory course on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Transport Phenomena: elementary fluid mechanics;
computational aspects; turbulence & turbulence modelling; RANS vs Large-Eddy Simulations; operations and transport
processes in process equipment; chemical reactions; two-phase flows
building an understanding of CFD, its promises and its limitations; acquire experience in numerical and computational exercises;
understanding turbulence; becoming capable of interpreting and assessing CFD results
lectures and tutorials
active participation plus weekly assignments plus a larger final assignment including a report
This course will only be given if at least 10 students will participate.
Yes
Fluid Mechanics
Modelling
Numeric Methods
ChemE gebouw

CH3562
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Prof.dr.ir. H.E.A. van den Akker


C. Haringa

Nanoparticle Technology

Prof.dr. A. Schmidt-Ott
Prof.dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen
0/0/4/0
3
3
Different, to be announced
English
Nanoparticle Technology focuses on particles smaller than 100 nm in size. These particles have basically different properties
from large particles, and represent the building blocks of nanotechnology. Their applications include Food, Catalysis, Cosmetics,
Medical diagnostics & therapy, Energy conversion and storage, Chemical sensors, Supercapacitors, Composite materials and
Coatings.
Topics:
Motivation of applying nanoparticles: Different behavior of small particles and large particles; examples for application of small
particles (without explaining underlying principles).
Basic properties of small particles: Geometric (e.g. surface/volume) effects, Magnetic effects, Quantummechanical effects.
General applications of nanoparticles: Food, Catalysis, Cosmetics, Medical diagnostics & therapy, Chemical sensors,
Supercapacitors, Composites, Coatings.
Focus on energy-related applications of nanoparticles: Solar cells, Hydrogen production, Hydrogen storage, Fuel cells, Li-ion
Batteries, LED-lighting
Nanoparticle production: Milling, Gas phase methods, Liquid phase methods.
Nanoparticle functionalization.
Nanoparticle assembly principles.
Safety and health issues.
Exercises: Qualitative and quantitative questions/problems to solve after lecture blocks.

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

1. The student is able to describe the synthesis, characterization and application of nanoparticles.
2. The student is able to use the scientific literature to find relevant information on nanoparticles.
3. The student is able to develop and apply model descriptions for nanoparticle synthesis, characterization and applications.
4. The student is able to use the developed models to analyse defined cases.
Lectures, assignments.
Assignment

Page 39 of 92

CH3622
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Process Intensification (PI)

Prof.dr.ir. A.I. Stankiewicz


Dr. G. Stefanidis
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
1. Introduction to Process Intensification(PI):
- sustainability-related issues in process industry;
- definitions of Process Intensification;
- fundamental principles and approaches of PI.
2. How to design a sustainable, inherently safer processing plant
- presentation of PI case study assignments.

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Continuing Courses

3. PI Approaches:
- STRUCTURE - PI approach in spatial domain (incl. "FOCUS ON" guest lecture)
- ENERGY - PI approach in thermodynamic domain (incl. "FOCUS ON" guest lecture)
- SYNERGY - PI approach in functional domain (incl. "FOCUS ON" guest lecture)
- TIME - PI approach in temporal domain (incl. "FOCUS ON" guest lecture)
Basic knowledge in Process Intensification
Lectures
1. Lecture notes via Blackboard.
2. Book "Re-Enegineering the Chemical Processing Plant: Process Intensification" by A. Stankiewicz and J. A. Moulijn (Marcel
Dekker, 2004), also available for on-line reading via the Library of TU Delft.
3. Recommended papers via Blackboard
4. "Process Intensification Information Sheets" via Blackboard
Written exam

CH3622-P Process Intensification Project

CH3622-P
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Summary
Course Contents
Study Goals
Education Method
Prerequisites
Assessment

Process Intensification (PI) Project

Prof.dr.ir. A.I. Stankiewicz


Dr. G. Stefanidis
Different
4
4
Different, to be announced
English
This is an optional part of the CH3622 Process Intensification course.
Team work on Process Intensification case studies.
Conceptual process design experience in Process Intensification.
Team work on case studies - intermediate reporting, consultancy.
The Process Intensification (CH3622) course is required for this project. Credits for this group project are not valid without
passing the CH3622 exam.
Presentation and discussion of case-study assignment results by project groups.

Page 40 of 92

CH3982
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Assistent
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

Remarks

Liturature Study

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Dr. P.J. Hamersma
Ir. A.J.W. Haket
selfstudy - Start possible in each period
1
2
3
4
1
Exam by appointment
English
Generally, a literature review is the start of the research preparation on a certain scientific topic. This is necessary to establish
what the latest developements in the field are (state-of-the-art) and to identify gaps in the literature. The subject of the literature
study is related to the expertise field of your supervisor. For this reason it is necessary that you first do some "research" on the
subjects of your interest (look at the web, talk with group members or students). If you have found a supervisor, please formulate
clearly what the subject is of the literature study and make a clear time-planning.
The subject of the study may not overlap with the subject of the MSc Thesis work, because this is also a part of your thesis
project.
The student is able:
a) to review and assess scientific literature critically;
b) to write an overview of the relevant literature for a specific research topic;
c) to present and defend the content to specialists in this particular field of research.
supported self-study with feedback from the supervisor(s).
The assessment is based on a discussion about the presented results and the defence on the bases of the presented literature
review (written report).
The final mark is established by at least two scientific staff members: a) the supervisor of the literature study; b) by a professor
of another section/department.
This course covers a study load of 3 ec (84 hours) for MSc students and 6 ec (168 hours) for BSc students.
The final result (including mark) should be send to Arno Haket. It's appreciated if you contact him in an early stage about your
plans.

Page 41 of 92

SET3041
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Energy from Biomass

Prof.dr.ir. W. de Jong
Prof.dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
The following topics will be dealt with:
- Biomass Characterisation (biomass types, properties, analyses)
- Pretreatment (harvesting, size reduction, drying, torrefaction)
- Thermochemical conversion (gasification, combustion; reactor types)
- Biochemical conversion (industrial microorganisms, fermentation)
- Transport fuels / biorefinery (syngas conversion, economics)
- Process design (structured design approach)
The student will get knowledge of and insight into energy supply technologies based on biomass conversion processes. They will
be offered problems to solve in this area.
These main learning objectives can be divided into several smaller learning objectives:
1) The student has knowledge on the typical biomass composition, related properties (like e.g. heating value, ash melting
behaviour) and fuel characterization techniques.
2) The student is able to identify and perform basic capacity calculations concerning biomass conversion systems for small and
larger scale (combined) heat and power generation as well as systems for transportation fuel production.
3) The student is able to set up reaction equations (stoichiometry) for a wide range of energy production related fuel conversion
processes.
4) The student can set up and perform heat and mass balance calculations regarding reactions and biomass based conversion
systems.
5) The student knows how to perform basic ideal gas phase chemical reaction equilibrium calculations to calculate product
compositions and extents of reactions given initial reaction mixture composition, pressure and temperature.
6) The student can understand and describe reaction kinetic expressions and apply them in order to solve problems related to the
conversion of fuels and the formation of emission components.
7) The student demonstrates good knowledge of mass and heat transfer mechanisms and phenomena applied to the chemical
conversion of both liquid and solid biomass (derived) fuels.
8) The student can derive equations for idealised model reactors (well-stirred reactor and plug flow reactor concepts) and apply
these simplified reactor concepts to solve engineering problems related to the thermal conversion of biomass fuels, in particular
combustion and gasification.
9) The student is able to perform calculations concerning the conversion of small particles; important in this respect is the
identification of the regime of conversion. Related dimensionless numbers such as the Thiele Modulus and the Biot number are
key indicators in this respect.
10) The student is able to understand the basics of biochemical and thermo-chemical conversion processes and to translate this
into designing and evaluating such (sometimes hybrid) systems, including their economic evaluation.
11) The student demonstrates good communication skills, both oral and written, concerning presentation of scientific results.
28 contact hours: lectures, meetings in which the teams can work and get feedback on their assignments, and meetings in which
students present and discuss the solution of the assignments.
Book: "Biomass, a sustainable energy source for the future", de Jong and van Ommen, Wiley.
The final grade consists of four parts:
* the solution to the (four) assignments (team work);
* an individual test consisting of multiple choice questions;
* a larger final assignment (team work);
* evaluation of presentations.
The assessment method may be adapted to actual student population.

Page 42 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Electives for Chemical Product Engineering 2016

Page 43 of 92

AP3252
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests

Electron Microscopy Characterization of the Nanoscale


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English

The aim of this course is becoming familiar with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as unique tool to characterise the
structural and chemical properties of nanoscale materials. This includes learning about the different TEM operation modes, how
to extract and interpret information on crystal structure from TEM measurements, how to correlate structural analysis with other
material properties such as optical, electrical, and transport properties, and the use of image simulations and atomic structure
modelling to complement TEM analysis. Topics include:
1. The transmission Electron Microscope. Scattering and Diffraction. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering. Electron Source. Lenses,
Apertures, and Resolution. The Instrument.
2. Specimen preparation. Mechanical polishing. Ultramicrotomy. Focus Ion Beam.
3. Geometry of Solids. Lattices and Unit Cells. Lattices in Three Dimensions. Thinking in Reciprocal Lattice.
4. Electron Scattering in Crystals. Diffraction Patterns. Diffraction from Crystals. Indexing Diffraction Patterns.
5. Imaging. Imaging in the TEM. Defects in crystals. Strain Fields. Phase-Contrast Images. High-Resolution TEM.
6. TEM Image Simulation.
7. Spectrometry. X-ray Spectrometry. Qualitative X-ray analysis. Spatial Resolution and Minimum Detectability. Electron
Energy-Loss Spectrometers. The Energy-Loss Spectrum.
8. Cryo Electron Microscopy, in-situ TEM, Electron Holography.
1. To become familiar with the different TEM imaging modes, their advantages and limitations, and their use to extract and
interpret quantitative structural information from TEM images.
2. To learn how to characterise the crystalline structure of a specimen from TEM diffraction patterns in terms of Bragg
reflections, and to identify deviations from a perfect crystal such as structural defects.
3. To define novel strategies for structural characterization depending on the specific problems to solve, and to exploit the
complementarities with characterization techniques for optical, electric and transport properties.
4. To master the complementarities of TEM measurements and atomic modelling and TEM image simulation tools for an indepth understanding of nanomaterial properties.
Lectures, expert lectures, examples of TEM problem-solving, student presentations.
Transmission Electron Microscopy. M.D.B. Williams, C.B. Carter. Plenum Press, New York, (1996). ISBN: 0-306-45247-2. In
addition, Lecture handouts will be added to the Course documents folder after the lectures.
The assessment is performed through a written test (50%) and one presentation on scientific literature (50%)

CH3011
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method

Course Relations

Literature and Study


Materials
Assessment
Remarks

S. Conesa Boj

Interfacial Engineering

Dr.ing. G.J.M. Koper


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
Exam by appointment
English
Basic knowledge in physical chemistry
Contemporary products and processes involve micro and nanostructured materials. As a consequence they possess an incredible
amount of internal interface: of the order of a soccer field per liter! This course addresses the recently developed techniques to
study the behavior of such internal interfaces with the ultimate goal of harnessing them into new product and process
technologies. Topics include but are not limited to aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS), wet nanoparticle synthesis, green
waterborne coatings and graphene exfoliation.
At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to critically assess the current literature dealing with nanostructured
systems from fundamental knowledge to practical systems.
The course consists of 5 different topics based on recent scientific articles. For each topic, a basic introduction into the topical
field will be provided in the first lecture (1 class hour). Students are then required to work out a number of exercises that detail
the material presented in the article (1 class hour plus self-study). The answers are discussed during the final lecture and an
outlook is presented (2 class hours). Groups of students are to choose one topic to draft a basis-of-design (BOD) for a process or
product (2 class hours and self-study). These BODs are discussed at the end of the course (2 class hours).
For some of the topics, experts are invited to give a presentation at the ChemE colloquium (Monday lunch time). These colloquia
are open to all students and afterwards the expert is available for discussion.
CH3372 - Soft Matter for Chemical Products (SMP)
CH3162 - Design and Synthesis of Advanced Chemical Products (DSP)
CH3172 - Structure/Property Relationships of Advanced Chemical products (SPRP)
Introductory material:
An Introduction to Interfacial Engineering, G.J.M. Koper, VSSD 2009.
Fundamentals of Interfacial Engineering, R.J. Stokes and D.F. Evans, Wiley-VCH 1997
Written or oral exam, depending on the number of candidates, based on a relevant, recent scientific article. A complete set of
worked-out exercises has to be handed in prior to the exam.
See http://blog.gerkoper.nl/profi/another-teaching-method-advanced-interfacial-engineering/

Page 44 of 92

CH3101
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Prerequisites
Assessment

Heterogeneous Catalysis for Chemical Engineers

0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
History of Catalysis; Catalyst Preparation; Catalyst Performance Testing; Mechanism of Catalysis; Reaction Kinetics; Texture
and Morphology; Active Site Determination; Characterization (Infrared Spectroscopy, Temperature Programmed Techniques, XRay Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy).
Bring to life the black box that the catalyst often is to Chemical Engineers.This means gaining knowledge of:a.How catalysts are
prepared.How catalysts are tested for performance and kinetics. Which techniques can be used to characterize catalysts.
Lectures
Catalysis and Catalysts by J.A. Moulijn, F. Kapteijn, and G. Mul, Handouts Lectures
Bachelor Molecular Science and Technology; major Technology.
Written examination (80%) + assignment (20%)

CH3301
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Special Information

Foreign Excursion Tour TG

Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Books
Reader
Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Summer Holidays
5
none
English
BSc Chemical Engineering or equivalent
The student association TG organises a foreign excursion tour. During this tour several universities and companies are visited.
After this tour the students is able:
- to understand the involved processes of processing raw materials in to products on an industrial scale
- to give a description of the processes involved, including safety, health and environmental aspects
- to write a scientific report about the objective of the study trip i.e. subject from industry.
- to write an essay about the visit of the different institutions and/or (chemical) companies
Visit to foreign institution and companies
Assessment by written report of which the content covers the study goals.
Trip organised by TG.

CH3531
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period

Prof.dr. J. Gascon Sabate


Prof.dr. F. Kapteijn

Functional Ceramics

Dr. E.M. Kelder


0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
BSc: general and inorganic chemistry, basic quantum chemistry
Ceramic materials show a wide variety in chemical, optical and electrical properties. They are used in many different
applications, ranging from catalysts, fuel cells, batteries and sensors to solar cells, photo-catalysts and luminescent nanoparticles.
This course will treat the basic properties of functional ceramic materials. The following topics will be included: - crystal
structures - bonding in inorganic solids - basic electronic structure and properties of semiconductors - defect chemistry including
point defects, non-stoichiometry and doping - ionic and electronic charge transport - semiconductor junctions and space charges.
After this course, the student is able to:
- Correlate crystal structure and band structure to optical and electrical properties of ceramic materials
- Describe the operating principles of simple devices based on semiconductor junctions (solar cells, diodes, LEDs, photoelectrodes) and ionic conduction (Nernst sensors, SOFCs, catalysts)
- Identify and predict relationships between point defects, dopants, space charges, and ionic/electronic conduction in both
semiconductors and ionic conductors, and perform simple calculations
Lectures, self study, instruction classes
- "Physical Ceramics" by Y-M Chiang, D. P. Birnie, and W.D. Kingery, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 0-471-59873-9
- Several handouts and the lecture slides will be made available on Blackboard
Written exam
- Calculator, closed book (overview of most important equations will be handed out during exam)

Page 45 of 92

CH3562
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Nanoparticle Technology

Prof.dr. A. Schmidt-Ott
Prof.dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen
0/0/4/0
3
3
Different, to be announced
English
Nanoparticle Technology focuses on particles smaller than 100 nm in size. These particles have basically different properties
from large particles, and represent the building blocks of nanotechnology. Their applications include Food, Catalysis, Cosmetics,
Medical diagnostics & therapy, Energy conversion and storage, Chemical sensors, Supercapacitors, Composite materials and
Coatings.
Topics:
Motivation of applying nanoparticles: Different behavior of small particles and large particles; examples for application of small
particles (without explaining underlying principles).
Basic properties of small particles: Geometric (e.g. surface/volume) effects, Magnetic effects, Quantummechanical effects.
General applications of nanoparticles: Food, Catalysis, Cosmetics, Medical diagnostics & therapy, Chemical sensors,
Supercapacitors, Composites, Coatings.
Focus on energy-related applications of nanoparticles: Solar cells, Hydrogen production, Hydrogen storage, Fuel cells, Li-ion
Batteries, LED-lighting
Nanoparticle production: Milling, Gas phase methods, Liquid phase methods.
Nanoparticle functionalization.
Nanoparticle assembly principles.
Safety and health issues.
Exercises: Qualitative and quantitative questions/problems to solve after lecture blocks.

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

1. The student is able to describe the synthesis, characterization and application of nanoparticles.
2. The student is able to use the scientific literature to find relevant information on nanoparticles.
3. The student is able to develop and apply model descriptions for nanoparticle synthesis, characterization and applications.
4. The student is able to use the developed models to analyse defined cases.
Lectures, assignments.
Assignment

Page 46 of 92

CH3582
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Summary

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Chemistry and Physics of Actinides

Dr. D. Bykov
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
General chemistry, basics of thermodynamics
Actinides are 5f-elements with many unique properties. Three of them - Th, Pa and U occur naturally and the elements following
the uranium in the Periodic Table (transuranium elements) are manmade. The actinides are essential to nuclear power generation
but also find applications in many other areas of industry, medicine and research. Many aspects related to these elements
including synthesis, properties, impact on chemistry and physics, and their importance to society make them exclusive
representatives of the Periodic Table. Due to their significant role and because the final destination of transuranic elements
originating from the nuclear fuel cycle is still an open issue, the actinide chemistry and physics continues to be one of the major
areas of nuclear research.
Furthermore, the biological and environmental hazards associated with these elements pose certain risks which must be
controlled and minimized. For these reasons knowledge of chemistry and physics of the actinide elements remains an essential
component of modern educational programmes in Nuclear Science and Engineering. Moreover, understanding of properties of
actinides and f-electronic shells contributes to a better understanding of the Periodic Table in general.
The course is aimed at master level students with background in chemistry and/or physics. The content will cover properties of
5f-electronic shells which underpin many unique features of the actinide series. Comparison with 4f-elements will be made:
electronic configurations, oxidation states, redox potentials, thermochemical data, crystal structures, ionic radii.
Inorganic, structural and organometallic chemistry of major classes of actinide compounds will be reviewed, as well as their
environmental properties and toxicology. An important issue of actinides behaviour in the environment and in the geosphere will
be discussed, together with analytical tools for their identification. A separate section of the course will be dedicated to the
technological applications of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle, in catalysis, for space batteries and medical application etc.
Finally, magnetic and optical properties and thermodynamics of actinides will be addressed.
This is a 3 ECTS course composed of 28 total lecture hours, 56 self-study and a final examination.
Lecture 1. Introduction: actinide concept, 5f-electron phenomena in the metallic state, comparison of properties of the actinide
and transactinide elements.
Lecture 2. Inorganic/structural chemistry of actinide compounds.
Lecture 3. Actinides in the geosphere/actinides in the environment.
Lecture 4. Identification and speciation of actinides.
Lecture 5. Thermodynamics/ magnetic /optical properties of actinides and actinide compounds. Computational actinide studies.
Lecture 6. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis and characterization.
Lecture 7. Technological applications of actinides (nuclear fuel cycle, space batteries, catalysis, medical application etc.).
1. Be able to explain chemical behaviour of actinides in view of their electronic structure.
2. Discuss roles played by major and minor actinides in the traditional fuel cycle, describe other technological applications of
actinides.
3. Be able to discuss in detail chemical and physical properties of various actinide compounds.
4. Illustrate the role of redox reactions in chemistry of the actinide series.
5. Be able to predict environmental behaviour of various actinide species.
6. Compare properties of actinide and transactinide elements.
7. Apply fundamentals of actinide thermodynamics to predict important properties of the actinide elements, ions, and
compounds.
8. Characterise major analytical techniques for actinide studies.
9. Compare/contrast physical properties (magnetic, optical, etc.) of actinides.
10. Identify/predict similarities and differences in behaviour of 4f-, 5f- and 6f-elements (lanthanides, actinides, superactinides).
Oral lectures / Supported self-study (in case of small number of participants).
Main:
The Chemistry of the Actinide and Transactinide Elements (L.R. Morss, N.M. Edelstein, J. Fuger (Ed.)), Springer Netherlands,
2011
S.A. Cotton, Lanthanide and Actinide Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, 2006
M. Halka, B. Nordstrom, Lanthanides and Actinides, Facts on File Inc., 2011
Additional:
W. Loveland, D.J. Morrissey, G.T. Seaborg, Modern Nuclear Chemistry, Wiley-Interscience, 2006.
G.R. Choppin, J. Rydberg, J.-O. Liljenzin, C. Ekberg, Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry, Academic Press, 2013.

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests

Final examination/essay.

Page 47 of 92

CH3632
Responsible Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Chemistry and Physics of Solar Cells

Dr. A.J. Houtepen


Dr. T.J. Savenije
8/0/0/0
1
1
1
2
English
Quantum Chemistry and Physics (4051QCHFYY)
The course deals with the working of various solar cell technologies. Traditional (first and second generation) solar cells are
based on semiconductors that are prepared by physical methods (usually involving high temperature and/or high vacuum
methods). However, various more recent solar cell technologies (so-called third generation solar cells) are prepared via chemical
approaches. Examples are dye sensitised solar cells, organic solar cells, colloidal quantum-dot solar cells and perovskite solar
cells. These new technologies have received a lot of attention since they can be produced much more cheaply and in some cases
offer the prospect of increased efficiency.
In this course we will discuss the operation of solar cells in general and will pay particular attention to the chemistry of recent
solar cell technologies and the related challenges and opportunities.
Understanding the operation of solar cells requires knowledge about the physics of semiconductors. Therefore the first part of the
course will focus on the properties of semiconductors, following the book "Semiconductor physics and devices".

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests

In the second part of the course this knowledge will be applied to the operation of solar cells. Finally it will be discussed how the
same principles that govern the operation of solar cells also apply to applications such as Light Emitting Diodes, Lasers,
Photoelectrochemical cells and sensors.
After this course the student:
Has a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics of solid state materials.
Can explain the origin of electronic bands in semiconductors and the occupation of those band by charge carriers
Can discuss the factors that govern charge transport in semiconductors
Can discuss electronic doping and the formation of junctions
Can interpret the effect of specific junctions on the behavior of charge carriers
Can explain the operation of p-n junction solar cells
Knows various types of solar cell technologies, is able to discuss their respective promises and challenges
Is able to discuss the operation of LEDs, lasers, photoelectrochemical cells and sensors in terms of the properties of
semiconductor materials
Lectures and exercise classes
The first part of the course will follow the book "Semiconductor Physics and Devices" by Donald Neamen (4th edition).
The second part of course will use handouts and selected scientific papers.
Examination will take place via a written final exam
Calculator and formula sheet

CH3672
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Computational Materials Science

Dr. F.C. Grozema


0/0/4/0
3
3
Different, to be announced
English
Basic knowledge of quantum mechanics and electronic properties of materials (For example "Structure property relationships of
advanced chemical products" (CH3172) and/or "Chemistry of Solar Cells" (CH3632))
- Basic knowledge of methods for electronic structure calculations: Hartree-Fock, Density Functional Theory, Electron
correlation
- Potential energy surfaces and geometry optimizations (vibrations, transition states and chemical reactions)
- Electrostatic properties of molecules (dipole moment, charge distribution, polarisability)
- Optical properties of molecules: Absortion, fluorescence.
- Interactions between molecules: Vd Waals, electrostatic

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

- Electronic (band) structure of solid materials


- Student has an overview of the existing molecular simulation techniques.
- Student has basic knowledge of quantum chemical methods.
- Student is able to choose a suitable simulation technique for a specific problem
- Student is able to evaluate and interpret the result of a typical simulation
Lectures and extensive hands-on computer exercises
Lecturer will provide study material
Assignment (Hands-on computer simulation on practical problem + written report)

Page 48 of 92

CH3982
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Assistent
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

Remarks

Liturature Study

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Dr. P.J. Hamersma
Ir. A.J.W. Haket
selfstudy - Start possible in each period
1
2
3
4
1
Exam by appointment
English
Generally, a literature review is the start of the research preparation on a certain scientific topic. This is necessary to establish
what the latest developements in the field are (state-of-the-art) and to identify gaps in the literature. The subject of the literature
study is related to the expertise field of your supervisor. For this reason it is necessary that you first do some "research" on the
subjects of your interest (look at the web, talk with group members or students). If you have found a supervisor, please formulate
clearly what the subject is of the literature study and make a clear time-planning.
The subject of the study may not overlap with the subject of the MSc Thesis work, because this is also a part of your thesis
project.
The student is able:
a) to review and assess scientific literature critically;
b) to write an overview of the relevant literature for a specific research topic;
c) to present and defend the content to specialists in this particular field of research.
supported self-study with feedback from the supervisor(s).
The assessment is based on a discussion about the presented results and the defence on the bases of the presented literature
review (written report).
The final mark is established by at least two scientific staff members: a) the supervisor of the literature study; b) by a professor
of another section/department.
This course covers a study load of 3 ec (84 hours) for MSc students and 6 ec (168 hours) for BSc students.
The final result (including mark) should be send to Arno Haket. It's appreciated if you contact him in an early stage about your
plans.

LM3311
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Books

Assessment

Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology

Dr. F. Hollmann
Prof.dr. I.W.C.E. Arends
0/0/18/0
3
3
3
4
English
Organic Chemistry (LB1045 or 4051OCSTRY)
Chemical Biology (LB2621) OR Catalysis (4052KATALY)
Depleting fossil fuels and environmental concerns force us to change the way we produce our goods. The transition of the
chemical industry to becoming sustainable represents one of the major challenges to be faced in the 21st century. Catalytic
reactions will increasingly substitute the existing energy- and resource-intensive production procedures; hence reducing or
preventing toxic pollutants. Biotechnology will play a major role in this transition and complement advanced chemical
production technologies.
This course will highlight the emerging role of catalysis in the chemical industry. A major focus will lie on biotechnological
production of chemicals (fermentation processes, isolated enzymes). These methods will be related to their chemocatalytic
counterparts. Thus, ample examples including the underlying mechanistic principles - of bio- and chemocatalytic processes will
be discussed. Finally, the emerging field of renewable feedstocks will be discussed not only from a chemical standpoint, but also
on socioeconomical and ecological grounds. The 12 Principles of Green Chemistry will serve as guideline to assess the scope
and limitations of the examples discussed.
After attending this course the student will:
(1) have detailed knowledge of sustainable catalysts (enzyme- and chemo-catalysis)
(2) know industrial examples of sustainable manufacturing practice
(3) be able to use the 12 Principles of Green Chemistry to assess the sustainability of a given process
(4) be able to critically assess the purport of green claims
Lecture Sheets, specialized books, articles and patents
selected articles will be available via Blackboard
suggested reading:
'Green Chemistry - An Introductory Text' (2nd ed., M. Lancaster) RSC Publishing (ISBN: 978-1-84755-873-2)
and/or
'Green Chemistry and Catalysis' (
Green Chemistry and Catalysis
R. A. Sheldon, Isabella Arends, Ulf Hanefeld), Wiley VCH (SBN: 978-3-527-30715-9)
70 % written assignment
20 % digital test (E=factor calculations)
10% individual participation in the course

Page 49 of 92

LM3731
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Enrolment / Application
Schedule

Location

Advanced Biocatalysis

Prof. U. Hanefeld
Prof.dr. I.W.C.E. Arends
16/24/0/0
1
2
1
2
3
English
BSc degree LST or MST or equivalent
This course gives an introduction to the use of enzymes for the synthesis of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Starting from a basic
knowledge in biochemistry, enzymology and organic chemistry, we will study proteins for their capacity to act as catalysts for
different classes of reactions (such as reductions, oxidations and C-C bond formations). The importance of enzymes for the
synthesis of chiral compounds will be an important theme. In addition the advantage and technique of immobilization of
enzymes will be treated.
After this course the student should have acquired in depth knowledge about enzymes as biocatalysts and their application in
Organic Chemistry. Based on this knowledge the student should be able to choose a suitable biocatalyst for an industrially
important reaction and he/she should be able to explain why which type of approach is more suitable for the production of a
given bulk or fine chemical. This includes an in depth analysis of the enzyme, the working conditions and the mechanism.
Lectures, Self-study and a lecture by the student
Handouts/Blackboard/Book: K. Faber, Biotransformations in Organic Chemistry, 6th ed., Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2011.
Literature studies in the lecture theatre.
Written examination, critical review and presentation of a self-chosen scientific paper.
not later than one week before the first lecture via Black Board Delft
(courses > Master > LS&T).
1.Introduction
2.Why are enzymes such good catalysts/kinetics
3.Classes of enzymes
4. Hydrolysis/enantioselectivity
5.Reaction media: water or no water
6.Reductions
7.Oxidations
8.C-C bond formation
9.Immobilisation
10. Other relevant enzyme classes
11. Comparison of the enzymes and their application.
Delft

Page 50 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Electives for Nuclear Science and Engineering 2016

Page 51 of 92

AP3371TU D

Radiological Health Physics

M. Schouwenburg
Responsible Instructor
Drs.
M.J. van Bourgondien
Instructor
Dr.
K.R.
Huitema
Responsible for assignments
Contact Hours / Week
0/0/8/8 (friday) = Note that the course starts earlier and ends later than Q3.
x/x/x/x
Education Period
3
Start Education
3
Exam Period
Different, to be announced
Course Language
English
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Lectures and tutorials on:
- Radiation, radioactivity, decay.
- Radiation sources.
- Interaction of radiation with matter.
- Methods of radiation detection.
- Radiation dosimetry.
- Radiation shielding.
- Biological effects of ionizing radiation.
- Internal dosimetry.
- Natural and man-made sources/background radiation.
- Radiation protection philosophy (protection principles).
- Rules and regulations; organizational, procedural and administrative tasks.
- Safety measures; operational radiation protection.
- Radiation protection when handling open sources.

Study Goals

Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials
Practical Guide
Assessment

Exam Hours
Permitted Materials during
Tests
Special Information

Mandatory parts:
- Practical experiments. These include prior preparation at home, active participation during the experiments, documenting
results, reporting including discussion and conclusion/giving advice. All these aspect of the practical work will be monitored and
scored during the course.
- Several assignments during the course.
This course will teach you how to work safely with sources of ionizing radiation.
It is a broad introduction into the field of radiation protection and the application of ionizing radiation in science, medicine and
industry.
Because of this broad coverage of the subject it consists of both a theoretical and a mandatory practical part.
Oral lectures (classes), tutorials/instructions, assignments, lab experiments
This course is a topic of choice for Applied Physics, Chemical Engineering and SET students in Q3.
J.E. Turner, Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection, John Wiley, New York, 3rd completely revised edition.
The practical workbook will be made available on Blackboard on the first day of the course.
Two parts:
- part 1: Multiple Choice (written closed book exam) (max 33 points)
- part 2: 4 problems (essay type questions, written open book exam) > (max 67 points)
To pass the exam: part 1 > = 18 points AND part 2 > = 37 points.
May 23, 2016: 11.00 h - 12.00 h and 13.30 h - 16.30 h
Part 1 (Multiple Choice part): non-programmable calculator and 'clean' dictionary.
Part 2 (Essay type questions): All course materials like the textbook, notes, hand outs, etc.
As of 2016 new law and regulations apply to this course and also the Dutch name is changed from Stralingshygine
deskundigheidsniveau 3 to Cordinerend Deskundige (CD; in English RPO) in de Stralingsbescherming.
These new regulations make it necessary to include new topics like ethics(training), communication skills and non-ionizing
radiation. These new topics have not been included yet in the course that starts in January 2016. Therefore, in 2016 students are
not eligible to obtain the diploma of Cordinerend Deskundige when passing the written exam. Of course, students passing the
written exam and having successfully followed the mandatory parts of the course will obtain the applicable ects (= 6).
The coming year it will be determined whether it is feasible and possible to include these new topics in the next course that will
run in 2017 and keeping the number of ects the same.
It will also be determined whether the new topics can be offered in a separate two day additional module allowing students to
obtain the diploma Cordinerend Deskundige. You will be informed through Blackboard about further developments.

Studyload/Week
Schedule

Location

In the mean time please feel free to contact the responsible lecturer Marcel Schouwenburg (m.schouwenburg@tudelft.nl) when
you have any questions or remarks.
1 day/week classes + 0.5 day/week labs + 0.5 day/week preparation
Note that the course starts earlier and ends later than Q3.
The detailed course program will be published on Blackboard on December 22, 2015.
Reactor Institute Delft (building 50)
Mekelweg 15
NL - 2629 JB DELFT

Page 52 of 92

CH3301
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment
Special Information

Foreign Excursion Tour TG

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Summer Holidays
5
none
English
BSc Chemical Engineering or equivalent
The student association TG organises a foreign excursion tour. During this tour several universities and companies are visited.
After this tour the students is able:
- to understand the involved processes of processing raw materials in to products on an industrial scale
- to give a description of the processes involved, including safety, health and environmental aspects
- to write a scientific report about the objective of the study trip i.e. subject from industry.
- to write an essay about the visit of the different institutions and/or (chemical) companies
Visit to foreign institution and companies
Assessment by written report of which the content covers the study goals.
Trip organised by TG.

Page 53 of 92

CH3582
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Summary

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

Chemistry and Physics of Actinides

Dr. D. Bykov
0/0/4/0
3
3
3
4
English
General chemistry, basics of thermodynamics
Actinides are 5f-elements with many unique properties. Three of them - Th, Pa and U occur naturally and the elements following
the uranium in the Periodic Table (transuranium elements) are manmade. The actinides are essential to nuclear power generation
but also find applications in many other areas of industry, medicine and research. Many aspects related to these elements
including synthesis, properties, impact on chemistry and physics, and their importance to society make them exclusive
representatives of the Periodic Table. Due to their significant role and because the final destination of transuranic elements
originating from the nuclear fuel cycle is still an open issue, the actinide chemistry and physics continues to be one of the major
areas of nuclear research.
Furthermore, the biological and environmental hazards associated with these elements pose certain risks which must be
controlled and minimized. For these reasons knowledge of chemistry and physics of the actinide elements remains an essential
component of modern educational programmes in Nuclear Science and Engineering. Moreover, understanding of properties of
actinides and f-electronic shells contributes to a better understanding of the Periodic Table in general.
The course is aimed at master level students with background in chemistry and/or physics. The content will cover properties of
5f-electronic shells which underpin many unique features of the actinide series. Comparison with 4f-elements will be made:
electronic configurations, oxidation states, redox potentials, thermochemical data, crystal structures, ionic radii.
Inorganic, structural and organometallic chemistry of major classes of actinide compounds will be reviewed, as well as their
environmental properties and toxicology. An important issue of actinides behaviour in the environment and in the geosphere will
be discussed, together with analytical tools for their identification. A separate section of the course will be dedicated to the
technological applications of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle, in catalysis, for space batteries and medical application etc.
Finally, magnetic and optical properties and thermodynamics of actinides will be addressed.
This is a 3 ECTS course composed of 28 total lecture hours, 56 self-study and a final examination.
Lecture 1. Introduction: actinide concept, 5f-electron phenomena in the metallic state, comparison of properties of the actinide
and transactinide elements.
Lecture 2. Inorganic/structural chemistry of actinide compounds.
Lecture 3. Actinides in the geosphere/actinides in the environment.
Lecture 4. Identification and speciation of actinides.
Lecture 5. Thermodynamics/ magnetic /optical properties of actinides and actinide compounds. Computational actinide studies.
Lecture 6. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis and characterization.
Lecture 7. Technological applications of actinides (nuclear fuel cycle, space batteries, catalysis, medical application etc.).
1. Be able to explain chemical behaviour of actinides in view of their electronic structure.
2. Discuss roles played by major and minor actinides in the traditional fuel cycle, describe other technological applications of
actinides.
3. Be able to discuss in detail chemical and physical properties of various actinide compounds.
4. Illustrate the role of redox reactions in chemistry of the actinide series.
5. Be able to predict environmental behaviour of various actinide species.
6. Compare properties of actinide and transactinide elements.
7. Apply fundamentals of actinide thermodynamics to predict important properties of the actinide elements, ions, and
compounds.
8. Characterise major analytical techniques for actinide studies.
9. Compare/contrast physical properties (magnetic, optical, etc.) of actinides.
10. Identify/predict similarities and differences in behaviour of 4f-, 5f- and 6f-elements (lanthanides, actinides, superactinides).
Oral lectures / Supported self-study (in case of small number of participants).
Main:
The Chemistry of the Actinide and Transactinide Elements (L.R. Morss, N.M. Edelstein, J. Fuger (Ed.)), Springer Netherlands,
2011
S.A. Cotton, Lanthanide and Actinide Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, 2006
M. Halka, B. Nordstrom, Lanthanides and Actinides, Facts on File Inc., 2011
Additional:
W. Loveland, D.J. Morrissey, G.T. Seaborg, Modern Nuclear Chemistry, Wiley-Interscience, 2006.
G.R. Choppin, J. Rydberg, J.-O. Liljenzin, C. Ekberg, Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry, Academic Press, 2013.

Assessment
Permitted Materials during
Tests

Final examination/essay.

Page 54 of 92

CH3982
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Assistent
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Assessment

Remarks

Liturature Study

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Dr. P.J. Hamersma
Ir. A.J.W. Haket
selfstudy - Start possible in each period
1
2
3
4
1
Exam by appointment
English
Generally, a literature review is the start of the research preparation on a certain scientific topic. This is necessary to establish
what the latest developements in the field are (state-of-the-art) and to identify gaps in the literature. The subject of the literature
study is related to the expertise field of your supervisor. For this reason it is necessary that you first do some "research" on the
subjects of your interest (look at the web, talk with group members or students). If you have found a supervisor, please formulate
clearly what the subject is of the literature study and make a clear time-planning.
The subject of the study may not overlap with the subject of the MSc Thesis work, because this is also a part of your thesis
project.
The student is able:
a) to review and assess scientific literature critically;
b) to write an overview of the relevant literature for a specific research topic;
c) to present and defend the content to specialists in this particular field of research.
supported self-study with feedback from the supervisor(s).
The assessment is based on a discussion about the presented results and the defence on the bases of the presented literature
review (written report).
The final mark is established by at least two scientific staff members: a) the supervisor of the literature study; b) by a professor
of another section/department.
This course covers a study load of 3 ec (84 hours) for MSc students and 6 ec (168 hours) for BSc students.
The final result (including mark) should be send to Arno Haket. It's appreciated if you contact him in an early stage about your
plans.

Page 55 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Entrepeneurship 2016
Contact for students
In association with the
Faculty of
ECTS Program
Contact for Students

Introduction 1

Program Structure 1

Arno Haket
TBM
20
To start the Annotation Entrepreneurship Programme, to change the course list of your Annotation Entrepreneurship Programme,
to take part in the thesis related MOT9611 module, and to complete the Annotation Entrepreneurship and obtain the certificate,
contact dcestudents@tudelft.nl
Students who are interested in Technology-based Entrepreneurship can opt for the Master Annotation Entrepreneurship
programme, which trains students to gain entrepreneurial skills and knowledge on starting a tech-based start-up. It combines a
set of courses (>15ECTS) and an additional thesis part (5ECTS) to the main graduation project that touches upon
entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship in the sense of this program can vary from starting up your own business to establishing
entrepreneurial projects within existing business environments and establishing a culture of corporate entrepreneurship. If you
complete the program successfully you will receive an Certificate of the Annotation Entrepreneurship along with their MSc
degree.
This programme is offered by the Delft Centre for Entrepreneurship, faculty of Technology, Policy and Management.
The programme has two compulsory modules which both build on the logic of understanding what it takes to start
entrepreneurial high-tech start-ups (MOT9610 Entrepreneurship Basic course, 5ec) and an experiential learning module
(MOT9612 Business Development Lab short, 5ec) in which you will practice and apply the skills and knowledge in high-tech
Entrepreneurship.
These two modules are complemented with entrepreneurship-related elective modules totalling at least 5ec. See blackboard
organization 'Annotation Entrepreneurship' for a complete list of electives.
To finalize the Master Annotation Entrepreneurship program, you need to complete a written report that addresses the
identification and appropriation of the commercial and societal value of the research topic of your master thesis project. This is
done in the project-based MOT9611 (Project Entrepreneurship Thesis related, 5ec) module.
The Annotation Entrepreneurship consists of these components:
- The obligatory modules MOT9610, MOT9611 and MOT9612 (15ec).
- Elective module(s) on entrepreneurship totalling at least 5ec.
A maximum of 6ec can be done as free electives in the R&D orientation; or as an alternative the required elective is done as part
of the MOT orientation.
Option: the remaining courses fit in an (individual) honours programme!

Page 56 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Obligatory Entrepeneurship Modules 2016

Page 57 of 92

MOT9610

Entrepreneurship basic course

H. Khodaei
Module Manager
Dr.
J.R. Ortt
Instructor
H.
Khodaei
Instructor
Responsible for assignments H. Khodaei
Contact Hours / Week
2/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period
1
Start Education
1
Exam Period
1
2
Course Language
English
Course Contents
This course assists aspiring and active high-tech entrepreneurs in developing great ideas into great companies. High-tech startups are an essential part of our future economic prosperity and challenging economic times presenting the necessity for many to
make their own job. So the need to develop the skills to develop and act on innovative business opportunities is increasingly
vital. Using proven content, methods, and models for new venture opportunity assessment and analysis, you will learn how to
analyze the commercial potential of implementing new technologies either by analysing social challenges or analysing the value
of technology for various user applications. Innovation, opportunity recognition, strategic decision making, business modelling,
marketing and high-tech academic spin-offs are core elements of the course.
The course is organized into 10 sessions (10 weeks) into 3 learning blocks with an assessment at the end of each. Each session
consists of a mixture of lecturing, and discussions of cases, literature and assignments, and presentations. Assignments provide
you with opportunities to integrate and apply learnings from each learning block.
Study Goals
Our goal is to demystify the high-tech start-up process, and to help you build the skills to identify and act on innovative
opportunities now, and in the future. Upon finishing the course you will be able to:
1.Understand and apply the generic pattern of development and diffusions for radically new high-tech products or systems.
2.Understand, apply and discuss the innovation process and discuss how the innovation process depends on the context.
3.Identify and develop great ideas into start-ups and examine how to identify opportunities based on real customer needs.
4.Understand the various ways in which Intellectual Property (IP) can be protected.
5.Understand and apply different niche-strategies to commercialize radical new high-tech products.
6.Understand and apply methods for developing solid business models for the creation of successful new ventures.
7.Understand and apply the basic principles and concepts of marketing and their applications, in high-tech markets in particular.
8.Explore how to secure funding for company and discuss the many financing options available to get the new venture funded.
9.Understand and discuss the high-tech academic spin-off growth process.
10.Understand and discuss the academic spin-offs critical junctures and factors that can help academic spin-offs navigate the
critical junctures
11.Develop a thorough understanding of corporate entrepreneurship; the contexts, the forms, and the relationship with strategic
management.
Education Method
Book:
Trott, P., Hartmann, D., Scholten, V., van der Duin, P., & Ortt, J. R. (2015). Managing technology entrepreneurship and
innovation. New York, USA

Assessment

Journal articles: Will be posted on Blackboard-site.


Slides presented in class: Will be posted on Blackboard-site.
The assessment is composed of three main elements (30/30/40):
1.Active participation during the lectures. You will be assessed based on the active participation, completing assigned readings,
and on time assignment submission of each learning blocks. This will account for the 30% of the final grade.
2.Group report and final presentation. PowerPoint presentation and the final report given by the group of students will be judged
on their ability to understand both theoretical and practical aspects of bringing a technology to the market, and to analyze reallife business problems in the field of entrepreneurship and innovation. The group grade will be adjusted for individual
participation. This will account for the 30% of the final grade.
3.Final written exam This will account for the remaining 40% of the final grade.

MOT9611
Module Manager
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education

Exam Period
Course Language

Project entrepreneurship thesis related

Dr. L. Hartmann
Dr. J.R. Ortt
Dr. L. Hartmann
Dr.ing. V.E. Scholten
H. Khodaei
0,5/0,5/0,5/0,5
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
none
English

Page 58 of 92

MOT9612

Business development lab (short)

Dr. J.R. Ortt


Module Manager
Dr. J.R. Ortt
Instructor
A. Wetters
Instructor
H. Khodaei
Instructor
Dr.
J.R. Ortt
Responsible for assignments
Contact Hours / Week
0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period
3
Start Education
3
Exam Period
3
4
Course Language
English

Page 59 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Electives on Entrepeneurship 2016


Program Structure 1

See blackboard organization 'Annotation Entrepreneurship' for a complete list of electives.

Page 60 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Technology in Sustainable Development 2016


Contact for students
ECTS Program
Introduction 1

Program Structure 1

Arno Haket
30
This is a university-wide initiative. The specialisation 'Technology in Sustainable Development' fits into all MSc curricula at TU
Delft. The specialisation is open to all TU Delft master students that intend to integrate sustainable development into their
graduation project.
The graduation specialisation covers both broader and deeper knowledge regarding Sustainable Development (SD) and
technology. Sufficient depth is achieved by the demand that SD has to be a core issue in the graduation project. Approval of the
thesis work and the internship by the departments advisor on sustainability is needed. He will assess the project regarding the
way SD has been tackled in the problem definition, the actual work and in the conclusions of the project.
The broadening of knowledge is guaranteed through a number of elective courses in the field of SD and the Colloquium
Technology in Sustainable Development (WM0939TU). Another goal of this colloquium is to teach the students to apply a long
term vision in determining their engineering priorities. It consists of two parts in which interdisciplinary groups of students work
on typical sustainability issues and approaches. The first part is a full-time week which takes place in a hostel where guest
lectures and workshops are held. In the second part - which is spread over about 6 weeks - students are asked to develop
approaches to solve the sustainability problems. In interdisciplinary groups they focus on one subject, for example: water,
energy, industry, transport, etc.
Approval of the Masters thesis work and the internship by the responsible programme employee is required.
The programme consists of:
. Internship within a R&D institution with a clear relation to sustainability (at least 15 credits; 2.5 months),
. Colloquium Technology in Sustainable Development (WM0939TU, 5 credits)
. cluster-A electives (3-7 credits; see www.tudelft.nl/tisd for the list),
. cluster-B electives (3-7 credits; see www.tudelft.nl/tisd for the list).
The thesis project must be focussed on sustainable development or the development of knowledge and technology aimed at a
more sustainable future. Approval of the Masters thesis work and the internship by the responsible programme employee (Dr.
W.G. Bouwman) is required.

Page 61 of 92

WM0939TU
Module Manager
Instructor
Instructor
Responsible for assignments
Co-responsible for
assignments
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for

Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Assessment

Enrolment / Application

Engineering for sustainable development

Dr.ir. B. Broekhans
Dr. C.I.M. Nevejan
Dr.ir. E.H.W.J. Cuppen
Dr.ir. B. Broekhans
Dr.ir. E.H.W.J. Cuppen
0/4/0/0 period 2 including full week 2.8
2
2
none
English
The course is open to all Msc students. It is a compulsory course for students wishing to pursue a annotation in Technology in
Sustainable Development. Participants work in interdisciplinary groups on sustainability issues and approaches.
It is organised once a year for maximum 40 students. If the course is overbooked, students that are able to proof that they have
made definite arrangements to the graduation annotation 'Technology in Sustainable Development' will be preferred.
The course provides students with a unique opportunity to explore the connection between engineering, the environment and
society. Through the course students apply knowledge from the classroom to solve real-world problems and see first-hand how
engineers are tackling the massive challenges of sustainable development.
Sustainable development is one of the biggest challenges our society is facing. Climate change, loss of biodiversity, pollution,
water scarcity at some places and floods at others, scarcity of natural resources, population growth and the increasing gap
between the rich and the poor are all issues that make sustainable development urgent. With sustainable development is meant
development that is good for nature (e.g. biodiversity, environment), people (e.g. poverty reduction, welfare) and at the same
time economically profitable (e.g. business model). Technology plays a vital role in transitions towards sustainable development,
as it can help to alleviate greenhouse gas emissions, water pollution, et cetera. That means that, as an engineer, you will be able
to play an important role in sustainable development. As sustainability problems cover different disciplinary fields at the same
time and cannot be tackled by only one of them, an interdisciplinary approach is necessary. In addition, there needs to be more in
place than just technology for innovations to become implemented widely. Innovations are embedded in so-called sociotechnical
systems, i.e. systems of technological infrastructures, people and institutions (e.g. regulations). In order to understand how
sustainable innovations come about, it is important to understand the wider sociotechnical system and how it may foster or
hamper sustainability transitions.
This course offers reflection that you will need as an engineer working on sustainability issues. First, reflection on actual
sociotechnical systems will be enhanced during lectures, site visits and discussions during the meetings. Central are
sociotechnical scenarios and societal aspects of technology for sustainability. Second, students work in interdisciplinary teams on
a particular sustainability transition. Each team will design pathways towards a more sustainable future for a particular (selected)
project. Third, students will reflect on their own role, as an engineer, in sustainable development in individual columns.
During the course students will:
-Experience complexity, tensions and dilemmas that come with sustainable practices and required interdisciplinary efforts;
- Consider their role as an engineer with regard to sustainable development and reflect on personal educational objectives,
professional values, ethics and beliefs.
- Analyse (im)possibilities and design pathways of transitions to sustainable futures of sociotechnical systems.
-In the classroom: The course will start with a mandatory kick off meeting.
-In the field: The kick off meeting is followed by 5 meetings which combine guest lectures and site visits. Students have to
attend at least 4 out of 6 meetings to pass the course.
-In a learning lab and bubble: Week 2.8 will be a (mandatory) project that is meant to inspire and challenge you to put your
disciplinary knowledge into interdisciplinary and complex practice. The aim is to design pathways to sustainability with an
interdisciplinary team. We plan to stay in a hostel outside Delft for five days and four nights.
Final grades will be primarily based upon the teams report. Team members receive the same grade. However, under specific
circumstances individual grades may be given. Moreover, individual grades may differ from the group grade to a maximum of
0,5 based upon the quality of the written reflection report and participation during meetings. Serious participation in at least 4
meetings (the kick-off meeting plus at least three site visits/guest lectures) and the learning lab is required.
Enrolment in Blackboard only on your request. Please send motivation letter and personal information (name, student id, MSc
program, estimated graduation date) to get on the preliminary list of participants. Sign up in time to be sure of participation.
The course is organised once a year for maximum 40 students. If the course is overbooked, preference is given to students that
can proof to have made definite arrangements to the graduation annotation 'Technology in Sustainable Development'.

Special Information
Targetgroup

Category

Participation in the course will bring additional cost of approx. 100,00 to be paid by bank transfer. You will receive an invoice
after admission.
esd@tudelft.nl
The course Engineering for Sustainable Development is a compulsory course for students who want to receive the Technology in
Sustainable Development annotation to their degree certificate. It is open to all TU Delft students, apart from SET and IE
Masters students (see: www.tudelft.nl/tisd).
MSc level

Page 62 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

TiSD Electives
Program Structure 1

. TiSD cluster-A electives (3-7 credits; see www.tudelft.nl/tisd for the list),
. TiSD cluster-B electives (3-7 credits; see www.tudelft.nl/tisd for the list).

Page 63 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Study Abroad 2016


Contact for students
In association with the
University of
ECTS Program
Introduction 1

Exchange office Applied Sciences, Physics building, Room A210


see http://partneruniversities.tudelft.nl
30
This programme is especially tailored for (Dutch) students who will do a PhD after completing their master education as an
alternative for the industrial internship. It consists of a semester, project and/or courses, at a foreign university. For completing
the master programme within two years, it fits best in the spring semester of the first year. The programme has to be approved in
advance by the board of examiners.
See http://www.tnw.tudelft.nl/studyabroad for more information.
Note: the application deadline for the spring semester is September 15! Deadline for the autumn semester is February 9.

Page 64 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Education 2016
ECTS Program
Introduction 1

30
The educational programmes are aimed at Dutch-speaking students only, because they are oriented towards the Dutch school
system and because it includes internships (Schoolpracticum) at Dutch schools. Consequently the educational programme
modules are taught in Dutch.
The programme consists of Basisdeel/Ed1 (30 EC) and Verdiepingsdeel/Ed2 (30 EC).
The minor Education (Basisdeel/Ed1) can be done during the bachelor programme and leads to certification as a tweedegraads
secondary school teacher with limited qualification (beperkte bevoegdheid). If a student has done the minor Education, only the
Verdiepingsdeel/Ed2 of 30 EC remains for the master programme scientific and social orientation. The combination of the minor
Education and Ed2 specialisation leads to certification as a fully-qualified eerstegraads (grade-one) secondary school teacher.
The certificate will be attached to the master diploma.
Students that did not take the minor Education can follow the Basisdeel/Ed1 specialisation as part of their master programme and
then do the Verdiepingsdeel/Ed2 as a post-master course in order to become fully qualified.
The programme should be approved by the education programme coordinator M.A.F.M. Jacobs. You should contact him before
starting this programme.

Page 65 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Education Basis 2016

Page 66 of 92

SL3031
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Remarks

Didactical Skills, only given in Dutch


2/0/0/0

1
1
none
Dutch
Didactische werkvormen zorgen voor afwisseling tijdens de lessen. Afhankelijk van leerdoelen en leerinhoud kiezen docenten
voor een bepaalde werkvorm. In dit vak maak je op een heel praktische manier kennis met het plannen, voorbereiden, verzorgen
en evalueren van een les. Je oefent drie werkvormen, waarbij je medestudenten als leerlingen optreden. Je reflecteert op je eigen
functioneren o.a. door een dvd opname. Je krijgt feedback van je docent en medestudenten.
Je kunt met succes de volgende didactische werkvormen, in combinatie, toepassen:
-Doceerles.
-Onderwijsleergesprek.
-Zelfstandig werken.
Je hebt inzicht gekregen in de elementaire beginselen van leerdoelen, een lesplan maken, lesvoorbereiding, afwisseling in
werkvormen en evalueren.
Microteaching en werkcolleges
-Op Blackboard
- Geerts, W. en Van Kralingen, R. Handboek voor leraren , Coutinho, 2011, 1e druk, ISBN: 9789046902509
Aan de hand van:
- ingeleverde lesvoorbereidingen,
- uitvoering microlessen,
- reflecties,
- samenwerking (zie ook: opmerkingen).
Aanwezigheid is verplicht!
Dit vak vereist een grote mate van discipline. De planning (die bij de eerste bijeenkomst wordt uitgereikt) geeft aan op welk
moment er iets van je verwacht wordt. Omdat je medestudenten van jouw activiteiten afhankelijk zijn en andersom, kan niet van
deze planning worden afgeweken. Te laat handelen en/of reageren wordt niet geaccepteerd.

SL3041
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment
Remarks
Location

Drs. M. Bruggink

Orienterende stage

D.P. Lans
Drs.ing. A.J. Boer
Prof.dr. M.J. de Vries
Ir. L.A.R. Henze
Drs.ing. S. de Haan
M. Bruggink
Dr. J.G. Spandaw
Dr. W.T.M. Caspers
Ir. W. Sonneveld
Dr. P.J.J.M. Dekkers
Ir. I.D. Verhoev
x/x/0/0 In overleg met de stageschool
1
None (Self Study)
1
Exam by appointment
Dutch
Didactische vaardigheden (kan ook parallel gevolgd worden)
Opdrachten op een stageschool uitvoeren, waaronder: interviews houden met leraren en leerlingen, lessen observeren, assisteren
in de klas, lessen voorbereiden en onder begeleiding van de schoolpracticumdocent enkele losse (deel)lessen uitvoeren en
evalueren. Jouw gegeven lessen worden bekeken en geevalueerd. Bij succesvol doorlopen van deze stage is toegang verschaft tot
Schoolpracticum A.
Zich orinteren op de praktijk van het natuurkunde- / scheikunde- / wiskunde- / informatica-onderwijs voor havo en vwo.
Schoolpracticum
Handleiding Orinterende Stage (Zie Handleiding Schoolpracticum)
Aan de hand van een schoolpracticumverslag.
Lever je verslag in uiterlijk voor week 7 van periode 1!
Aanwezigheid en actieve deelname verplicht. Planning en roostering gebeurt in overleg tussen student en
schoolpracticumdocent.
De havo/vwo-afdeling van een school voor voortgezet onderwijs.
Minor-studenten kunnen ook les geven aan klassen vmbo-t

Page 67 of 92

SL3116
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents
Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment

Research Methodology in the Social Sciences for Education

0/2/0/0
1
1
none
Dutch
Selected topics in social research methods towards constructing an adequate and relevant research plan.
Development of the knowledge and skills required to design a small scale research study into the teaching and learning of
science at secondary school
Combination of lectures, workshops and small-group work with online and face-to-face feedback sessions.
Production of a research proposal and plan, and activities report

SL3132
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Education Method
Assessment
Enrolment / Application

SL3174
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents
Study Goals
Education Method
Prerequisites
Assessment

M.A.F.M. Jacobs
Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld
Dr. P.J.J.M. Dekkers

Vakdidactiek Scheikunde 1

Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld


2/0/0/0
1
1
none
Dutch
Colleges
Opdrachten
Aan de hand van de opdrachten
Via Blackboard

Schoolpracticum Scheikunde A

Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld


In overleg met de vakdidacticus en de stageschool wordt bepaald wanneer de stage plaatsvindt.
2
Different, to be announced
1
Exam by appointment
Dutch
Betrokkene laat zien dat hij competent is op de verschillende gebieden zoals geformuleerd in de handleiding portfolio.
Aantoonbare ontwikkeling in de - in de handleiding portfolio genoemde - kerncompetenties.
Portfoliobijeenkomsten / schoolpracticum
Aanwezigheid en actieve deelname is verplicht.
Orienterende stage is met voldoende resultaat afgerond evenals Didactische vaardigheden.
Is hieraan (nog) niet voldaan dan is toestemming van de docent noodzakelijk.
Aan de hand van portfolio A; beoordeling door vakdidacticus en schoolpraktikumdocent.

Page 68 of 92

SL3342

Vakdidactiek Scheikunde 2

Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Study Goals

Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld

Education Method
Assessment
Enrolment / Application

Colleges, werkcolleges, opdrachten.


Aan de hand van de opdrachten
Via Blackboard

0/4/0/0
2
2
none
Dutch
VD1, DiVa
Verdieping van wat je in VD1 geleerd hebt.
1.De student kent het Nederlandse scheikundelerarenlandschap, zoals de vakvereniging, de tijdschriften, de
scholierenwedstrijden.
2.De student kent de samenhang tussen de onderdelen van de schoolstof en (globaal) hun samenhang met toepassingen.
3.De student kan leerdoelen (van een lessenserie) opstellen.
4.De student kan een lessenserie voorbereiden en uitvoeren met behulp van het PCK-model, rekening houdend met de
voorkennis, interesses, mogelijkheden en beperkingen van de leerlingen. De student kan daarbij een onderbouwde
onderwijsaanpak kiezen.
5.De student kent verschillende lesmethoden en kan aan de hand van deze verschillende methoden een les en een lessenserie
voorbereiden.
6.De student kan een lessenserie voorbereiden gebruikmakend van andere bronnen dan het lesboek.
7.De student kan de aangereikte theorie over scheikundedidactiek toepassen in zijn lessen.
8.De student kan verschillende uitlegstrategien toepassen en kan zijn keuzes onderbouwen.
9.De student kan de vaktaal correct hanteren en houdt rekening met pre- en misconcepties.
10.De student kan verschillende werkvormen, waaronder ADSL, toepassen en kan zijn keuzes onderbouwen.
11.De student kan een valide en betrouwbaar proefwerk inclusief correctievoorschrift opstellen om gegeven leerdoelen te
toetsen. De student kan een gegeven correctievoorschrift correct hanteren.

SL3462
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Required for
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment

Educational Science

M.A.F.M. Jacobs
4/4/0/0
1
2
1
none
Dutch
De minor Educatie en voor de eerstegraads lerarenopleiding.
Onderwijskunde legt de basis voor de onderwijspraktijk (in de stage). Aan de orde komen: de leerling, de leraar, het
onderwijsleerproces en de schoolorganisatie.
De leerling: leerprocessen, leertheorien, metacognitie, hersenen en geheugen, motivatie, de ontwikkeling van de adolescent,
leerstijlen, leerproblemen, enz.
De leraar: motiveren, onderwijzen, klassenmanagement (orde), opvoeden, enz.
Het onderwijsleerproces: lessen ontwerpen, leerdoelen, werkvormen, toesting, enz.
De schoolorganisatie: het Nederlandse onderwijsstelsel, mentoraat, leerlingbegeleiding en leerlingenzorg.
Als je het vak gevolgd hebt, kun je relevante theorien selecteren en toepassen om de kwaliteit van je handelen als leraar te
verbeteren.
Colleges, zelfstudie, samenwerken, werkstukken maken.
Aan de hand van werkstukken.

Page 69 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Specialisation Education Verdieping 2016

Page 70 of 92

SL3012

Professionalization in SC and SE

Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Drs. C. Wehrmann
Drs. M. Bruggink
Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld

Study Goals

Students will be able to identify and explain similarities and differences between science communication and education.

0/0/0/2
4
4
none
English
All theoretical SC or Ed courses
In this course for all science education and science communication master-students we will focus on the similarities and
differences between education and communication. Students will explore and elaborate the statement that education is formal
communication and communication is informal education. Knowing, identifying and using similarities and differences will
enhance your own and specific education and communication practice and reasoning. Some examples: Teaching might be
strongly supported by communication strategies. The psychology of communication might enhance the learning processes in
groups and/or individuals. Communication professionals on their turn could benefit from the way educational researchers and
education professionals deal with the various basic attitudes of an audience towards new knowledge.
Through an integration assessment students learn from each other their specific theoretical knowledge. This course not only
focusses on new theories and the broadening of your theoretical scope, but moreover makes you familiar with the power of
professional feedback and getting used to learn from and questioning other domains. The latter is important for education and
communication which are multidisciplinary by nature.

Students will be able to compare and integrate theories from both domains and their application.

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials
Assessment

Student will be able to apply what they have learned in their professional activities.
Seminars
To be decided
Assessment will be based on:
- assignments (done individually or in small groups);
- presentations;
- a final course paper.

Page 71 of 92

SL3021
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

The designing of education or communication products and


processes

Dr. M.C.A. van der Sanden


Drs.ing. A.J. Boer
Ir. W. Sonneveld
0/0/4/4
3
4
3
none
English
How to create a series of lessons, design a strategic science communication process on a certain technological subject and its
according communication means? In the Bachelors stage you will have already become acquainted with designing. It will be that
experience in the field of technological design that will form the basis for this course on designing of communication and
education products and processes. The central themes of this course will be: how to design, realise, implement and evaluate
education and communication products and processes.
The issues dealt with will be problem analysis methods, systems theory, design methods and precisely how communication and
education theories can be applied to the design process. In case of the latter, also creativity, experience and intuition are
discussed and made explicit during lectures and assignments. These domains of knowledge are helpful in bridging the gap
between theory and practice. And of course ethical and philosophical issues connected to innovations in science and technology
will be taken into account of the design process.

Study Goals

Education Method
Literature and Study
Materials

The course's first period is considered a more theoretical part in which science education and science communication students
work together , whereas the second period you will start working on your own education of communication design.
The first period combines education and communication. In the second period you will deepen and broaden either an education
process and product or a communication process or product. An important aspect of this stage of the course will be the justifying
of your choices.
By the end of this course you will have obtained:
- insight into the theories concerning the process of designing, planning and producing products designed for the purposes of
conveying scientific and technological knowledge;
- insight into the evaluation methods deployed in the areas of education and communication;
- skills in bridging the gap between education and communication theory and practice by design.
Lectures and seminars
Reader provided via blackboard. The additional literature for the first period will be posted on blackbord.
For science education students the literature concerning the second period see 'Literatuur en studiemateriaal'.

Prerequisites
Assessment

For science communication students the literature concerning the second period will be posted on blackbord as well.
None
The final products will comprise:
- education product and process or communication product and process accompanied by a detailed description of the strategic
design choices made;
- design processes needs to be evaluated;
- individual oral assessment during period 1 and 2;
- presentation to be given during the final lecture.
The final mark will be based on the final product of the first period and the one from the second period (1:1), moreover both
assignments should be graded 6 or more. The oral individual assessments in both period 1 and 2 can result in -1 or +1 difference
with your final group grade.

Remarks

Lecture attendance is compulsory.


Students are expected to work on the final assignments in pairs of two or in groups of three.
The first part of this course will be taught in English. The language used in the second part depends: English for students in the
Science Communication track, Dutch for students in the Education track.

Page 72 of 92

SL3311
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents
Study Goals
Education Method
Assessment
Remarks

Research of Education

M.A.F.M. Jacobs
Prof.dr. M.J. de Vries
Ir. L.A.R. Henze
Drs. M. Bruggink
Dr. J.G. Spandaw
Dr. P.J.J.M. Dekkers
Je stelt in overleg met de docent een planning op voor het onderzoek.
3
4
3
3
4
Dutch
SL3111 Social science research methods
Systematisch onderzoeken van een onderwijskundig en/of vakdidactisch probleem, met als doel oplossingen voor het probleem
te verkennen.
Zelfstandig een onderzoek kunnen opzetten en uitvoeren in een onderwijsomgeving en hierover rapporteren.
Individueel.
In overleg met de docent is het ook mogelijk het onderzoek in tweetallen of drietallen uit te voeren.
Aan de hand van de onderzoeksopzet en het onderzoeksverslag.
In januari en februari 2016 worden enkele bijeenkomsten georganiseerd om ervoor te zorgen dat iedere student op tijd aan het
onderzoek gaat beginnen en daardoor het onderzoek tijdig kan afsluiten.
Vooral individuele begeleiding door de onderzoekers van SEC.
Studenten die de tweejarige lerarenopleiding volgen, kunnen dit vak inpassen in hun vakdidactisch onderzoek.

Page 73 of 92

SL3381
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Expected prior knowledge
Course Contents

Study Goals

Didactics Chemistry 3

Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld


0/0/2/2
3
4
3
Exam by appointment
Dutch
VD1 en VD2
. Pedagogical Content Knowledge
. Beginselen van de Nieuwe Scheikunde
. Praktijkonderzoek
. Examenprogramma, PTA
. Verschillen tussen leerlingen
. Pedagogical Linkmaking (Lessenseries)
. RRI onderwijsaanpak
. ICT
. Technisch ontwerpen
. NLT
. Schoolexamen, Centraal Examen
. Professionele ontwikkeling

1.De student kent en neemt actief deel aan het Nederlandse scheikundelerarenlandschap (denk aan congresbezoek, schrijven van
artikel, DvD deelname).
2.De student kent de samenhang tussen de onderdelen van de (nieuwe) examenstof en kan een PTA voor de hele bovenbouw
analyseren aan de hand van deze examenstof.
3.De student kan een ontwerpgerichte lessenserie voorbereiden met behulp van het PCK-model. *
a.De student houdt rekening met de voorkennis, interesses, mogelijkheden en beperkingen van de leerlingen.
b.De student kan rekening met de leerstijl van leerlingen.
c.De student kan daarbij de vaktaal correct hanteren en houdt rekening met pre- en misconcepties.
d.De student kan gebruikmaken van concept-context didactiek en dit onderbouwen.
e.De student kan in het ontwerp rekening houden met ADSL-werkvormen.
f.De student kan gebruikmaken van eigen bronnen als lesmateriaal.
g.De student kan in het ontwerp rekening houden met ICT-werkvormen
h.De student kan een correctievoorschrift ontwerpen en dit correct hanteren.
4.De student kan zelf theorie over scheikundedidactiek verwerven en verwerken bij de voorbereiding van lessen en lessenseries.
5.De student kan een vakdidactisch praktijkonderzoek doen en op basis hiervan aanbevelingen doen voor het verbeteren van een
les of lessenserie.
6.De student kan een valide en betrouwbaar schoolexamen inclusief correctievoorschrift opstellen om gegeven leerdoelen te
toetsen. De student kan een gegeven correctievoorschrift correct hanteren.
7.De student kan een eindexamen volgens het gegeven correctievoorschrift nakijken.
8.De student kan een vakoverstijgende module analyseren en aanbevelingen ter verbetering doen.
* Zie ook opdracht 4d uit SPB: Ontwerp- en modelleeropdracht. Deze opdracht is een onderdeel van de ontwerpgerichte
lessenserie zoals beschreven in de leerdoelen van VD3.

Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials
Prerequisites
Assessment
Enrolment / Application

Werkcolleges.
Actieve deelname en aanwezigheid is verplicht.
Relatie met VD1, VD2, SP B, OvO en OCE
Via de docent en op Blackboard
VD1, VD2, OS, SPA, DiVa en OK zijn met een voldoende afgerond. Wanneer hieraan (nog) niet is voldaan is toestemming van
de examencommissie nodig
Dossier Vakdidactiek Scheikunde 3
Via Blackboard

Page 74 of 92

SL3424
Responsible Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period

Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals
Education Method
Course Relations
Literature and Study
Materials
Prerequisites
Assessment
Enrolment / Application

Schoolpracticum Scheikunde B

12

Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld


In overleg met de vakdidacticus en de stageschool wordt bepaald wanneer de stage plaatsvindt
3
4
Different, to be announced
1
Exam by appointment
Dutch
Het schoolpractikum wordt deels zelfstandig uitgevoerd. Betrokkene laat zien dat hij/zij vakdidactische en onderwijskundige
kennis en vaardigheden in de praktijk kan toepassen.
Hij/zij toont aan competent te zijn op de gebieden zoals geformuleerd in de portfolio handleiding.
Bereiken van een startcompetentie voor zelfstandig functioneren als eerstegraads docent scheikunde.
Voldoen aan de kerncompetenties van de Msc SEC.
Schoolpracticum; Portfolio bijeenkomsten
Aanwezigheid en actieve deelname is verplicht.
Relatie met SP A, VD3, OCE, OvO
Handleiding Schoolpracticum en handleiding Portfolio.
Toelatingseisen Vakdidactiek 1 en 2 zijn met voldoende resultaat afgerond; Portfolio A is beoordeeld en goedgekeurd.
Aan de hand van het portfolio B; beoordeling door vakdidacticus en schoolpractikumdocent.
Via Blackboard

Page 75 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

Management of Technology 2016


In association with the
Faculty of
Introduction 1

TBM
This programme is offered by the faculty of Technology, Policy and Management. The programme consists of the second
semester of the MSc Management of Technology.

Page 76 of 92

Year
Organization
Education

2016/2017
Applied Sciences
Master Chemical Engineering

2nd Semester MoT Modules 2016

Page 77 of 92

MOT1003
Module Manager
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Instructor
Responsible for assignments
Co-responsible for
assignments
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Integration Moment

Dr. H.K. Lukosch


Dr.ir. G. Bekebrede
Dr. G. van de Kaa
Dr. L.J. Kortmann
Dr. H.K. Lukosch
Dr. R.M. Verburg
C. Milchram
Dr. H.K. Lukosch
Dr.ir. G. Bekebrede
0/0/0/9
4
4
none
English
The Master programme in Management of Technology (MOT) educates students with a bachelor degree in engineering as
technology managers, innovation managers, analysts of technological markets (either as scientists or consultants), and
entrepreneurs in technology-based, internationally-oriented competitive business environments.
The ultimate objective of the programme is to improve the quality of technology and innovation management in the different
engineering mono-disciplines in practice. Students contribute to t scientific work in the area of MOT and have the opportunity to
apply their knowledge in real-world settings, such as advanced technology organizations, laboratories, and high-tech business
ventures.

Study Goals

Education Method

Assessment

The programme deliberately aims at an international and diverse group of students. Students of MOT are all rooted in different
engineering mono-disciplines and work together in order to combine insights from the different engineering disciplines and to
apply the different aspects of technology and innovation management. The programme focuses on technology and innovation in
relation to (1) organization, (2) commercialization, (3) engineering economics, (4) research and reflection. In the course
MOT1003 students learn how to integrate the different themes of the programme.
1.By the end of the Integration Moment you are acquainted with the MOT knowledge and skills as put forward in the first year
of the Progam,
2.By the end of the Integration Moment you have a thorough understanding of the (inter-) relationships between the different
parts of the MOT program.
3.By the end of the course you have experienced how to apply MOT knowledge and skills effectively.
In part 1 of this course students will play a Business Strategy Game (BSG, see www.bsg-online.com) In groups of 1 to 5 class
members students are assigned to operate an athletic footwear company that produces and markets both branded and privatelabel footwear and competes head-to-head against footwear companies run by other members of the class.
In part 2 of the MOT1003 course students are asked to design their own version of a simulation game. The game played in part 1
may serve as a trigger but students are free to design a game that provides an optimal integration of the different topics of the
MOT curriculum. In order to prepare students, lectures on the basics of game design will be part of the course. Part 2 will be
broken down into 3 different deliverables for each week
We will use the case method of instructing and assessment during the Integration Moment. Students will be expected to do
online assignments as well as a classroom participation during the business game. All assignments are group assignments. The
final grade is based on the score of the online group assignment (50%) as well as the score on their design of a future MOT game
(50%).

Page 78 of 92

MOT1435

Technology, Strategy and Entrepreneurship

Dr. G. van de Kaa


Module Manager
Responsible for assignments Dr. G. van de Kaa
Prof.dr. C.P. van Beers
Co-responsible for
assignments
Contact Hours / Week
0/0/5/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period
3
Start Education
3
Exam Period
3
4
Course Language
English
Summary
The course Technology, Strategy and Entrepreneurship focuses on formulating and implementing technology strategy for large
firms and entrepreneurs. However, before a manager can formulate a successful strategy, it is needed to understand the specifics
of the external economic and societal environment in which the strategy will be implemented. Throughout the course, students
will be acquainted with a variety of academic perspectives which are utilized by strategy and entrepreneurship researchers.
Course Contents
Greater product and technology complexity and increased internationalization of innovation activities have increased costs and
risks for innovators such that the boundaries of the firms have changed and are changing.
Specifically, we explain the typical patterns of technological innovation in order to provide a foundation for the formulation of a
technology strategy. Furthermore, we focus on identifying the reasons why most industries adopt a dominant design and why a
particular firms technology is adopted as the dominant design. We will examine the factors that affect the outcome of standards
battles. These include e.g. timing of entry strategies, collaboration strategies, and appropriability strategies.
We will provide a basic background of entrepreneurship. Specifically, we will pay attention to networking strategies for new
firms (entrepreneurs). How do these firms attempt to achieve success with their new technology, in a new market? As the
boundaries of the firms are getting more transparent due to greater complexity of technical projects, it is required to decide
whether to collaborate with external partners, and with whom. This can be a good option for entrepreneurial firms as they lack
the necessary complementary assets to successfully commercialize a new technology. We will explore collaboration strategies
for entrepreneurial firms.

Study Goals

Education Method

Literature and Study


Materials

Technological innovation is a much more uncertain activity for a firm than other activities. Strategic thinking and formulation
require knowledge on the boundaries of the firm and the markets in which the firm operates, its value chain and its core
competencies. Also, strategy formulation aims at controlling the external environment of the firm, which is characterized by
uncertainties. A distinction can be made in changes in the external environment in time or by location. General Purpose
Technologies affect strategy formulation in time and frugal or inclusive innovations by location. After formulating the sources
and innovation strategies we will pay attention to the resources firms have for innovation processes and specific valuation
techniques, like real options, conjoint analysis and data envelopment analysis.
After the course students are able to understand the theoretical background of technology strategy. The course provides students
with a coherent framework to understand, to relate and to position a variety of strategy topics.
After the course students are able to understand the theoretical background of entrepreneurship.
After the course, students are able to understand and apply key technology strategy models; students are able to understand the
relations between those models.
After the course students are able to understand, analyze and conclude on the industry dynamics of technological innovation.
After the course, students are able to understand, analyze and conclude on companies technology strategy, and are able to
generate recommendations for formulating and implementing such a strategy for large and entrepreneurial firms.
After the course students are able to formulate and implement the technological innovation strategy for large and entrepreneurial
firms
This is a blended course and the course is organized into 1 introduction session, 6 regular sessions, 2 game sessions, 4 teaching
case sessions, and one concluding session with exam preparation. Each week will start with a spark which will be communicated
through blackboard on the discussion forum. On the first day the teacher will be online at a predefined time to discuss the spark
with you. On the second day of the week a teaching case or teaching game will be offered. On the third day of the week, teaching
material will come online. On the fourth day of the week, a regular interactive lecture is planned. On the fifth and final day of the
week quizzes and mid-term exams are available. Deadlines for quizzes and mid-term exams are every Friday 13:00. Each regular
session will consist of lectures. In the teaching case sessions students discuss questions posed in assigned teaching cases that
relate to the topics studied in the regular sessions. For the regular sessions students study the literature and for the teaching case
sessions students prepare the teaching cases. In the teaching game sessions students apply the theory by implementing and
evaluating various strategies in a real life situation.
Book: Schilling, M. A. 2013. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation. New York, USA, 4th Revised edition,
ISBN10 0071326448, ISBN13 9780071326445
Journal articles: Will be posted on Blackboard-site.

Assessment
Enrolment / Application

Slides presented in class: Will be posted on Blackboard-site.


Individual exam on book, literature, and lectures
True/false Quizzes and mid term multiple choice exams
blackboard

Page 79 of 92

MOT1451
Module Manager
Responsible for assignments
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period

Course Language
Course Contents

Inter- and intra-organisational decision making

H. Asghari
H. Asghari
0/0/0/4
4
4
4
4A
4B
English
All organizations, big or small, public or private, national or international, take decisions on a daily basis. One would like to
believe that such decisions - taken in and between organizations - are highly structured, well-planned and based on all the
necessary information. In reality, information is often incomplete or contested by the multiple actors involved in decision
making processes. Whether it is governments pushing through policies or companies trying to increase profits, rarely can a
decision be made in isolation from competing interests, both within the organization and outside it. As a result, decisions often
appear to be taken in a chaotic and ill-structured manner.
One of the primary purposes of this course is to make students realize that it is often impossible to reach decisions through
rational problem solving and information processing. In many instances, carefully pre-conceived plans and hierarchically
enforced decisions backfire. Even ministers or CEOs often cannot decide unilaterally but have to negotiate and make
compromises. Decision making is characterized by permanent struggle and the exercise of both formal and informal power. In
such situations, with many different actors that have a variety of interests yet are dependent on each other, rational problem
solving is not only unattainable but also undesirable.

Study Goals

Education Method

Literature and Study


Materials

Assessment

Elective

This course first of all introduces students to theoretical perspectives and models that help to describe how decisions are made in
practice, i.e. what decision-makers really do, and explain why decisions are made in such a way, i.e. why decision makers
actually do what they do. Beyond description and explanation, this course then acquaints students with how networks are
structured and what strategies may be used in managing a variety of actors and interests. During the lectures students apply the
theoretical perspectives and models to real-life examples of decision making. In parallel students analyze a case study in more
depth, which evaluates past decision making processes to formulate recommendations to actors about future decision making
processes. At the end of the course students are not only able to analyze decision making processes in and between
organizations, but are also able to design (strategies for) decision making processes that enable change in a multi-actor context.
At the end of this course students will be able to:
- Understand and apply rational and political perspectives on decision making.
- Contrast the characteristics of networks with the characteristics of hierarchies, and recognize these in real life cases.
- Independently reconstruct and evaluate decision-making processes about complex problems in multi-actor settings, i.e. in
networks and organizations.
- Recognize and design strategies for decision-making processes in networks and organizations.
This course will primarily consist of (interactive) lectures, case studies and writing a paper individually.
- During the lectures we will synthesize the required readings. We start each lecture with examining a real-life case of a decision
making process.
- During the tutorials students discuss the paper they are required to write individually and hand in at the end of the course. The
paper needs to reflect the students ability to analyze a decision making process (describing what happened and why it happened
that way) as well as to design strategies that enable change in a multi-actor context (offering suggestions or recommendations for
action). The analysis and strategies are based on the theoretical perspectives, models and concepts discussed during the lectures.
The following academic literature is required reading for the course:
1. The (excerpts from) book chapters and articles published on Blackboard. They can be downloaded as pdfs for free. The book
chapters and articles are accompanied by short texts that provide background information.
2. The book Management in networks: on multi-actor decision making by Hans de Bruijn & Ernst ten Heuvelhof (edition 2008,
ISBN 978-0415462495).
The final grade for this course is determined as follows:
1. Ability to apply knowledge of the required readings is assessed through a digital exam that account for 50% of the final grade.
2. Ability to evaluate a real-life case using theoretical perspectives, models and concepts is assessed through writing an
individual paper. Students should be able to analyze a decision making process and design strategies that enable change in a
multi-actor context. The paper accounts for 50% of the final grade.
3. The exam and the paper will only be graded if the short assignments are handed in through Blackboard in time, prepared them
individually, and if they reflect serious effort.
Yes

Page 80 of 92

MOT1531
Module Manager
Instructor
Contact Hours / Week
x/x/x/x
Education Period
Start Education
Exam Period
Course Language
Course Contents

Study Goals

Education Method

Literature and Study


Materials

Assessment

Business Process Management and Technology

Prof.dr.ir. M.F.W.H.A. Janssen


Dr. M.V. Dignum
0/0/4/0
3
3
none
English
Business processes are at the core of high-tech organizations and consist of a large number of activities aimed at creating value.
In the digital age business processes are supported by, enabled through and changed by technology. Business processes are
situated at the point where the business meets IT and where technology and customer needs are aligned. If they fail or do not
adapt to the needs of customers the whole business might fail. Business Process Management (BPM) is necessary for ensuring
that processes are operating in concert and that these processes are adaptable to changes in the overall environment of the firm.
In this course the relationship between strategy, technology and business processes will be illustrated, explained and discussed.
Methods and tools for business process analysis and improvement will be presented, including a number of statistical and ICTarchitecture methods. New solutions will be architected for technology organizations. The extent to which the nature of business
processes is affected by contemporary technology constitutes the core of this course. In particular to analyze technologies and
their impact on business process management and to architect new solutions in the organizational context of the firm.
Topics
Aligning strategy and processes, value perspective, supply chains
Workflow, resources, BPM elements and control
Business process modeling (concepts, BPMN) + practical work
Process measurement, Balanced Score Card, Activity-based Costing + practical work
Business process improvement strategies and approaches, path dependencies, capabilities, resource-based view, business process
maturity
Improvement methodologies (LSS, lean, six sigma, theory of constraints, ..)
Statistical analyses and improvement + practical work
Simulation for business process improvement
Compliance by design, build-in-controls in processes and technology
Business process automation and technology (BPM, ERP, workflow, SOA,..)
Business processes automation (case-based, process -based, use-based)
Enterprise IT-architecture + practical work
Agility and adaptability of BPM systems and the users, business process and agile enterprises
Business and knowledge rules
The overall aim of the course is to learn how to improve the relationship between business processes, strategy and technology for
realizing organizational strategies. The focus is on realizing business processes enabled by new technology for high tech
organizations. In particular the objectives are
To analyze the relationship between business processes, strategy and technology
to understand new technologies and their impact on business process management
to have knowledge of methods and tools for improving business processes
to analyse and provide improvement suggestions for business processes
to design a technology architecture for supporting business processes
-lectures
-practical work
-assignment
N. Slack, A. Brandon-Jones, R. Johnston, A. Betts (2012) Operations and Process Management. Principles and Practice for
strategic Impact.
Parts of the book N. Bharosa, R. Van Wijk, N. De Winne & M. Janssen (2015). Challenging the Chain. Governing the
Automated Exchange and Processing of Business Information. IOS Press http://www.iospress.nl/book/challenging-the-chain/
(open access)
Reader
Students will collaborate in groups to make an assignment which should contain the design of a process and a technical
architecture. Students should select a process which they want to improve. The assignment consists of three parts
1.Analysis: Students select a company, analyse their strategy and select a critical business process. The existing process should
be modelled and the resulting product, stakeholders role, customer needs and technology used should be analysed.
2.Improvement: Based on the improvement methods and instruments a proposal for improvements should be made.
3.Realization: The proposed business process should be realized using a technology architecture.
For each part the students are expected to prepare a presentation and some of the groups will present these during the lectures.
Grading will be based on presentations (20%) and final report (80%).

Page 81 of 92

MOT2312

Research Methods

Dr. W.A.G.A. Bouwman


Module Manager
Responsible for assignments Dr. W.A.G.A. Bouwman
Contact Hours / Week
0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period
3
Start Education
3
Exam Period
3
4
Course Language
English
Course Contents
This course focuses on methods and techniques for designing and executing research. Both quantitative as qualitative research
methods are taught. The aim of this course is to provide MOT students with meaningful knowledge on how to execute and
critically assess research. Students are expected to acquire fundamental research methodological and statistical know-how and
skills.
This course is designed to help students develop and execute research steps: conceptualization of research ideas/problems,
development of a relevant theoretical framework and to develop related propositions, define core concepts and the way they are
empirically measured or observed, develop an appropriate research design and if required to test statistical hypotheses, to analyse
data and give interpretation of results.

Study Goals

Education Method

Topics that will be covered among others:


- define research problem, research objectives and questions
- conduct research process of scientific investigation
- develop a conceptual model
- formulation of hypotheses
- operationalize and develop measurement of concepts
- develop research design, as well as make motivated decisions on data collection and data analysis methods
- evaluate different types of quantitative techniques (hypothesis testing, non-parametrics, regression analysis, multivariate
analyses)
- perform data analyses through practical use of statistical software (SPSS)
- be able to analyse qualitative data, based on coding principals (possibily use software for qualitative data analysis)
- interpret and present results
- be able to discuss reliability and validity of research
- research ethics
After following this course, students are expected to:
- be able to describe scientific research problems, as well as research objectives and research questions
- develop a conceptual model
- describe the fundamental principles of specific research method and process, as well as being able to develop a research design
- be able to make an informed choice for a quantitative or qualitative research design
- identify sampling and data collection methods
- develop operationalization and measurement of variables
- compare different types of quantitative data analysis methods
- analyse results with SPSS as a statistical tool
- present the results and draw key conclusions
- as well as to be able to execute a qualitative research project, and to be able to make clear what the fundamental difference with
traditional empirical analytical research is.
The course consists of lectures in which knowledge and experience with regard to methodological choices and statistical
analyses go together.
During the lectures, students learn about research design and methods, (theoretical) sampling, data collection methods,
quantitative and qualitative data analysis technique, statistics and research report writing.

Literature and Study


Materials
Assessment

To put theory into practice, students are given exercises in which they apply what is taught during class and make use of SPSS
software when necessary.
To be announced via BB
Students will be assessed based on a written and MC Exam: 100%
Exercises are formative
In order to pass the course, students should have a final mark of at least 6.0 for their final exam.

MOT2421

Emerging and Breakthrough Technologies

Dr. J.R. Ortt


Module Manager
Responsible for assignments Dr. J.R. Ortt
Contact Hours / Week
0/0/0/8
x/x/x/x
Education Period
4
Start Education
4
Exam Period
4
5
Course Language
English

Page 82 of 92

Prof.dr.ir. H.E.A. van den Akker


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85000
B58-

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85000
B58-

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85000
B58-

Prof.dr. I.W.C.E. Arends


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
BT/Biotechnologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86659
B5-1.010

H. Asghari
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Policy, Org Law & Gaming

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88460
B31-B2.140

Prof.dr. C.P. van Beers


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89031
c3.110

Dr.ir. G. Bekebrede
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Policy, Org Law & Gaming

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81139
b2.060

Dr.ir. N.A.M. Besseling


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Organic Mat. & Interf.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83874
B58-

Drs.ing. A.J. Boer


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

P.E. Boukany
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89981
B58-

Drs. M.J. van Bourgondien


Unit
Department

Reactor Instituut Delft


Cursussen

Dr. W.A.G.A. Bouwman


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Information & Communication T

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87168
b3.260

Page 83 of 92

Dr.ir. B. Broekhans
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Policy, Org Law & Gaming

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81105
B31-b2.180

Drs. M. Bruggink
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84240
B22-C 103

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84240
B22-C 103

Unit
Department

Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Software Engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84240
B22-C 103

M. Bruggink
Dr. D. Bykov
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Nucl. Energy & Rad. Appl.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89531
B50-01.01.120

Dr. W.T.M. Caspers


Unit
Department

Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Analysis

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88239
HB 04.090

S. Conesa Boj
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
QN/Conesa-Boj Lab

Unit
Department

QuTech
TQC/Kouwenhoven Lab

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
QN/Quantum Transport

Dr.ir. E.H.W.J. Cuppen


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Policy, Org Law & Gaming

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86583
b2.190

Dr. P.J.J.M. Dekkers


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83035
C 115

Dr.ir. A.G. Denkova


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Radiat. &Isot. for Health

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84471
02.00.360

Dr. M.V. Dignum


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Information & Communication T
Page 84 of 92

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88064
b3.200

Dr. R. Eelkema
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Advanced Soft Matter

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81035
B58-

P.A. Elshof
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86361
B22-A 208

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86361
B22-A 208

L. van der Elst


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87495
B22-A 210

Dr. H.B. Eral


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Intensified Reaction and Separ

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86715
B34b-K-0-250

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Intensified Reaction and Separ

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86715
B34b-K-0-250

Prof.dr. J.H. van Esch


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Advanced Soft Matter

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88826
B58-

Prof.dr. J. Gascon Sabate


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Catalysis Engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89820
B58-

Dr. F.C. Grozema


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Opto-electr. Materials

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83914
B58-

Prof.dr.ir. A.B. de Haan


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89228
B58-

Drs.ing. S. de Haan
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.
Page 85 of 92

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Unit
Department

Bouwkunde
Docenten extern

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Ir. A.J.W. Haket


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85582
A 206

Dr. P.J. Hamersma


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82651
B58-

Prof. U. Hanefeld
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
BT/Biocatalysis

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89304
0.146

C. Haringa
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81352
B58-

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81352
B58-

Dr. L. Hartmann
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Centre for Entrepreneurship

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88073
B31-C2.150

Ir. L.A.R. Henze


Unit
Department

Industrieel Ontwerpen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81224
B32-C-2-130

Unit
Department

Industrieel Ontwerpen
Design Concept. & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81224
B32-C-2-130

Unit
Department

Industrieel Ontwerpen
Applied Ergonomics & Design

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81224
B32-C-2-130

Unit
Department

Industrieel Ontwerpen
Design Concept. & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81224
B32-C-2-130

Page 86 of 92

Dr. F.A. Henze-Rietveld


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81781
B22-C 105

Dr. F. Hollmann
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
BT/Biocatalysis

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81957
0.132

Dr. A.J. Houtepen


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Opto-electr. Materials

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82157
B58-

Dr. K.R. Huitema


Unit
Department

Reactor Instituut Delft


Cursussen

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84071
03.00.150

M.A.F.M. Jacobs
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85594
C 104

Dr. W.F. Jager


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Organic Mat. & Interf.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82626
B58-

Prof.dr.ir. M.F.W.H.A. Janssen


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Information & Communication T

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81140
b3.150

Prof.dr.ir. W. de Jong
Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Large Scale Energy Storage

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89476
B34-J-0-920

Dr. G. van de Kaa


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83678
B31-C3.050

Prof.dr. F. Kapteijn
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Catalysis Engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84384
B58-

S. Karssen-Minekus
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Support TNW

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83253
B22-A 210
Page 87 of 92

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83253
B22-A 210

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83253
B22-A 210

Dr. E.M. Kelder


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Fund. Asp. of Mat.&Energy

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83262
1.014

Dr.ing. S. Kenjeres
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83649
B58-

H. Khodaei
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Centre for Entrepreneurship

Room

B31-C2.130

Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Room

B31-C2.130

Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Room

B31-C2.130

Prof.dr. R.J.M. Konings


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Nucl. Energy & Rad. Appl.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89531
B50-01.01.120

Dr.ing. G.J.M. Koper


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Advanced Soft Matter

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88218
B58-

Dr. L.J. Kortmann


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Beleidsanalyse

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82154
B31-b2.290

Dr.ir. H.J.M. Kramer


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Intensified Reaction and Separ

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85593
B34b-K-1-150

Prof.dr.ir. M.T. Kreutzer


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Chemical Engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89084
B12-0.014

Page 88 of 92

Dr. D.J.P. Lahaye


Unit
Department

Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Numerical Analysis

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87257
HB 03.040

D.P. Lans
Dr. H.K. Lukosch
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Beleidsanalyse

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83211
B31-b2.290

Dr.ir. M. Makkee
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Catalysis Engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81391
B58-

Dr.ir. G.M.H. Meesters


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85501
B58-

Dr. E. Mendes
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Advanced Soft Matter

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82623
B58-

C. Milchram
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85297
B31-c3.080

Dr. C.I.M. Nevejan


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Systeemkunde

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84107
B31-b1.050

Prof.dr.ir. H.J. Noorman


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
BT/Bioprocess Engineering

Room

B58-

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
BT/Bioprocess Engineering

Room

B58-

Dr. H.W. Nugteren


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84376
B58-

Dr. E. Oehlke
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Radiat. &Isot. for Health

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82640
B50-02.00.380

Page 89 of 92

Prof.dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82133
B58-

Dr. J.R. Ortt


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84815
c3.010

Ir. C. Picioreanu
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
BT/Milieubiotechnologie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81166
2.492

Dr. L. Portela
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Transport Phenomena

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82842
B58-

Dr.ir. M. Rohde
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Nucl. Energy & Rad. Appl.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86962
B50-01.01.040

Dr. M.C.A. van der Sanden


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83055
C 110

Dr. F. Santoni De Sio


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Ethiek & Filosofie van de Tec

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85141
b4.140

Dr. T.J. Savenije


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Opto-electr. Materials

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86537
B58-

Prof.dr. A. Schmidt-Ott
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Mat for Energy Conv &Sto

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83577
B58-

Dr.ing. V.E. Scholten


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 89596
B31-C2.170

M. Schouwenburg
Unit
Department

Reactor Instituut Delft


Cursussen

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86575
03.00.110
Page 90 of 92

Prof.dr. L.D.A. Siebbeles


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Opto-electr. Materials

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 81800
B58-

Ir. W. Sonneveld
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 88679
-

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Dr. J.G. Spandaw


Unit
Department

Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Analysis

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 85806
HB 04.090

Prof.dr.ir. A.I. Stankiewicz


Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Intensified Reaction and Separ

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82147
B34b-K-0-160

Dr. G. Stefanidis
Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Intensified Reaction and Separ

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83852
B34b-K-1-170

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Intensified Reaction and Separ

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83852
B34b-K-1-170

Dr.ir. V. van Steijn


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Prod. & Proc. Engineerin

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87194
B58-

Dr.ir. M.A. van der Veen


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
ChemE/Catalysis Engineering

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 86458
B58-

Dr. R.M. Verburg


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Economics of Techn. and Innov.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87234
c3.030

Ir. I.D. Verhoev


Unit
Department

Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Analysis

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 84560
B36-HB 04.050

Prof.dr.ir. T.J.H. Vlugt


Unit

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Page 91 of 92

Department

Engineering Thermodynamics

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 87551
B34b-K-0-150

Prof.dr. M.J. de Vries


Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Filosofie

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83027
B22-C 106

Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 83027
B22-C 106

Drs. C. Wehrmann
Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Science Education & Comm.

Telephone

+31 15 27 81070

A. Wetters
Unit
Department

Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Centre for Entrepreneurship

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Ship Design, Prod & Operations

Room

Unit
Department

Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Onderwijs en Studentenzaken

Prof.dr. H.T. Wolterbeek


Unit
Department

Technische Natuurwetenschappen
RST/Radiat. Science and Techn.

Telephone
Room

+31 15 27 82105
B50-01.01.140

Page 92 of 92