You are on page 1of 8

Part I: Identification of Learning Problem

By Matt Morris
Target Audience
The students that I will be guiding throughout the study are a group of 9 elementary school teachers. 8 of
the teachers are female, and 1 is male. They all teach grades 4th-5th.
Learning Problem
I have noticed that one of the most common problems with student of all ages is that they learn through
rote memorization and do not have the ability to convey higher order understanding and concept mastery on
their projects and assessments. With the new Georgia standards rolling out next year, this skill is going to be
essential for students to be successful on their high stakes exams. Unfortunately, students are frequently
assessed on increasingly higher DOK levels, and they consistently come up short in all age groups.
Most teachers and administrators feel that this skill needs to be developed at the lower levels of
education and instructional scaffolding needs to be implemented as the students more through grade levels. I
have put a lot of thought into why this task is causing big problems for public school students. One thing that I
have realized is that students rarely set out to actually master anything. They are taught to strive for a letter
grade, which leads them to focusing on the wrong things.
Goal
To fix this issue, my goal is to create a professional development workshop for elementary educators
teaching them to use digital cartoons to get students to think through their educational standards and
conceptualize the information. That way a small change in verbiage on a test will not negatively affect student
test scores.

Part 2: Learner Analysis


By Matt Morris
1. Introduction
The students that I will be guiding throughout the study are a group of 9 elementary school teachers. 8
of the teachers are female, and 1 is male. They all teach grades 4th-5th. My goal is to create a professional
development workshop for elementary educators teaching them to use digital cartoons to get students to think
through their educational standards and conceptualize the information. That way a small change in verbiage on
a test will not negatively affect student
2. Entry Skills and Prior Knowledge
6 of the participants have B.S. Degrees in Early Childhood. 2 of the participants have a M.Ed in
Curriculum and Instruction, and 1 of the participants has an E.dS in Curriculum and Instruction. All of the
participants are at least somewhat versed in technology. A pre-workshop school tour and interviewed revealed
that their school is doing a great job of providing STEM based learning opportunities to their students. I will not
have to sell the participants on the value of technology, but merely demonstrate something new to them that
may aid in their instructional setting.
3. Attitudes Toward Content & Academic Motivation

My target group of 9 participants all have a great attitude towards teaching and technology integration
in the classroom. I had originally contemplated demoing google classrooms to them, but several of them are
already using the medium and all of them had at least some experience with it. However, none of the 9 had any
prior experience with digital cartoons in an instructional environment.
4. Educational Ability Levels
All of the participants are college educated and state certified teachers. (Their degree levels are stated
above). They should have no problems mastering the main concepts from the workshop.
5. General Learning Preferences
When questioned during the pre-workshop school visit, all 9 of the educators stated that they prefer face
to face learning to purely online learning. As such, I chose to conduct the face to face workshop with this
particular group and save the online workshop for a different set of educators.
6. Attitude Toward Education in General
Overall student motivation in this group is very high, and during the pre-workshop interviews they all
seemed positive about learning new technology based strategies for their classroom.
7. Group Characteristics (including social characteristics and relevant cultural information)
This group is comprised of 8 females and 1 male. The most senior teacher in the group has 17 years
experience, while new youngest member of the group is a new teacher. They are all at least fairly interested in
technology based education.
Matt Morris KA Part 3 Task Analysis:
Teaching Conceptualizing Through the Use of Digital Cartoons
I have constructed an outline using Procedural Analysis, which according to Morrison is a process that
is used to analyze tasks by identifying the steps required to complete them.(Morrison 2004). Educators can use
this outline when guiding elementary students through the task of persuasive writing. One of the most common
problems with student of all ages is that they learn through rote memorization and do not have the ability to
convey higher order understanding and concept mastery on their projects and assessments. My goal is to create
a professional development workshop for elementary educators teaching them to use digital cartoons to get
students to think through their educational standards and conceptualize the information. That way a small
change in verbiage on a test will not negatively affect student test scores. Procedural analysis should help the
learners best meet their goals because it breaks tasks into the steps needed for learning. (Morrison 2004).

Task Outline:
1. Introduce the concept of a digital cartoon.
1.1 Define what a digital cartoon is.
1.2 Identify the problems with only using rote memorization activities.
1.2.1 Show example from website
1.2.2 Discuss with group successful strategies they have used in the past

4.

2.

Explain why a digital cartoon is a relevant and exciting teaching tool.


2.1 Discuss the benefits to student learning that using a digital cartoon can have.
2.1.1 Test Scores
2.1.2 Behavior Management/Positive Learning Environment.

3.

Show examples of a digital cartoon.


3.1 Show them different options available on the web.
3.2 Tell them why ToonDoo was chosen as the course model.

Show learners how to setup a ToonDoo account and create a digital cartoon
4.1. Walk them through setting up an account
4.2 Teach them how to set a background and place characters
4.2.1 Show them how to use the toolbar
4.2.2 Show them how to add written text
5.

Show learners how to publish and share their work


5.1 Show them how to save their projects
5.2 Show them how to download or embed their finished ToonDoo

6.

Discuss blogs and course repositories and options for housing digital work
6.1 Tell students about course repositories
6.1.1 Show them how they could embed their work on a weebly page
6.2 Also show them blogger, and how they can also add images as well and reflections to that site.

7.

Give learners the final assessment and course evaluation.


7.1 Have each learner take the assessment on google docs
7.2 Have each learner complete the course evaluation

Subject Matter Expert (SME)


I, Matt Morris, will serve as SME, or subject matter expert throughout this instructional unit. I am a
public schools teacher who has a background of teaching both HS Economics and MS English. I have a B.S.
Degree in History from Georgia Southern University. I have 7 years of teaching experience, having also served
as a flipped classroom instructor and behavior management instructor for Savannah-Chatham County Schools
and Bulloch County Schools. Each year that I have taught, I have spent an extensive amount of time analyzing
and tracking data After teaching HS Economics and preparing students for high stakes testing, I began to realize
that it was more important for students to conceptualize information and process it at a high DOK level that it
was for students to simply use rote memorization to learn basic facts.
References:
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2004). Designing effective instruction. Hoboken, NJ: J. Wiley &
Sons.

FLOW CHART

1. Introduce the
concept of a
digital cartoon

6. Discuss blogs
and course
repositories and
options for
housing digital
work

2. Explain why a
digital cartoon is
a relevant and
exciting teaching
tool

5. Show learners
how to publish
and share their
work

3. Show
examples of a
digital cartoon

4. Show learners
how to set up a
ToonDoo account
and create a
digital cartoon

7.Give learners
the final
assessment and
course
evaluation.

KA Part 4
Terminal Objective 1:
Following the unit, students will be able to create a digital cartoon that demonstrates the ability of the student to
conceptualize high level information.

Enabling Objectives:
1a. Students will be able to create a ToonDoo account
1b. Students will demonstrate their ability to navigate the ToonDoo interface

Content

Recall

Comprehension

Fact
Concept
Principles
and Rules
Procedure
Interpersona
l Skills
Attitude

Performance
Applicatio Analysis
n

Synthesis

Evaluation

1a

1b

Key
Assessments Design of Instruction Part V: Matt Morris

Instructional
Strategies
Lesson 1: Creating a
Digital Cartoon.
Students will view

Goals
Students will be able
to create a digital
cartoon that
demonstrates the
ability of the student
to conceptualize high
level information.

Objectives
All objectives will be
taught in 1 lesson

UDL

Assessments

Multiple means of
engagement:
Students will be
allowed to select the
topic of their digital
cartoon, as well as
the slide layout.

Students will be
assessed both
through instructor
observation as well
as through the use of
a google form
questionnaire.

UDL Differentiation for Assessments:


Lesson 1:
Multiple means of engagement: Students will be allowed to select the topic of their digital cartoon, as well as
the slide layout.

Key Assessment Instructional Sequence Part VI


Matt Morris
Sequence
1

Description
Enhancing Your Classroom With Digital Cartoons

Objective
1-7

This instructional sequence is arranged in a concept related order, which is defined as a sequencing
manner that is consistent with how we organize the world conceptually or logically (Posner 1976). The concept
related sequencing scheme used is propositional relations, where the learners are first provided examples, then
the proposition. Even thought everything will be taught in one session, we will move from step to step in a
planned sequence.

Lesson 1: Stating and supporting a claim

Objectives
All
Motivational Strategy:
Students will view a comparative scenario where one teacher uses only rote memorixation to teach, while the
other uses inquiry based activities like digital cartoons. Learning is an active process in which the learner
constructs meaningful relationships between the new knowledge presented in the instruction and his or her
existing knowledge.(Morrison 2004).
Initial Presentation:
More recent research suggests that having students engage in argumentation- that is, answering questions
others pose about a concept or about members of a class- supports the learning of the concept. (Asterhan &
Schwartz 2008). Knowing this statement to be true, we as educators need to work towards more inquiry based
learning. I will show the students how to create digital cartoons, by walking them through the steps and
answering their questions.
Generative Strategy:
Students will create their own sample digital cartoon using ToonDoo.
Differentiation:
Multiple means of engagement: Students will be allowed to select the topic of their digital cartoon, as well as
the slide layout.

References
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., & Kemp, J. E. (2004). Designing effective instruction. Hoboken, NJ: J. Wiley &
Sons.
Posner, G. J., & Strike, K.A. (1976). A categorization scheme for principles of sequencing content. Review of
Education Research, 46, 665-690.
Craik, F.I.M. & Lockhart, R.S.(1972). Levels of processing: A framework for memory research. Journal of
Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 11, 671-684.
Astherhan, C.S.C., & Schwartz, BB. (2008) The effects of monological and dialogical argumentation on
concepts learning in evolutionary theory. Journal of Educational Psychology, 99(3), 626-639.

Key Assessments Design of Instruction Part VII: Matt Morris


**Some of the lessons may require multiple days for student completion, depending on the proficiency of
the learners and the time allotted for each activity per day.**

Instructional
Strategies
Lesson 1: Creating a
Digital Cartoon.
Students will view

Goals
Students will be able
to create a digital
cartoon that
demonstrates the
ability of the student
to conceptualize high
level information.

Objectives
All objectives will be
taught in 1 lesson

UDL

Assessments

Multiple means of
engagement:
Students will be
allowed to select the
topic of their digital
cartoon, as well as
the slide layout.

Students will be
assessed both
through instructor
observation as well
as through the use of
a google form
questionnaire.

Key Assessments Part VIII


Matt Morris
For my formative evaluation of this course I will have all instructors and my SME complete an online survey
using a link to Google Forms. My subject matter expert will be Ellen Scripture, who has experience working withal levels
of students as a high school Media Specialist. The SME will review course materials, and give necessary feedback.
I was able to create a ToonDoo account *
Strongly Disagree
1-5
Strongly Agree
I was able to set the background on my digital comic *
Strongly Disagree
1-5
Strongly Agree
I was able manipulate the characters that way I needed to (resize, change emotion, posture, etc) *
Strongly Disagree
1-5
Strongly Agree
I was able to add text to my digital comic *
Strongly Disagree
1-5
Strongly Agree
I was able to publish and share my ToonDoo *
Strongly Disagree
1-5
Strongly Agree
Following the course completion, we will review the survey results as well as student data, and revise the
instructional unit as needed. We will specifically address areas of concern to continuously attempt to close instructional
gaps and improve the course to maximize student achievement.