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IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express



Installation, Service, and User Guide


Service information: 2498 - B24, 24E

Read Before Using


This product contains software that is licensed under written license agreements. Your use of such software is subject to
the license agreements under which they are provided.

GA32-0580-03

IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express



Installation, Service, and User Guide


Service information: 2498 - B24, 24E

GA32-0580-03

Note:
Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in Notices on page 43.

Copyright 2008-2010 Brocade Communications Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


The following paragraph does not apply to any country (or region) where such provisions are inconsistent with
local law.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION AS IS WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states (or
regions) do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions; therefore, this statement
may not apply to you.
Copyright IBM Corporation 2008, 2013.
US Government Users Restricted Rights Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.

Read this first


Summary of changes
This is the fourth edition of the IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express Installation,
Service, and User Guide. The content changes since the last edition of this
publication are noted by a vertical line placed in the left margin beside each
change. Minor edits are not identified by this mark. A summary of the changes for
each edition are listed below.

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Fourth edition
The following changes were made in the fourth edition:
v Addition of information regarding the need for clean optics with higher
transmission speeds.
v Addition of information for link troubleshooting
v Other minor content updates

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Third edition
The following changes were made in the third edition:
v Addition of information about the Server Application Optimization (SAO)
optional feature
v A change to the Fabric Operating System (FOS) required version
v Update of environmental notices
v Reorganization of general information, including the addition of the Read This
First section
v Update of the Notices section
v Update of how to submit reader comments

Second edition
The following changes were made in the second edition:
v Corrections to LED status tables

Getting help
For the latest version of your product documentation, visit the web at
www.ibm.com/shop/publications/order. Search by form number or title.
For more information about IBM SAN products, see the following website:
www.ibm.com/servers/storage/san/
IBM Redbooks often provide in depth information about product best practices,
configurations, and more technical information. For redbooks associated with this
product, enter search terms on the following website: www.redbooks.ibm.com/.
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For support information for this and other IBM products, see the IBM Support
Portal, www.ibm.com/supportportal. Search for the product Machine type or
product name.

Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

iii

For Fabric OS Release Notes and access to Fabric OS firmware downloads, go to


the IBM Support Portal, www.ibm.com/supportportal. Search for the product
Machine type or product name, and then follow links for Downloads. More
detailed instructions are available through the Accessing firmware updates and
OS documentation updates link on the product documentation CD that is shipped
with this product.

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You can also contact IBM within the United States at 1-800-IBMSERV
(1-800-426-7378). For support outside the United States, you can find the service
number at: www.ibm.com/planetwide/.
Visit www.ibm.com/contact for the contact information for your country or region.
For detailed information about the Fibre Channel standards, see the Fibre Channel
Industry Association (FCIA) website at: www.fibrechannel.org/
For information about storage industry standards, see the Storage Networking
Industry Association (SNIA) website at: www.snia.org/

Taiwan Contact Information


IBM Taiwan Product Service Contact Info:
IBM Taiwan Corporation
3F, No 7, Song Ren Rd., Taipei Taiwan
Tel: 0800-016-888

Accessibility features for the SAN26B-4 Express


Accessibility features help users who have a disability, such as restricted mobility
or limited vision, to use information technology products successfully.

Accessibility features
Accessibility features help users with restricted mobility or limited vision
successfully use information technology products. IBM strives to provide products
with usable access for everyone, regardless of age or ability.
The following list includes the major accessibility features in this product:
v Light emitting diodes (LEDs) that flash at different rates, to represent the same
information as the colors of the LEDs
v Industry-standard devices for ports and connectors
v Management of the product through management applications is available
through Web and Graphical User Interface (GUI) options

Keyboard navigation
This product does not have an attached or integrated keyboard. Any keyboard
navigation is provided through the management software and GUI. This product
uses standard Microsoft Windows navigation keys. You can navigate the software
and the product documentation from the keyboard by using the shortcut keys for

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iv

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

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your browser or screen-reader software. See your browser or screen-reader


software Help for a list of shortcut keys that it supports.

Vendor software
This product includes certain vendor software that is not covered under the IBM
license agreement. IBM makes no representation about the accessibility features of
these products. Contact the vendor for the accessibility information about its
products.

Related accessibility information


You can view the publications for this product in Adobe Portable Document
Format (PDF) using the Adobe Acrobat Reader. The PDFs are provided on a
product documentation CD-ROM that is packaged with the product. The CD-ROM
also includes an accessible HTML version of this document.

IBM and accessibility


See the IBM Human Ability and Accessibility Center website at
http://www.ibm.com/able/ for more information about the commitment that IBM
has to accessibility.

How to send your comments


Your feedback is important in helping us provide the most accurate and
high-quality information. If you have comments or suggestions for improving this
document, send us your comments by email to starpubs@us.ibm.com. Be sure to
include the following:
v Exact publication title
v Form number (for example, GC27-2270-00)
v Page numbers to which you are referring
You can also mail your comments to:
International Business Machines Corporation
Information Development
Department GZW
9000 South Rita Road
Tucson, Arizona 85744-0001 U.S.A.
When you send information to IBM, you grant IBM a nonexclusive right to use or
distribute the information in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any
obligation to you.

Read this first

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Contents
Read this first . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
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Summary of changes . . . . . .
Fourth edition . . . . . . .
Third edition . . . . . . . .
Second edition . . . . . . .
Getting help . . . . . . . . .
Taiwan Contact Information . . .
Accessibility features for the SAN26B-4
Accessibility features . . . . .
Keyboard navigation . . . . .
Vendor software . . . . . . .
Related accessibility information. .
IBM and accessibility . . . . .
How to send your comments . . . .

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Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
About this document . . . . . . . . xiii
Product documents . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Brocade documents . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
IBM and Brocade product matrix . . . . . . xiv
Safety and environmental notices . . . . . . . xiv
Safety notices and labels . . . . . . . . . xiv
Rack safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Product recycling and disposal . . . . . . xxiii

Chapter 1. Introducing the SAN24B-4


Express switch. . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Features and functions of the switch
Supported connectivity . . . . .
Port side of the switch . . . . .
Nonport side of the switch . . .
Supported fabric configurations . .
Additional port activation . . . .
ISL Trunking groups . . . . . .
Supported optional features . . .

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Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the


switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Items included with the switch . . . .
Installation and safety considerations . .
Electrical considerations . . . . .
Environment considerations . . . .
Cabinet considerations . . . . . .
Installing a stand-alone switch . . . .
Installing the switch into an EIA cabinet .
Time required . . . . . . . .
Items required . . . . . . . .
Installation instructions . . . . .
Recommendations for cable management
Configuring the switch . . . . . .
Using the EZSwitch setup (optional) .
Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

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Providing power to the switch


Creating a serial connection .
Setting the switch IP address
Setting the date and time . .

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Chapter 3. Operating the switch . . . . 21


Powering the switch on and off.
Interpreting LED activity . . .
LED locations . . . . .
LED patterns . . . . . .
POST and boot specifications .
POST . . . . . . . .
Boot . . . . . . . . .
Interpreting POST results . . .
Switch FRU units . . . . .
Maintaining the switch . . .
Installing SFPs . . . . .
Diagnostic tests . . . . .
Managing the switch . . . .

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Appendix A. Product specifications . . 33


Weight and physical dimensions
Environmental requirements . .
Facility requirements . . . .
System specifications . . . .
Memory specifications . . . .
Data transmission ranges . . .
Fibre Channel port specifications
Serial port specifications . . .
Power supply specifications . .
Supported SFPs and HBAs . .

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Appendix B. Link troubleshooting . . . 39


Fault isolation . . . . . . . . . . .
Dust, dirt, or other contaminants . . . . .
Best practices for minimizing link loss . . .
Attenuation on LWL connections . . . . .
Best Practice for LWL connections Optically
engineer a long-distance connection . . .
2G LWL SFP maximum receive power . .

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Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic emission notices . . . . . . . . .
Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Class A Statement . . . . . . . . . . .
Industry Canada Class A Emission Compliance
Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avis de conformit la rglementation
d'Industrie Canada . . . . . . . . . . .
European Union EMC Directive Conformance
Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Germany Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive
People's Republic of China Class A Electronic
Emission Statement . . . . . . . . . . .

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vii

Japan VCCI Council Class A Statement . . .


Japan Electronics and Information Technology
Industries Association (JEITA) Statement . .
Korea Communications Commission (KCC)
Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Russia Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Class
A Statement . . . . . . . . . . . .

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Australia and New Zealand Class A Statement

49

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Figures
1.
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3.
4.
5.
6.

Port side of the switch . . . . . . . . . 2


Trunking groups . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Rack assembly . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Separating the inner and outer rails . . . . 12
Mounting the moving portion of the slide and
mounting brackets to the switch . . . . . 13
Mounting the fixed portion of the rail and the
locking brackets to the rack . . . . . . . 14

Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Inserting slides into the rack rails . . . . . 15


Detailed view, location of LEDs on the switch 22
SFP installation and bail closing. . . . . . 28
Removing an SFP . . . . . . . . . . 29
Identifying the origin of failure . . . . . . 39

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Tables
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Brocade and IBM product and model number


matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Sample caution notices . . . . . . . . xviii
Parts supplied with the rack-mount kit
11
Power status LED patterns, status, and
recommended actions . . . . . . . . . 23
System status LED patterns, status, and
recommended actions . . . . . . . . . 23
Port LED patterns during normal operation
24
Ethernet LED patterns . . . . . . . . . 25

Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Management options for the switch . . . .


Physical dimensions and weight of the switch
Environmental requirements . . . . . . .
Facility requirements . . . . . . . . .
General specifications . . . . . . . . .
Memory specifications . . . . . . . . .
Data transmission ranges . . . . . . . .
Switch power supply specifications . . . .
Specifications of LWL 10km transceivers
Maximum receive power of 2 Gbps LWL SFPs

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42

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

About this document


This document is intended for use by systems administrators and technicians
experienced with networking, Fibre Channel, and storage area network (SAN)
technologies. It describes how to install, service, and use the IBM System Storage
SAN24B-4 Express (machine type 2498, models 24B and E24). Throughout this
document, the product is referred to as the SAN24B-4, or simply the switch to
apply to both models.

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This document has been created to include information specific to SAN24B-4


switches running on Fabric OS version v7.1.1. This document does not support all
Fabric OS versions. It is specific to Fabric OS v7.1.1 or later. To obtain information
about a Fabric OS version other than v7.1.1, refer to the documentation specific to
your Fabric OS version.
The sections that follow provide information about:
v Product documents
v Brocade documents
v Safety and environmental notices on page xiv

Product documents
The following documents contain information related to this product. The
documentation may be printed material or may be on the documentation CD that
is shipped with the product. Newer versions of product documentation may be
available through the IBM Publications Center website www.ibm.com/shop/
publications/order. Newer versions may also be available through the IBM
Systems Support website www.ibm.com/systems/support/supportsite.wss/. Select
your product family, then the specific product, and then select Documentation.
v IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User's Guide,
GA32-0580 (this document)
v IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express Quick Start Guide GA32-0585
v IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express Access Gateway Quick Start Guide
GA32-0588
v Safety Notices
v IBM Warranty

Brocade documents
IBM b-type switches use software licensed from Brocade Communications Systems,
Inc. You can find information related to the software that supports the director in
the following documents on the CD-ROM supplied with this product:
Brocade Fabric OS
v Fabric OS Administrator's Guide
v Fabric OS Command Reference
v Fabric OS MIB Reference Manual
v Fabric OS Message Reference Manual
v Fabric OS Troubleshooting and Diagnostics Guide
Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

xiii

v Access Gateway Administrator's Guide


v EZSwitchSetup Administrator's Guide
Brocade Fabric OS optional features
v Fabric Watch Administrator's Guide
v Web Tools Administrator's Guide

IBM and Brocade product matrix


When you use any of the Brocade documents, such as Fabric Operating System
(FOS) publications, you will notice that the model numbers reflect the
corresponding Brocade products. Table 1 provides a product matrix for you to use
to correlate the Brocade products and models to the IBM product names and
machine types and model numbers. Products withdrawn from marketing are not
listed.
Table 1. Brocade and IBM product and model number matrix
Brocade product name

IBM product name

IBM machine type and


model number

Brocade 6520

SAN96B-5

2498 Models F96 and N96

Brocade 6505

SAN24B-5

2498 Model F24, 249824G

Brocade 6510

SAN48B-5

2498 Model F48

Brocade DCX 8510-4

SAN384B-2

2499 Model 416

Brocade DCX 8510-8

SAN768B-2

2499 Model 816

Brocade DCX-4S

SAN384B

2499 Model 192

Brocade DCX

SAN768B

2499 Model 384

Brocade Encryption Switch

SAN32B-E4

2498 Model E32

Brocade 7800

SAN06B-R

2498 Model R06

Brocade 5300

SAN80B-4

2498 Model B80

Brocade 300

SAN24B-4

2498 Models B24 and 24E

Safety and environmental notices


This section contains information about:
v Safety notices and labels
v Rack safety on page xxi
v Product recycling and disposal on page xxiii

Safety notices and labels


When using this product, observe the danger, caution, and attention notices
contained in this guide. The notices are accompanied by symbols that represent the
severity of the safety condition. The danger and caution notices are listed in
numerical order based on their IDs, which are displayed in parentheses, for
example (D004), at the end of each notice. Use this ID to locate the translation of
these danger and caution notices in the Safety Notices publication that is shipped
with this product.

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

The following notices and statements are used in IBM documents. They are listed
below in order of increasing severity of potential hazards. Follow the links for
more detailed descriptions and examples of the danger, caution, and attention
notices in the sections that follow.
v Note: These notices provide important tips, guidance, or advice.
v Attention notices on page xx: These notices indicate potential damage to
programs, devices, or data.
v Caution notices on page xvii: These statements indicate situations that can be
potentially hazardous to you.
v Danger notices: These statements indicate situations that can be potentially
lethal or extremely hazardous to you. Safety labels are also attached directly to
products to warn of these situations.
v In addition to these notices, Safety labels on page xix may be attached to the
product to warn of potential hazards.

Danger notices
A danger notice calls attention to a situation that is potentially lethal or extremely
hazardous to people. A lightning bolt symbol accompanies a danger notice to
represent a dangerous electrical condition. Read and comply with the following
danger notices before installing or servicing this device.
DANGER
To prevent a possible shock from touching two surfaces with
different protective ground (earth), use one hand, when possible, to
connect or disconnect signal cables. (D001)

DANGER
Overloading a branch circuit is potentially a fire hazard and a
shock hazard under certain conditions. To avoid these hazards,
ensure that your system electrical requirements do not exceed
branch circuit protection requirements. Refer to the information
that is provided with your device or the power rating label for
electrical specifications. (D002)

DANGER
If the receptacle has a metal shell, do not touch the shell until you
have completed the voltage and grounding checks. Improper wiring
or grounding could place dangerous voltage on the metal shell. If
any of the conditions are not as described, STOP. Ensure the
improper voltage or impedance conditions are corrected before
proceeding. (D003)

About this document

xv

DANGER
An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place
hazardous voltage on metal parts of the system or the devices that
attach to the system. It is the responsibility of the customer to
ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and grounded to prevent
an electrical shock. (D004)

The following general electrical danger notice provides instructions on how to


avoid shock hazards when servicing equipment. Unless instructed otherwise,
follow the procedures in the following danger notice.

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

DANGER
When working on or around the system, observe the following
precautions:
Electrical voltage and current from power, telephone, and
communication cables are hazardous. To avoid a shock hazard:
v Connect power to this unit only with the IBM provided power
cord. Do not use the IBM provided power cord for any other
product.
v Do not open or service any power supply assembly.
v Do not connect or disconnect any cables or perform installation,
maintenance, or reconfiguration of this product during an
electrical storm.
v The product might be equipped with multiple power cords. To
remove all hazardous voltages, disconnect all power cords.
v Connect all power cords to a properly wired and grounded
electrical outlet. Ensure that the outlet supplies proper voltage
and phase rotation according to the system rating plate.
v Connect any equipment that will be attached to this product to
properly wired outlets.
v When possible, use one hand only to connect or disconnect
signal cables.
v Never turn on any equipment when there is evidence of fire,
water, or structural damage.
v Disconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications
systems, networks, and modems before you open the device
covers, unless instructed otherwise in the installation and
configuration procedures.
v Connect and disconnect cables as described below when
installing, moving, or opening covers on this product or attached
devices.
To disconnect:
1. Turn off everything (unless instructed otherwise).
2. Remove the power cords from the outlets.
3. Remove the signal cables from the connectors.
4. Remove all cables from the devices.
To connect:
1. Turn off everything (unless instructed otherwise).
2. Attach all cables to the devices.
3. Attach the signal cables to the connectors.
4. Attach the power cords to the outlets.
5. Turn on the devices.
(D005)

Caution notices
A caution notice calls attention to a situation that is potentially hazardous to
people because of some existing condition. A caution notice can be accompanied
by different symbols, as in the examples below:
About this document

xvii

Table 2. Sample caution notices


If the symbol is...

It means....
A hazardous electrical condition with less
severity than electrical danger.

18-32 kg (39.7-70.5 lbs)

svc00167

A generally hazardous condition not


represented by other safety symbols.
A specification of product weight that
requires safe lifting practices. The weight
range of the product is listed below the
graphic, and the graphic and the wording of
the caution varies, depending on the weight
of the device.

18-32 kg (39.7-70.5 lbs)


A potential hazard of pinching the hand or
other body parts between parts.
P/N 18P5850-B
SJ000752

A hazardous condition due to moving parts


nearby.

A hazardous condition due to the use of a


laser in the product. Laser symbols are
always accompanied by the classification of
the laser as defined by the U. S. Department
of Health and Human Services (for example,
Class I, Class II, and so forth).

Read and comply with the following caution notices before installing or servicing
this device.
CAUTION:
Energy hazard present. Shorting may result in system outage and
possible physical injury. Remove all metallic jewelry before servicing.
(C001)
CAUTION:
This part or unit is heavy but has a weight smaller than 18 kg (39.7
lb). Use care when lifting, removing, or installing this part or unit.
(C008)
CAUTION:
The system contains circuit cards, assemblies, or both that contain lead
solder. To avoid the release of lead (Pb) into the environment, do not
burn. Discard the circuit card as instructed by local regulations. (C014)
CAUTION:
This product is equipped with a 3-wire (two conductors and ground)
power cable and plug. Use this power cable with a properly grounded
electrical outlet to avoid electrical shock. (C018)

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SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

CAUTION:
This product might contain one or more of the following devices:
CD-ROM drive, DVD-ROM drive, DVD-RAM drive, or laser module,
which are Class 1 laser products. Note the following information:
v Do not remove the covers. Removing the covers of the laser product
could result in exposure to hazardous laser radiation. There are no
serviceable parts inside the device.
v Use of the controls or adjustments or performance of procedures
other than those specified herein might result in hazardous
radiation exposure.
(C026)
CAUTION:
The power-control button on the device does not turn off the electrical
current supplied to the device. The device might also have more than
one connection to dc power. To remove all electrical current from the
device, ensure that all connections to dc power are disconnected at the
dc power input terminals. (C031)
CAUTION:
Servicing of this product or unit is to be performed by trained service
personnel only. (C032)

Safety labels
As an added precaution, safety labels are often installed directly on products or
product components to warn of potential hazards. These can be either danger or
caution notices, depending upon the level of the hazard.
The actual product safety labels may differ from these sample safety labels:
DANGER
Hazardous voltage, current, or energy levels are present inside
any component that has this label attached. Do not open any
cover or barrier that contains this label. (L001)

DANGER
Rack-mounted devices are not to be used as a shelf or work space.
(L002)

DANGER
Multiple power cords. The product might be equipped with
multiple power cords. To remove all hazardous voltages,
disconnect all power cords. (L003)

About this document

xix

DANGER
Hazardous voltage present. Voltages present constitute a shock
hazard, which can cause severe injury or death. (L004)

Attention notices
An attention notice indicates the possibility of damage to a program, device, or
system, or to data. An exclamation point symbol may accompany an attention
notice, but is not required. A sample attention notice follows:
Attention: Do not bend a fibre cable to a radius less than 5 cm (2 in.); you can
damage the cable. Tie wraps are not recommended for optical cables because they
can be easily overtightened, causing damage to the cable.

xx

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Rack safety
Rack installation
DANGER
Observe the following precautions when working on or around your IT rack system:
v Heavy equipmentpersonal injury or equipment damage might result if
mishandled.
v Always lower the leveling pads on the rack cabinet.
v Always install stabilizer brackets on the rack cabinet.
v To avoid hazardous conditions due to uneven mechanical loading, always install the
heaviest devices in the bottom of the rack cabinet. Always install servers and
optional devices starting from the bottom of the rack cabinet.
v Rack-mounted devices are not to be used as shelves or work spaces. Do not place
objects on top of rack-mounted devices.

v Each rack cabinet might have more than one power cord. Be sure to disconnect all
power cords in the rack cabinet when directed to disconnect power during servicing.
v Connect all devices installed in a rack cabinet to power devices installed in the
same rack cabinet. Do not plug a power cord from a device installed in one rack
cabinet into a power device installed in a different rack cabinet.
v An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage on the
metal parts of the system or the devices that attach to the system. It is the
responsibility of the customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and
grounded to prevent an electrical shock.

(R001 part 1 of 2)
CAUTION:
v Do not install a unit in a rack where the internal rack ambient temperatures will
exceed the manufacturers recommended ambient temperature for all your
rack-mounted devices.
v Do not install a unit in a rack where the air flow is compromised. Ensure that air flow
is not blocked or reduced on any side, front, or back of a unit used for air flow
through the unit.
v Consideration should be given to the connection of the equipment to the supply circuit
so that overloading of the circuits does not compromise the supply wiring or
overcurrent protection. To provide the correct power connection to a rack, refer to the
rating labels located on the equipment in the rack to determine the total power
requirement of the supply circuit.
v (For sliding drawers) Do not pull out or install any drawer or feature if the rack stabilizer
brackets are not attached to the rack. Do not pull out more than one drawer at a time.
The rack might become unstable if you pull out more than one drawer at a time.
v (For fixed drawers) This drawer is a fixed drawer and must not be moved for servicing
unless specified by the manufacturer. Attempting to move the drawer partially or
completely out of the rack might cause the rack to become unstable or cause the
drawer to fall out of the rack.
(R001 part 2 of 2)

About this document

xxi

Rack relocation (19" rack)


CAUTION:
Removing components from the upper positions in the rack cabinet improves
rack stability during relocation. Follow these general guidelines whenever you
relocate a populated rack cabinet within a room or building:
v Reduce the weight of the rack cabinet by removing equipment starting at the
top of the rack cabinet. When possible, restore the rack cabinet to the
configuration of the rack cabinet as you received it. If this configuration is not
known, you must do the following:
Remove all devices in the 32U position and above.
Ensure that the heaviest devices are installed in the bottom of the rack
cabinet.
Ensure that there are no empty U-levels between devices installed in the
rack cabinet below the 32U level.
If the rack cabinet you are relocating is part of a suite of rack cabinets,
detach the rack cabinet from the suite.
Inspect the route that you plan to take when moving the rack to eliminate
potential hazards.
Verify that the route that you choose can support the weight of the loaded
rack cabinet. Refer to the documentation that came with your rack cabinet
for the weight of a loaded rack cabinet.
Verify that all door openings are at least 760 x 2030 mm (30 x 80 in.).
Ensure that all devices, shelves, drawers, doors, and cables are secure.
Ensure that the four leveling pads are raised to their highest position.
Ensure that there is no stabilizer bracket installed on the rack cabinet
during movement.
Do not use a ramp inclined at more than 10 degrees.
Once the rack cabinet is in the new location, do the following:
- Lower the four leveling pads.
- Install stabilizer brackets on the rack cabinet.
- If you removed any devices from the rack cabinet, repopulate the rack
cabinet from the lowest position to the highest position.
If a long distance relocation is required, restore the rack cabinet to the
configuration of the rack cabinet as you received it. Pack the rack cabinet in
the original packaging material, or equivalent. Also, lower the leveling
pads to raise the casters off of the pallet and bolt the rack cabinet to the
pallet.
(R002)

xxii

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Product recycling and disposal


Refer to the IBM Systems Environmental Notices and User Guide (Z125-5823) for
translated environmental statements and information regarding product recycling
and disposal. This document may be provided either in printed version or on the
product documentation CD.

About this document

xxiii

xxiv

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Chapter 1. Introducing the SAN24B-4 Express switch


The IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Express is a cost-effective and highly-scalable
1, 2, 4, or 8 Gbit/sec switch, designed for small to mid-sized businesses. It runs on
the Fabric Operating System (Fabric OS) and is compatible with other IBM
switches, which enables seamless connectivity into heterogeneous SAN
environments. This switch is a dual purpose device that you can use either as a
full-functioned switch or as an N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) access gateway.
When functioning as an access gateway, the it provides a single platform for all
SAN connectivity. Because the switch is scalable, you can use it as a foundation
switch for a small storage area network (SAN) and continue to use it as a building
block as the SAN grows.
This chapter provides the following information:
v Features and functions of the switch
v Supported connectivity on page 2
v Port side of the switch on page 2
v Nonport side of the switch on page 3
v Additional port activation on page 3
v ISL Trunking groups on page 3
v Supported optional features on page 4

Features and functions of the switch


The switch provides the following features and functions:
v 1U chassisThe chassis can be installed as a standalone unit or mounted in a
standard Electronic Industries Association (EIA) 48.26 cm (19 in.) cabinet.
v One built-in fixed power unit (not field-replaceable)
v Three built-in fans (none are field-replaceable). The switch is cooled by a
redundant fan configuration, which allows continued operation with a single fan
failure.
v On-demand scaling of 8 to 24 8 Gbit/sec ports
v ASIC technology supporting 1, 2, 4 and 8Gbit/sec auto-sensing Fibre Channel
ports.
v Ability to operate as either a full-functioned switch or an NPIV access gateway.
v RJ45 Ethernet management port that in conjunction with EZSwitchSetup,
supports switch IP address discovery and configuration.
v Uses EZSwitchSetup wizard for setup and basic configuration.
v Single motherboard design with a 667 MHz PowerPC 440EPx Reduced
Instruction Set Computer (RISC) CPU with integrated peripherals.
v Offers forward and backward compatibility with IBM System Storage SAN
switch models, 1, 2, 4 and 8 Gbps auto-sensing capability, as well as Advanced
Fabric Services and management tools.
v Enables interoperability between IBM System Storage b-type and m-type SAN
switches and directors.
v Inter-Switch-Link Trunking (licensable) enables up to eight ports (at 1G, 2G, 4G,
or 8G speeds) between a pair of switches to be combined to form a single,

Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

v
v
v

logical ISL switch with a speed of up to 64 Gbits/sec (128 Gbits/sec full duplex)
for optimal bandwidth utilization and load balancing.
Advanced Zoning.
Intelligent management and monitoring with Web Tools, Fabric Watch, and
Performance Monitor.
Adaptive Networking Services uses network intelligence to anticipate congestion
and to dynamically make adjustments in the fabric so that application traffic
continues to flow
Dynamic Path Selection (DPS) optimizes fabric-wide performance and load
balancing by automatically routing data to the most efficient available path in
the fabric.

v Light emitting diodes (LEDs) to indicate system power, system status, Ethernet
speed and link status, and port status.

Supported connectivity
Specific details on supported operating systems, servers, and devices, storage
products attachability, SAN connectivity products, and configuration options can
be found in the interoperability matrices at the following website:
www.ibm.com/servers/storage/support/san.

Port side of the switch


Figure 1 shows the port side of the switch. All LEDs are on the port side of the
switch: the nonport side is used to allow the free flow of air. The switch enclosure
has forced-air cooling, with the fans pushing the air from the nonport side of the
chassis through the enclosure, exhausting to the port side. For a complete
description of the locations and interpretations of these LEDs, see Interpreting
LED activity on page 21.

B24_0001

1
Figure 1. Port side of the switch

Item number

Description

System status (top) and power (bottom)


LEDs

System RS232 console port (RJ-45)

Ethernet Port with two Ethernet status LEDs

USB port

Fibre Channel status LEDs

Fibre Channel Ports (24)

AC power receptacle

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Nonport side of the switch


The nonport side of the switch is used solely for air flow. There are no features on
this side.

Supported fabric configurations


The switch is supported as an edge device in fabrics of up to 239 switches.

Additional port activation


The switch can be purchased with 8, 16, or 24 licensed ports. As your needs
increase, you can activate unlicensed ports by purchasing and installing the
additional 8 port activation feature. After it has been installed, the license appears
under the licenseShow command as Ports on Demand license.
The additional ports are ready to be unlocked in the switch firmware. The license
might be part of the licensed paper pack supplied with switch software, or you can
purchase the license separately from IBM, who will provide you with a key to
unlock it.
By default, ports 0 through 7 are enabled on the switch. To enable ports 8 through
16, install a Ports on Demand license key. To enable ports 16 through 24, install
another Ports on Demand license.
After you have installed the license keys, you must enable the ports. You can do so
without disrupting switch operation by using the portEnable command on each
port individually. Alternatively, you can disable and reenable the switch to activate
all ports simultaneously.
To install the additional port activation license, you can either use the supplied
license key or generate a license key. Typically the switch is shipped with a paper
pack that specifies the transaction key to use with the Software License Keys link.
|
|
|
|
|

Use this transaction key at the IBM Support Portal, www.ibm.com/supportportal:


v Search for the product Machine type or product name, and then follow links for
Downloads.
v On the Downloads tab, select License request.
v Follow the instructions on the page that displays.

ISL Trunking groups


The switch supports Interswitch Link (ISL) Trunking as a licensed feature. When
this feature is enabled, create Trunked groups of up to 8 contiguous ports. This
means that you can create up to three trunked groups that contain 8 ports each.
The Fibre Channel ports on the switch are numbered from left to right and
color-coded within groups of eight to indicate which ports you can combine into
trunked groups.

Chapter 1. Introducing the SAN24B-4 Express switch

B
A
B24_0002

B
Figure 2. Trunking groups

v ATrunk Group 1: ports 0 through 7


v BTrunk Group 2: ports 8 through 15
v CTrunk Group 3: ports 16 through 23
Note: ISL Trunking is optional software that allows you to create trunking groups
of ISLs between adjacent switches. For more information about trunking,
refer to the Fabric OS Administrators Guide.

Supported optional features


The switch supports the following optional software, which you can activate by
purchasing the corresponding license key:
v Extended Fabricallows implementation of long distance dynamic (LD) and long
distance static (LS) distance levels. This feature extends SAN fabrics beyond the
Fibre Channel standard 10 km by optimizing the internal switch buffers to
maintain performance on ISLs at distances up to 500 kilometers.
v Fabric Watchmonitors mission-critical switch operations. This feature is
designed to enable real-time proactive awareness of the health, performance, and
security of each switch. It automatically alerts network managers to problems
and helps avoid costly failures by providing:

Real-time tracking of numerous fabric and switch elements


Automatic event notifications when switch and fabric elements exceed
thresholds
Security, availability, and congestion monitoring thresholds and alerts
Adaptive Networking provides a set of capability allowing high priority
connections to obtain the bandwidth necessary for optimum performance, even
in congested environments.
Advanced Performance Monitorprovides Performance Monitoring capability to
help identify end-to-end bandwidth usage by host/target pairs and is designed
to provide information for capacity planning.
Trunking Activationdesigned to enable Fibre Channel packets to be efficiently
distributed across multiple Inter-Switch connections (links) between two SAN
b-type fabric switches, while preserving in-order delivery. ISL Trunking is
supported between any of the supported 2, 4, or 8 Gbps b-type models. Both
SAN b-type fabric switches must have ISL Trunking activated.
Server Application Optimization (SAO)designed to bring Quality of Service
(QoS) enhancements for server consolidation and virtualization

In addition, customers can order a set of optional features bundled into one
orderable feature, the B24 Enterprise Package. This bundled feature consists of one
of each of Fabric Watch, Trunking Activation, Advanced Performance Monitor,
Adaptive Networking, and two 8-Port Activations.

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

For more information on the use of these features, refer to the Fabric OS
Administrators Guide.

Chapter 1. Introducing the SAN24B-4 Express switch

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch


You can install the switch in either of two ways:
v As a stand-alone unit on a flat surface
v In an Electronic Industries Association (EIA) cabinet using a slide-rail rack
mount kit, which is provided with the switch. When you mount the switch into
a slide-rail rack, you can mount the chassis to slide from either the port side or
the non-port side.
The SAN24B-4 can be configured and operated as either a SAN fabric switch or as
an Access Gateway. The configuration instructions in this publication are for the
SAN24B-4 to operate as a switch. The installation instructions in this document
apply to both Switch and Access Gateway modes. To configure and operate the
SAN24B-4 in Access Gateway mode, refer to the IBM System Storage SAN24B-4
Access Gateway Quick Start Guide and the Access Gateway Administrator's Guide.
Attention: When you enable Access Gateway mode, you disable the ability for
the SAN24B-4 to operate as a switch. Access Gateway mode and switch mode are
mutually exclusive. If you want to use the SAN24B-4 as a switch at a later time,
you will need to disable Access Gateway mode and enable switch mode. Changing
between Access Gateway and Switch modes is a data disruptive operation. It is
strongly recommended that you disable the switch from the command line
interface before enabling or disabling Access Gateway mode.
This chapter provides the following information:
v Items included with the switch
v Installation and safety considerations on page 8
v Installing a stand-alone switch on page 9
v Installing the switch into an EIA cabinet on page 9
v Recommendations for cable management on page 15
v Configuring the switch on page 16

Items included with the switch


The following items are included with the standard shipment of the switch. When
you open the packaging, verify that these items are included in the package and
that no damage has occurred during shipping:
v One SAN24B-4 switch
v An accessory kit that contains the following items:
Serial cable with an RJ-45 connector
One grounded 1.8 m (6 ft.) country-specific power cord
Four rubber feet, required for setting up the switch as a stand-alone unit
SFP transceivers (quantity depending upon features ordered)
IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Installation, Service, and User Guide (this
document)
IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Quick Start Guide
IBM System Storage SAN24B-4 Access Gateway Quick Start Guide
IBM documentation CD
Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

EZSwitchSetup CD
One LC wrap plug
Paperpack of optional features license and key activation information (if
ordered)
Attention: Retain this paperpack in a safe place. The transaction keys in
the paperpack are required for activation of optional features on the switch.
Once a feature is activated, its activation key is associated with a specific
product WWN and serial number.

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Installation and safety considerations


Use this section to prepare your site for a safe and successful installation.
Attention: Although the switch has been designed for customer installation and
replacement procedures, you must first ensure that the rack into which the switch
is to be installed is also customer accessible. If it is not, then only trained personnel
can install and service these switches in such a rack.
Attention: Read the Safety and environmental notices on page xiv
before attempting any installation or maintenance procedures.

The switch can be installed either as a free-standing unit, or installed in an EIA


cabinet, using an optional slide-rail rack mount kit. When mounting into a
slide-rail rack, you can mount the chassis to slide from either the port side or the
nonport side.

Electrical considerations
To install and operate the switch successfully, ensure the following standards are
met:
v The primary outlet is correctly wired, protected by a circuit breaker, and
grounded in accordance with local electrical codes.
v The supply circuit, line fusing, and wire size are adequate, as specified by the
electrical rating on the switch nameplate.
v The power supply standards provided in Power supply specifications on page
36 are met.

Environment considerations
For successful installation and operation of the switch, ensure that the following
environmental requirements are met:
v At a minimum, adequate cooling requires that you install the switch with the
nonport side, which contains the air intake vents, facing the cool-air aisle.
v All equipment in the rack should force air in the same direction to avoid
intaking exhaust air.
v A minimum of 680 l/min (24 cubic ft/min) of air flow is available to the air
intake vents on the nonport side of the switch.
v The ambient air temperature does not exceed 40 C (104 F) while the switch is
operating.

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Cabinet considerations
Attention: See Rack safety on page xxi for danger and caution notices related
to product installations in racks or cabinets.
For successful installation and operation of the switch in a cabinet, ensure that the
following cabinet requirements are met:
v The cabinet must be a standard EIA cabinet.
v Plan a cabinet space that is 1 rack unit 4.45 cm (1.75 in.) high, 48.3 cm (19 in)
wide.
v Ground all equipment in the cabinet through a reliable branch circuit connection
and maintain ground at all times. Do not rely on a secondary connection to a
branch circuit, such as a power strip.
v Ensure that airflow and temperature requirements are met on an ongoing basis,
particularly if the switch is installed in a closed or multicabinet assembly.
v Verify that the additional weight of the switch does not exceed the cabinets
weight limits or unbalance the cabinet in any way.
v Secure the cabinet to ensure stability in case of unexpected movement, such as
an earthquake.

Installing a stand-alone switch


To install the switch as a stand-alone unit, use the following procedure:
1. Unpack the switch and verify the items listed in Items included with the
switch on page 7
2. Apply the adhesive rubber feet. Applying the rubber feet onto the switch helps
prevent the switch from sliding off the supporting surface.
a. Clean the indentations at each corner of the bottom of the switch to ensure
that they are free of dust or other debris that might lessen the adhesion of
the feet.
b. With the adhesive side against the chassis, place one rubber foot in each
indentation and press into place.
3. Place the switch on a flat, sturdy surface.
4. Provide power to the switch as described in Powering the switch on and off
on page 21.
Attention: Do not connect the switch to the network until the IP address is
correctly set. For instructions on how to set the IP address, see Configuring the
switch on page 16.

Installing the switch into an EIA cabinet


Attention: Although the switch has been designed for customer installation and
replacement procedures, you must first ensure that the rack into which the switch
is to be installed is also customer accessible. If it is not, then only trained personnel
can install and service these switches in such a rack.
Attention: Read the Safety and environmental notices on page xiv
before attempting any installation or maintenance procedures.

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch

Attention: Refer to Rack safety on page xxi for danger and caution notices
related to rack and cabinet installations.
You can install the rack mount kit in either of two ways:
v To allow the port side of the switch to slide out of the exhaust-air side of the
cabinet. In this installation, the port side of the switch is flush with the edge of
the cabinet.
v To allow the non-port side of the switch to slide out the cool-air side of the
cabinet. In this installation, the port side of the switch is set 7.62 cm (3 in.) back
from the edge of the cabinet, allowing a more gradual bend in the fiber optic
cables.

Time required
Approximately 30 minutes

Items required
You need the following items to install the switch in a slide-rail rack:
v Straight slot screwdriver
v Rack space: 1 EIA unit of rack space, 48.3 cm (19 in.) wide, and 60.96 cm (24 in.)
deep
v One power cord that is provided with the switch
v One power outlet
v Rack mount kit
Attention: Use the exact screws specified in the procedure for use with the switch
chassis. Using screws longer than 3/16 in. can damage the switch. The different
types of screws are listed in Table 3 on page 11.
Note: Make sure that you tighten all screws used in this procedure.

Installation instructions
To install the switch in a slide-rail rack that meets EIA standards, use the following
procedure.
Note: These procedures use parts that are included in the rack-mount kit. These
parts are listed in Table 3 on page 11. The installation procedure
cross-references the items in this table. Be sure to use the referenced parts
when you perform each step.
Before you start the rack-mount installation process, locate the rack-mount slides
and the mounting bracket that are provided in the shipping container.
Figure 3 on page 11 shows the rack assembly. The number keys, such as 1, refer
to the items listed in Table 3 on page 11.

10

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

4
4X

9
Outer Slide

8X

4X

EIA Rack Rail

Inner Slide

See
Detail A

1
2X

5
4X

7
4X

10
8X

11
8X

12

5X

8X

Front of Switch

6
2X

Detail A

2X
SJ000153

Figure 3. Rack assembly

1. Unpack the rack-mount kit and verify that all ordered items and parts are
present and undamaged. See Table 3 for a list of parts and the quantities
supplied.
Table 3. Parts supplied with the rack-mount kit
Item

Description

Quantity

1

Rack mount slide (inner and outer slide)

2

Right rack mount bracket (optional bracket


for front of switch)

3

Left rack mount bracket (optional bracket for


front of switch)

4

Rack mounting bracket (3-hole)

5

Nut clip, M5

11

6

Screw, 8-32 x 3/16 in., zinc

11

7

Screw, M5 x 12

11

8

Bracket to slide rack kit (contains items 9 12)

9

Screw, 8-32 x 3/8 in., zinc

10

Washer, flat, No. 8

11

Washer, lock, No. 8

12

Nut, hex, 8-32

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch

11

2. Separate the inner and outer slides.


a. Open one of the slides until the lock engages.
b. Press the lock release lever (1 in Figure 4) and remove the inner rail from
the outer rail.

SJ000046

Figure 4. Separating the inner and outer rails

c. Repeat step 2a and step 2b for the other rail.


Note: For racks with flush-mount doors, such as the 9306 Netfinity racks, do
not install the front brackets. Instead, use the rack-mount slides by
attaching the switch to the set of mounting holes, which are offset 3
inches into the rack.
3. Install the inner (smaller) slide on the switch chassis, as Figure 3 on page 11
shows.
Attention: If you use screws longer than 3/16 in., you can damage the switch.
a. Position the flat side of the inner rail along one side of the switch. Align the
holes in the rail with the threaded holes in the side of the switch chassis.
The chamfered end of the inner rail should face toward the rear of the
switch (away from the ports) as shown in Figure 5 on page 13.
b. Attach the inner rail by using three of the 8-32 x 3/16 in. zinc screws (6 in
Table 3 on page 11).

12

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Front

SJ000047

Figure 5. Mounting the moving portion of the slide and mounting brackets to the switch

c. Repeat step 3a on page 12 and step 3b on page 12 for the second inner rail
on the other side of the switch chassis.
4. Optional step: Install the right rack mount bracket 2 (see Figure 3 on page 11)
and the left rack mount bracket 3 on the switch chassis. Use these brackets to
secure the switch to the rack as shown in Figure 5.
Attention: Do not use screws longer than 3/16 in.; they can damage the
switch.
a. Position the left rack mount bracket at the left front corner of the switch
chassis. Align the two holes in the bracket with the two threaded holes in
the switch chassis.
b. Attach the bracket by using two of the 8-32 x 3/16 in. zinc screws (see 6
in Figure 3 on page 11)
c. Repeat step 4a and step 4b for the right rack mount bracket on the right
front corner of the switch chassis.
5. Attach all four of the 3-hole rack mounting brackets 4 in Figure 6 on page 14.
a. Position a 3-hole rack mounting bracket 4 at the end of one of the outer
slides.
b. Attach the bracket by using the 8-32 x 3/8 in. zinc screws 9. Ensure that
the screw heads are inside the slides.
c. Place one each of the following items on the outer end of the screw in the
order listed:
1) Washer, flat No. 8 10
2) Washer, lock No. 8 11
3) Nut, hex, 8-32 12
d. Repeat steps 5a through 5c for the three remaining rail ends.

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch

13

12 11
10

4
3

SJ000048

Figure 6. Mounting the fixed portion of the rail and the locking brackets to the rack

6. Install the outer (larger) slides in the rack, as shown in Figure 6.


a. At the selected height, install the five M5 nut clips 5. Put three M5 nut
clips in the front of the rack and two in the back. The middle clip in the
front of the rack is for the locking ears.
Note: Some rack mount kits might use 10-32 nut clips in place of the M5
nut clips for the locking ears.
b. Attach the slides by using four M5 x 12 screws 7 (see Figure 3 on page
11).
c. Repeat step 6a and step 6b for the other rail.
7. Install the switch in the rack.
a. Position the switch in front of the rack. Insert the switch into the rack by
sliding the inner slides that are mounted on the switch into the outer slides
that are mounted on the rack. See Figure 7 on page 15.

14

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

SJ000049

Figure 7. Inserting slides into the rack rails

b. Check the alignment of the slides by sliding the switch in and out of the
rack. Any difficulty moving the switch indicates lateral stress or
misalignment. If this situation occurs, adjust the slide positions until the
movement is smooth.
8. Optional step: If the right and left rack mount brackets are installed on the
front corners of the switch, attach both brackets to the cabinet rack by using M5
x 12 screws 7. See step 4 on page 13 and Figure 3 on page 11. The screws
should pass through the front of each bracket and the slide rail.
Note: Some rack mount kits might use 10-32 nut clips in place of the M5 nut
clips for the locking ears.
9. Continue with initial setup of the switch by following the procedures in
Configuring the switch on page 16.
DANGER
An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place
hazardous voltage on metal parts of the system or the devices that
attach to the system. It is the responsibility of the customer to
ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and grounded to prevent
an electrical shock. (D004)

Note: Do not connect the switch to the network until you perform one of the
following steps:
v Set the internet protocol (IP) address.
v Verify that the default IP address does not conflict with the existing IP
addresses in the same network.

Recommendations for cable management


Attention: The minimum bend radius for a 50 micron cable is 51 mm (2 in.)
under full tensile load and 30.5 mm (1.2 in.) with no tensile load.

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch

15

Cables can be organized and managed in a variety of ways: for example, using
cable channels on the sides of the cabinet or patch panels to minimize cable
management. Following is a list of recommendations:
v Plan for rack space required for cable management before installing the switch.
v Leave at least 1 meter (3.28 ft) of slack for each port cable. This provides room
to remove and replace the switch, allows for inadvertent movement of the rack,
and helps prevent the cables from being bent to less than the minimum bend
radius.
v If you are using Brocade ISL Trunking, consider grouping cables by trunking
groups. The cables used in trunking groups must meet specific requirements, as
described in the Fabric OS Administrator's Guide.
v For easier maintenance, label the fiber optic cables and record the devices to
which they are connected.
v Keep LEDs visible by routing port cables and other cables away from the LEDs.
v Use hook-and-loop fasteners to secure and organize fibre optic cables. Do not
use tie wraps on fiber optic cables, because wraps are easily overtightened and
can damage the optic fibers.

Configuring the switch


You must configure the switch to ensure correct operation within a network and
fabric. For instructions about how to configure the switch to operate in a fabric
that contains switches from other vendors, refer to the Fabric OS Administrator's
Guide.
For more information about the commands used in this procedure, refer to the
Fabric OS Command Reference.
v Using the EZSwitch setup (optional)
v Providing power to the switch
v Creating a serial connection on page 17
v Setting the switch IP address on page 17
v Setting the date and time on page 18

Using the EZSwitch setup (optional)


Once you have set up the switch in a rack or as a stand-alone switch, it is time to
give it power and a basic configuration. If you are going to use the switch in a
single-switch setup, you can use EZSwitchSetup to complete the basic
configuration. See the EZSwitchSetup CD included with the accessory kit for more
information. You can also use the SAN24B-4 Quick Start Guide. If you do not want
to use EZSwitch Setup, use the instructions in following sections.

Providing power to the switch


To provide power to the switch:
1. Connect the power cord to the power receptacle on the port side of the switch,
and then to the power source. Ensure that the cord has a minimum service loop
of 15 cm (6 in.) available and is routed to avoid stress.
The switch does not have a on/off power switch. This means that power is
supplied to the switch as soon as you connect it to an AC power source.
The status LEDs display amber until POST is complete, and then change to
green. The switch usually requires from 1 to 3 minutes to boot and complete
POST.

16

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

2. After POST is complete, verify that the switch power and status LEDs on the
left of the port side of the switch are green.

Creating a serial connection


You will perform all basic configuration tasks in this guide using a serial
connection. To create a serial connection to the switch, complete the following
steps:
1. Connect the serial cable to the serial port on the switch and to an RS-232 serial
port on the workstation.
If the serial port on the workstation is RJ-45 instead of RS-232, remove the
adapter on the end of the serial cable and insert the exposed RJ-45 connector
into the RJ-45 serial port on the workstation.
2. Disable any serial communication programs running on the workstation.
3. Open a terminal emulator application (such as HyperTerminal on a PC, or
TERM, TIP, or Kermit in a UNIX environment), and configure the application
as follows:
v In a Windows environment:
Bits per second

9600

Databits

Parity

None

Stop bits

Flow control
None
v In a UNIX environment, type the following string at the prompt:
tip /dev/ttyb -9600
If ttyb is already in use, use ttya instead and enter the following string at the
prompt:
tip /dev/ttya -9600

Setting the switch IP address


You can configure the switch with a static IP address, or you can use a DHCP
(Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) server to set the IP address of the switch.
DHCP is enabled by default. The switch supports both IPv4 and IPv6.

Using DHCP
When using DHCP, the switch obtains its IP address, subnet mask, and default
gateway address from the DHCP server. The DHCP client can only connect to the
a DHCP server that is on the same subnet as the switch. If your DHCP server is
not on the same subnet as the switch, use a static IP address.

Setting a static IP address


1. Log into the switch using the default password, which is password.
2. Use the ipaddrset command to set the Ethernet IP address.
If you are going to use an IPv4 IP address, enter the IP address in dotted
decimal notation as prompted.
Ethernet IP Address: [192.168.74.102]

If you are going to use an IPv6 address, enter the network information in
semicolon-separated notation as prompted.

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch

17

switch:admin> ipaddrset -ipv6 --add 1080::8:800:200C:417A/64


IP address is being changed...Done.
3. Complete the rest of the network information as prompted.
Ethernet
Ethernet
Ethernet
4. Enter off

Subnetmask: [255.255.255.0]
IP Address: [192.168.74.102]
Subnetmask: [255.255.255.0]
to Disable DHCP when prompted.

DHCP [OFF]: off

Setting the date and time


The switch maintains the current date and time inside a battery-backed real-time
clock (RTC) circuit. Date and time are used for logging events. Switch operation
does not depend on the date and time; a switch with an incorrect date and time
value still functions properly. However, because the date and time are used for
logging, error detection, and troubleshooting, you should set them correctly.

Setting the date


1. If you are not already logged into the switch; do so now using the default
password, which is password.
2. Enter the date command, using the following syntax:
date "mmddHHMMyy"
The values represent the following information:
v mm is the month; valid values are 01 through 12
v dd is the date; valid values are 01 through 31
v HH is the hour; valid values are 00 through 23
v MM is minutes; valid values are 00 through 59
v yy is the year; valid values are 00 through 99 (values greater than 69 are
interpreted as 1970 through 1999, and values less than 70 are interpreted as
2000-2069)
switch:admin> date
Fri Sep 29 17:01:48 UTC 2007
switch:admin> date "0927123007"
Thu Sep 27 12:30:00 UTC 2007
switch:admin>

Setting time zones


You can set the time zone for a switch by name. You can specify the setting using
country and city or time zone parameters.
If the time zone is not set with the new options, the switch retains the offset time
zone settings. The tsTimeZone command also includes an option to revert to the
prior time zone format. For more information about the tstimezone [--old] option,
see the Fabric OS Command Reference.
You can set the time zone for a switch using the tsTimeZone command. The
tsTimeZone command allows you to perform the following tasks:
v Display all of the time zones supported in the firmware
v Set the time zone based on a country and city combination or based on a time
zone ID such as PST

18

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

The time zone setting has the following characteristics:


v You can view the time zone settings. However, only those with administrative
permissions can set the time zones.
v The tsTimeZone setting automatically adjusts for Daylight Savings Time.
v Changing the time zone on a switch updates the local time zone setup and is
reflected in local time calculations.
v By default, all switches are in the GMT time zone (0,0). If all switches in a fabric
are in one time zone, it is possible for you to keep the time zone setup at the
default setting.
v System services that have already started will reflect the time zone changes only
after the next reboot.
v Time zone settings persist across failover for high availability.
The following procedure describes how to set the time zone for a switch. You must
perform the procedure on all switches for which the time zone must be set.
However, you only need to set the time zone once on each switch, because the
value is written to nonvolatile memory.
1. If you are not already logged into the switch; do so now using the default
password, which is password.
2. Enter the tsTimeZone command as follows:
switch:admin> tstimezone [--interactive]/ [, timezone_fmt]
Use timezone_fmt to set the time zone by Country/City or by time zone ID,
such as PST.
The following example shows how to display the current time zone setup and
how to change the time zone to US/Central.
switch:admin> tstimezone
Time Zone : US/Pacific
switch:admin> tstimezone US/Central
switch:admin> tstimezone
Time Zone : US/Central
The following procedure describes how to set the current time zone using
interactive mode to Pacific Standard Time.
1. Type the tsTimeZone command as follows:
switch:admin> tstimezone --interactive

2. You are prompted to select a general location.


Please identify a location so that time zone rules can be set correctly.

3. Enter the appropriate number or Ctrl-D to quit.


4. At the prompt, select a country location.
5. At the prompt, enter the appropriate number to specify the time zone region or
Ctrl-D to quit.

Synchronizing local time using NTP


You can synchronize the local time of the principal or primary fabric configuration
server (FCS) switch to a maximum of eight external network time protocol (NTP)
servers. To keep the time in your SAN current, it is recommended that the
principal or primary FCS switch has its time synchronized with at least one
external NTP server. The other switches in the fabric will automatically take their
time from the principal or primary FCS switch.

Chapter 2. Installing and configuring the switch

19

All switches in the fabric maintain the current clock server value in non-volatile
memory. By default, this value is the local clock server <LOCL> of the principal or
primary FCS switch. Changes to the clock server value on the principal or primary
FCS switch are propagated to all switches in the fabric.
For more information on using an NTP server, and IPv6 considerations, see the
Fabric OS Administrators Guide.
1. If you are not already logged into the switch; do so now using the default
password, which is password.
2. Enter the tsClockServer command:
switch:admin> tsclockserver "<ntp1;ntp2>"

where ntp1 is the IP address or DNS name of the first NTP server, which the
switch must be able to access. The second ntp2 is the second NTP server and is
optional. The operand <ntp1;ntp2> is optional; by default, this value is
LOCL, which uses the local clock of the principal or primary switch as the
clock server.
The tsClockServer command accepts multiple server addresses in either IPv4, IPv6,
or DNS name formats. When multiple NTP server addresses are passed,
tsclockserver sets the first obtainable address as the active NTP server. The rest
will be stored as backup servers that can take over if the active NTP server fails.
The principal or primary FCS switch synchronizes its time with the NTP server
every 64 seconds.
switch:admin> tsclockserver
LOCL
switch:admin> tsclockserver "132.163.135.131"
switch:admin> tsclockserver
132.163.135.131
switch:admin>
The following example shows how to set up more than one NTP server using a
DNS name:
switch:admin> tsclockserver "10.32.170.1;10.32.170.2;ntp.localdomain.net"
Updating Clock Server configuration...done.
Updated with the NTP servers
Changes to the clock server value on the principal or primary FCS switch
are propagated to all switches in the fabric.

20

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Chapter 3. Operating the switch


This chapter provides the following information:
v Powering the switch on and off
v Interpreting LED activity
v LED patterns on page 23
v
v
v
v
v
v

POST and boot specifications on page 25


Interpreting POST results on page 26
Switch FRU units on page 26
Maintaining the switch on page 26
Managing the switch on page 31

Powering the switch on and off


See Chapter 2, Installing and configuring the switch, on page 7 for initial setup
instructions before powering the switch on for the first time. Once the switch has
been properly configured, follow these instructions to power the switch on and off.
The SAN24B-4 does not have an AC power switch. To power on the SAN24B-4,
connect the power cable to the AC receptacle on the switch and to a power source.
The switch runs POST by default each time it is powered on, reset, or rebooted,
and requires a minimum of three minutes to run. To end the flow of power to the
switch, remove the power cord from the power source.

Interpreting LED activity


System activity and status can be determined through the activity of the LEDs on
the switch. All LEDs are located on the port side of the switch. There are three
possible LED states: no light, a steady light, and a flashing light. The steady lights
and flashing lights can be green or amber. The LEDs flash either of these colors
during boot, POST, or other diagnostic tests. This is normal and does not indicate a
problem unless the LEDs do not indicate a healthy state after all boot processes
and diagnostic tests are complete.
The switch has the following LEDs:
v System power LEDOne LED (green) to indicate system power
v System status LEDOne LED (green/amber) to indicate system status
v Ethernet status LEDsTwo LEDs to indicate speed and link status
v Port status LEDs24 LEDs (green/amber) to indicate status for each port

Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

21

LED locations

B24_0003

All the switch LEDs are located on the port side. Figure 8 shows the location of
individual LEDs

F
A
E
B
C

Figure 8. Detailed view, location of LEDs on the switch

22

Item

LED names and descriptions

System status LED (green/amber)

System power LED (green)

Ethernet link status LED

Ethernet link speed LED

Port status LED for port 3

Port status LED for port 7

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

LED patterns
Table 4 through Table 7 on page 25 summarize the switch LED locations, color, and
meaning, as well as any recommended user response.

Power status LED patterns


The power status LED patterns are shown in Table 4
Table 4. Power status LED patterns, status, and recommended actions
Recommended
action

LED name

LED color

Status of hardware

Power Status LED

No light

Primary power cord


is disconnected or is
not actively powered,
or power supply has
failed.

Verify that switch is


on and has
completed booting.
Verify cord
connections are
secure.

Steady green

Switch is on and
power supply is
functioning properly.

No action is required.

System status LED patterns


The system status LED patterns are shown in Table 5
Table 5. System status LED patterns, status, and recommended actions
Recommended
action

LED name

LED color

Status of hardware

System Status LED

No light

Switch is off, boot is Verify that switch is


not complete, or boot on and has
failed.
completed booting.

Steady green

Switch is operational. No action is required.

Slow-flashing green
(on 1 second, off 1
second)

One or both of the


following are true:
One or more
environmental ranges
are exceeded.
Error log contains
one or more port
diagnostic error
messages.

Check environmental
conditions, error log,
Port Status LEDs,
SFPs, cables, and
loopback plugs.
Correct error
condition. Clear error
log. Rerun
diagnostics to verify
fix.

Amber

Switch is faulty, or
initializing.

Wait a few moments


to verify that the
switch is not
initializing.

Port status LED patterns


Each port has one LED port status indicator. Table 6 on page 24 shows the LED
color, status, and recommended action for these port LEDs.

Chapter 3. Operating the switch

23

Table 6. Port LED patterns during normal operation

24

Recommended
action

LED name

LED color

Status of hardware

Port status

No light

No light or signal
carrier (SFP or cable)
detected.

Check SFP and cable.

Steady green

Port is online
(connected to
external device) but
has no traffic.

No action is required.

Slow-flashing green
(on 1 second, off 1
second)

Port is online but


segmented,
indicating a loopback
cable or incompatible
switch.

Verify that the correct


device is connected
to the port and that
the switch and port
settings are correct.

Fast-flashing green
(on 1/4 second, off
1/4 second)

Port is in internal
No action is required.
loopback (diagnostic).

Flickering green

Port is online, with


traffic flowing
through port.

Steady amber

Port is receiving light No action is required.


or signal carrier but
is not yet online.

Slow-flashing amber
(on 1 second, off 1
second)

Port is disabled as
the result of
diagnostics or
portDisable
command. If all ports
are slow-flashing
amber, the switch
could be disabled.

If all ports are


slow-flashing amber,
the switch could be
disabled. Enable the
port using the
portEnable
command; refer to
Fabric OS Command
Reference for more
information.
If all ports are
slow-flashing amber,
enable the switch
(switchEnable
command).

Fast-flashing amber
(on 1/4 second, off
1/4 second)

Port is faulty.

Check the Port Status


LEDs, error log, SFP,
and cable or
loopback plug. Clear
the error log. Rerun
the diagnostics to
verify that the error
condition is fixed.

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

No action is required.

Ethernet LED patterns


Each Ethernet port has two LEDs, which are described in Table 7
Table 7. Ethernet LED patterns
Recommended
action

LED name

LED color

Status of hardware

Ethernet speed LED


(right)

No light

Port speed is 10
Mb/sec.

No action is required.

Steady green

Port speed is 100


Mb/sec.

No action is required.

No light

No link detected

Verify the Ethernet


cable is connected
correctly.

Blinking amber

There is link activity


(traffic).

No action is required.

Solid Amber

There is a link.

No action is required.

Ethernet link status


LED (left)

POST and boot specifications


When the switch is turned on or rebooted, the switch performs POST. Total boot
time with POST is up to 3 minutes. POST can be omitted after subsequent reboots
by using the fastboot command or entering the diagDisablePost command to
persistently disable POST.
For more information about these commands, refer to the Fabric OS Command
Reference.

POST
The success or failure results of the diagnostic tests that run during POST can be
monitored through the error log or the command line interface.
POST includes the following steps:
1. Preliminary POST diagnostics are run.
2. Operating system is initialized.
3. Hardware is initialized.
4. Diagnostic tests are run on several functions, including circuitry, port
functionality, memory, statistics counters, and serialization.

Boot
In addition to POST, boot includes the following steps after POST is complete:
1. Universal port configuration is performed.
2. Links are initialized.
3. Fabric is analyzed, and if any ports are connected to other switches, the switch
participates in a fabric configuration.
4. Switch obtains a domain ID and assigns port addresses.
5. Unicast routing tables are constructed.
6. Normal port operation is enabled.

Chapter 3. Operating the switch

25

Interpreting POST results


POST is a system check that is performed each time the switch is powered on,
rebooted, or reset. During POST, the LEDs flash amber and green. Any errors that
occur during POST are listed in the error log.
To determine that POST completed successfully and whether or not any errors
were detected:
1. Verify that the switch LEDs indicate that all components are healthy. See
Table 4 on page 23 through Table 7 on page 25 for the description and
interpretation of LED patterns. If one or more LEDs do not display a healthy
state, verify that the LEDs on the switch are not set to beacon; use the
switchShow command to detect if beaconing is active.
2. Verify that the switch prompt displays on the terminal of a computer
workstation connected to the switch. If there is no switch prompt when POST
completes, press Enter. If the switch prompt still does not display, try opening
another telnet session or accessing through another management tool. If this is
not successful, the switch did not successfully complete POST; contact IBM
Service for repair.
3. Review the switch system log for errors. Any errors detected during POST are
written to the system log, which is accessible through the errShow command.
For information about all referenced commands, and on accessing the error log,
refer to Fabric OS Administrator's Guide. For information about error messages, refer
to the Fabric OS System Error Message Reference Manual.

Switch FRU units


The only parts for this switch that are field replaceable are the SFPs. The entire
switch is a FRU. The fan units and power supply are not field replaceable in this
switch.
|
|
|
|

Attention: Use only transceivers that are supported for this product. Only
transceivers purchased from IBM are supported. The use of transceivers that are
not supported may cause data loss or cause the product to malfunction. For a
listing of transceivers compatible with this product:

|
|
|
|

v Go to the IBM Support Portal www.ibm.com/supportportal.


v In the Search field, enter b-type supported transceiver.
v Alternatively, use this direct link: http://www-01.ibm.com/support/
docview.wss?uid=ssg1S1004421.

Maintaining the switch


The switch does not require any regular physical maintenance; it was designed to
minimize the chance of failure. Ensure that the environmental conditions,
described in Environment considerations on page 8, are met. This helps prevent
failure of the switch due to distress or abuse.

Installing SFPs
The switch only supports Brocade-branded SFPs. If you use an unqualified SFP, the
switchShow command output will show the port in an Mod_Inv state. Fabric OS
will also log the issue in the system error log.

26

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

Attention: With increasing speeds of optical connections, the cleanliness of the


connections assumes greater importance in ensuring maximum performance and
error free transmission. Due to the tighter tolerances associated with state of the art
optics, levels of contamination that were acceptable at lower speeds may not be at
higher speeds. While IEC Standard 61300-3-35 specifies a set of guidelines for
trouble free performance, most issues can be avoided by adhering to the following
best practices:
v When cables or connectors are not in use for extended periods of time, use the
dust covers provided.
v Ensure that the cable length and type that is used are suitable for the speed and
application.
v Inspect and clean optical connections and fiber cables before you connect or
reconnect components.

v Ensure that cables are properly seated within the connector.

|
|

Kits are commercially available for cleaning and inspecting these connections. IBM
also offers services that will ensure optimal condition of the network.

Follow these instructions to install an SFP:


1. Ensure that both cable and transceiver are clean prior to installation.
2. Making sure that the bail (wire handle)B is in the unlocked position, place
the SFP in the correctly oriented position on the port, as shown in Figure 9 on
page 28
Note: Each SFP has a 10-pad gold-plated PCB-edge connector on the bottom.
The correct position to insert an SFP into the upper row of ports is with
the gold edge down. The correct position to insert an SFP into the lower
row of ports is with the gold edge up.
3. Slide the SFP into the port until you feel it click into place; then close the bail.

Chapter 3. Operating the switch

27

B24_0004

Figure 9. SFP installation and bail closing

28

Item

Description

Switch chassis

SFP with open bale

SFP

Closed bale

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Removing SFP modules


To
1.
2.
3.
4.

remove an SFP:
Press and hold the cable release B, as shown in section 1 of Figure 10
Remove the cable from the SFP, as shown in section 2.
Pull the bail (wire handle) D in section 3 to release the SFP.
Grasping it by the bail, gently but firmly pull the SFP (C in section 4) out of
the port.
Attention: If the SFP you are removing does not have a bail, use a small
implement such as a screwdriver to press the release trigger beneath the port.
Non-bailed SFPs can be damaged by the removal process and are not
recommended. Refer to the interoperability matrix at the following website:
www.ibm.com/servers/storage/support/san for a list of supported SFPs and
devices.
5. Repeat this procedure for the remaining ports, as required.

B
A

C
3

1
scale: 1/8" = 1"
IO
IO
I

k
rac4 in.
:
O N h for /6
N TI ew lenmgtor13
TE
AT um scrbe 5m
im to
M axnting
m ou

B24_0005

Figure 10. Removing an SFP


Item

Description

Switch chassis

Cable release

Chapter 3. Operating the switch

29

Item

Description

SFP

Bail

Cabled Fibre Channel ports

Testing a port, SFP, and fiber cable


The PortLoopbackTest command is used to verify the functional operation of the
switch by sending frames from the port "N" transmitter and looping them back
into the same port "N" receiver. The loopback is done at the parallel loopback path.
The path exercised in this test does not include the media or the fiber cable.
However if data transmission errors indicate that a port, SFP or cable are faulty,
you can use this command to determine whether the port is faulty. You can use
those results to isolate the problem to either the port or the SFP and cable
combination. If a port is faulty, the switch will need to be replaced. If the port is
not faulty, the problem is either with the SFP or the cable.
With this command, only one frame is transmitted and received at a time. No
external cable is required to run this test. The port LEDs flicker rapidly (green)
while the test is running.
The
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

test performs the following operations:


Sets all ports for parallel loopback.
Creates a frame F of maximum data size (2,112 bytes).
Transmits the frame F through port "N".
Picks up the frame from the same port "N".
Checks the eight statistic error counters for nonzero values:
ENC_in, CRC_err, TruncFrm, FrmTooLong, BadEOF, Enc_out, BadOrdSet, DiscC3

6. Checks whether the transmit, receive, or class 3 receiver counters are stuck at
some value.
7. Checks whether the number of frames transmitted is not equal to the number
of frames received.
8. Repeats Steps 2 through 7 for all ports until one of the following conditions
are met:
a. The number of frames (or passcount) requested is reached.
b. All ports are marked bad.
At each pass, the frame is created from a different data type. If seven passes
are requested, seven different data types are used in the test. If eight passes
are requested, the first seven frames use unique data types, and the eighth is
the same as the first. The seven data types are:
CSPAT: 0x7e, 0x7e, 0x7e, 0x7e, ...
BYTE_LFSR: 0x69, 0x01, 0x02, 0x05, ...
CHALF_SQ: 0x4a, 0x4a, 0x4a, 0x4a, ...
QUAD_NOT: 0x00, 0xff, 0x00, 0xff, ...
CQTR_SQ: 0x78, 0x78, 0x78, 0x78, ...
CRPAT: 0xbc, 0xbc, 0x23, 0x47, ...
RANDOM: 0x25, 0x7f, 0x6e, 0x9a, ....
9. If the test indicates that all ports are good, the problem is associated with
either the cable or SFP.
10. Replace the SFP with an SFP known to be good.

30

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

11. Simulate the data transmission scenario when the error occurred. If the error
does not reappear, the original SFP was defective, and should be discarded. If
the error does reappear, the cable is defective. Replace the cable and discard
the original cable.
12. Simulate the data transmission scenario again to verify that the problem does
not reappear.

Diagnostic tests
In addition to POST, Fabric OS includes diagnostic tests to help troubleshoot the
hardware and the firmware. This includes tests of internal connections and
circuitry, fixed media, and the SFPs and cables in use.
The tests are implemented by command, either through a Telnet session or through
a terminal set up for a serial connection to the switch. Some tests require the ports
to be connected by external cables, to allow diagnostics to verify the
serializer/deserializer interface, SFP, and cable.
All diagnostic tests are run at link speeds of 1, 2, 4, and 8 Gbps, depending on the
speed of the link being tested.
Attention: Diagnostic tests can temporarily lock the transmit and receive speed of
the links during diagnostic testing.
For information about specific diagnostic tests, refer to the Fabric OS Administrators
Guide.

Managing the switch


You can use the management functions built into the switch to monitor the fabric
topology, port status, physical status, and other information to help you analyze
switch performance and to accelerate system debugging. The switch automatically
performs power-on-self-test (POST) each time it is turned on. Any errors are
recorded in the error log. For more information about POST, see POST and boot
specifications on page 25.
For information about upgrading the version of Fabric OS installed on your switch,
refer to the Fabric OS Administrators Guide. You can manage the switch using any
of the management options listed in Table 8.
Table 8. Management options for the switch
Management tool

Out-of-band
support

In-band support

Command line interface (CLI)


Up to two admin sessions and four user sessions simultaneously.
For more information, refer to the Fabric OS Administrator's Guide and the
Fabric OS Command Reference.

Ethernet or serial
connection

IP over Fibre
Channel

Web Tools
For information, see the Web Tools Administrator's Guide.

Ethernet or serial
connection

IP over Fibre
Channel

Standard SNMP applications


For information, see the Fabric OS MIB Reference Manual.

Ethernet or serial
connection

IP over Fibre
Channel

Fabric Manager (optional purchase)


For information, refer to the Fabric Manager Users Guide.

Ethernet or serial
connection

IP over Fibre
Channel

Management Server
For information, see the Fabric OS Administrator's Guide and the Fabric OS
Command Reference.

Ethernet or serial
connection

Native in-band
interface (over
HBA only)

Chapter 3. Operating the switch

31

Table 8. Management options for the switch (continued)


Management tool

Out-of-band
support

In-band support

EFCM (optional purchase)


For information, refer to the EFC Manager Software User Manual.

Ethernet or serial
connection

IP over Fibre
Channel

Note: To achieve in-band support for IP over Fibre Channel, the software must be
run on both the HBA and the switch, and it must be supported by both the
HBA and HBA driver.

32

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Appendix A. Product specifications


This appendix contains the following information:
v Weight and physical dimensions
v Environmental requirements
v Facility requirements on page 34
v
v
v
v
v
v
v

System specifications on page 35


Memory specifications on page 35
Data transmission ranges on page 36
Fibre Channel port specifications on page 36
Serial port specifications on page 36
Power supply specifications on page 36
Supported SFPs and HBAs on page 37

Weight and physical dimensions


Table 9 lists the weight and physical dimensions of the switch.
Table 9. Physical dimensions and weight of the switch
Dimension

Measurement

Height

4.29 cm (1.69 in.)

Width

42.88 cm (16.88 in.)

Depth

30.6 cm (12.07 in.)

Weight

4.2 kg (9.3 lb)

Environmental requirements
Table 10 lists the acceptable environment for both operating and nonoperating
conditions.
Table 10. Environmental requirements
Condition

Acceptable range during operation

Acceptable range during


non-operation

Temperature

-10 to + 40C (14 to 104F)

-25 to 70C (-13 to 158F)

Humidity

10% to 85% RH noncondensing, at 40C, 10% to 90% RH noncondensing,


with maximum gradient of 10% per hour at 70 C

Altitude

0 to 3 km (9,842 ft) above sea level

0 to 12 km (39,370 ft) above sea


level

Shock

20 G, 6 ms duration, half sine wave

33 G, 11 ms duration, half sine

Vibration

0.5 G, 5500 Hz

2.0 G, 5500 Hz

Air flow

High speed: 23 CFM


Low speed: 18 CFM

None required

Note: The -10 to 40 Celsius range applies to the ambient air temperature at the
air intake vents on the nonport side of the switch. The temperature inside
the switch can be up to 80 Celsius during switch operation. If the internal
Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

33

temperature range exceeds the operating ranges of the components, the


LEDs, error messages, and Fabric Watch alerts indicate a problem. Enter the
tempShow or Fabric Watch commands to view temperature status.

Facility requirements
To ensure correct operation of the switch, the facility where the switch is in use
must meet the requirements listed in Table 11.
Table 11. Facility requirements
Type

Requirements

Electrical

v Primary AC input 100-240 VAC, 2.0A,


47-63 Hz; switch autosenses input voltage
v Adequate supply circuit, line fusing, and
wire size, as specified by the electrical
rating on the switch nameplate
v Correctly wired primary outlet, with
circuit protected by a circuit breaker and
grounded in accordance with local
electrical codes

Thermal

v A minimum air flow of 24 cubic ft/min


available to the air intake vents on the
nonport side of the switch.
v Ambient air temperature not exceeding
40 C (104 F) while the switch is
operating
v At a minimum, adequate cooling requires
that you install the switch with the
nonport side, which contains the air
intake vents, facing the cool-air aisle
v All equipment in the rack should force air
in the same direction to avoid intaking
exhaust air
v Ensure that airflow and temperature
requirements are met on an ongoing basis,
particularly if the switch is installed in a
closed or multicabinet assembly

Cabinet (when rack-mounted)

v One rack unit in a standard EIA 19-in.


(48.3 cm) cabinet
v All equipment in cabinet grounded
through a reliable branch circuit
connection and maintain ground at all
times. Do not rely on a secondary
connection to a branch circuit, such as a
power strip
v Additional weight of switch not to exceed
the cabinets weight limits
v Cabinet secured to ensure stability in case
of unexpected movement, such as an
earthquake

34

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

System specifications
Table 12 lists the system specifications for the switch.
Table 12. General specifications
Specification

Descriptions

Autoconfiguring port types

F_Port, FL_Port, M_Port, N_Port, and E_Port

System architecture

Nonblocking shared-memory switch

System processor

IBM PowerPC 440EPx, 667 MHz

SDRAM

512 MB DDR2 SDRAM onboard memory


operating at 133 MHz

Compact flash

1 GB

ANSI Fibre Channel protocol

FC-PH (Fibre Channel Physical and


Signalling Interface standard)

Modes of operation

Fibre Channel Class 2, Class 3, Class F

Fabric initialization

Complies with FC-SW-2 6.6

Ethernet port

One 10/100BaseT Ethernet port; accessed


through RJ45 connector

Terminal port

One UART interface for terminal, accessed


through RJ-45 connector

ASIC

Goldeneye-2 ASIC for Fibre Channel


Switching

Port Status LEDs

24 LEDs (green/amber) to indicate status for


each port

System Power LED

One LED (green) to indicate system power

System Status LED

One LED (green/amber) to indicate system


status

Ethernet LEDs

Two Ethernet LEDs to indicate speed and


link status

Power supply

One fixed power supply (not a FRU)

Fans

Three fixed fans operating at dual speeds


(not a FRU).

FC-IP (IP over Fibre Channel)

Complies with FC-IP 2.3 of FCA profile

Aggregate switch I/O bandwidt

384 Gbps if all 24 ports running at 8 Gbps,


full duplex

Port-to-port latency

Less than 700 nanoseconds with no


contention (destination port is free)

Memory specifications
The switch memory specifications are shown in Table 13.
Table 13. Memory specifications
Memory type

Installed memory

Main memory (SDRAM)

512 MB

Compact flash

1 GB

Appendix A. Product specifications

35

Data transmission ranges


Table 14 provides the data transmission ranges for different cable types and port
speeds.
Table 14. Data transmission ranges
Port speed

Cable size (microns)

Short wavelength (SWL)

Long wavelength (LWL)

1 Gbps

50

500 m (1,640 ft)

N/A

62.5

300 m (984 ft)

N/A

N/A

up to 10 km (6.2 mi)

50

300 m (984 ft)

N/A

62.5

150 m (492 ft)

N/A

N/A

N/A

50

150 m (492 ft)

N/A

62.5

70 m (230 ft)

N/A

N/A

N/A

50

150 m (492 ft)

N/A

62.5

21 m (69 ft)

N/A

N/A

10 km

2 GGbps

4 Gbps

8 Gbps

Fibre Channel port specifications


The Fibre Channel ports in the switch are compatible with SWL, LWL, and ELWL
SFPs. The strength of the signal is determined by the type of SFP in use. The ports
are capable of operating at 1, 2, 4 and 8 Gbps, and are able to autosense the
highest speed capable for all attached devices. The ports meet all required safety
standards.

Serial port specifications


The serial port is located on the port side of the switch as a RJ-45 connector,
designed to connect to a DTE port. Use the serial port to connect to a computer
workstation to configure the switch IP address without connecting to the fabric.
The serial ports parameters are 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, and no
flow control.

Power supply specifications


The power supply is universal and capable of functioning worldwide without
using voltage jumpers or switches. It meets IEC 61000-4-5 surge voltage
requirements and is autoranging in terms of accommodating input voltages and
line frequencies. The power supply has its own built-in fan for cooling, pushing
the air toward the port side of the switch. The power supply is not removable.
Table 15 lists the power supply specifications for the switch.
Table 15. Switch power supply specifications

36

Specification

Value

Inlet

C13

Maximum output from the power supply

75 watts

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Table 15. Switch power supply specifications (continued)


Specification

Value

System power consumption

48 watts nominal, 57 watts maximum

Input voltage

85 - 264 VAC, universal

Input line frequency

47 - 63 Hz

BTU rating

277 BTU/hr

Inrush current

21.5 Amps at 240 VAC cold start

Supported SFPs and HBAs


When you receive the switch, your package contains at least 8 Brocade-branded
SFPs for the base configuration. Use only SFPs that are tested and supported. For
the most up to date list of supported SFPs and HBAs for the switch, refer to the
product interoperability matrix at the IBM SAN Support web pages at:
www.ibm.com/servers/storage/support/san

Appendix A. Product specifications

37

38

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Appendix B. Link troubleshooting


IBM SAN b-type directors and switches use the latest high bandwidth Fibre
Channel technology and auto-negotiate to 16 Gbps, 8 Gbps, 4 Gbps, or 2 Gbps
based on the link data rate capability of the attached transceiver and the speed
supported by the switches and directors. Negotiation to 1 Gbps is not supported
unless 4 Gbps FC transceivers are used. As the 8 and 16 Gbps channel is more
sensitive to the condition of the existing multimode and single mode cable plant, it
is very important to minimize connector reflections and maintain an acceptable
link loss budget.
This section provides link troubleshooting advice on fault isolation and provides
guidance in the following areas:
v Dust and dirt contamination
v Link loss
v Attenuation on LWL connections

Fault isolation
Since a job loss issue can be caused by a variety of problems, it is important to
employ a systematic fault isolation process to remedy the issue. Note that job
losses do not necessarily result from link errors. They may also be due to:
v Configuration issues
v Networking overload
v Failures on storage device, switch, or server
Assume for these procedures that the observed errors originate from link errors
and are not the result of configuration issues, network overload or network
equipment failures.
Whenever CRC errors are discovered on a particular link, it is easy to jump to the
conclusion that the link is causing the network issue. This might not be the case.
Since CRC errors are just symptoms of a link issue, we need to trace the
propagated error to where it originated.
Figure 11 shows a simplified network involving a server, a switch, and a storage
device. In this example, assume that the server experienced an error at port 1. This
observable error can potentially originate from links 1, 2, 3 or 4 and/or SFP 1, 2, 3
or 4.

Switch

Link 3

Rx
Tx

Port 9

Rx

Link 2

SFP 4

Tx

SFP 3

Tx

Port 6

Link 4

Rx

Port 5

Link 1

SFP 2

Rx

SFP 1

Port 1

Tx

Storage
b965036

Server

Figure 11. Identifying the origin of failure

To determine the original failing link, the observable CRC error needs to be
tracked back to the first occurrence of the CRC error. By following this process, it
Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

39

is discovered in this example that CRC errors observed in link 4 were propagated
from link 3, which in turn originated from link 2.
Once the original failing link (link 2) has been determined, the two connecting
ports of that link need to be checked for the following errors:
v Encoder errors
v Disparity errors
v Invalid transmission words
The port that displays any of the above errors is the cause of the link issue, which
can be caused by dust or dirt in the connectors or fiber, an insufficient link loss
budget, and/or incompatible SFPs.

Dust, dirt, or other contaminants


One of the most common optical link problems is caused by dust, dirt, or oil in the
connectors and fiber. 8 and 16 Gbps links are more prone to such issues while
lower link data rates, such as 1, 2, or 4 Gbps may be unaffected.
Once the failing port has been identified by following the above fault isolation
process, the receive power of the transceiver sitting in that port needs to be
determined. An abnormally low receive power usually means that the physical link
is dirty.
The receive power can be checked by querying the SFP diagnostics data via the
command line interface. This information will provide a rough gauge whether the
receive power is abnormally lower than the minimum receive specification of the
transceiver. It is also prudent to compare this receive power with those of
neighboring transceivers.
For better accuracy, it is advisable to use a power meter to measure the actual
receive power of the link. If you are experiencing excessive bit errors and the
receive power of the transceiver is abnormally low, it is recommended that you:
v Re-seat the transceivers for the failing link
v Clean the connector and optical fiber
Most link issues are solved by completing these steps.

Best practices for minimizing link loss


The "link margin" or the "power budget" of the link is a measure of signal power
gain or loss expressed in decibels (dB). Maintaining a healthy link budget is critical
to establishing a reliable and stable network.
Follow these best practices for minimizing link loss:
v Stay well within the maximum cable distance calculated for the link.
v Apply typical or worst-case values during loss calculations.
v Use the highest grade cabling components for the application to be supported.
v Match the cable type with the wavelength, bandwidth, and distance to be
supported; do not mix cable types within a link.
v Inspect loss ratings of all cabling components during the selection process.
v Record loss measurements for horizontal and vertical cable runs during
installation.

40

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

v Become familiar with how to quickly determine the link budget and link loss of
selected sections of the cabling.
v Account for power loss associated with future repairs and expansion.
v Do not stress the cables.
v Prototype a link with anticipated maximum cable distance and selected
componentsand then take measurements to calculate the actual link loss

Attenuation on LWL connections


In the datacenter environment, there may be 8 Gbps or 4 Gbps LWL transceivers
that are connected to 2 Gbps LWL transceivers using single-mode fiber over short
distances. Such connections need to be optically engineered because there is a
possibility that the transmit power of the 8 Gbps / 4 Gbps LWL transceivers may
saturate the receiver of 2 Gbps LWL transceivers and cause CRC errors.
Attention: This discussion does not apply to 16 Gbps transceivers since
connections between 16 Gbps and 2 Gbps transceivers is not supported.
Refer to Table 16 for the typical specifications of maximum transmit and receive
power of LWL transceivers. This information is also available in the information
technology industry standard "Fibre Channel Physical Interface-4 (FC-PI-4)"
document.
Table 16. Specifications of LWL 10km transceivers
LWL SFP/SFP+

2GFC

Power, Tx (max) dB

-3

Power, Rx (max) dB

0 or -3

4GFC

8GFC

-1

+0.5

N/A

N/A

The maximum receive power specifications of some 2 Gbps LWL 10km transceivers can
vary from 0dB to -3dB. However, most 2 Gbps 10km transceivers specify a maximum
receive power of 0dB.

It is important to check the maximum receive power of the 2 Gbps LWL


transceiver in the manufacturer's datasheet.
Without taking into account connector and fiber losses, the transmit power of 8
Gbps / 4 Gbps LWL transceivers may be observed to overdrive the -3dB maximum
receive power of 2 Gbps LWL transceivers. If the maximum receive power of the 2
Gbps LWL transceiver is 0dB, a 4 Gbps LWL transceiver with a -1dB transmit
power will not overdrive the 2 Gbps transceiver. Although some 8 Gbps LWL
transceivers may reduce their transmit power to 4 Gbps levels, this may still
overdrive a 2 Gbps LWL transceiver.

Best Practice for LWL connections Optically engineer a


long-distance connection
It is always a good practice to optically engineer a long-distance connection. Most
link issues caused by SFP incompatibility can be solved either by use of 4 Gbps
LWL transceivers or use of 8 Gbps LWL transceivers that employ rate select.

2G LWL SFP maximum receive power


The IBM SAN b-type 8 Gbps and 16 Gbps directors and switches use the latest
high bandwidth Fibre Channel technology and auto-negotiate to 16 Gbps, 8 Gbps,
4 Gbps, or 2 Gbps based on the link data rate capability of the attached transceiver.
Appendix B. Link troubleshooting

41

Negotiation to 1 Gbps is not supported. Since 8 and 16 Gbps equipment is more


sensitive, the existing cable plant may require additional attention to cable care
after upgrading from 2 or 4 Gbps fibre. In a few cases, the Tx power of the switch
can be higher than the connected equipment. In nearly all of those cases, there is
enough attenuation in the existing cable plant so as not to require additional
attenuation. The common 2 Gbps SFP Rx maximum power levels are listed in
Table 17 and can be used as a quick method to relieve concerns of over saturation.
Table 17. Maximum receive power of 2 Gbps LWL SFPs

42

Vendor

Part number

Description

Max Receive Power


(dB)

Avago

AFCT-57M5ATPZ

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

-3 dB

Finisar

FTLF1319P1xTL

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

0 dB

Finisar

FTRJ1319P1xTL

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

0 dB

JDSU

JSH-12L1DD1

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

1 dB

Hitachi Cable

HTR6517

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

-3 dB

Optoway

SPS-9110FG

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

-3 dB

Optoway

SPS-9110AFG

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

-3 dB

JDSU

JSH-21L3AR3

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

1 dB

E20

ES212-LP3TA

2 Gbps 10 km SFP

-3 dB

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the USA.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in
other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the
products and services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM
product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM
product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product,
program, or service that does not infringe on any IBM intellectual property right
may be used instead. However, it is the user's responsibility to evaluate and verify
the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you
any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, N.Y. 10504-1785
U.S.A.
For additional information, visit the web at:
http://www.ibm.com/ibm/licensing/contact/
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other
country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law:
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION AS IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or
implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply
to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be
incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements
and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this
publication at any time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM websites are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those
websites. The materials at those websites are not part of the materials for this IBM
product and use of those websites is at your own risk.
IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it
believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled
environment. Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments may
vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made on development-level
Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

43

systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the same on
generally available systems. Furthermore, some measurement may have been
estimated through extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document
should verify the applicable data for their specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of
those products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources.
IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of
performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products.
Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the
suppliers of those products.
If you are viewing this information in softcopy, the photographs and color
illustrations may not appear.

44

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of
International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries,
or both. A complete and current list of other IBM trademarks is available on the
Web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml
Adobe, the Adobe logo, PostScript, and the PostScript logo are either registered
trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States,
and/or other countries.
Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks of Sun Microsystems,
Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other
countries, or both.
Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United
States, other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other
countries.
Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies.

Notices

45

Electronic emission notices


The following statements apply to this product. The statements for other products
intended for use with this product will appear in their accompanying manuals.

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A


Statement
This equipment has been tested and complies with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated
in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at
his own expense.
Properly shielded and grounded cables and connectors must be used in order to
meet FCC emission limits. IBM is not responsible for any radio or television
interference caused by using other than recommended cables and connectors or by
unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment. Unauthorized changes
or modifications could void the user's authority to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and
(2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that
may cause undesired operation.

Industry Canada Class A Emission Compliance Statement


This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

Avis de conformit la rglementation d'Industrie Canada


Cet appareil numrique de la classe A est conform la norme NMB-003 du
Canada.

European Union EMC Directive Conformance Statement


This product is in conformity with the protection requirements of EU Council
Directive 2004/108/EC on the approximation of the laws of the Member States
relating to electromagnetic compatibility. IBM cannot accept responsibility for any
failure to satisfy the protection requirements resulting from a non-recommended
modification of the product, including the fitting of non-IBM option cards.
Attention: This is an EN55022 Class A product. In a domestic environment this
product may cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to
take adequate measures.
Responsible manufacturer:
International Business Machines Corp.
New Orchard Road
Armonk, New York 10504
Tel: 919-499-1900
European community contact:
IBM Technical Regulations, Department M456

46

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

IBM-Allee 1, 71137 Ehningen, Germany


Tel: +49 7032 15-2937
E-mail: tjahn@de.ibm.com

Germany Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive


Deutschsprachiger EU Hinweis:
Hinweis fr Gerte der Klasse A EU-Richtlinie zur Elektromagnetischen
Vertrglichkeit
Dieses Produkt entspricht den Schutzanforderungen der EU-Richtlinie
2004/108/EG zur Angleichung der Rechtsvorschriften ber die elektromagnetische
Vertrglichkeit in den EU-Mitgliedsstaaten und hlt die Grenzwerte der EN 55022
Klasse A ein.
Um dieses sicherzustellen, sind die Gerte wie in den Handbchern beschrieben zu
installieren und zu betreiben. Des Weiteren drfen auch nur von der IBM
empfohlene Kabel angeschlossen werden. IBM bernimmt keine Verantwortung fr
die Einhaltung der Schutzanforderungen, wenn das Produkt ohne Zustimmung der
IBM verndert bzw. wenn Erweiterungskomponenten von Fremdherstellern ohne
Empfehlung der IBM gesteckt/eingebaut werden.
EN 55022 Klasse A Gerte mssen mit folgendem Warnhinweis versehen werden:
"Warnung: Dieses ist eine Einrichtung der Klasse A. Diese Einrichtung kann im
Wohnbereich Funk-Strungen verursachen; in diesem Fall kann vom Betreiber
verlangt werden, angemessene Manahmen zu ergreifen und dafr
aufzukommen."
Deutschland: Einhaltung des Gesetzes ber die elektromagnetische
Vertrglichkeit von Gerten
Dieses Produkt entspricht dem "Gesetz ber die elektromagnetische Vertrglichkeit
von Gerten (EMVG)". Dies ist die Umsetzung der EU-Richtlinie 2004/108/EG in
der Bundesrepublik Deutschland.
Zulassungsbescheinigung laut dem Deutschen Gesetz ber die
elektromagnetische Vertrglichkeit von Gerten (EMVG) (bzw. der EMC EG
Richtlinie 2004/108/EG) fr Gerte der Klasse A
Dieses Gert ist berechtigt, in bereinstimmung mit dem Deutschen EMVG das
EG-Konformittszeichen - CE - zu fhren.
Verantwortlich fr die Einhaltung der EMV Vorschriften ist der Hersteller:
International Business Machines Corp.
New Orchard Road
Armonk, New York 10504
Tel: 919-499-1900
Der verantwortliche Ansprechpartner des Herstellers in der EU ist:
IBM Deutschland
Technical Regulations, Department M456
IBM-Allee 1, 71137 Ehningen, Germany
Tel: +49 7032 15-2937
E-mail: tjahn@de.ibm.com

Notices

47

Generelle Informationen:
Das Gert erfllt die Schutzanforderungen nach EN 55024 und EN 55022 Klasse
A.

People's Republic of China Class A Electronic Emission


Statement

Japan VCCI Council Class A Statement

Translation: This is a Class A product based on the standard of the VCCI Council.
If this equipment is used in a domestic environment, radio interference may occur,
in which case, the user may be required to take corrective actions.

Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries


Association (JEITA) Statement

jjieta1

Japanese Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA)


Confirmed Harmonics Guideline (products less than or equal to 20 A per phase).

Korea Communications Commission (KCC) Statement


Please note that this equipment has obtained EMC registration for commercial use.
In the event that it has been mistakenly sold or purchased, please exchange it for
equipment certified for home use.

48

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

rusemi

Russia Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Class A Statement

Australia and New Zealand Class A Statement


Attention: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product
might cause radio interference in which case the user might be required to take
adequate measures.

Notices

49

50

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

Index
A

About this document xiii


accessibility
IBM commitment v
keyboard navigation iv
vendor software v
address
IBM v
air flow
requirements 33
altitude
requirements 33
attention notice
definition xx
example xx
attention notices xx

danger notices xv
definitions xv
examples xv
date
setting 18
default
password 17
diagnostic
tests 31
director of licensing, address
disposal xxiii
documentation xiii
documents
Brocade xiii

B
boot
specifications 25
Boot steps 25
Brocade
documents xiii
Brocade documents xiii

C
cabinet
considerations 9
installation 9
requirements 9, 34
cable management
recommendations 15
caution notices xvii
definition xvii
examples xviii
CLI
management 31
command line interface (CLI)
management 31
comments, sending to IBM v
configurations
fabric 3
supported 3
configuring
switch 7, 16
connectivity
supported 2
considerations
cabinet 9
electrical 8
environmental 8
rack 9
creating a serial connection 17

Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2013

features (continued)
USB port 1
fiber cable
testing 30
Fibre Channel port
specifications 36
field replaceable unit (FRU)
FRUs 26

43

general specifications
getting help iii

35

H
help iii
humidity
requirements

E
edition notice ii
EFCM
management 31
electrical
considerations 8
requirements 8, 34
electrical requirements 8
electronic emission notices 46
environmental
considerations 8
notices xxiii
product recycling and disposal
requirements 8, 33
environmental notices xiv
environmental requirements 33
Ethernet port
LED patterns 25
Ethernet status
LED 21
EZSwitch setup
installation 16

26

33

xxiii

F
fabric
configurations 3
Fabric Manager
management 31
facility requirements 34
features
1U chassis 1
auto-sensing Fibre Channel ports 1
built-in fans 1
built-in power supply 1
Dynamic Path Selection (DPS) 1
Ethernet port 1
EZSwitchSetup wizard 1
Inter-Switch-Link trunking 1
LEDs 1
NPIV access gateway 1
optional 4
RJ45 Ethernet management port 1

IBM
accessibility commitment v
address v
interoperability matrix 37
notices 43
trademarks 45
in-band support 31
installation
EZSwitch setup 16
slide-rail
instructions 10
switch
instructions 10
installing
electrical requirements 8
facility requirements 34
SFP 26
slide-rail rack 8, 9
stand-alone switch 9
stand-alone unit 8, 9
switch 7
installing the switch 8
instructions
installation 10
intellectual property 43
interpreting LED activity 21
Interpreting POST results 26
Interswitch Link (ISL) 3
IP address
setting 17
static 17
using DHCP 17
ISL
trunking groups 3
items included 7

51

K
keyboard navigation

iv

L
labels, safety xix
LED
activity 21
descriptions 2
Ethernet status 21
interpretation 21
locations 2, 22
patterns 23
system power 21
system status 21
types 21
LED patterns
Ethernet port 25
port status 23
power status 23
system status 23
license
agreement v
keys
paperpack 8
license, for patents 43
local time
synchronizing 19
using NTP 19

M
maintaining
switch 26
maintenance
switch 26
management
CLI 31
EFCM 31
Fabric Manager 31
in-band 31
Management Server 31
SNMP 31
Web Tools 31
management features 31
Management Server
management 31
managing
cables 15
memory 35

N
network time protocol (NTP)
time synchronization 19
nonport side
switch 3
notice, edition ii
notices
attention xx
caution xvii
danger xv
environmental xiv, xxiii
general 43
IBM 43

52

notices (continued)
patents 43
safety xiv
types xv
notices ,danger xv
notices and labels
safety xiv
NTP
time synchronization

19

P
parts supplied with switch rack-mount
kit 11
password
default 17
patents 43
physical dimensions 33
port
activation 3
descriptions 2
Ethernet 2
Fibre Channel 2
locations 2
system console 2
testing 30
USB 2
port side
LEDs 22
switch 2
port status
LED 21
LED patterns 23
POST
interpreting results 26
specifications 25
POST and boot specifications 25
POST steps 25
power
consumption 36
switch 16
power status
LED patterns 23
power supply
BTU rating 36
inlet connector 36
input line frequency 36
input voltage 36
inrush current 36
maximum output 36
specifications 36
product
documentation xiii
product specifications 33
data transmission ranges 36
environmental requirements 33
Fibre Channel ports 36

Q
qualified
SFPs 26

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide

rack
considerations 9
requirements 9
safety xxi
rack mount kit 11
rack relocation
safety xxii
rack safety xxi
read this first iii
recycling xxiii
removing
SFP 29
requirements
air flow 33
altitude 33
cabinet 34
cacbinet 9
electrical 8, 34
environmental 8, 33
humidity 33
rack 9
shock 33
temperature 33
thermal 34
vibration 33
results
POST 26

S
safety xiv
considerations 8
labels xiv, xix
examples xix
notices xiv
rack xxi
rack installation xxi
rack relocation xxii
safety labels xix
safety notices xiv
serial connection
creating 17
UNIX 17
Windows 17
serial port
specifications 36
setting
date 18
IP address 17
time 18
time zones 18
setting the IP address 17
SFP
bail 26, 29
FRUs 26
installing 26
removing 29
supported 37
supported types 26
testing 30
shock
requirements 33
SNMP
management 31

specifications
boot 25
data transmission ranges 36
Fibre Channel ports 36
general 35
memory 35
physical dimensions 33
POST 25
power supply 36
product 33
serial port 36
system 35
weight 33
stand-alone
switch 9
installing 9
static IP address
setting 17
supported
SFPs 26
supported (optional) features 4
supported connectivity 2
switch
airflow 3
cabinet 9
configuring 7, 16
features 1
See features
FRU units 26
installing 7, 9
introduction 1
items included 7
library xiii
maintaining 26
maintenance 26
management features 31
memory 35
nonport side 3
parts supplied with the rack-mount
kit 11
physical dimensions 33
port side 2
power 16
powering on and off 21
product specifications
See product specifications
specifications 35
stand-alone 9
weight 33
synchronizing
local time 19
system power
LED 21
system specifications 35
system status
LED 21
LED patterns 23

tests
diagnostic 31
thermal
requirements 34
time
setting 18
time zones
setting 18
trademarks 45
trunking groups
ISL 3

V
vendor software v
vibration
requirements 33

W
Web Tools
management
websites iii
weight 33

31

T
temperature
requirements 33
terminal emulator applications
testing
fiber cable 30
port 30
SFP 30

17

Index

53

54

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User Guide



Part Number: 98Y5367

GA32-0580-03

(1P) P/N: 98Y5367

Printed in USA



Spine information:

IBM System Storage SAN24B-4


Express

SAN24B-4 Express Installation, Service, and User


Guide

Service information: 2498


- B24, 24E