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Stress and Sleep

Group C5: Shyann Rio, Jiawen Dai, Aimee Martin


EDT 180C
Professor Lewallen
November 29, 2016

Group 5C
Stress and Sleep

INTRO
The topic that we decided to research is stress and sleep. The questions that we included in our
survey are: What year of study are you in? What is your gender? What are you studying? On average how many hours do you spend working on school work each day? On average how many
hours a week do you work outside of school? On average how many hours of sleep do you get
each night? On a scale of 1 to 5, how much stress do you feel weekly? We created a survey on
Google Docs Form to collect the data from our peers. We had a total of 100 responses from our
survey.

DISCUSSION
When comparing average stress level per week with class we see a spike in the stress level in the
sophomore class. This is a likely a result of having 47 sophomore out of a total 100 respondents.
However it is interesting that the highest number of people reported they were only a 4 on a scale
of 1 (not being stressed at all) to 5 (extremely stressed).

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Group 5C
Stress and Sleep

When comparing average weekly stress level and gender we see that there are a larger number of
females who feel stressed. This is a likely result due to the fact that 80% of respondents were female. However, it is still interesting that the highest amount of stress females reported feeling
was a 4 on a scale of 1 (not being stressed at all) to 5 (extremely stressed).

When comparing average stress level weekly to hours spent on school work each week we see a
high correlation with 0-5 hours spent. This result may not be truly accurate due to the fact that 57
respondents out of the 100 total reported only spending 0-5 hours on school work weekly. However, it is still interesting that although they spend little time on school work they still report a 3
in stress level on a scale of 1 (not being stressed at all) to 5 (extremely stressed).

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Group 5C
Stress and Sleep

When comparing average weekly stress levels to average hours of sleep each night we see a
spike in stress level and those who get 6-8 hours of sleep. We likely see this because the majority
of respondents reported getting 6-8 hours of sleep. Similarly, it is interesting to see the second
most popular reported hours of sleep was 4-6 hours also have a higher reported amount of stress
level.

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Group 5C
Stress and Sleep

ANALYSIS
After looking at our results it seems that the correlation between stress and sleep can still not be
answered. As most our responses seemed to be bias towards the majority of the respondents. If
we were to redo this process we would certainly ask more specific questions and get a better
range of respondents in order to avoid the bias we ran into this round. Some other questions that
we came up with related to stress and sleep are:

Do you feel your major affects the amount of sleep you get every night? If so, why?

Have you ever stayed up all night studying? If so, how many times a month?

Do you feel like the amount of sleep you get each night is a healthy amount?

If you have a job, do you think your job affects your level of stress?

Another helpful tool we would change is eliminating all short answer options and only allowing
multiple choice, checkbox, true/false, and scale questions. When having to enter all of the data,
the short answer answers are very inconvenient to enter in Excel. The multiple choice, checkbox, true/false, and scale options are more helpful when performing a basic analysis of the gathered data.

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