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Social Justice/Multicultural Lesson Plan

T&L Instructional Plan Template


(Updated 4/17/15)
(edTPA Aligned)
Overview
The information included in this document is to support faculty in teaching about and supporting students with the
T&L (and edTPA) Instructional Plan. While there are many variations of lesson plans, this format meets
departmental requirements and is aligned with the 2014 edTPA as well.
Background Information (When doing the actual edTPA, leave out identifiers)
Teacher Candidate: _____Justine_ Bishop_____________ Date:_11/3/16_______
Cooperating Teacher: ______________
Grade:__Fourth________
School District: _________________
School: _________________
University Supervisor:
Unit/Subject: Language Arts
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Using Details to Describe a Person or Their Life
Section 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment
a. Instructional Plan Purpose: Teacher candidates explain how this instructional plan develops students
conceptual understanding of overall content goals. This is sometimes also called a rationale and includes a
what, why, how general statement (see also Central Focus in edTPA)
Additionally, explain where in a unit this lesson would be taught. What lesson topic came prior to this one
(yesterday) and what related lesson will come after this one (tomorrow)?
For this lesson, students will be reading and discussing a new book. The goal of this lesson is to help students
see how authors use details to describe characters or the lives of characters.
In addition, students will make the connection that they, as writers, are also able to do these things. To
achieve this, students will be asked questions about the characters, and asked to use the text or the
illustrations to support their answers.
Finally, I have selected a multicultural childrens book in an attempt to get students to think critically about
perspectives and diverse groups of people.
After reading and discussing the book Sitting Bull: Lakota Warrior and Defender of His People. Students
will continue to engage in lessons and activities that deepen their understanding of Native American culture.
After this lesson, we will connect it to current events and social justice by connecting it to the current DAPL/
pipeline protests. Since the book takes place in the same area as these protests, students will be able to build
on their understanding of Native American culture, and use it to better understand what the protests are
about. In addition, we are also going to use this in order to introduce students to Native American Oral
History Stories. Finally, this will all lead up to their Lelooska Cultural Center fieldtrip this May.
b. State/National Learning Standards: Teacher candidates identify relevant grade level concepts/content and
align them to Content StandardsCommon Core Standards or Washington State EALRs, or National.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing
inferences from the text.
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CCSS. ELA-Literacy.RL.4.7: Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the
text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
c. Content Objectives (to be copied in Assessment Chart below) and alignment to State Learning
Standards:
1. SWBAT answer questions and support their answers with explicit examples from the text.
Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing
inferences from the text.
2. SWBAT answer questions and support their answers by referencing illustrations.
Aligned standard: CCSS. ELA-Literacy.RL.4.7
Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text,
identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
Language Objectives:
1. SWBAT work together in order to support their own learning and the learning of their peers.
Aligned standard: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
d. Previous Learning Experiences: Teacher candidates should explain what students know and have learned
that is relevant to the current lesson topic and process.
This is the classes first time reading the book Sitting Bull: Lakota Warrior and Defender of His Peoples, so
they are unfamiliar with this particular story.
All though this is a new book and topic for them, students will be able to use their previous learning to help
them understand parts of the lesson and process. For instance, students are familiar with autobiographies
from writing their own in a previous lesson. In that lesson, students also discussed the similarities and
differences in autobiographies and biographies.
In addition, students are familiar with, and understand how to use the close reading process. They know that
we read through the text multiple times, support our answers with evidence from the book, and cite where we
found our information.
e. Planning for Student Learning Needs (accommodations, student experiences, prior learning and
experiences):
Students have previously been introduced to biographies and autobiographies, so they should be familiar
with this type of text. The teacher will briefly review these genres to support students who have not learned
about these in the past.
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In addition, to support the diverse needs of the classroom, this lesson will include various activities and
grouping. Students will be able to work individually, in pairs, in small groups, and as a whole class. Students
will get the opportunity to learn the material by listening, reading, writing, and discussing.
Finally, the teacher will observe students during group, partner, and individual work times, and be available
to provide extra support as needed.
f. Assessment Strategies (Informal and formal)
Teacher candidates should attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to their
assessment strategies, including accommodations or modifications for students with disabilities as stated in
their IEPs. They may also attach appropriate marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
Consideration for multiple means of expression should occur here. That is, how will teacher candidates allow
for K-12 students to express their learning in different ways? Will K-12 students be given some choice?
Content/Language Objectives
SWBAT answer questions and support their
answers with explicit examples from the text.

SWBAT answer questions and support their


answers by referencing illustrations.
SWBAT work together in order to support
their own learning and the learning of their
peers.

Assessment Strategies
Informal: Teacher observations during group discussions.
Informal: For independent practice, students will use their
independent reading books and record examples that show
the author using details to describe a person/their life. They
will record these examples in their reading journals, which
the teacher will check after the lesson.
Informal: Teacher observations during group discussions.
Informal: Teacher observations during group discussions.
Informal: Exit slip.

(Add rows as needed)


*In the right column, describe whether the assessment youll collect is informal or formal. Note: most
assessment is considered formative when thinking about day-to-day lessons. Summative is related to mastery.
An exception might be having a formal quiz mid-way in a unit to assure that students are on track with a
certain degree of proficiency. Should the quiz indicate students are not progressing, and adjustment of timing in
the instructional unit will be required.
g. Student Voice: Student voice is a term used to describe students expressing their understanding of their own
learning process. For your lesson, respond to the three required components of student voice and identify how
students will reflect and/or communicate on their learning or progress toward meeting the goals. (Use the
following table.)

K-12 students will be able to:

1. Explain student learning targets


and what is required to meet
them (including why they are
important to learn).

2. Monitor their own learning


progress toward the learning
targets using the tools provided
(checklists, rubrics, etc.).

3. Explain how to access


resources and additional
support when needed (and
how/why those resources will
help them).

Student-based evidence to be
collected (things produced by
students: journals, exit slips, selfassessments, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
Exit Slip

Exit Slip
KWL chart

Exit Slip

Description of how students


will reflect on their learning.

At the end of the lesson,


students will be asked to
quickly complete an exit slip,
which asks them to complete
statements such as Today our
goal was to learn and I
can use what I learned
At the end of the lesson,
students will be asked to
complete an exit slip which
encourages reflection through
statements such as Today I
learned
Students will also complete a
KWL chart to show what they
learned and how their
understanding of Native
American culture has
changed.
At the end of the lesson,
students will be asked to
complete an exit slip which
encourages reflection through
statements such as If I still
need help, I can

h. Grouping of Students for Instruction: Describe why, how, and where in the lesson students will be divided
into groups, if applicable (e.g., "why" could be to support language learners, for reciprocal teaching, and/or to
use jigsaw, and "how" might include random, ability-based, interest, social purposes, etc.). Recognize that
some lessons or parts of a lesson may call for grouped work or individualized work or both.
Students will be grouped in a variety of ways in order to maintain engagement and allow for students to get the
chance to work both independently and with their peers. During the introduction, students will think
independently, share their ideas with an elbow partner, and then have a whole class discussion. Then the class will
work as a whole for the main portion of the lesson. Finally, students will get the opportunity to practice these
skills individually with their independent reading books.
Section 2: Instruction and Engaging Students in Learning
a. Introduction: Teacher candidates identify how they are going to introduce the concept, skill or task in a way
that gains students attention and gets them involved (the lesson hook).

To introduce the lesson, the teacher will put a picture of Sitting Bull up on the projector screen. Students will
then do a think/pair/share, and brainstorm about who they think the person is, and what clues in the picture
tell them this. Students are not expected to know specifically who he is, but instead be able to make
inferences based on the picture. For this portion of the lesson, it is not important if students are correct, as
long as they are defending their answers with evidence from the image.
At the end of the introduction, the teacher will tell students that the picture is of a man named Sitting Bull,
and this book will be about him. The teacher will do a KWL chart with students to see where they have
misconceptions, and what they want to learn while reading the book. This will also be a good assessment for
the teacher to see if students had misconceptions at the beginning of the lesson, and if so, to see if these
misconceptions are corrected throughout the course of the lesson(s).
b. Questions: Questions teacher candidate will ask during the lesson that drive thinking and learning and
engagement (5 or more questions) and in parentheses, indicate Bloom level and/or question type to ensure
that you are posing questions that push critical thinking and engagement (e.g. Analysis/Divergent)
Before Reading Text/ Focus Questions

How do authors use words and illustrations to help the reader?


How do authors use evidence, events, and description to write a biography?
How does the author use details to describe events?
If we took these words out, would you understand the events the same way?
After Reading Text
What does the word Hunkpapa mean? Show me where you found this in the text
How did Sitting Bull get his name?
What does the word Wasichus mean?
How do the Lakota feel about the white men? How do the white men feel about the Lokata? Use the
text to support your answer
Look at the illustrations. Why are the Lakotas horses different colours? Why do the warriors paint
their bodies?
What are two words that you would use to describe Sitting Bull? Use the text to support your answer.

c. Learning Activities: Describe what the teacher will do and say and students will do during the lesson.
Write it as a procedural set of steps in the left column of table below. On the right, refer to a supporting
learning theory or principle driving that activity and/or your rationale for doing what you are doing.
Prompts for right hand columnsupporting theories/principles. In the right column, use references from
texts, research/peer reviewed journals, or other learning theories to support your choice of activities. You
might draw from your 301 and/or your methods courses here.
o Connections between students own lives, experiences, cultures, interests and the content.
o Active learning over passive learning (e.g. SCI Learning Experiences laddersimulation over verbal)
o Theoretical support for learning activities (e.g. Culturally responsive strategy, or processing)
o Multiple means of representation for the K-12 students (UDL principle)
o Multiple means of engagement for the K-12 students (UDL principle)
o Multiple means of expression of learning by the K-12 students (UDL principle)
o Accommodations and modifications for students with diverse needs, including those with disabilities (as
stated in their IEPs)
o How the teacher candidate will assess the learning of the students (from table above)
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(Add rows as needed)


Learning Steps and Activities
Example: Transition from introduction by asking
students to look at inputs and in pairs, create a list
of additional community assets/contributions (inputs)
for social change diagram. Circulate around groups
to observe students progress.
Introduction- Teacher will show a picture of Sitting
Bull and ask students to brainstorm who he might be
and what in the picture suggests this. Students will do
a Think-Pair-Share. (5 minutes)
Introduce book. What is a biography? Teacher will
introduce focus questions and tell students to think of
these questions while reading.
How do readers consider point of
view and author evidence?
How do authors use evidence, events,
and description to write a biography?
How does the author use details to
describe events?
If we took these words out, would
you understand the events the same
way?
(5 minutes)
Teacher reads aloud, students follow along in own
copies. As needed, students will also be given the
option of reading independently, or with a partner.
(30min)
Teacher poses questions, students reread through text
and answer questions using explicit evidence. (30)
Closure- Students will review the focus questions,
talk about the goals, and discuss what they learned.
After the class discussion, students will complete the
exit slip and complete the learned section and still
want to learn section of their KWL chart. (5
minutes)
Independent Practice- For extra practice, for
homework students will use their independent
reading books and reading journals to record how
authors use details to describe characters or their
lives.

Supporting Theories/Principles
(Why are you doing what you are doing?)
Supports multiple means of engagement, and
allowing students to generate their own inputs from
experience; is more culturally responsive than
teacher generated ideas only.
Vygotsky- Importance of Language.

Vygotsky- Importance of language.


Blooms Taxonomy of Thinking.

Bandura- Observational Learning.

Vygotsky- importance of language.


Constructivism- Learners construct their own
knowledge.
Blooms Taxonomy of Thinking
Vygotsky- Importance of language.

Constructivism- Learners construct their own


knowledge.

b. Closure: Closure is the signal to students that the lesson is now coming to an end. In closure, teachers
review the learning targets (what was taught) for the day and refocus on what is important.

What was the goal of our lesson?


How can you use what you learned today when reading independently?
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How can you use what you learned today in your own writing?
How can you use details to show events?

After a brief class discussion, students will finish the lesson by filling out the exit slip, any by completing the
Learned and Still want to learn sections of their KWL charts.
c. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and
demonstrate understanding in a new and different context (perhaps even outside of the classroom). Include
possible family interaction (identify at least one way in which you might involve students families in this
instructional plan.)
For additional practice, students will get a chance to apply what they have learned for a homework
assignment (or when they have free time). They will be asked to read their independent reading books, and
while they are reading, they will be asked to look for instances where the author is using details to describe a
person or a persons life. They will write these examples in their reading notebooks. All students will be
asked to put their reading journals back on the shelf once they are done so that the teacher(s) may look at
what they found, and check for understanding.
d. Next Steps:
After reading and discussing the book Sitting Bull: Lakota Warrior and Defender of His People. Students
will continue to engage in lessons and activities that deepen their understanding of Native American culture.
After this lesson, we will connect it to current events and social justice by connecting it to the current DAPL/
pipeline protests. Since the book takes place in the same area as these protests, students will be able to build
on their understanding of Native American culture, and use it to better understand what the protests are
about. In addition, we are also going to use this in order to introduce students to Native American Oral
History Stories. Finally, this will all lead up to their Lelooska Cultural Center fieldtrip this May.
e. Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology: Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and
students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, worksheets, multi-media tools, and any assessment
materials utilized.

Picture that will be used for the lessons introduction.

Know

Want To
Know

Learned

Still Want To
Know

f. Acknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources

Nelson, S.D. (2015). Sitting Bull: Lakota Warrior and Defender of His People. Abrams Books for Young
Readers. New York: New York.
ReadyGen: Grade 4. Pearson (2016).
Woolfolk Hoy, Anita (2013). Educational Psychology (12th ed.) Boston, Ma: Pearson.

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