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Daily Lesson Plan/Learning Guide for Day 1


ELA
Romeo and Juliet
9th-10th Grade

Course, Unit Theme and


Grade Level

Utah State Core Standard


and Objective

Essential Question(s)

How do activities,
materials etc. connect to
students prior
knowledge?
(academic, interests,
learning styles, motivation,
Funds of Knowledge)

1. What themes in the play still resonate today?


2. How does Shakespeare influence the world
today?

Assessments
(formative and/or
summative)

Learning Activities:
(Include description and
time frame for each
activity)

Speaking and Listening Standard 1


Language Standard 4
Language Standard 6

Multiple Intelligences addressed


(verbal/linguistic, kinesthetic, interpersonal,
and visual-spatial)
Motivation/funds of knowledge: the use of pop
songs to help students understand
Shakespeare.
Interest/motivation: lesson activities geared
to increase student buy-in for Romeo and
Juliet.
Informal observation of student participation
and demonstration of understanding within
class discussions and activities
Nearpod quiz
Exit tickets

1. Concentric Circles: Students form two


circles, one within the other. The students
across from each other become partners.
They are given 1-2 minutes to answer each
question below. The outer circle rotates with
each change of question. Afterward, the class
discusses their responses a whole.
a. What do you think of when you hear
Shakespeare?
b. When you heard you are going to read
Shakespeare, what is your first
reaction?
c. What experiencesgood and/or bad
have you had with Shakespeare?

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

d. What do you know, or think you know,


about Shakespeare?
e. Can you quote anything from
Shakespeare?
f. What stories, movies or television
shows do you know of that are based on
Shakespeares play?
g. What do you know what is definitely not
true about him and his works? (15
minutes)
Words, Words, Words: The teacher projects
Shakespearean words and phrases that are
still used today on the whiteboard. Students
are asked to put a check mark next to the
words and phrases that they have read or
seen before. The teacher then reveals that all
the words on the board were
created/popularized by Shakespeare. She
emphasizes that the students are already
familiar with Shakespeares words. (10
minutes)
If Shakespeare Wrote Pop Songs:
Students read pop songs translated in Early
Modern English. In groups, they try to guess
which song is it. A few seconds of each song
is played as the answers are revealed. (30
minutes)
Why Shakespeare loved iambic
pentameter video: Students watch the
video. Then, they take an online quiz about
the video via Nearpod. Further examples of
iambic pentameter are given in modern
English. (20 minutes)
Vocabulary Sketch: Students add the
following vocabulary words to their
vocabulary sketch handout: iambic
pentameter, blank verse, and meter. (10
minutes)
Exit Ticket: Students rate their comfort with
Shakespeares language at the beginning of
class verses the end of class using a scale of
1 to 5. 1 being I have no idea whats going
on and 5 being Im getting all of it. (5
minutes)

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Accommodations made
for struggling and
accelerated learners
(grouping patterns,
content literacy
strategies, etc.)

Grouping patterns: mixed ability grouping


Literacy strategy: vocabulary sketch handout

Resources

Huffington Post article, If Shakespeare Wrote


Pop Songs
(huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/27/pop-sonnetsshakespeare_n_5718453.html)
Words Shakespeare Invented (shakespeareonline.com/biography/wordsinvented.html)
Why Shakespeare loved iambic pentameter
video and lesson questions
(http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-shakespeareloved-iambic-pentameter-david-t-freemanand-gregory-taylor)
Vocabulary Sketch handout
Nearpod quiz (https://app.nearpod.com/?
pin=3D668F1C6CA5AB6234
7229C7F688971D-1)

How has the prior days


assessment shaped your
instruction?

N/A

Daily Lesson Plan/Learning Guide for Day 2


Course, Unit Theme and
Grade Level

Utah State Core Standard


and Objective

Essential Question(s)

ELA
Romeo and Juliet
9th-10th Grade
Speaking and Listening Standard 1
Reading Literature Standard 1, 4, & 5
Language Standard 4 & 5
1. What themes in the play still resonate today?
2. Why might our interpretations of a work differ?
3. How does Shakespeare influence the world
today?

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How do activities,
materials etc. connect to
students prior
knowledge?
(academic, interests,
learning styles, motivation,
Funds of Knowledge)

Assessments
(formative and/or
summative)

Learning Activities:
(Include description and
time frame for each
activity)

Multiple Intelligences addressed


(verbal/linguistic, kinesthetic, interpersonal,
visual-spatial, and kinesthetic)
Interest/motivation: Lesson activities geared to
increase student buy-in for Romeo and Juliet.
Discussion questions are meant to introduce
the themes of the play the students can relate
to their lives.
KWL: Know column addresses prior
knowledge of Shakespeare and Romeo and
Juliet.
Informal observation of student participation
and demonstration of understanding within
class discussions and activities
KWL charts

1. Shakespearean Insults: After the students


watch the If Shakespearean insults were used
today video, they are given a handout with
Shakespearean words they can use to create
their own insults. They are given 3-5 minutes to
write down at least five insults. Then, the
students line up into two lines on opposite sides
of the room. The first person in each line
insults each other and then goes to the end
of their respective lines. The students now at
the front their lines insult each other, and so
on. (10 minutes)
2. KWL Chart: Individually, students fill out the
Know column of the chart about what they
know about Romeo and Juliet. (5 minutes)
3. Reduced Shakespeare Company clip: After
watching this video, students add to their KWL
Charts individually first, and then in groups. The
class discusses what they included in their
charts. (20 minutes)
4. Line up Discussion: Using a scale of 1-10 (1
being strongly agree to 10 being strongly
disagree), students line up according to their
opinions concerning the statements below. The
line then folds in half, and students on the
opposite end of the spectrum discuss their
views in partnerships.
a. Teenagers cant understand what true

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love really is.
b. There is only one way to interpret
literature or other artistic forms.
c. Telling lies or hiding the truth is okay if
you have good reasons to.
d. If someone hurts you or someone you
love, you should get revenge.
e. Its possible to fall in love at first sight.
f. Teenagers often behave without thinking.
g. Shakespeare is no longer relevant or
important in todays world.
h. Good friends should stick together no
matter how wrong a friend may be.
i. Parents decisions, whether good or bad,
affect their children. (20 minutes)
5. Prologue Activity: Students are divided into 4
groups and each group is given prologue cards.
They are instructed to create a dramatized
recitation of their quatrain or couplet. They
should use physical gesture and vocal infection
to emphasis the meaning of the text. They can
read chorally and/or have group members read
specific parts. After a short rehearsal, students
stand in a circle. Group members do not need
to be next to each other. The students then
perform their prologue sections, stepping
forward when they do. After the activity, the
class discusses the meaning of the prologue
and the plays possible themes. Questions
could include:
a. What is the tone of the prologue? What
words and phrases make you say this?
b. In your opinion, which line tells us the
most about the world we are about to
enter? What makes you say this?
c. Why do you think Shakespeare revealed
the ending of the play at its beginning?
(30 minutes)
6. Vocabulary Sketch: The students add
sonnet, couplet, and tragedy to their
vocabulary sketch handout before the end of
class. (10 minutes)
Accommodations made
for struggling and
accelerated learners

Grouping patterns: mixed ability groupings


Literary strategy: comparison chart

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(grouping patterns,
content literacy
strategies, etc.)
Resources

How has the prior days


assessment shaped your
instruction?

Reduced Shakespeare Companys synopsis of


Romeo and Juliet (youtube.com/watch?v=XR1qWLaagU)
Shakespearean Insult Kit
(pangloss.com/seidel/shake_rule.html)
If Shakespearean insults were used today
video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=P_Uej8LJ48Q)
Prologue cards
(http://www.folger.edu/sites/default/files/TM13%
20-%20R%26J%20Prologue%20Cards.pdf)
Pre-Reading Romeo and Juliet: Performing and
Analyzing the Prologue
(http://www.folger.edu/pre-reading-romeo-andjuliet-performing-and-analyzing-the-prologue)
Vocabulary sketch handout

N/A

Daily Lesson Plan/Learning Guide for Day 3


ELA
Romeo & Juliet
9th/10th Grade

Course, Unit Theme


and Grade Level

Utah State Core


Standard and Objective

Reading: Literature Standard 1, 2, & 3


Reading: Literature Standard 4, 7, & 9
Writing Standard 6
Speaking and Listening Standard 1
Reading: Informational Text 1

Essential Question(s)

Why might our interpretations of a work differ?


What themes present in the play still resonate
today?
How does Shakespeare influence the world
today?

7
How do activities,
materials etc. connect
to students prior
knowledge?

(academic, interests,
learning styles,
motivation, Funds of
Knowledge)

Assessments
(formative and/or
summative)

Learning Activities:
(Include description
and time frame for
each activity)

Multiple Intelligences addressed


(verbal/linguistic, interpersonal, visual-spatial,
kinesthetic)
Scene performance build upon from previous
lessons and activities.
Comparison charts
Scene performance
Informal observation of student participation
and demonstration of understanding within
class discussions and activities
Exit tickets

1. Vocabulary Sketch: Pun, comic relief, and


foreshadowing are defined for the students and
they are instructed to add the term to their
vocabulary sketch handout. They are
encouraged to look for examples as they read
and write them down under the respective
definition. (10 minutes)
2. Act I: Abridged scripts of the play are passed
out. The teacher assigns roles to student
volunteers. The volunteers then perform Act I of
the Romeo and Juliet while the remaining
students follow along in their scripts. The
teacher provides simple costumes and props.
(10 minutes)
3. Film Clips & Comparison Charts: Students
watched selected scenes from three film
adaptations of Romeo and Juliet from Acts I. As
they watch, the students fill in their
comparisons charts. After, they discuss their
observations in a group and then with the whole
class. (30 minutes)
4. Scene Performance: Students are divided into
groups of 3-4 and given the full text of one of
the scenes in ACT I or II. The will be performing
the scene for their classmates. They are
instructed to cut 50% of the scene. The criteria
for editing their scene includes:
a. What does the audience have to know?
b. Does the scene still make logical sense
after the cuts?

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c. Is the storyline still clear?
d. Are there any key words/phrases that
must be retained?
The students also must include three stage
movements, one costume change and one
prop. They also must pick three of the following
to include in their cutting: a moment of
laughter, a moment of crying, a ten second
pause, a tableau, a modern prop, a whisper, a
line spoken directly to the audience, or a line
spoken chorally. After each group presents their
scene. The class assesses whether the scene
was understandable, discuss their observations,
and how the group communicated the scenes
meaning. (30 minutes)
5. Exit Ticket: Students are instructed to (1)
summarize the play so far in a few sentences or
bullet points, and (2) write down anything in the
play theyre still confused about. (5 minutes)
Accommodations made
for struggling and
accelerated learners
(grouping patterns,
content literacy
strategies, etc.)

Resources

How has the prior days


assessment shaped
your instruction?

Literacy strategy: No Fear Shakespeare


available
(http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/)
Grouping patterns: mixed ability groupings
Romeo and Juliet abridged scripts
Act I film clips (Zeffirelli, Luhrmann, and Carlei)
o Act I, scene 1: Street Scuffle Zeffirelli
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=xawp9co17Z4)
o Act I, Scene 4: Romeo and Juliet Meet
Zeffirelli
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=0nYG_wQMheg)
Vocabulary Sketch handout
Comparison charts
Editing as Close-Reading: Cutting and
Performing Complex Texts
(http://www.folger.edu/editing-close-readingcutting-and-performing-complex-texts)

N/A

Daily Lesson Plan/Learning Guide for Day 4


ELA
Romeo & Juliet
9th/10th Grade

Course, Unit Theme and


Grade Level

Utah State Core


Standard and Objective

Reading: Literature Standard 1, 2, & 3


Reading: Literature Standard 4, 7, & 9
Writing Standard 6
Speaking and Listening Standard 1 & 4
Reading: Informational Text 1

Essential Question(s)

How does media communicate meaning?


Why might our interpretations of a work differ?
What themes present in the play still resonate
today?

How do activities,
materials etc. connect
to students prior
knowledge?

(academic, interests,
learning styles, motivation,
Funds of Knowledge)

Multiple Intelligences addressed


(verbal/linguistic, interpersonal, and visualspatial)
Interest/Motivation: the articles in the jigsaw
activity have high relevance to students

Assessments
(formative and/or
summative)

Learning Activities:
(Include description and
time frame for each
activity)

Comparison charts
Exit tickets
Double-entry charts
Informal observation of student participation
and demonstration of understanding within
class discussions and activities

1. Vocabulary Sketch: Soliloquy, aside, and


irony are defined for the students and they are
instructed to add the term to their vocabulary
sketch handout. They are encouraged to look
for examples as they read and write them
down under the respective definition. (10
minutes)
2. Act II-III: Abridged scripts of the play are
passed out. The teacher assigns roles to
student volunteers. The volunteers perform
Act II-III of the Romeo and Juliet while the
remaining students follow along in their

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3.

4.
5.

6.
7.

Accommodations made
for struggling and
accelerated learners
(grouping patterns,
content literacy
strategies, etc.)

Resources

scripts. The teacher provides simple costumes


and props. (10 minutes)
Film Clips & Comparison Charts: Students
watch selected scenes from three film
adaptations of Romeo and Juliet from Acts IIIIV. As they watch, the students fill in their
comparisons charts. After, they discuss their
observations in a group and then with the
whole class. (30 minutes)
TEDTalk The Biochemistry of Love:
Students view and discuss the TEDTalk. (10
minutes)
Article Jigsaw: Students are divided into 6
groups and each group is given an article to
read, discuss, and summarize its main points.
A graphic organizer is handed out to assist
students in the latter. Then, new groups are
created with one person from each of the
different groups. They each present the main
points of their original groups article and
discuss their opinions. (20 minutes)
Intra-act Game: The groups complete the
Intra-act game. (10 minutes)
Exit Ticket: They also rate their
understanding of the play so far using a scale
of 1 (I have no idea whats going on) to 5
(Im getting all of it). (5 minutes)
Grouping Patterns: mixed ability groupings
Literacy strategies: double-entry chart,
vocabulary sketch, Intra-act game
Struggling students: assigned articles with a
lower-reading level
Accelerated students: assigned as group
leaders
Romeo and Juliet abridged scripts
Vocabulary Sketch handout
Act II-III film clips:
o Act II, Scene 1: Balcony Scene Zeffirelli
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=S0qao2xINsE)
o Act II, Scene 5: Secret Wedding
o Act III, scene 1: Romeo fights Tybalt

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How has the prior days


assessment shaped your
instruction?

Zeffirelli
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=ADvHO-lGjOs)
Comparison charts
Double-entry chart
TEDTalk The Biochemistry of Love
(https://www.ted.com/talks/helen_fisher_studie
s_the_brain_in_love?language=en)
National Geographic article, Teenage Brains
The Dana Foundation article, Beyond Raging
Hormones: The Tinderbox in the Teenage
Brain
NPR article, The Teen Brain: Its Just Not
Grown Up Yet
New York Times article, The Brain on Love
Psychology Today article, Taking Words
Seriously: Romeo and Juliet are Troubled Kids
New York Times article: Love and Pain Relief

N/A

Daily Lesson Plan/Learning Guide for Day 5


ELA
Romeo & Juliet
9th/10th Grade

Course, Unit Theme and


Grade Level

Utah State Core


Standard and Objective

Reading: Literature Standard 1, 2, & 3


Reading: Literature Standard 4, 7, & 9
Writing Standard 6
Speaking and Listening Standard 1 & 4
Reading: Informational Text 1

Essential Question(s)

What themes present in the play still resonate


today?
How does an adaptation of Romeo and Juliet
reveal its a product of its time?
How does Shakespeare influence the world
today?

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How do activities,
materials etc. connect to
students prior
knowledge?

(academic, interests,
learning styles, motivation,
Funds of Knowledge)

Assessments
(formative and/or
summative)

Learning Activities:
(Include description and
time frame for each
activity)

Multiple Intelligences addressed


(verbal/linguistic, interpersonal, and visualspatial)
Funds of knowledge: the theme of immigration
is important to the West Side Story activity
Comparison Charts
Romeo and Juliet in Performance Presentations
Informal observation of student participation
and demonstration of understanding within
class discussions and activities

1. Act IV-V: Abridged scripts of the play are

passed out. The teacher assigns roles to


student volunteers. The volunteers perform
Act IV-V of the Romeo and Juliet while the
remaining students follow along in their
scripts. The teacher provides simple costumes
and props. (10 minutes)
2. Film Clips & Comparison Charts: Students
watch selected scenes from three film
adaptations of Romeo and Juliet from Acts IVV. As they watch, the students fill in their
comparisons charts. After, they discuss their
observations in a group and then with the
whole class. (40 minutes)
3. West Side Story: Students watch the 1961
trailer for West Side Story and the America
scene. The class then discusses what they
found dated and why. The teacher also asks
the students what they thought was still
relevant today in the clip. Next, the teacher
projects a short PowerPoint about the
productions background. Next, the students
are put into groups of 3-4. The article Same
City, New Story and the discussion web for it
are handed out. Students read the article and
complete the discussion web. The class then
discusses their responses to article and their
ideas for a modernized adaption of Romeo
and Juliet. (30 minutes) Begin Romeo and
Juliet in Performance Research: In
groups, the students are assigned to research
the productions below of Romeo and Juliet and

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present to the class their findings. Each group
is given four questions to answer about their
production. Each presentation should include
at least three visuals. (Productions below are
listed by company or theatre, director, and
then year produced.)
a. Royal Shakespeare Company, Michael
Bogdanov (1986)
b. Vesturport, Gisli rn Gardarsson (2002)
c. Royal Shakespeare Company, Rupert
Goold (2010)
d. Broadway, David Leveaux (2013)
e. National Theater in Baghad/World
Shakespeare Festival, Monadhil Daood
(2012) (to end of class)
Accommodations made
for struggling and
accelerated learners
(grouping patterns,
content literacy
strategies, etc.)

Resources

Grouping patterns: mixed ability grouping.


Literacy strategy (for struggling students):
graphic organizer to help guide research
Accelerated students: Ask to read additional
background information for West Side Story
activity to teach group members during the
activity
Romeo and Juliet abridged scripts
Act IV-V film clips
o Act IV, scene 1: The Friars Plan
o Act IV, scene 4: Juliet is found dead
o Act V, scene 3: The tragic end Zeffirelli
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=FjFNiZexBoA)
Comparison charts
Discussion web
West Side Story Trailer
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=yA_aFprGzyc)
America song from West Side Story
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhSKkcvblc)
Our City/Neustra Ciudad lesson
Same City, New City article
Article questions
Review of original production of West Side

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How has the prior days


assessment shaped your
instruction?

Story
1957 news article about Puerto Rican
immigration
Questions from New York Times article
Shaking up Shakespeare
Graphic organizer

N/A

Day 6
Students finish Romeo and Juliet in Performance research and present
findings to class. Then, the Production Pitch authentic assessment is
introduced. If time permits, the students are led in a review game for the
post-assessment that will take place the next day.
Day 7
Students play review games and take the post-assessment. If there is time
remaining, the students may work on their Production Pitches.
Day 8
At the beginning of class, students give each other feedback for what they
currently have for their Production Pitches. Students are then given time to
complete their projects.
Day 9
Student present their Production Pitches.