You are on page 1of 97

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF ETHIOPIA

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE EXPLORATION
AND EVALUATION DIRECTORATE  

                                         
 

 

Review and Reinterpretation of Geophysical
Data of Tendaho Geothermal Field
 
 
 
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                     
 
                                                                                                                            By

Berhanu Bekele

August 2012
Addis Ababa


 

                                                                     Abstract 
Tendaho  geothermal  field  is  one  of  the  first  priorities  for  the  development  of  power 
generation on the basis of its proximity to electric power grid, level of study compared to 
other  geothermal  prospects,  and  its  huge  potential  since  it  is  found  in  the  afar  triple 
junction.  
The  present  review  and  reinterpretation  of  geophysical  data  were  performed  with  the 
objectives  of  improving  the  understanding  of  the  subsurface  of  Tendaho  geothermal  fields, 
delineate geothermal reservoirs, and locate exploration drilling sites.  

After  correcting  for  the  magnetic  and  gravity  field  variations  that  are  unrelated  to  the 
earth’s crust, several filters were applied to the reduced data, so that anomalies of interest 
can be enhanced and displayed in a more interpretable manner.   
Three high residual gravity ridges separated by three gravity ridges separated gravity lows 
are  reflection  of  subsurface  rift  configurations  imprinted  on  Afar  stratoid  basalts. 
Computation of horizontal gravity gradients enabled to map the contact between masses of 
different  densities.  With  such  edge  enhancement  fault/contacts,  calderas,  craters,  domes 
and vents are outlined.  The magnetic method defined the axial region of the Tendaho rift 
which  coincides  with  the  central  high  gravity  ridge.  Estimates  of  vertical  and  horizontal 
positions  have  been  made  using  Euler  3D  deconvolution  for  fault,  and  sill/dyke  models. 
Such models enabled to construct faults blocks constituting two half grabens separated by 
hinged  high  blocks  with  central  depression.  Geologically  mapped  thermal  manifestations 
and  craters  bear  positional  correlations  with  the  geophysical  interpreted  faults,  ring 
fractures,  calderas,  craters,  and  vents.  Both  gravity  and  magnetic  data  show  that  the 
Tendaho graben is severely affected by fault systems, trending NW, NE, EW, and NS 
Stacking  of  the  direct  current  (DC)  and  magnetotelluric  geo‐electric  sections,  digitizing 
resistivity  structures  and  integrating  the  various  geo‐data  helped  to  extract  useful 
subsurface  information.  Depths  to  resistive  basement,  estimated  using  the  DC  and  MT 
methods,  imaged  the  corrugated  nature  of  the  subsurface  structure.  The  central  uplifted 


 

resistivity  structures  and  discontinuities  are  well  correlated  with  density  structures  and 
magnetic fault blocks.  
Temperature gradients were recalculated and used with estimated Curie depth in order to 
predict Curie temperature of 6000C which indicates that the magnetic mineral is magnetite. 
The  MT  method  revealed  a  low  resistivity  diapir,  interpreted  as  a  magmatic  melt.    From 
temperature  resistivity  relation,  the  interpreted  magmatic  melt  has  an  estimated 
temperature reaching 13000C. Temperature gradient map outlined areas of high heat flow, 
where geothermal reservoirs occur. The axial rift region coincides with the high heat flow 
area and the magmatic melt occurs just below it at an average depth of 6.17 km. As a first 
approximation,  contour  closure  of  1200C/km  may  have  delineated  the  geothermal 
reservoir.   
Based  on  the  obtained  results,  it  is  highly  recommended  to  drill  a  deep  well  at  Airobera, 
where faults and ring fractures intersect and coincide with steaming grounds. Other highly 
recommended drilling site is at southeast position of the mud pools. But this has to be done 
after conducting high resolution MT survey at the recommended sites. Other recommended 
geothermal  works  are  Heat  flow  survey  to  estimate  the  resource  and  micro  seismicity  to 
locate fractures and monitor drilling activities. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

....................................1Data Reduction ..................... 25  2.......................................................................2 Surface Geoscientific Investigations .................................................................................. 22  2......................................3............................. 17  1............................................................................................2................................................................................... 14  1.........................................................................................2 Geophysical Data Reduction and Processing ...........................................1 Geophysical Surveys ............. 11  1.........Contents  Abstract ................................. 1  1 Introduction ..3.................................................................................................................... 10  1...................................... 21  2 Tendaho Geophysical Data ................................................................................................................. 20  1..........................................................................................................................3................................................3 Regional Geological and Tectonic Setting........ 28  3................................ 38  4..........................1 Total Field Magnetic Anomaly .... 25  2...............................................1 Regional Tectonic Setting ................... 7  1...................................................1 Simple Bouguer Gravity Anomaly .....................................................2 Regional Geological Setting ............................................................................................ 28  3................................................................................................1  Location and Accessibility of Tendaho Geothermal Field ............... 40  4.........................................................................................................................................................2 Spectral Analysis of Magnetic Data .4  Objective ......................................................3 Residual Magnetic Anomaly of Tendaho .... 22  2.4 Causative Source Distribution of Magnetic anomalies ..........................................2 Residual Gravity anomaly of Tendabho ......................2 Data Processing in space and Fourier Domains ..............................3 Horizontal Gravity Gradient ................... 32  4 Magnetic Anomaly Description and Interpretation ................................................ 42  3    .........................................2........................................................................................3 Local Geological Setting ........................................ 35  4........................................... 8  1............................................................................... 35  4.......... 11  1......................................................................................2 Hydrothermal Activity ............ 26  3 Gravity Anomaly Description and Interpretation ............................................................................................... 30  3........................................2....

...................4......................................................................................................................................... 72  8 Summary and Discussions of Geophysical Results..................................................... 59  6 Magnetotelluric Resistivity Structure ............ 76  9 conclusion and Recommendation ............................................84        4    ..........................................................................1 Stacked Geoelectric Sections ................. 49  5 DC Resistivity Structure .................................................73  Table 5: Depth estimates as obtained from different methods………………………………………...................................................................................................................1 Magnetic Fault Model ...................................................................................................   and temperature gradient ………………………………………………………………………………………………..................................... 86  9............................................................................................................81  Table 6: Summary of results for temperature & depth ranges.......................... 87      List of Tables  Table 1: Results of Spectral analysis of magnetic data………………………………………………………......43  Table 3: processing parametrs of windowing on uncertainities and offsets…………………44   Table 4: Temperature gradient………………………………………………………………………………………….....................4........................................................................................ 66  7 Temperature gradients ...................................39  Table 2: summary of processing parameters while applying Euler  Deconvolution…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................................... 55  5.................................4......................2 Recommendation .......1 Conclusion .. 86  9..............2 Magnetic Dyke/sill Model ................................... 55  5................................................2 Correlation of Resistivity Layers with Borehole Geological Logs ... 44  4.........

3a: Section map showing plots of multiple solution   peaks and interpolated points constituting the curves……………………………………………………….2: Geological Map of the explored part of Tendaho Graben (NW Tendaho)   and Manda Hararo Zone………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2.1: Geophysical Survey layout Plotted against Topographic map of   Tendaho Geothermal Prospect…………………………………………………………………………………………………24  Figure 3.3a: Section map showing plots of multiple solution   peaks and interpolated points constituting the curves……………………………………………………….16   Figure 1.1: Simple Bouguer gravity Map of Tendaho Geothermal Prospect……………………….33  Figure 4.………29  Figure 3.53  5    .2: Residual gravity map of Tendaho……………………………………………………………………………32  Figure 3.5.5.List of Figures  Figure 1.1a: Solution Plot of Subsurface Fault with varying   depth shown with different colours………………………………………………………………………………………. TD2.45  Figure 4..52  Figure 4.2a: Solution Plot of Subsurface Dyke/sill with varying   depth shown with different colour…………………………………………………………………………………….50  Figure 4.1: Location Map of Tendaho geothermal field with respect to   the Ethiopian Rift system…………………………………………………………………………………………………………9  Figure 1.18  Figure 2.41   Figure 4..3: Horizontal gravity gradient Map……………………………………………………………………….2. and TD3. Lines   connecting Afar Stratoid Basalt Series from well to well………………………………………………………….5.1b: 3D Solution Plot of Subsurface Fault with varying   depth shown with different colours………………………………………………………………………………………47  Figure 4.3: Schematic Geological well logs of TD1.3: Redual Manetic Anomaly Map of Tendaho…………………………………………………………….2: Power Spectrum of Total Magnetic field of Tendaho………………………………………………39  Figure 4.1: Total Field Magnetic anomaly Map of Tendaho………………………………………………………37  Figure 4..

.3: Three Dimensional View of Deep Resistivity structure assembled   from depth slice of resistivity map and geo­electric section of Profile line 01 ……………………70  Figure 7. 64  Figure 5.1: Stacked MT Resistivity sections assembled from individual section   Figure 6.93  Appendix 1b: Regional Total Field Map of Tendaho……………………………………………….67   Figure 6.56   Figure 5. 61  5..2b: Geoelectric section along profile 15 found north of the well area…………………………….2: One­Dimensional MT Resistivity section………………………………………………………….95  Appendix 2a: Three Dimensional Solution plot of Dyke/Sill……………………………………96          6    .60   Figure 5.3: Reinterpreted Geoelectric and Pseudo resistivity sections along Profile 5……….1: Map showing Superposition of Horizontal gradient   Fault locations and craters……………………………………………………………………………………………….2a: Geoelectric section along profile 16 found south of the well area………………….1: Stacked Geo‐electric Section of Tendaho rift……………………………………………….1: Map showing temperature gradients………………………………………………………………75  Figure 8..94  Appendix 3a: Profiles of Elevation Fault and Dyke/Sill………………………………………….79  Figure 8..2: Graph showing relationship between Resistivity &   Temperature from laboratory experiment ……………………………………………………………………….3: Interpretative schematic cross sections portraying possible geometries……………85  Appendix 1a: Regional Gravity Field Map of Tendaho……………………………………………..Figure 5..83  Figure 8.. 69  Figure 6.2: Map of Interpreted resistivity structures superimposed………………………………58   on resistivity contour of the bottom substratum………………………………………………………….

  It  could  represent  an  outflow  from  a  deep  resource. the  capital  city  of  Afar  region  is  10km  away  from  drilled  area  which  is  a  primary  target  for  geothermal power development in Tendaho. At the drilled positions the Afar Stratoid  Series may have low permeability and as a result no significant geothermal fluid flows into  the  wells  at  the  level  penetrated  by  the  deep  wells.7MW  diesel  generators  in  Semera  and  Dubti.  at  least.  This may lead to the development of  generating local electric power supply at small scale.  If  Dubti  geothermal  resource  is  fully  studied  involving  geochemical  monitoring.  Already a 30 MW electric power from hydro is  exported to Djibouti.  a  well  head  turbine  for  electricity  generation can be installed until a power plant is in place.  As  a  first  step.  the  shallow  resource can be well defined and its potential known. which can replace the existing 3.  Geophysical  survey  data  interpreted  in  light  of  information  provided by the drilling supports the above interpretation. A high temperature reservoir is thought to underlie the area immediately to the  southeast  of  the  drilled  area. in Ethiopia. The transmission line of 230kV to Djibouti with a substation at Semera.  probably  situated  in  the  southeast.  well  testing.     Exploration  drilling  from  the  two  deep  wells  (TD1  &  TD2)  also  showed  the  existence  of  temperatures reaching 2780C at deeper depth within the Afar Stratoid  basalt Series. Tendaho is relatively the most explored geothermal field next to the  Alutu field that can be progressed to the development stage for inclusion in the schedule of  power projects to be executed at any time soon.   7    .1 Introduction     At present. of these three are shallow and  the  rest  are  deep.  Geochemical  information  has  interpreted the existence of a deep parental geothermal fluid at a temperature of about 300  OC or more. which  is covered by a thick layer of sedimentary rocks.  and  reservoir  engineering  program  in  a  continuous  manner.  The  drilled  wells  intersected  a  shallow  resource  having  220‐260OC  temperature  in  the  depth  range  of  200‐600  m  in  Dubti  farm  area.                                                            Between 1993 and 1998 six exploratory wells were drilled.  for  about  6  months.

  could  be  helpful  to  comprehend  the  Tendaho  geothermal  system  and  identify  knowledge  gaps  in  order  to  formulate  project  ideas  for  definitive feasibility study. the greatest success in developing a geothermal resource comes through the  appropriate  consideration  of  all  types  of  available  information  in  a  synergistic  interpretation. following a fast growing Ethiopian economy.  Of  these fields. the drilled area is found only at Dubti.   Dubti.   Review  of  previous  geo‐scientific  reports  and  reinterpretation  of  Tendaho  geophysical  data. At the initial stage. and  Alalobeda  geothermal  fields  are  situated  in  the  northwestern  part  of  Tendaho  graben. On the average the  graben is a  50km wide depression of late Quaternary age. Logiya. Addis Ababa (Figure 1). and flows towards southeast into Lake Abe.   As has been indicated above.  would  encourage  public  and/  or  private  power  developers  to  invest  in  electricity  generation  from  geothermal  resource  and  supply  power  to  a  geographically  expanding  market. Tendaho is a region of multiple geothermal prospect areas.  the  southwestern graben bounding up‐lifted block.  Tendaho is a prime target for geothermal energy  development owing to its position with respect to Afar Triple Junction.  which  is  the  subject  of  this  report.   River  Awash  enters  the  graben  through  a  ravine  (Figure  2)  in  the  rift  shoulder. only a few  of which have been investigated beyond the reconnaissance stage.       1.  Gulf  of  Aden  and  Main  Ethiopian  rift  join.  therefore.  The  greater  availability of  reliable  information  on  the  geothermal  resources  of  the  country.  Altitudes  on  this  part  of  Tendaho  graben  floor  vary from 800m to 219m. Ayrobera. upstream geo‐scientific exploration data leads to a better  informed  choice  of  well  sites  and  effective  application  of  exploration  capital.   8    .  about 600 kms from the capital city. where the Red Sea.1 Location and Accessibility of Tendaho Geothermal Field    The Tendaho graben is located within the central NE part of Ethiopia in Afar regional state.Increasingly.

1: Location Map of Tendaho geothermal field with respect to the Ethiopian Rift system    9    ..   Figure 1.

  Dubti.  was  carried  out  under  a  technical  cooperation  program  with  the  Italian  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs  (MAE).  Aquater  provided  a  team  of  geologists.   1.  Dubti  and  Logiya  are  now  connected  to  the  EEPCo  diesel  generator  in  Semera. Semera.  also  served  as  the  campsite  for  the  geothermal  exploration  project  since the 1990s.  the  most  important  economic  activity  for  the  past  4  to  5  decades  has  been  cultivation  of  cotton  at  Dubti.  MAE  paid  for  the  technical  services  of  Aquater  spa  of  the  ENI  group.2 Surface Geoscientific Investigations The  first  exploration  work.   Energy  consumption  of  the  rural  population  is  mainly  based  on  biomass  fuel  use:  wood  from acacia trees. Diesel fuel is used to generate power for irrigation and drainage pumping.   An  asphaltic  road  from  Addis  Ababa  bifurcates  at  Semera  to  continue  to  Djibouti  and  Assab.The region’s populations are mostly pastoralist engaged mainly in camel and goat herding.987(60%  male) of which 25% or 21.  Because  of  this  temporary  facility  of  storage  area  has  been  built  at  Semera  to  minimize cost of portal service. The population of Dubti wereda in July 2004 was estimated at 83. and for air conditioning  and lighting.  Tangaye  Koma  and  Asayita  plantations.  following  the  reconnaissance  survey  of  1969‐71. However all four towns have  electricity  supply.342)  and  Det  Bahri  started  as  satellite  towns  to  the  farms  that  bear  their  names.  10    .  geochemists  and  geophysicists  who  worked  with  counterparts  from  GSE  under  a  project  managed  by  GSE.  Det  Bahri. crop residue and camel and goat droppings.  which started out as a road  maintenance  camp. and it is growing  up at a fast rate.  The  main  transport  route  for  Ethiopia’s  foreign  trade  at  present  is  only  through  Djibouti.  used  primarily  in  household  lighting  and  the  commercial  sector.  Exploration  equipment  was  brought from Italy for the duration of the project.095 people lived in the above four towns. Semera has become the capital of Afar region since 2004. The town of Logiya is a product of  the road traffic which  provides service to the truck traffic on that highway.  the  wereda  seat  of  government  (population  15.  Dubti  farm  generates its own electricity for use at its ginnery and workshop.  Owing  to  the  fertile  alluvial  soils  and  water  supply  of  Awash  River.

 and magnetotelluric (MT)  survey were carried out after the cease of drilling activity. To define and for more understanding of the geothermal system.  The  work  aimed  at  gaining  an  understanding  of  the  probable  heating and circulation system and the citing of exploration wells aimed at discovering an  economically  exploitable  geothermal  reservoir.. and broad thermal upwelling from the lower mantle (Lithyow‐ Belton  &  Sheer.. GSE carried out further drilling during 1997‐ 98 using its own budget.   Proposed  models  for  the  origin  of  rifting. and  Wolfeden E..  fill‐in surveys.Detailed geoscientific studies (Geology.3. & sleep.. The  plateau  up  lift  together  with  Cenozoic  volcanism  led  to  the  inference  that  a  hot  mantle  beneath Afar was responsible for voluminous magmatism and initiation of the NE directed  extension in the southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (Menzies M. 1998). are: stationary plume head.. et al. et al. et al.  exploration  drilling  was  carried  out  during  1993‐95  with  financial and technical assistance from MAE.  et al. results of Geological  studies  by  different  groups  and  geothermal  exploration  activities  are  outlined  and  summarized.  Whichever model accounts for the observed  first order features (rifting. al.   1...1 Regional Tectonic Setting    The  majority  of  the  Ethiopian  flood  basalts  and  associated  felsic  rocks  were  erupted  between 31 and 29 Ma (Hofmann C. 2004.3 Regional Geological and Tectonic Setting    1.  1998)  with  a  support  from  petrological  character  of  the  basalts  showing  sources in primary magma generation in the Dupal anomaly region of the mantle (Kieffer  B.. Here below.. Runny plume head  (Ebinger C. Geochemistry. Geophysics) followed by the drilling  of  shallow  temperature  gradient  holes  were  carried  out  in  two  phases  during  the  late  1970s  to  the  early  1980s.  volcanism  and  plateau  uplift  in  East  Africa  as  summarized by Nyblade A. reservoir engineering & geochemical monitoring. 1990 & 1992. 1997). 2004).  11    .  After  a  long  interval  following  the  completion  of  these  surveys.. covering 1000 km diameter region. The petrologic character of the basalts shows sources in primary  magma generation in the DUPAL anomaly region of the mantle. 2003). et. A.

   Stage 2 of rifting in both the southern Red Sea (19‐12 Ma) and the northern MER (Main  Ethiopian Rift) between 2 Ma and the present are marked by a rift ward migration of  strains to narrow zone of aligned eruptive centers and normal fault swarms (Ebinger C. This  is equivalent to stage 1 of EGLE (the Ethiopian Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment)  that the rift formation in the southern Red sea occurred between the time span of 28 to 19  Ma. et al...volcanism  &  uplift).  12    .   The flood basalt stage was followed by the eruptions of trachytic and rhyolitic volcanism in  close  proximity  to  the  zones  where  the  rift  margin  and  transverse  structures  were  to  develop  later. while the magmatic segments of  the  southern  Red  Sea  were  abandoned  and  the  northern  MER  propagates  northward  (Wolfeden E. 2011).  1990  &  1992).  et  al.. 2004).  Rogers  N.5 to 4 Ma (ELC.  Rifting  thus  developed  across  a  flood  basalt  plateau. 1987). 2004. 1975).   Initial rifting in the southern Red Sea occurred soon after or  concurrent with flood basalt  magmatism  when  the  African  and  Arabian  plate  split  apart  (Menzies  M.  Beyth  M.. or new plate boundaries may form  at  the  expense  of  other  boundaries  that  became  inactive’’  (Garfunkel  Z. Border faulting of Afar initial rifting began between 25 and 23 Ma (ELC. ‘’Diffuse extension may  give way to separation along a narrow spreading center. et al.  2006).  2004  applied  trace  element  and  Os  isotope  analysis  of  a  detailed  Trap  Series  basalt  section  and  that  Afar  plume  was  at  a  depth  between  120  and  150 km.   The Red Sea as an oceanic rift seems to be more and more obliterated south of 150  North  (Ross  &  Schlee  1973.... and the  triple junction reorganized itself in the Pliocene to Recent..  Gas  Mallick  &  Cox  1973)  and  it  is  even  inactive  in  the  areas  from  Hanish‐dubbie up to Baab el Mandab (Barberi F.. and Ebinger C.   Stage 3. oceanization of the southern Red Sea with extrusion of thick piles of basaltic lavas  known as the Stratoid Series probably occurred between 3.. & Varet J..  2004).  as  a  further  development  of  crustal  processes  taking  place  under  the  influence  of  the  Afar  plume  (Demssie G.. 1987).

  the  SSW  branch  forming  an  active  volcanic  range  along  a  narrow  spreading  center  propagates  southward  on  land  at  the  northern  tip  of  the  Afar  triangle..   The northern part of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) in southern Afar. 2001 & 2003). 2006. G.  G. In between Manda Hararo and  Alyata  is  Dabbahu  magmatic  segment.   Erta  Ale  volcanic  range  is  active. Cheminee J. Tat’  Ali.. which ends in the Dadar graben and a southwestern segment... 1975. et al.. H. widening towards the north.  Abbate  E..  belonging  to  the  SSW  branch  of  the  axial  structure  of  northern  Afar  rift  which  indicates  the  shifted  extension  of  the  Red  Sea  spreading  axis  (Barberi F.  Schonfeld.Thus in response to the diminishing of opening (T. Christiansen  T..   13    .  Beyene  A.  1995.  The  NNE‐SSW  trending  Wonji  Fault  Belt  (Mohr.  1998.  &  Zan  L. Ayele et al. 2007)...50N latitude bifurcates into two. Schaefer and M. Alyata.  Abdelsalam M. the Red Sea spreading center south of 17... Christiansen.  ‐U.  1967  &1972).  is  a  rift  in  a  rift  structure  referred  to  as  where  faulting  and  dyking  constitute  its  extension. The MER propagated  northeast in the last 11 Ma with a predominantly N35‐450E Miocene border faulting.  Such  dyking  that  opened  by  up  to  8  meters  was  accompanied by seismic activity (Wright et al. 2005).  &  Zan  L. 2005. 1973). and Abdelsalam M.  associated with a volcanic eruption along 60 km length fed from a shallow magma chamber  occurring  between  depths  of  2  &  9  km..  B.& Gorden  R.  It  is  characterized by right‐stepping of magmatic segments or en echelon zones of magmatism  and faulting with localization of strain (Ebinger and Casey.  and  Schonfeld M... & Varet J.  It branches into a southeastern segment.  Manda Hararo is  the southern continuation of Alyata (the western segment) which propagates into central  Afar.. Passerini  P..  1995.‐C. and Lahitte p. B.  2004). 1975).. After  ~  3  Ma  the  border  faulting  was  superseded  by  N15 0E  striking  faults  (Wolfenden  et  al.  while  the  southeastern branch preserves the southern continuation of the Red sea (Chu D.  Schaefer  H.. ‐U. 2001).. Southward of Manda Hararo are the Tendaho‐Goba Ad propagators that terminate at  the  western  side  of  Ali  Sabieh  block  (Abbate  E.  Passerini  P. G.. starting from the area  of south Fantale forms a funnel shape.  where  a  major  rifting  episode  occurred  in  2005. and Beyene A.

  Its  outcrops  are  largely  observed  in  the  area  north  of  the  gulf  of  Tadjura  and  consists  of  thick  flows.  Mabla  rhyolite  series  is  characterized  by  the  deposition  of  a  large  volume  of  acid  volcanics  with  subordinate  basaltic  and  intermediate  lavas  (Mabla  rhyolites)  dated  between  15. (1975).  Barberi  F.  but  ages  based  on  Barberi  F.  (1975)  recognized  these  three  volcanic  formations.  et  al.  having  cross‐cutting  relationships  between them.  (1974a).  In  the  Ali  Sabieh  region.. for its formation spans between 22..  et  al.3  million  years.s.  domes  and  ignimbrites  of  slightly  peralkaline  (comenditic  )  rhyolites with some intercalated basaltic flows.  (1975).y.  Ribita  rhoylite gave a 3.7  Ma.  age  and an age of 4 m.   Tendaho  graben  interrupts  the  Karrayu  rift  sharply.  On  the  basis  of  the  relative  stratigraphical  positions  and  nature  of  volcanic  products.2 Regional Geological Setting     Regionally. (1975)).  associated  with  the  initial  and  2nd  stages of rifting in Afar.  (1975)  determinations  are  ranging  from  14..  Mabla  rhyolites  and  the  overlying  late  Miocene  Dalha  basalt..  (1975).y.. pumice and cinerite deposits (Barberi F.2  to  9. and Barberi F.y...y.3 to 14.5 m.  the  pre‐Stratoid  succession  consists  of  Adolie  basalt.  outcrops  ranging  from  8  to  6. et al.5  m.5 Ma in accordance with  ages determined by Chessex et al.  and  Civetta  et  al.3  and  3.  Black  et  al.3.  et  al.   Adolie  basalt  is  the  oldest  of  these  rock  formations.  the  western  branch  is  the  Karrayu  rift  and  the  eastern  being  the  main  branch  of  the  Ethiopian  rift..  Ali  Sabieh‐Aischa  and  south  east  of  Danakil  Alps  (Barberi  F.  Dahla  basalt:    As  cited  by  Barberi  et  al. et  al.   1. (1974a).As  the  MER  comes  nearer  to  the  Tendaho  propagator.  five  age  determinations  have  been  obtained  for  the  Dalha  series  s..  (1974a)).  It  occurred  during  late  second  stage  of  rifting.  according  to  Chessex  et  al.I.A.  Dahla  basalt  outcrops  near  the  western  Afar  margin  (Mille  region)  and  also  in  southern Afar (Adda’ do graben).  it  branches  into  two.  have  age  around  14  m.  They  can  be  observed  in  eastern  margin  of  Afar.  (1972b).  in  T.F. was obtained for the uppermost flow of  14    .

   Figure 1.2 is a regional geological map of central Afar with emphasis on Manda Harraro and  the  northwest  part  of  Tendaho  graben. 2011). Tendaho graben  was formed on this geological landscape (Demssie G.6‐6. Results are the same as those we obtained in T.   This unit  consists  of  a  series  of  basaltic  flows  with  rare  intercalations  of  ignimbrites  and  detritic  deposits.    15    .   Since about 4 million years ago.5 m. (7.  (1972)  have  shown  that  the  central  Afar  is  floored  by  a  dominantly  basaltic  Stratoid  formation  without  any  important  break.    The  Afar  rift  is  believed  to  have  reached  its  present  geological  setting  during  the  Pleistocene  period. thus forming a complex mosaic of horsts  and grabens which are still active and form localized sedimentary basins. 1975) in the  Beylul region.F.I.y. et al.. (1974a.  with  the  emergence  of  the  axial  zones  of  crustal  separation.A.  producing  mostly  the  fissural  Afar  Stratoid Series basalts and subordinate rhyolites.    Intense  tensional tectonics affects the entire depression.basalt covered by the Stratoid Series has been dated by Civetta et al.  Barberi  et  al.. and reaches a thickness of 800 meters. the inner part of the rift floor became affected by tensional  tectonics  and  accompanying  intense  volcanic  activity.).

                                              Figure 1.2: Geological Map of the explored part of Tendaho Graben (NW Tendaho) and  Manda Hararo Zone (After Getahun Demessie. 2011).  16    .

  Few  among  them  are  proposals  (see  reference  for  the  list)  for  ARGEo  (African Rift Geothermal Development Facility).  The Afar  Stratoid  series.   17    . MOFED (Ministry of Finance and Economic  Development). and to  study the different types of alteration mineral assemblages in the rocks:  • Geological  logs  were  prepared  for  each  well  based  on  cutting  samples  that  were  collected at 5 m intervals. especially  at  major  changes  of  formation.  forming  the  basement  rocks  on  which  the  sediments  have  been  laid.  a  very  brief  account  of  surface  and  subsurface  geology  of  northwest  Tendaho rift is presented from summaries given in various project proposals for Tendaho  geothermal  field.  The  sedimentary  sequences  that  fill  the  graben  floor  are  fine  to  medium  grained  sandstone. that covers the project area. X‐ray Diffractometry (XRD).3. Intercalation of basaltic lava sheets with the sediment was observed in the geological  log.3). and.  siltstone  and  clay.  detailed  laboratory  analyses  including  absolute  age  dating  of  hydrothermal  phases. X‐ray Fluorescence (XRF).  both  fissural  and  central by origin make up the positive topographic features inside the graben.   The  samples  were  petrographically  examined  in  order  to  identify  the  different  types  of  hydrothermal  minerals  present  in  the  collected  drill  cutting  and  core  samples.1).  a  Pliocene  to  early  Pleistocene  (<4  million  years)  formation. and.  The  series  have  been  encountered  by  deep  drilling.   • Core  samples  were  recovered  below  a  depth  of  500  m. Electron Microprobe.  Furthermore.  The  youngest  rock  units  that  form  the  upper  volcanic  complexes. with a minimum of 200 m interval between core samples.  and  Pleistocene  volcanites of Manda Hararo. with minor rhyolitic bodies in its upper part. 1. and AFD (French Development Agency).   With a view to establish the stratigraphic succession in the drilled area (Figure 1. consists of a NW‐SE elongated  broad plain. The volcanic  complexes  are  mainly  composed  of  basalt  &  subordinate  rhyoloite. make up  the  graben  bounding  fault  blocks. about 50 km in width having an area of about 4000 Km2 (Figure 2.   The portion of Tendaho graben.3 Local Geological Setting    Here  in  this  section.  consisting  mostly of basalts of fissural origin.

  TD2.3:  Schematic  Geological  well  logs  of  TD1.  Lines  connecting  Afar Stratoid Basalt Series from well to well    18    .  Figure  1.  and  TD3.

 calcite and clay minerals) and decreased Na. and  o The occurrence of epidote.    It  is  likely  that  all  wells  have  been  drilled  in  the  proximity  of  the  up  flow  zone  of  the  system.  o The Afar Stratoid series has poor primary permeability and it is presumed that only  secondary permeability induced by recent tectonic activity may exist. K.  very  low  permeability  and  very shallow hot water flow.  are  under  more  or  less  stable  conditions.  o sedimentary  horizons  with  better  permeability  may  exist  in  the  more  arenaceous  levels. pyroxene.  Fluid  Inclusion  studies  were  performed  in  various  laboratories in Italy:  • The results obtained from the study of geological logs showed that:  o permeable intervals are found in the upper part of the sequence and essentially in  the basaltic intercalations within the sedimentary sequence. laumontite. and amphibole crystallization  occurred after wairakite or laumontite.  probably  in  an  area  characterized  by  self‐sealing.  The  mineralogy  and  fluid  inclusion  data  from TD3 indicated the opposite to be true. garnet.  cooling.   • Chemical  analysis  of  core  samples  (altered  basalts)  showed  increased  Ca. TD3 was drilled far from any up‐flow zone.for  samples  from  TD1  to  TD4.  possibly due to abrupt changes in pH and CO2 partial pressures. while calcite underwent different stages of dissolution/precipitation.  TD5  and  TD6  on  the  other  hand.  Mg.  zeolite  (wairakite  or  laumontite)  and  quartz  crystallization.   • The heat source for the hydrothermal activity within the graben appears to be related  to the recent and widespread fissural basaltic volcanism specifically to magma that may  be injected into fractures in this tectonically active zone. Si  and Ti (owing mostly to the dissolution of glass matrix).    19    . epidote.   • Petrographic study of cuttings and core samples showed:  o evidence  of  an  early  stage  of  calcite.    Wells  TD2.  TD4. garnet.  Fe.   • The mineralogical features of well TD1 and fluid inclusion data indicate a recent heating  of  the  geothermal  fluid. prehnite.  Al  content  (owing  to  the  dissolution  of  plagioclase  and  femics  and  the  precipitation  of  wairakite.

 Airobera and Begaadoloma.  • solfatara  of  various  degrees  of  activity  associated  with  a  number  of  rhyolitic  edifices  located in the southeastern part of the graben   • thermal springs occurring on the shores of L.  It  should  be  noted  that  Tendaho is a generic name for Dubti. etc.2 Hydrothermal Activity    The inventory of hydrothermal features was carried out in Tendaho area on two occasions:  during  1969  by  a  ground  based  survey  by  GSE  and  during  the  1971  an  airborne  thermal  infrared  survey  carried  out  in  conjunction  with  ground  truth  work  that  was  successfully  used for locating areas of surface thermal anomaly in unknown areas of poor access (UNDP.  this  work  has  provided the following information on the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal  manifestations:  • A spouting hot spring and hot water pools at boiling temperature at Alalobeda along the  western graben margin. Abhe.    20    .2. about 20 km SW of Dubti.  1973). Alalobeda. Magenta range.  • Very  high  temperature  fumaroles  occurring  in  the  annular  collapse  structure  of  Dama'ale volcano near L.  The  above  inventory  of  hydrothermal  manifestations  formed  the  basis  for  the  determination  of  Tendaho  graben  as  a  target  for  exploration.  • Mud  volcanoes  and  steaming/  altered  ground  on  the  north‐eastern  margin  of  Dubti  plantation.  • zones of steaming and warm ground on Airobera plain about 15kms north of Dubti.  • Fumaroles on Magenta range.  • Thermal  springs  (50OC)    on  the  shore  of  Begaadoloma  crater‐lake.1.  located  approximately 30 km NW of the Dubti. the south western graben bounding fault block adjacent  to Alalobeda. Abhe and the higher standing terrain to  the southwest.  According  to  summaries  by  GSE  in  various  project  proposals.

  the  main  scope  of  this  work  is  then  to  improve  the  understanding  of  the  subsurface  of  Tendaho geothermal fields    Specific Objectives  Prior to the progress of the Tendaho geothermal field into the development stage.  • Propose  future  geoscientific  studies  for  more  understanding  of  the  source  though  filling any knowlrdge gap.  The  advance  in  digital  processing  offers  the  opportunities  to  perform  advanced  processing.1.        21    . specific  objectives have  to  be set  and  achieved  in  order  to realize  power development.  to  integrate  various  data  and  extract  new  information  that  would  have  been  impossible  decades  ago.    Broad objective  The overall objective is to contribute to the realization of geothermal power generation through the  provision of subsurface information and identify knowledge gap to propose future studies. the objectives to be met are:   • Delineate  the  geothermal  reservoir  through  outlining  and  defining  the  subsurface  geological structures  • Locate  target  sites  for  exploration  drilling  for  the  discovery  of  an  exploitable  geothermal resource which the previous multidisciplinary exploration information  has indicated to exist and.  Such  opportunities and the need for more power generation initiated the performance of review  and reinterpretation of previous geophysical data.4 Objective  A lot has been changed in software and computer technology since the time of exploration  works  for  geothermal  resource  in  Tendaho  have  been  conducted. In short.  As  part  of  this endeavour.

   Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data were taken on 177 points at an interval of three km  along profiles separated by 5 km.  magnetic  and  resistivity  surveys  in  and  around  Tendaho  rift.  Reprocessing  of  the  geophysical data and review of the available information were performed after retrieving  them from the web based geothermal database. research institutions and agencies. Portions of the Tendaho rift covered by all these  surveys are approximately 50 km by 41 km.1 Geophysical Surveys  The  Geological  Survey  of  Ethiopia  (GSE)  and  Aquater  in  1979/80  conducted  detailed  gravity. Later in 1996 & 2004.   Observation  points  for  the  gravity  &  magnetic  surveys were  2379 and  3443  respectively. To attain higher data density and resolution of the  22    . Figure 2 depicts the resistivity survey layout and station  locations occupied for gravity and magnetic observations.  The  MT  survey  attained  great  depth  of  penetration  but was unable to delineate what may be interpreted to be a geothermal reservoir or any  other related feature.  owing to sparse measurement stations. Station intervals  varied between 250 m and 500m. large amount of geophysical data have been generated by the Geological  Survey of Ethiopia.  A  micro‐seismic  survey was also performed from May. GSE alone ran in‐fill surveys along accessible  tracks at Dubti plantation and its vicinity. 1989 up to January 1990 using data recorded by two  sets of 3 seismometers.  During  2007.  a  joint  GSE‐BGR  resistivity  survey  consisting  of  transient  electromagnetic  (TEM)  and  magnetotelluric  (MT)  was  carried  out  along  widely  separated  profiles  with  sparse  measurement  station  density.  The surveys were conducted along profiles and rarely on random points. since it lacks resolution both in the horizontal and vertical directions. The sub‐section devoted to data processing  elaborates the applied processing procedures. This section gives a brief account of  the  various  geophysical  surveys  from  which  the  data  were  obtained.   2.2 Tendaho Geophysical Data    Through the years.

 Such data may give a regional overview of Tendaho with  respect  to  Afar  depression.     Other  relevant  geophysical  data  can  be  obtained  from  aeromagnetic  survey  by  Girdler  (1969). GSE continues detailed MT surveying at the time of writing  this review work.  gravimetric  and  magnetotelluric  data  which  have  led  to  the  better  understanding  of  crust‐mantle  interactions  and  temperature  distribution  at  depth.  provided a large volume of fundamental information on the evolution and current state of  the Afar.  These  have  been  fundamental  to  the  understanding  of  the  gross  geothermal  structure  of  the shallow subsurface of the Afar. The works of research institutions from the then German Federal Republic have  provided  regional  seismic. gravity mapping by Geophysical Observatory (1970).                     23    .  such  fundamental  information  will  be  used  for  the  review  and  reinterpretation  of  the  geophysical  data  of  Tendaho geothermal field.  initiated  especially  by  the  Italian  and  French  national  research  institutions.  considerable  international  research  interest  in  plate  tectonic  and  continental  rifting  processes. and Starting from the 1970s.subsurface resistivity structure.  Though  we  focus  on  the  detailed  surveys.

1:  Geophysical  Survey  layout  Plotted  against  Topographic  map  of  Tendaho  Geothermal Prospect      24    .  Tendaho   Figure  2.

 topographic terrain. Thus when combining the  two data sets. The non‐dipole core magnetic field  variations were corrected for 1979/80 and 2005 magnetic data in the office using 1980 and 2005  IGRF  models  respectively.  since  density  variation  is  of  interest  for  gravity  exploration.  respectively. only the former five have been removed. only simple Bouguer values were used for processing and interpretation.67. In  case of the 2005 gravity data. These effects are predictable and the  1979/80 gravity data have been corrected for all  of  them. To prevent overshooting/undershooting in  areas  of  sparse  data. It is thus essential to remove these variations in order to obtain observations due to only the  earth’s crust. instrument  drift. latitude.2.    In gravity data reduction. Correction for diurnal variations was performed during the data acquisition stage by  monitoring the variation  on a daily basis using a  base station.    Regular  grids  with  124  by  102  points  and  mesh  size  of  750x750  meters  for  gravity  data  processing  were  selected  employing  UTM  25    .1Data Reduction    Diurnal magnetic variations and non‐dipolar broad variations of the magnetic field arising from the  earth’s  core  are  of  external  and  internal  origins.   Gridding   The irregularly distributed gravity and magnetic data were interpolated on equally spaced  grids using the method of minimum curvature.  Then  the  two  data  sets  were  merged  for  further  processing  and  interpretation.2.2 Geophysical Data Reduction and Processing    Oasis Montage version 4.5  was  applied.  This  was  done  first  by  applying tidal. Finally free air and Bouguer reductions were employed using a density of 2.  2. the factors that affect the gravity observations are earth’s tide.3 of Geosoft software package was used for reduction and processing of  potential field data collected in parts of Tendaho rift. & drift corrections then latitudinal correction was made employing the 1967  formula. the mass between sea level and observation points and  density.25  to  0.  a  tension  factors  from  0.  which  are  unrelated  to  the  earth’s  crust. altitude.  This  method  was  chosen  owing  to  its  suitability  for  a  sparse  data  distribution  and  honors  the  individual  random  values  to  generate  a  smooth  surface.

035‐0. Except the smoothing process.33  cycles/km.  Thus  derivative  filters  26    .  Even  after  removing  the  long  wavelength  part  of  the  anomaly.  high.coordinate projection with a datum of Adindan to produce the required basic grids. The power spectrum was  also used to estimate depths.  Radially  averaged  power  spectrum  computed  in  the  wave  number  domain  has  been  used  to  determine the spatial frequencies for filtering. all the filters were applied to the data in a wave  number  domain.85 cycles/km was used to remove the masking effect of  high amplitude.  In  the  case  of  magnetic  data  the  residual  field  is  obtained by applying a band pass filter with cut off spatial frequencies between 0.2 Data Processing in space and Fourier Domains     First the measured data were inspected for spikes and a notch filter was applied to despike  them.  there  remain  the  overlapping  gravity  or  magnetic  field  effects  due  to  the  closeness  of  geological  bodies  in  which  the  details  are  obscured.2. the mesh size is 500x500 meters using the same projection. In case  of magnetic data interpolation. A variety of filtering techniques were applied to the grid data sets in order to obtain  new  interpretative  information  by  enhancing  particular  trends  or  wavelength  of  the  observed  anomalies.  A  band  pass  filter  with  wave  number cut offs between 0.    2.  low  &  band pass filters. horizontal derivatives in X & Y directions and vertical derivative filter in Z  direction.  These  techniques  included  a  smoothing  filter  (hanning).  Regional­Residual Separation  A  regional  component  in  the  Bouguer  gravity  or  in  total  magnetic  fields  distorts  or  obscures  the  effects  or  signals  of  the  near  surface  geology.10‐0. long wavelength anomaly and the resulting residual gravity can be judged  to  reflect  the  near  surface  geology.  FFT  (Fast  Fourier  Transformation)  algorithm  was  employed  in  transforming  the  spatial  data  into  wave  number  domain  or  spatial  frequency. The filtering results were then transformed  into space domain and contoured to produce the required maps.  or  10‐3  km  wavelength.

e.  size  and  intensity  (frequency)  of  subsurface  features. Details of resistivity data processing & interpretations are given  by Aquater (1980 & 1995). Summary of MT data processing and interpretation is given  in the section dedicated for this purpose. The processing and interpretation results were summarized by  individual geoelectric section.  Resistivity data processing and Curve fitting  According to Aqauter (1980). the calculated apparent resistivity for each VES was plotted  against  half  electrode  separation  (AB/2)  on  a  double  logarithmic  paper.  distribution.were applied to the gravity/magnetic fields in order to improve the resolution or enhance  the edge effects in the application of Euler deconvolution.  stacking  of  the  various  resistivity  sections  was  conducted in order to obtain the overall subsurface picture of Tendho graben.  Approximate  interpretation method i. the auxiliary point method was employed for the determination  of  the  resistivity  and  thickness  which  were  used  as  initial  model  parameters  for  a  more  computer  assisted  iterative  interpretation  to  determine  the  layer  parameters.  Euler  3D  deconvolution  was  applied  to  understand  shape.  Derivative  filters  and  upward  continuation  were  employed  while  applying Euler deconvolution and producing analytical signal map.  orientations.               27    .  depth.  In  this  review. This helps to minimize interpretation difficulties due to effects  of  low  magnetic  latitude  and  remnant  field. and more details are found in the report by    Kalberkamp  U  (2010).  resistivity  and thickness of the layers.    Analytical signal computation was performed in order to match the magnetic highs and the  causative magnetic bodies.

  Airobera  and  Begaadoloma  Crater  Lake.  It  is  open  on  its  ends  &  extends  from  East  to  West. Allalobeda and Serdo.  The  observed  gravity  anomalies  can  be  classified  in  to  three  categories. The origin of the intermediate zone  could  be  ascribed  to  gradational  contacts  between  two  anomalous  masses  of  differing  densities. Within the  zones there are very high anomalies of short wavelength with ‐25 mGals contour closure.  A broad.  namely. which decrease from ‐30 to ‐35  mGals. very low  gravity anomalies are hosted within the low gravity zones.  Figure  2  is  a  graphical  display  of  the  Tendaho  simple  Bouguer  gravity  map  along  with  a  histogram  view  of  the  gravity  data.1 Simple Bouguer Gravity Anomaly    The  Tendaho  gravity  field  over  the  surveyed  area  ranges  from  ‐19  to  ‐57  mGals  with  a  mean  value  of  ‐31  mGals.   28    . The  zone is characterized by a smooth pattern of iso anomalies.  Another  zone  sandwiched  between two high anomalies is found East of Ayrobera.  intermediate  and  low  anomalous zones.  high. They are outlined by a contour  line of ‐40 mGals.  very  high  gravity  anomaly  is  found  between  Gum’Atmali. The one found Southeast of Dubti town could be attributed to low density  intrusion of magnetic origin. intermediate gravity zone is observed in the central part of the surveyed area.  Dense  intrusion. The extrusive complex may  not  be  the  cause  of  the  anomaly.  through  its  association  cannot  be  ruled  out.  could  be  the  cause  of  this  anomaly.  It  coincides  with  parts  of  the  upper  extrusive  complex consisting mainly of basalt and subordinate rhyolite.  probably  within  the  zone  of  the  rift  axis.  The high gravity anomalous zones are bounded by a contour line of ‐30 mGals. very high gravity anomalies occur over  and around the rift margins  at Tendaho. A  conspicuous. As in the high zone.  The gravity low zones are bounded by ‐35 mGals contour line.  Other less significant.  The  anomaly  center  occurs  over  a  topographically  depressed  area  with  its  margins  on  high  grounds.3 Gravity Anomaly Description and Interpretation  3.

     Figure 3. The regional  gravity field map is presented in appendix 1a for interested readers.1: Simple Bouguer gravity Map of Tendaho Geothermal Prospect    29    .The Bouguer gravity field of Tendaho is dominated by regional field component and similar  except the short wavelength anomalies contained in the Bouguer gravity field.

  The  gravity  ridges  are  also  covered  by  sediment covers except in the areas where outcrops of stratiod basalt and recent extrusive  volcanic complex occur.  They  run  parallel  to  each  other  in  a  NNW  direction.  forming  curvilinear  gravity  ridges.2 Residual Gravity anomaly of Tendabho    Short  wavelength  anomalies  are  assumed  to  reflect  the  geophysical  property  of  the  geological bodies occurring at the surface or at a shallow depth.  Three  high  gravity  ridges  are  outlined  by  a  zero  contour  line.  The Southern tail of the eastern high gravity ridge is not mapped owing to lack of gravity  data.  Each  of  them  hosts  short  wavelength.  The  short  wavelength  high  anomalies  within  the  ridge  could be volcanic centers which are responsible for intrusive or extrusive volcanism.  but  just  south  of  Logya‐Dubti  axis  the  central  and  the  western  gravity  ridges  curved  toward  the  east. Figure 3 is a graphical presentation of the Tendaho residual  gravity map with its associated histogram view.3.  The Tendaho residual gravity field over the mapped area varies between ‐13 and 10 mGals  with an average value of zero. The gravity field obtained  by applying a high pass filter with a spatial frequency greater than 0.06 cycles per meter or  wavelength less than 16 km is a residual gravity to characterize the near surface feature. The central  high  gravity  ridge  is  interpreted  as  a  buried  axial  range  in  which  the  recent  basalt  and  associated  minor  rhyolite  occur. The Western high gravity ridge is caused by Afar stratoid basalts that  are  exposed  or  occur  at  the  western  Tendaho  rift  margin.  Step  faults  of  the  basalt  and  crisscross faults may give rise to several high anomalies with short wavelength.      30    .  high  gravity  anomalies  which  are  circular  or  elongated  in  the  direction of the ridge. They are interpreted as  graben  structures  that  are  filled  with  sediments.   Sandwiched between these ridges are two elongated gravity lows.

 the Tendaho rift could be only a graben structure formed due to fault  extension of the upper elastic crust.      Figure 3. The development of the axial ridge at later stage may  indicate  the  initiations  of  magmatic  extension  which  may  have  dominated  the  extension  31    .2: Residual gravity map of Tendaho  At the initial stage.

  nearly  circular  or  elliptical  plots  occurring  within  the  gravity  depressions or gravity ridge.  buried  graben  and  horst  structures are easily identified on the map.  however.  The  observed gravity ridges may reflect either of such features.  But the plots occur only over the high gradients and are aligned along the longest direction.  similar in shape to observed topographic expression of the crater. plots of converging  dip  directions  towards  the  center  of  circular  or  elliptical  features  are  interpreted  to  be  buried  craters.  The  plots are designated by a strike & dip symbol (┤ or ├).  The  high  magnitude  plots  obtained  from  the  edge  enhancement  by  the  horizontal  derivative  outline  lateral  mass  inhomogeneities  and  these  are  expressions  of  structural  and  lithological  boundaries.3. Such patterns  are  readily  observed  on  the  map  in  figure  3. dip directions marked by the plots face each other from the  opposite  sides  of  its  boundaries  or  dip  toward  the  low  gradient  (gravity  depression).  High gradients are then at the contacts between high and low density masses. Thus.  In  this  way.  or  vice  versa.  In  case of high density mass. Daorre crater  falls  at  the  edge  of  a  feature  outlined  by  circular  plots  with  converging  dip  directions.  calderas  or  collapsing  structures.   Linear  or  curvilinear  shaped  low  gradients  are  bounded  by  high  gradients.  plots  with  diverging  dip  32    . Some of them are not fully circular or elliptical.2)  is  bounded  by  high  gravity  gradient as observed in figure 3.     There  are  circular. dip directions diverge away from the low gradient.      At  the  apex  of  the  ridge  gradient  is  zero  and  the  central  region  possesses  low  gradients.mechanism  to  form  a  central  host  or  a  central  uplift  due  to  fault  block  adjustment.3.3 Horizontal Gravity Gradient    The  horizontal  gravity  gradient  field  superimposed  with  plots  of  the  locations  of  high  gradient  magnitudes  are  depicted  on  a  map  given  by  figure  2. The central  gravity  ridge  observed  in  the  residual  gravity  map  (fig  3.     3.  In case of a low density mass.

 TD‐4.    This  may  attest  that  the  east‐west  linear  feature  that  passes  between  the  two  33    .  and  south  of  the  gradient  well  GBH‐2. and TD‐ 6).  the  main  ones  occur  at  the  geothermal well location passing between TD‐1 and other wells (TD‐2.3: Horizontal gravity gradient Map  There  also  exist  several  east‐west  trending  linear  features. east of Tendaho town reaching the road to  Det  Bahri. TD‐5.  From  bore  hole  geological  logs  it  can  be  observed that the Afar stratoid series is about 280 meters deeper in well TD‐1 than in well  TD‐2. east of Logya crossing the road to Assaita.  Their  origin  is  unknown.directions  having  circular  or  near  circular  shapes  are  attributed  to  buried  doming  structures or volcanic cones.     Figure 3.  but  they  are  discrete  and  intermittently  extend  in  space.

 however.   In general. respectively. it can be said. that topographic up and downs or undulation along the  gravity  ridge  or  gravity  depressions  may  occur  owing  to  different  trending  faults.                                    34    .geothermal  wells  is  a  fault  responsible  for  the  vertical  displacement  of  the  Afar  stratoid  series.  and  or  due to doming or crater expressed by gradient lineaments and closed or open curvilinear  features.

  is  a  wet  colour  shaded  map  of  Tendaho  total  magnetic  field.  Such  theory  allows  description  and  interpretation of magnetic anomalies   The  Tendaho  magnetic  field  is  dominated  by  short  wavelength  anomalies.1 Total Field Magnetic Anomaly    The Tendaho total magnetic field over the surveyed area ranges from 35605 to 37656 ‐57  gammas  with  a  mean  value  of  36431  gammas.  Thus  the  magnetic  anomalies are observed to be characterized by high and low anomalies of complex nature.  with  positive  lobs  on  either  side  of  the  low  if  the  causative  bodies  are  shallow  and  of  limited  depth  extent.    More  complication  arises  if  the  causative  magnetic  bodies  are  close  together  since  their  corresponding  fields  superpose  either  to  give  exaggerated  highs  or  resulted  in  the  cancellation  of  positive  &  negative  magnetic  fields. Thus it should be noted that features are displaced to  southeast from their actual positions. the lows are due  to  high  magnetic  susceptibility  of  the  causative  magnetic  bodies.  Since Tendaho is found at the low magnetic latitude or magnetic equator.  In interpreting the magnetic field it is assumed that  Induced magnetization is dominant and remnant magnetization is neglected.   Magnetic  bodies  with  large  depth  extent  may  have  very  small  positive  lobs.  or  no  lobs.  It  is  illuminated  from  northwest  with  declination  angle  of  3150 Azimuth and inclination of 450.  Figure….  Two  zones  of  low  anomalies. magnetic field is dipolar having inseparable positive & negative anomalies  as  caused  by  a  shallow  magnetic  body  with  limited  depth  extent.  The  central  low  zone  consisting of several very low short wavelength anomalies straddles from Bagaadoloma in  the northwest to the southeast end of the surveyed area.4 Magnetic Anomaly Description and Interpretation    4.  All  of  the  geothermal  exploration wells and most temperature gradient shallow bore holes fall within this zone.  with  an  alignment  of  Northwest  are  identified. Their attendant positive lobs are  very  high  spreading  out  possibly  over  non‐magnetic  bodies.   35    .   Unlike gravity.

 It is displaced to southeast at  the location between Allao Beda & Tendaho before reaching logya.  They  cross  the  low  zones  and  are  also  crossed  by  the  zones.   36    .  Such  crisscross  are  of  geothermal  interest  specially  the  point  of  intersections  may  create  space  for  the  accumulation of geothermal fluids.The second low zone is found at southwest in Det Bahri area.  The  regional magnetic field map is presented in appendix 1b for interested readers. Minor east‐west trending features exist which also need  to be considered.  There  are  northeast  trending  magnetic  features  that  can  be  readily  observed  in  figure…..   The  total  magnetic  field  of  Tendaho  is  dominated  by  regional  field  component  and  they  similar  except  the  short  wavelength  anomalies  contained  in  the  total  magnetic  field.

1: Total Field Magnetic anomaly Map of Tendaho 37    .  Figure 4.

4.2 Spectral Analysis of Magnetic Data 
 

The radially averaged power spectrum of the total magnetic field data, shown in figure ……, 
takes the form of three segments with changes in slopes at about 0.2275 and 0.1108 wave 
numbers.    Depths  to  magnetic  layers  are  estimated  by  applying  slope  method  (grant  & 
west, 1975) given by  
                   Slope = ‐2Пh, where h is depth. 

    
  Figure 4.2: Power Spectrum of Total Magnetic field of Tendaho 

Depth  to  the  bottom  of  magnetic  basement  or  curie  depth  is  also  estimated  using  the 
formula (Botler, 1978) given by 
                                                       fmax = ln(D/h)/(D‐h) 
38 
 

 Where D is depth to the bottom of magnetic basement and fmax is peak frequency, where 
maximum amplitude occurs.  The base of the magnetic basement derived from peak frequency is 
interpreted  as  the  position  of  Curie  point  isotherm  (Bhattacharyya  and  Leu,  1975;  Byerly  et  al, 
1977;  Connard  et  al,  1983;  Blakely,  1996).  Estimated  Curie  temperature  and  corresponding 
magnetic minerals will be discussed in section 7.  

Employing spectral slope method, depth to the top of magnetic basement is 4.16 km. For 
this  part  of  Tendaho  rift,  the  peak  frequency  is  0.03  cycles  per  km  and  by  applying  the 
above relation, depth to the base of magnetic basement is 5.25 km, implying its thickness to 
be  1.09  km.  The  results  obtained  from  spectral  analysis,  given  in  table  2  below,  are 
ensemble  averages  and  in  the  absence  of  detailed  information  this  could  be  accurate 
enough for a first approximation.       
 Table 1: Results of Spectral analysis of magnetic data 
No  slope 

Depth 

Magnetic source rock

Remark 

Afar stratoid basalt 

It is also an average thickness of sediment 

series 

fills intercalated with basaltic rocks 

Magnetic basement 

Dahla  basalt  could  be  the  magnetic 

(km) 

‐7.62 

‐26.17 

1.2 

4.16 

basement rock 

 

5.25 

 

Depth to the bottom of magnetic basement

 
As pointed out previously, the power spectrum of magnetic data  is used in separating the 
residual  and  regional  fields.  However,  since  there  is  no  clear  cut  breaks  of  the  power 
spectrum  curve  (shown  above  in  fig  …),  there  is  some  degree  of  subjectivism  in 
determining the spatial frequencies to be used for filtering. To minimize such subjectivism 
different  spatial  frequencies  were  tried  out  and  the  filtering  results  that  reflect  known 
geology were selected.  
39 
 

4.3 Residual Magnetic Anomaly of Tendaho 
 
The  Tendaho  residual  magnetic field  over the  surveyed area  ranges  from  ‐312.3  to 294.6 
gammas with a mean value of 0.18 gammas. Figure 4.3 is a colour shaded map of Tendaho 
residual  magnetic  field.  It  is  illuminated  from  northeast  with  declination  angle  of  450 
Azimuth  and  inclination  of  450.  Because  of  such  illumination there  could  be  a  shift  of the 
anomalies toward the southwest from their actual positions. 
The  Tendaho  residual  magnetic  field  is  characterized  by  circular  short  wavelength 
anomalies. The anomalies are caused by magnetic bodies of limited depth extent defined by 
negative anomalies and their attendant positive fields.   
More  aligned  features  composed  of  short  wavelength  anomalies  are  observed  in  the 
residual  field  than  in  the  total  magnetic  field,  since  short  wavelength  anomalies  were 
enhanced at the expense of long wavelength magnetic field by the applied band pass filter. 
Such alignments define linear magnetic features of the surveyed area. In all cases positive 
anomalies  are  observed  with  attendant  negative  field  due  to  the  dipolar  nature  of 
magnetism, indicating that the causative magnetic bodies have shallow depth extents.  
Three alignment  directions  of  these  anomalies  can  be  easily  distinguished  in  the  residual 
magnetic map (figure…). These are northeast, northwest and east‐west trending magnetic 
lineaments,  composed  of  alignments  of  small  anomalies.  The  crisscrosses  are  more 
conspicuous than has been observed in the total magnetic map. 
The northeast (NE) trending magnetic linear features are mostly found in the western side 
of  the  residual  magnetic  map  (figure  4.3),  and  their  crisscrosses  with  northwest  are 
observed.  Their existences in the northeastern part persist, though crossed or offset by the 
NW features. 
Two northwest (NW) trending linear magnetic features are conspicuous in the central part 
of the map area, probably defining the axial rift region. They are interrupted by northeast 
trending features at and around well GBH2 in the south and Ayrobera in the north.  
40 
 

3: Redual Manetic Anomaly Map of Tendaho  41    .  Figure 4.

 the magnetic anomalies and lineaments are well defined and  the intersection areas can be easily spotted. This was done first by using or computing derivatives of residual  magnetic  data  and  then  inverting  the  gradient  (in  x.4 Causative Source Distribution of Magnetic anomalies    Estimates  of  depth  and  location  of  source  positions  were  obtained  using  Euler  3D  Deconvolution method.  It  is.  y.  therefore. The area. TD6) coincide with occurrences of the geothermal  manifestations.  respectively.  &  z)  data  to  obtain  depth  and  positions  of  the  anomaly  sources.  Logya.  around  well  area  of  TD1.  Anomalies  observed  at  and around Serdo are likely not to be real since magnetic data  were collected by a single  east west profile.  and  at  Kurub northeast.  There is another NW trending features south  east of Kurub which is crossed by an east west trending anomaly. TD5. TD4..  after  specifying  a  square  window  size. But. the observed features in the residual anomalies are similar to those observed in  the total magnetic field. where real anomalies exist. which  are measures of the rate of change with distance from the causative sources.     Reid et al (1990) pointed out that a minimum and maximum depth  returns are about the  same  as  and  twice  the  window  size. Unlike the other trending features they are very small with limited strike  extent  and  the  NW  linear  features  are  mostly  connected  by  them.  necessary  to  choose  an  optimum  window  size  so  that  deep  and  shallow  sources  are  fairly  represented.   4.Geothermal  fluids  may  circulate  in  the  space  provided  by  these  intersections  to  form  the  thermal manifestations observed at Airobera.  In general.   42    .  structural  index  (SI)  and  depth  tolerance  (in  percent).  Table  3  presents the processing parameters used while applying Euler Deconvolution.   The  EW  striking  features  occur  at  Gum  ’  Atmali. where an east‐west trending feature meets the NW trend at the  well location of TD1 (and TD2.  Thus a range  of indices were tried out and their plotted results were examined to locate reliable solution  clustering.  According  to  Reid  et  al  (1990)  anomalies  derived  from a real data are likely to be caused by sources with various structural indices.

  .             43    . and uncertainities(in %) of  depth (dz) & horizontal position (dxy).5 15 4000 Vertical Pipe /      horizontal cylinder  2  20 0. Depth Tolerance (m)  (dz in %)  Fault  0.    These  are  then  refined  by  applying located euler deconvolution to find solutions based on peaks in analytical signa.5 15 4000   Inversion of Euler’s homogeneity equation over a certain window of data gives solutions at  every  grid  points  even  in  areas  that  are  free  of  anomalies. Having done all these  features  with  correct  index  based  on  tight  clustering  and  data  density  were  chosen  as  reliable results. off sets in x and y positions.  Table  4  contains  windowing  parametrs  to  refine  the  solutions  obtained by the preceeding parametrs given in table 3. Since solution depth is less than the  maximum depth tolerance no windowing on depth was performed.  in  case  of  Tendaho.5 15 4000 Sphere  3  20 0.5 15 3000 Dyke/Sill  1  20 0.Table 2: summary of processing parameters while applying Euler Deconvolution  Magnetic model  Structural  Window Size Grid Point  Index (SI)  (Grid points)  Interval  (km)  Depth  tolerance  Max. or  windowing on solutions of depth.5  15 0.  reflect  the  geology  better  than  the  former.  windowing  on  solutions.  Even though located Euler deconvolution produces  fewer  reliable  solution.

  most  of  the  faults  occur  at  depth  less  than  600meters below ground surface.  As  can  be  observed  in  figure  4.  a  structral index of 0.   Depths  to  sources  below  ground  surface  vary  from  450m  to  2575m  with  mean  depth  of  970  m.1a &  4. are plotted in 2‐ and 3‐ dimensional maps and these are given in figures 4.5.1 Magnetic Fault Model     For  source  position  estimates  of  a  fault  model  in  3D  Euler  deconvolution  method.  are  represented  by  circles  and  depths are indicated by zone colours and proportionality of sizes.   44    .  in  figure  4. Fault solutions.4.  4.  respectively.4.  Horizontal  positions. obtained in  this way.5  10 20 ±2000  ±2000 Dyke/Sill  1  10 15 ±2250  ±2250 Vertical Pipe /      horizontal cylinder  2  5 10 ±2500  ±3000 Sphere  3  5 8 ±2500  ±3000 X‐offset  y‐offset (in meters)  (in meters)  (dxy in %)    The plot results from SI=2 & 1 are not presented here since mapping faults and dyke/sills  are our focus to be dealt in the next sections.1b.Table 3: processing parametrs of windowing on uncertainities and offsets  Magnetic model  Structural  Depth  uncertainty  Index (SI)  (dz in %)  Horizontal  uncertainty  Fault  0.1a.4.5 was employed to invert Euler’s homogeneity equation over a window  size of 15 with a maximum accepted distance of 3000 meters.4.1a.

    Figure 4.1a: Solution Plot of Subsurface Fault with varying depth shown with different colours  45    .4.

 NE.  Aquater. possess different orientations. It extends up to south  of Gum’ Atmali or well TD3.    Dubti  fault  inferred  (Aquater.2 km.  Features. After an interruption by a  circular  feature  in  the  area  between  Airobera  and  Gum’  Atmali.  the  former  being  two  the  dominant  ones.  1973.  Other  observed  features  are  circular.  1980 &1996)  faults  striking  NW  and  NE. At that  locality.  1996)  from  the  alignment  of  mud  cones  coincides  with  a  northwest trending fault solution plot.  Their  depth  wise  continuations can be easily observed from the coincidence of the solution plot at the same  location.    Parallel  to  TD1‐TD3 axis.  The  occurrence  of  the  NW  striking  features  dominantly  in  the  axial  region of Tendaho rift may indicate that these features are extensional faults or fractures. trending NW. patterns and positional associations with the solution plots of magnetic fault  model. but seems to be terminated by a NE  trending feature.Linear features.  due  to  bodies  of  different  densities.  The area south of the mud pools and the TD wells is featureless.  elliptical. Parallel to Dubti  fault there is another NW striking feature occurring east of well TD1.  at  the  western  rift  margin  west  of  allalobeda.  have  also  similar trends. This may confirm its real presence. on the map.  intersect  each  other. there are also features with the same trend that extend for about 15.   46    .  Geologically  observed (UNDP.  be  it  linear  or  curved  as  revealed  by  gravity  gradients.  though  vary  in  details. EW and NS.  the  NW  striking  features  continue starting from bagaadoloma crater region and their southern ends interact with a  NE  linear  feature.  semicircular  or  curved  fault  solution  plots.  an  east‐west  striking  features  discontinue  the  NW  and  NS  features.  where emphasis should be made for well citing purpose.

1b: 3D Solution Plot of Subsurface Fault with varying depth shown with different colours 47    .4.  Figure 4.

 From the close  correlation of gravity gradient and fault model solution.    There are several circular and elliptical features around well  GBH2 and semicircular ones  at  Allalobeda  and  north  of  Kurub. these features can be interpreted  as buried craters and vents.  The various curved features expressed by circular. Tract of warm ground at Airobera is a  peculiar  geothermal  development.The NE striking features are observed west of Dubti fault. These could  be interpreted as subsurface continuations of the NE trending MER (Main Ethiopian rift).  The  hot  springs  and  the  Geyser found  at  Allabeda  may  have reached to the surface by travelling through these fractures or faults. The linear faults are either  discontinued or become tangent to the ring feature.  in  areas  where  gravity  gradients  reveal  more  features.  The  east‐west  trending  warm  ground  overlies  the  tangential  east‐west  linear  fault.  the  difference  being  that  of  size.  The  NW  trending  warm  ground  extends  across  the  northern part ring fracture.   Features  with  east‐west  trend  are  dominant  in  the  area  between  Logya  &  Dubti. The NS trending features seem insignificant and are not dealt here.  presented  in  figure  3.  The features  west  of  Serdo have  nearly  the same trend. where ring fractures. and south of well GBH‐2. between Logya and Gum Atmali. in the region of Daorre crater.           48    .   The circular feature occurring in the area between Airobera and Gum’ Atmali may outline  buried crater rim. These are all coincident with  gravity  gradient  features. or circular faults exist.3.  owing  to  its  association  with  the  buried  ring  fractures  which  interacts  with  the  linear  faults.  in  the  central south region of the map area.  north east of Airobera.  However. and north of well GBH2. semicircular. fault solution plots may show less features and vise versa. or elliptical plot patterns  in  most  cases  have  positional  correlations  with  the  pattern  of  gravity  gradient  plots.

1b and 4.4.  As  can  be  observed  in  figure  4.4.2b. obtained  in this way.2a.2a). Euler deconvolution estimates epicentral positions of dykes  using a structural index of 1. since their edges can be detected by the inversion of Euler’s homogeneity  equation.  Blocks can also be modeled as sills with the same  structural index.  In other case.  similar  horizontal  positions. are plotted in 2‐ and 3‐ dimensional maps and these are given in figures 4.  As  borehole  logging  shows  basalt  layers  intercalated with sediments are at depths less than 1000 meters correlate well with these  features interpreted as dykes.   Depths  to  sources  below  ground  surface  vary  from  689m  to  2840m  with  mean  depth  of  1336  m. in figure  4.4.  width  to  depth ratio is small and a single peaked is detected to model the geological body as a dyke..e.  are  represented  by  circles  and  depths  are  indicated  by  zone  colours  and  proportionality  of  sizes. they vary in details and Dyke/sill solution depths are deeper than fault  solution  depths.  in  one  case.   In most parts of the two map pairs (fig. between maps of fault  &  dyke/sill  models.4.  Otherwise.4. i.  horizontal positions.2a  & 4. However.  a  geological  body  is  modeled  as  a  sill.4.2 Magnetic Dyke/sill Model    For  source  position  estimates  of  a  dyke/sill  model  in  3D  Euler  deconvolution  method. the correlation could be attributed to blocks at  different depth levels formed by faults. Depth to width ratio    Those features with small width to depth ratio.  When  width  is  much  greater  than  depth.4. 4.  49    . Dyke/sill solutions.  most  of  the  dykes/sills  occur  at  depths  between 1000 and 2000 meters below ground surface. As in the map of fault solution plots.4.  since  double  peaks  will  be  detected  magnetically.6.  Such  correlations.  could  be  attributed  to  lava  flow  through  faults/fractures to form dykes.1a.1a‐4.  In this way it is possible to differentiate dyke from sill.  a  structral index of 1 was employed to invert Euler’s homogeneity equation over a window  size of 20 with a maximum accepted distance of 3000 meters. estimated to occur at shallower depth are  most  likely  fissural  basalts  forming  the  dykes.  degrees  of  clustering  &  trends  are  observed. respectively.

4.2a: Solution Plot of Subsurface Dyke/sill with varying depth shown with different colour 50    .  Figure 4.

 TD2.    The  upper  and  lower  curves have nearly one to one match.4.3a  &  4.3a  &  4.  In figure 4.  Thus those features at deeper levels could be  associated to blocks of Afar stratoid basalts with larger width than its depth of burial.From the deep drilling wells (TD1. where the rocks might be magnetically  sound. & 1375  meters below  ground  surface.   The lower curve intersects the axes of the logs of TD1. Borehole  geological loggings are superimposed on the section so that exact correlations can be made  possible.4.  The  curves  intersect  the  axes  of  the  logs  of  the  three  deep  wells  (TD1. where the  top  of  Afar stratoid  basalts  occur.    The  lower  curve  (Figures  4.   From figure 4. TD2 & TD3). two peaks separated by a distance of 7 km are at relatively higher  levels with central depression between them (encompassing TD1 & TD2).  1150.5.3a  and  4.  The  upper  curve  (Figures  4. TD2 & TD3) at the locations of recent basalts.4.  and  interpolated  points  between  the  peaks  may  outline  blocks  while  block  edges  are  delimited  by  the  peaks  themselves.4.    51    . Well TD2 intersected the various geological layers at upper  levels  than  TD1  did.3b)  was  constructed  from  peaks  derived  from  estimates  of  structural  index  0.  and  interpolated  points  between  the  peaks  may  define  fault  planes  and  blocks.3a. it is known that Afar stratoid basalt series  occurs at depths greater than 1000 meters.3b)  was  constructed  from  peaks  derived  from  estimates  of  structural  index  1. respectively.  The  tangent  line  then  defines  a  fault  which  vertically  displaced  the  geological  layers  by  about  280  meters. &  TD3.4.4.3b  clearly  portray  horizontal  positional  associations of faults and dykes/sills which occur at different vertical positions.4.3a it can be observed that wells TD1 & TD2 cross a line which is tangent to  both the upper & lower curves.    Aquater  (1996)  observed  a  vertical  difference  of  300 meters and interpreted such difference due to a fault. at 1400.  This shows that the interpreted  geophysical  results  are  consistent  with  the  subsurface  geology  known  from  drilling  as  compiled by Aquater (1996).     Section  maps  shown  in  figure  4.5.

       52    .    Figure 4.5 and 1.4. the upper and lower curves are derived from anomaly  attenuation rates of 0. The superimposed deep wells are TD1 & TD2.3a: Section map showing plots of multiple solution peaks and interpolated  points constituting the curves. Tangent to slopes of the upper curves are indicated by a  red line.

3a:  Section map  showing  plots of  multiple  solution  peaks and  interpolated  points constituting the curves.5 and 1.      53    . Tangent to slopes of the upper curves are indicated by a  red line.4. The superimposed deep well is TD3.  Figure 4. the upper and lower curves are derived from anomaly  attenuation rates of 0.

5.5.3b)  defined  by  the  curves  portray  the  subsurface  configurations  of  Tendaho  rift.                                  54    .3a  &  4.The  geophysical  section  maps  (Figures4.  The  axial  region  is  probably  delimited  by  the  interpreted hinged highs separating two half‐grabens that face each other.

2)  together  with  the  drilling  result  demands  the  existence  of  resistive  dyke/sill  structure composed of post stratoid recent basalt.  Drilling  encountered  the  intercalation  of  post  stratoid  recent  basalts  with  sediments  and  Afar  Stratoid series below them at greater depth than depths of the resistive basement.  as  mentioned  above.     As revealed by the geological mapping.1 Stacked Geoelectric Sections    Figure 5.     55    .  since  the  stepping  faults  ends  on  them  and  drilling  intersected  Afar  stratoid  at  greater  depth.  while  sedimentary  sequences  fill  the  Tendaho  graben. as depth to the top of resistive basements vary along the resistivity profiles.  As  can  be  seen  on  the  stacked  DC  geo‐electric  sections.  forms  the  horst  structure.  In  between  these  grabens  recent  basalt.  Such  interpretation  is  consistent with results obtained from residual gravity and horizontal gravity maps. reflecting the Tendaho subsurface  configurations.1   &  5.  stepping  resistivity  structures  are  observed  at  the  borders  of  Tendaho  rift  followed by a lowered and uplifted resistivity structures. Configuration of the resistivity structure (shown in figure 5.  The  depressed  ones  can  be  interpreted  as  grabens. Thus the  central  elevated  resistivity  structure  is  not  caused  by  uplifted  Afar  stratoid  basalts.   The Stepping resistivity structures correspond to step fault blocks that bound the Tendaho  rift.1 is a stacked geoelectric sections to present the resistivity structures in full view  and  to  provide  a  more  revealing  insight  into  the  resistivity  structure  of  Tendaho  than  individual  sections  would  have  provided. stratoid basalt series are observed outcropping at  the  rift  shoulders.  With  more  depth  the  recent  basalt  gets  thicker  and  current  cannot  penetrate  deeper  as  it  is  resistive.5 DC Resistivity Structure  5. It may disguise the stratoid series due to such effect and can also be mistakenly  considered as stratoid series.

  Figure  5. 1980)  56    .1:  Stacked  Geo‐electric  Section  of  Tendaho  rift  (using  individual  resistivity  section  by  Aquater.

 that is.  grabens  and  the  central  horst  can  be  easily  recognized  by  the  observed  vertical  resistivity  discontinuities  which  could  be  lithological  contacts and or normal faults.    57    . are not similar since no  horst  structure  is  observed  there. containing resistive buried sill probably forms the axial zone  of the rift.2a).5. are 1200 and 800 meters. thicknesses of sediments deposited over the graben and the resisitivity ridge. Such zone is then a buried ridge axis which could be a southward continuation of  Manda  Hararo.  3.2)  have  mapped  the  local  subsurface  geological  setup.  3. Data scarcity and large  separation of VES points may result in the difference of shapes.    It  has  terminated  the  horst  structure.1  &  5.  In  the  central  part.  At  this  region.1)  and  residual  gravity  anomalies  Fig.   There are distorted elliptical resistivity features (fig. respectively.3) interrupts the  NW  trending  structure  and  coincides  with  this  right  lateral  fault.  Thus  both  the  geo‐electric  sections  and  contour  map  of  the  resistive  substratum  (figure  5.5. on the  averages.   There exists a major resistivity discontinuity between profiles 13 and 14 (figure 5.2)  are  displaced.  the  NW  trending  anomaly  of  total  field  anomaly  (fig.  namely. north of this discontinuity. and the resistivity features.1) or in  the  area  encompassing  Kurub  &  Gum’  Atmali  (figure  5.  the  interpreted  stepping  faults.2). A NE trending magnetic structure  found just at the position of GBH‐2 in the residual magnetic map (figure 4.2) at Airobera which have positional  coincidence  with  circular  features  observed  in  horizontal  gradient  map  (Fig.  Termination  of  a  NW  trending  linear  feature  at  this  same  area  can  also  be  observed in horizontal gravity gradient (fig. Resistivity discontinuities trending in NW  and NE and their crisscrossing with each other are similar to that observed in gravity and  magnetic maps.3). 3.  All the structures.  The central part of Tendaho. the Afar stratoid series is not the only resistive basement.It can be said that  the resistive basement may not be composed of the same kind of  rock  unit.1a &4. bounding these structures. 5.  southeast  of  TD‐1  the  horst  is  displaced by a NE trending right lateral fault and its intersections with the horst bounding  normal faults may give rise to an excellent permeability.  As  a  result.  4.3)  and  position plot maps of magnetic fault or sill/dyke (fig 4.

  Figure 5. 1980)  58    .2: Map of Interpreted resistivity structures superimposed on resistivity contour of the bottom substratum (modified  from Aquater.

   All  the  geothermal  wells  fall  within  the  interpreted  horst  structure.  When  geo‐electric  sections  of  these  profiles  are  correlated.  alteration  and  temperature due to the encountered geothermal fluids were examined.  TD‐4. In similar manner TD‐3 crossed the recent  basalt at 612 meters depth coinciding more or less with depth contour of 700 m and the  stratoid  series  is  at  1251  meters.2b).  As  a  result.  relationships  between  the  electrical  resistivity.  the  resistivity  layers  more  or  less have a one‐to‐one match.     59    . correlation with the well geological log is not exact. TD‐2.  Such  coherency  stands  to  reason  that  it  is  possible  to  find  correspondence  between  the  geological  logs  and  the  resistivity  layers. with the layers observed in borehole logs. etc). TD‐2.  no  DC  resistivity profile lines perpendicular to the general strike pass over the well area and as a  result of this.  the  interpolated  depth  contours  of  800  and  900  between  these  profiles  indicate the continuity of the layers across the profiles in the direction of the general strike. and TD‐6 are found between resistivity profiles 15 and 16 (figure5. though not exact.2 Correlation of Resistivity Layers with Borehole Geological Logs     Geophysical data from the 1979/80 survey were re‐examined in light of geologic data from  the  drill  holes. wells TD‐1. TD‐5.  however. A fault which vertically displaced the  geological layers by about 280 meters has been revealed by deconvolution of the magnetic  field.  correspond  to  sediment sequences intercalated with basalt layers as encountered by the geothermal wells  (TD‐1. 3.  though  not  correlated  exactly. With such correlation it turned out that post stratoid recent basalt is at  depths of 800 to 900 meters. The resistivity layers  with  low‐high‐low‐high  alternations. In fact.5.  so  that  results  of  this  correlation  can  be  extrapolated to areas of geothermal interest where there are no wells.  Furthermore.  The  post  stratoid  recent  basalt  is  then  the  resistive  sill  forming  the  horst  as  has  been  discussed  above.3).2a & 5.  In  the  gravity  section  it  was  pointed  out  that  difference  of  depths  in  well  TD‐1  and  TD‐2  is  due  to  an  east  west  trending  fault  as  revealed by horizontal gravity gradient map (fig. the drilling intersected Afar stratoid series at greater depths  of 1397 m in well TD‐1 & 1179 m in well TD‐2.

2a: Geoelectric section along profile 16 found south of the well area (Extracted from Aquater.Figure 5. 1980).   60    .

2b: Geoelectric section along profile 15 found north of the well area (Extracted from Aquater. 61    . 1980).    Figure 5.

 the top layers are unaltered and their  resistivities are relatively higher than the underlying zeolite‐clay zone which corresponds  to  resistivity  varying  from  0. In almost all the geothermal well logs.  Interestingly. thickness of the relative high resistivity layer increases with depth.  When referring to the borehole geological logging.  overburden  layer  resistivities.  Temperature  profiles  in  this  alteration  zone  show  values  ranging  between  150  &  190  0C.  in  general.  are  sequences of lows occurring nearly throughout the upper part of the geo‐electric sections.3  to  4.   As geothermal fluids alter rock mineralogy and increase the salinity of water.  These alteration minerals are high temperature minerals with  high permeability (wairakite indicates its high permeability).   62    .Because  of  the  prevalence  of  sediment  fills. the low resistivity layers correspond to  sedimentary sequence of siltstone and sandstone.6. Hydrothermal fluids may have channeled through Dubti fault that have resulted in  the formations of mud cones and weak fumaroles that are found in the area of geothermal  wells. resistivity of  rocks  depend.  The relative highs are attributed to the  intercalated  recent  lavas.  we  have  layers  characterized by a relative high resistivity values associated  with wairakite‐prehnite zone  and minor sporadic epidote. The geothermal wells crossed  a shallow geothermal reservoir in this zone with an average temperature of 2450C.  As  can  be  observed  in  the  geothermal  well  logs  and  resistivity  sections.  other  than  water  saturation  in  pores  &  rock  type. Dubti fault seems  to  be  syn‐depositional  and  its  connection  with  the  horst  bounding  normal  fault  is  not  known.   All the geothermal wells except TD‐2 & TD‐3 are very close to the western part of the horst  where influence of the bounding fault of the horst is pervasive. corresponding  to post stratoid recent basalts.  Resistivities of the layers  just above this fault is very low and are in sharp contact as observed in all the geo‐electric  sections and this low decreases even more  as we go to the south.  Below  the  zeolite‐  clay  zone.  on  alteration  and  temperature.  these  geothermal  manifestations  are  concentrated  over  the  western  side of the central horst structure at Dubti plantation. Close inspection of the  sections reveals that the sharp contact can be associated with Dubti fault.

  The  bottom  resistive  layer  with  100  ohm‐meters  is  the  Afar  stratoid  basalt  series.  Moreover.Depth  of  occurrence  and  thickness  of  alteration  zones  vary  from  borehole  to  borehole  as  well as the degree of alterations of rocks with their corresponding resistivities.  post  stratoid recent basalt layers. shown in figure 5.3. At well TD‐1 five resistivity layers are identified to a depth of  1400  meters.  Profile 5.3 is a geo‐electric  section  reproduced  from  the  report  supplied  by  Aquater  (1996).  TD‐3  is  used  to  constraint  the  resistivity  data  interpretation  since  it  is  found  in  close  proximity to VES 169 &144.  Overlying Afar Stratoid is a resistivity layer with 10 ohm‐meter occurring below TD‐1 and  has 400 meters thickness. below 600 m.  The  resistivity  method  may  not  detect  such  thin  layers  since  its  resolving power decreases with more depth. sandstone  and thin basalt.  VES  170  was  correlated  with  TD‐1  in  order  to  calibrate  the  resistivity  survey.  It  is  getting  shallower  beneath  TD‐3  until  it  reaches  the  resistivity  discontinuity. are thick. alteration and temperature and review of  Aquater’s (1980 & 1996) interpretation of this profile. Aquater (1996) reexamined results of the pre‐drilled geophysical results.3. According to the geoelectric section by aquater (1996) shown in figure 5.      63    .  The  following  is  a  reinterpretation of profile 5 in terms of lithology. It corresponds to alternating sequences of siltstone.  its  continuation  away  from  TD‐1  is  not  shown. Figure 5. was selected by Aquqter as a good representative geelectric  section for correlating the resistivity structure with subsurface geology for it encompasses  the axis of wells TD‐3 and TD‐1 in the general strike direction.  For a better correlation and more understanding of the deep subsurface structure of Dubti  geothermal field.  Towards  the  north  in  well  TD‐3. while the intercalated sediments and  pyroclasts  are  thin.

3: Reinterpreted Geoelectric and Pseudo resistivity sections along Profile 5 (after Aquater. 1996)    64    .Figure 5.

 However. from surface to depths of 95 m in TD‐1.  less  than  700 meters below the ground in well TD‐3.  three  layers  are  identified  by  the  resistivity method. The effect of this alteration is to  decrease the resistivity of the sediment.  comparable  to  the  resistivity  of  Afar  stratoid  series.    The  layer  exists  throughout  the  section  along  strike.   The  second  layer  has  higher  relative  values  ranging  from  8. 175 & 176.  Their  distributions  are  not  abundant  but  they  occur  commonly  or  sporadically  in  the  second  and  third  layers.  The 3rd low. the geothermal wells intersected a shallow reservoir within the second  layer which has a relatively higher resistivity value. only if the fluid in the reservoir is an out flow and very close to the up  flow zone to attain such high temperature.Within  the  anomalous  10  ohm‐meters  resistivity  layer. They are characterized by a low‐high‐low sequence of resistivity values.74  and  thicker  than  the  overlying  layers  and  observed  to  outcrop  in  the  southern  segment  of  the  section  at  VES  174.  but  occurs  at  a  relatively  shallower  depth. the layer is altered to zeolite‐clay.7  through  9  &  10  to  11  ohm‐ meters.   From  surface  to  the  top  of  the  resistive  recent  basalt.   The  surface  layer  has  resistivity  values  ranging  between  1. and temperature profile shows  that this layer is characterized by a maximum temperature of 270 0C.    Thus  their  effects  in  changing  the  resistivity  of  the  rocks  seem  minimal. below these.48  to  2. It corresponds to sandstone and fractured recent basalts.     65    . 50 m in TD‐2.  In well TD‐1.  It  is  an  unaltered sedimentary rock. resistivity layer below a geothermal  reservoir is possible. Laumonite + Epidote + wairakite are the alteration minerals.  drilling  indicates  the  presence  of  permeable zone at depth level between 850 to 900 meters.   A  thin  resistive  layer  composed  of  recent  basalt  is  characterized  by  a  resistivity  value  of  127  ohm‐meters. The third layer is a very  low  resistivity  layer  with  varying  values  between  0.35  and  1.9  ohm‐meters. while epidote‐wairakite is from 310 to 410. In well  TD‐4 chloride is common and  Zeolite is abundant in the second layer. and 59  m in TD‐3.  laumonite is dominant between 210 & 390 m.

  Depths to such anomalous feature under profile lines 01.  They  are  composed  of  an  unaltered  top  surface  and  zeolite‐clay  altered  zone.  and  its  upper  part  is  enclosed  by  4  ohm‐meters  value..  et  al. the 2‐D inversion method revealed a feature of low resistivity anomaly diapir..  Furthermore.1).  It  is  observed  along  the  whole  Profiles  in  Dubti  area.  (2010)  applied  one‐dimensional  and  two‐dimensional  model  inversions to the collected MT data based on the dimensionality of the resistivity structure  as determined from polar diagram. 6.  which  are  dominated  by  CO2.6 Magnetotelluric Resistivity Structure    The employed DC resistivity method at Tendaho.  respectively. 03 and 97 are 5. the discontinuity seems to offset the resistivity diapir.  Kalberkamp  U. This interpretation is consistent with the analytical results of  Aquater  (1995)  that  gases  from  the  geothermal  fluids.  the  top  resistivity  layer  has  a  variable  thickness. When profile lines 97 &  01 are compared.  As  in  the  DC  resistivity. could not  go  deeper  beyond  the  top  of  the  Afar  stratoid  basalt. as have been observed above.   66    .   In  the  central  position  of  the  sections.1)  and so it differs from the other MT profiles in its deeper part.  the  top  surface  layers  are  defined  by  very  low  resistivity  values.    The  layers  also  partially  include  laumonite‐wairakite‐prehnite altered zone.   The  low  resistivity  diapiric  feature  is  characterized  by  less  than  2  ohm‐meters.  Thus  for  more  depth  penetrations  below  the  stratoid  series  and  to  detect  a  possible  heat  source. & 7 km deep.  Kalberkamp  (2010)  attributed  such  anomaly to a magmatic melt.  As can be observed in the stacked resistivity sections  (figure 6.  indicate  a  strong  magmatic  origin. It coincides with resistivity  discontinuity that has been revealed by the DC resistivity method.  magnetotelluric  (MT)  method was applied to reach a depth down to more than 10 km.  the  supply  of  gases  from  magma  is  supported by the relative He content and by the ratio of 3He/4He.   The diapiric feature is not observed in the geo‐electric section of Profile line 02 (figure 6.  The  layers  are  dominantly  a  sedimentary  sequence  with  inter  layering  of  recent  basalt.

1: Stacked MT Resistivity sections assembled from individual section prepared by  Kalberkamp U.N  Figure 6. et al (2010)      67    .

  it  undulates  above  the  high  resistivity  layer.  The  large  separation  between  MT sites smoothed out such lateral discontinuities and the geo‐electric sections show only  the undulating resistivity layers. But in the Airobera section.  In  sections  of  profile lines 01and 03 the intermediate layer undulates and overlies a high resistivity layer.  Thus  the  1‐Dimensional  inversion  applied  to  the  high  frequency  MT  data  discerned  the  thin  resistivity  layers.  Within  the  geoelectric  section  of  profile  line  02  the  layer  rests  horizontally  over  a  high  resistivity  layer. et al (2010). In order to reveal the deeper structures. according to Kalberkamp U. et al (2010). Though not abundant.. it cuts through the various high resistivity layers and  encloses the low resistivity diapir. On both sides of the MT lines occur very high resistivity  features.   The  Afar  stratoid  basalt  characterized  by  100  Ohm‐meters  is  located  at  1397  m  below  ground in well TD‐1 and at depth of 1500 meters below VES 170.    Sharp  lateral  resistivity  discontinuities  in  the  subsurface  that  define  graben‐horst  structures  are  not  observed  in  the  MT  resistivity  sections. The  high frequency components of the MT soundings. wairakite‐prehnite  mixed zone occur in this layer and according to the geological logs. In the MT section (shown  68    .1 is a small scale map that cannot discern the thin upper resistivity layer. it is the high resistivity layer  that encloses the resistivity diapir.  In the central part of these sections. the low frequency  component of the data was emphasized in the 2‐D inversions and  stacked sections shown  in figure 6.  show  a  one  dimensional  characteristic.  showing  that  they  are  affected  from  the  heat  below.    Details  of  the  1‐D  MT  resistivity data interpretation is found in the report by Kalberkamp U. the frequency of recent  basalt  is  high  and  gets  thick  as  we  go  deeper.  It  has  an intermediate  layer resistivity  and  occurs throughout the sections of all profile lines. Here  only a single MT line passing over the well area is considered for comparison with the DC  resistivity interpretation. Its layout differs from profile to profile.  In  Airobera. while in other profile lines they  are  observed  to  occur  only  at  the  margins.. with very high values ranging from 84 to 2048 Ohm‐meters which are unaffected  under profile line 02 and remained horizontally stratified.Below  the  surface  layers  are  undulating  resistivity  layers  with  values  greater  than  the  upper surface ranging from 4 to  8 ohm‐meters.

 showing the  configuration of the heat source.  69    . The layers seem to be  bounded  by  buried  faults  probably  formed  by  the  upwelling.         Figure 6.2: One‐Dimensional MT Resistivity section reproduced from Dissa M.  which  is  constructed  by  putting  together  a  9  km  resistivity  depth  slice  and  resistivity  section  of  profile line 01. several layers are discerned.  Below  TD00106.. It undulates along the section.in  figure  6.3:  presents  a  three‐dimensional  view  of  a  resistivity  structure  of  Dubti. It can serve as the lower part a geothermal conceptual model.. indicating its corrugated nature which  determines  the  configurations  of  the  overlying  layers.  the  resistive  basement  that  is  defined  by  a  100  Ohm‐meters  should  be  the  Afar stratoid basalt.2). and Lemma Y. et al (2010)    Figure  6. that supplies the geothermal system.  where  the  upwelling of Afar stratoid is observed.  The  apex  of  gravity  ridge  defined by horizontal gravity gradient (also by residual gravity) and the NW trending total  magnetic anomaly axis coincide with the upwelling of Afar stratoid series at the location of  TD00106. in  Kalberkamp U.

3: Three Dimensional View of Deep Resistivity structure assembled from depth  slice of resistivity map and geo‐electric section of Profile line 01 (maps modified from  Kalberkamp U.  N     Figure 6. (2010))  70    .

  It  is  thus  thought  that  secondary  permeability  should  be  sufficiently  high  to  house a viable geothermal reservoir in the Stratoid series rocks at depth.                                      71    . High density of faulting and fracturing is observed in  outcrops  of  the  thick  succession  of  Plio‐Pleistocene  age  Stratoid  series  basalts  which  underlie the late Pleistocene sedimentary and intercalated lava succession which occupies  the  graben.Basaltic  dike  injection  into  the  uppermost  crust  is  observed  to  take  place  along  the  axial  zone of Manda‐Hararu range. and thus dikes of recent age are taken as the probable heat  sources in these two prospect areas.

67  to  1900C/km.  Recently  surface  temperature  surveys  were carried out over selected areas at Dubti plantation and Airobera.  and  in‐hole  maximum  temperatures  along  with  behaviours  of  temperature profiles. To the knowledge of  the author.  As can be observed in the table.7 Temperature gradients     Thermal  studies  involving  surface  and  in‐hole  temperature  measurements  and  heat  flow  survey are direct geothermal exploration tools. no heat flow survey has been conducted in any of Tendaho geothermal fields. Those gradients.   In the table below.  Variations of temperature profiles are observed because of such effects. In the  present  work. most measurements were affected  by  unstable  temperature  condition  (warm  up  effect).  1980).  Other  effects  are  ground  water  circulations.  Aquater  and  geological  survey  under the Ministry of Mines drilled eight multipurpose geothermal boreholes (MGBH). Boreholes in various localities of Tendaho  rift were drilled for groundwater supply. Water samples from these boreholes were taken  for  groundwater  or  hydro‐geochemical  studies.  Table  5  lists  temperature  gradients.  convective  air  movement  and  water  loss  through  fractures  or  contacts.  temperature  gradients  were  estimated  using  least  square  method  over  certain depth intervals or the whole depth.  Aquater  (1980)  determined  temperature  gradient  that  can  be  extrapolated to the average surface temperature based on observed constant trend.  This  section  summarizes  temperature  data  and  results  presented  in  detail  by  previous  reports  (Aquater. which show constant rate of  temperature increase and give surface temperature value when extrapolated. it can be readily observed that the computed temperature gradients for  the  shallow  multipurpose  gradient  boreholes  vary  from  36.    Conductive  heat  loss  from  the  shallow reservoir to the surrounding rocks may distort conductive heat loss from a deeper   72    . All the differences at any depth between the observed and predicted by  the gradient represent the perturbation caused by the effects pointed out above. are taken as  reliable gradient.   Despite  all  these  effects.  and  attempt  has  been  made  to  extend  this  work.  In  1980.  The  Geological  survey  of  Ethiopia  drilled  the  9th  one.  The  average  gradient  based  on  the  present  estimate  is  108  0C/  km.

50C/km  Isotherm below 75 m  41.90C Measurements taken 1 month after drilling 90.90C including isotherm  Measurement Affected by transient  temperature   from 130 to 170m  10   TD‐1   2900C/km   …………………  Conductive above  2400C Deep exploration well 600 meters  11  TD‐3     1000C/km   Conductive between  2400C Deep  exploration  well (after  36  days  1350 & 1450 depth  corrected Roux method (Aquater)  interval       73    .Table 4: Temperature gradient   No   Well  Temperature  Name   Gradient from  Temperature Gradient  Gradient Type or  computed using least  Maximum  Remark  temperature profiles Temper‐ Aquater (1980)  square method (present  ture   study)   1   GBH1   1800C/1km   1720C/km  Variable gradient 510C Measurements taken 1 month after drilling 2   GBH2   1000C/km   94.670C/km  1290C/km  Temperature reversal 42.950C Measurements taken 80 days after drilling 3   GBH3   500C/km   38.30C Measurements taken 2 months after  drilling  4   GBH4   700C/km   67.250C Last measurements taken 14 years later 41.70C/km   Constant gradient 35.20C Measurements taken 2 months after  depth down to  drilling  bottom hole  5   GBH5   3600C/km   190   0C/km  6   GBH6   ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   1550C/km  7   GBH7   1000C/km   85.70C/km  Variable gradient Variable gradient 60.30C Measurement affected by temperature  transient  8   9   GBH8   ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   GBH9   ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   36.10C Measurements taken 3 months after  with depth  drilling  Variable gradient  58.70C/km  Constant gradient 40.

  At  this  location  the  low  resistivity diaper is not observed in the MT section.  Figure  7. Geothermal gradients can be used to predict crustal temperature at  any depth and delineate areas with high surface heat flow. subsection 4.  where  extension of the Tendaho rift induces high heat flow. the temperature at this depth is then estimated to be 6070C.  the  solution  to  one‐dimensional  heat  conduction equation (K∂2T/∂2Z = 0) is then given by:                                T= Z * G + T0.25 km and the annual average surface  temperature  is  400C. As determined in section 4.   For  vertical  heat  conduction  under  steady  state  condition  with  constant  thermal  conductivity  and  with  no  crustal  heat  production.  owing  to  their  occurrence  in  the  axial  region.2 (spectral analysis of magnetic data).  At  the  northeast  part  open  high  gradient  is  readily  observed.1 portrays the  distribution  of  temperature  gradients. Z is depth below ground.    Unlike  the  low  gradient  anomalous  areas. the  ensemble average curie‐point depth for Tendaho is 5.  At  Curie  depth  magnetic  property  of  magnetic  minerals  vanish  due  to  high  heat  in  the  ground. and temperature gradients from deeper wells were not included in  computing the average.     74    .source (hot intrusion). but shows up at deeper level (9 km) in  plan  view  (figure  6. The two high gradient anomalous areas are separated by intermediate gradient  which  may  bear  correlation  with  the  DC  resistivity  discontinuity.  The  central  high  gradient  anomaly  stands  out  very  clearly. The center of this anomaly is due to the shallow geothermal reservoir heat transfer  by  conduction  to  the  surrounding  rocks  as  well  as  from  deeper  heat  source  (magma  chamber).  This could be a curie  temperature of magnetite (Fe3O4) which fits the standard assumption in curie‐point depth  analysis. and T0 is surface temperature. where T is temperature at any depth. G  temperature gradient.3).  Applying  the  above  relation  and  using  1080C/km  for  the  gradient  value.  these  high  anomalous  regions  could  be  thermally  active.

 at the southwest could be related to Allaobeda geothermal  manifestations (hot springs and geyser).1: Map showing temperature gradients  Isolated open gradient anomaly.  As  a  first  approximation.  Figure 7.  contour  closure  of  1200C/km  may  have  delineated  the  geothermal  reservoir.    75    .   The  high  temperature  gradient  anomalies  could  be  caused  by  the  superposition  of  heat  flows  from  magmatic  intrusion.  shallow  and  deep  geothermal  reservoirs.

  as  obtained  from  the  deconvolution  of  magnetic  data  bear  correlation  to  the  10  and  100  Ohm‐m  contour  lines.5  to  7  km  the  2‐D  inverted  MT  data  located  a  low  resistivity  diapir. the capability of the MT method to  76    . complemented the DC resistivity survey in that the central up lift  was  not  reached  by  the  DC  method. occurring at 800 to 1000 m depth. Such undulations along the sections indicate that such  configuration  has  controlled  the  depositional  style  of  the  overlaying  sedimentary  sequences.  It  is  outlined  by  a  10  ohm‐m  contour  line  which delineates the upper low resistivity layers. The interpreted resistivity  discontinuities of the bottom resistivity substratum (Aquater.  which  constitute  the  lower  and  upper  curves. correlate well with gravity gradient features and fault solution plots.  The MT survey. A contour line of 100 ohm‐m with similar  undulation  outlines  the  top  part  of  the  high  resistivity  layer.  At  deeper  level  reaching  4. 1980) shown in plan view by  figure 5. Furthermore.8 Summary and Discussions of Geophysical Results    At  this  stage  it  is  possible  to  summarize  results  and  synthesize  the  information  obtained  from the review of each geophysical method employed in Tendaho geothermal fields so far.  As the DC resistivity survey was carried out from one end of the rift margin to the   other.  step fault blocks and graben structures were mapped and the relatively narrow spaced VES  points  enabled  to  resolve  more  layers  and  structures  than  the  widely  spaced  MT  Survey.  the  resistive  layer  (bounded  by  100  Ohm‐m)  is  Afar  stratoid  basalt.  The difference arises due to the large separation of the MT sites. The central up lift mapped by  the  resistivity  method  corresponds  to  the  magnetically  mapped  two  hinged  high  blocks.  The  1‐D  inverted  MT  data  revealed  undulated resistivity structure with a central up lift in the region of the rift axis at depth  700  m  below  ground  directly  above  the  diapir.  which  is  interpreted  as  a  magmatic  melt.  since  current  couldn’t  go  beyond  the  deepest  recent  basalts.  and  the  central  uplift  is  at  about 1200 m depth below ground. however.2.  while the 10 Ohm‐m is related to basalt of post Afar Stratoid.    Recalling  solutions  plots.  In  such  case.

1.4. These are more clearly observed in the gravity gradient map.  Most are closed features.  interesting  results  can  be  readily  observed  on  the  integration map shown in figure 8. fault solution plots of magnetic deconvolution and geological layer  for  craters  are  brought  together.  two  possibilities  arise. the bottom of the feature is narrow and get wider and wider at  shallower  levels.  The  rift  margin  which  bound  the  gravity  depressions is expressed by gravity highs.  In  the  other  case  when  the  magnetic  features  are  at  deeper  levels.  nearly  circular  or  elliptical  features  within  the  gravity  depressions  or  gravity  ridge  revealed  by  residual  gravity  may  indicate  the  existence  of  craters or doming.  When  features  due  to  the  gravity are at deeper level.    Flanking  the  central  horst  structure  on  either  of  its  sides  are  gravity  depressions  which  could  be  attributed  to  graben  structures.  This  is  consistent  with  the  northwest  trending  shallow  resistivity  basement  occurring  at  the  central  part  and  the  central magnetic lows which define the axial region of Tendaho rift. Euler 3D deconvolution of the magnetic data revealed  similar  subsurface  structures  to  that  of  gravity  gradient.2) is caused by a  shallow  dense  mass. With the assumption that the gravity features and the magnetic  features  are  at  different  depth  levels.  forming  a  subsurface  horst  structure.  The features outlined by gravity gradients occur within features outlined by solution plots  of magnetic deconvolution. while few of them are open.penetrate  deeper  depth  enabled  us  to  identify  the  heat  source  and  extends  the  previous  survey to the next level. occurring within the larger ones. owing to the occurrence of the stratoid basalt at  shallow  level  or  at  the  surface.  The  occurrences  of  circular.  the  bottom of the feature is wide and get narrower and narrower at  shallower levels.  The central gravity ridge observed in the residual gravity map (figure 2.   When gravity gradient.  All  these  features  corroborate  well  with  configurations  revealed by the DC resistivity methods.  Several  circular  and  elliptical  features are observed. Upright  funnel  for  the  former  or  inverted  funnel  for  the  later  is  a  good  first  approximation  to  77    . some are large and some are small.

  This  is  also  true  for  gravity  gradient  features.  mud  cones  alignment. all bear  positional  correlations. with linear and curved features. at Allalobeda.  fractures  and  lithological  contacts  are  paths  for  fluid  migrations  towards  the  surface  for  the  formation  of  geothermal  manifestations.  in  the  area  of  deep  &  shallow  geothermal  wells.  at  Airobera. gravity gradient.explain such possible situations.   The  occurrence  of  geologically  observed  craters  supports  the  idea  that  these  features  outlined  buried  calderas. Close inspection shows that these features crisscross each other as can  be observed more in all of the maps.  Daorre  crater  falls  at  the  edge  or  rim  of  a  buried crater which itself is within a buried caldera.  craters  and  vents. magnetic fault & sill solution plots. and in  the integrated map of figure 8.  Thus  the  positional  association  of  the  features  and  manifestation  confirms  that  these  features  are  faults.  Faults.  with  the  circular  and  east‐west  trending  linear  features. northwest east‐west and north south trending  lineament features.  Steaming  ground. and hot springs and geyser.  showing  the  application  of  correct  structural  index  in  deconvolving  the  magnetic  data.   In the residual magnetic field. namely.  Different  trends  and  crisscrosses  of  these  features  are  readily  observed  in  the  figure.1  shows  the  pattern  and  distribution  of  the  linear  features. four alignment directions of  linear features can be easily  distinguished. The first possibility is more likely because faults revealed  by solution plots of magnetics are estimated to occur at shallow level within the sediment  fills and gravity samples the effects of density variations of sound rocks at deeper level.  it  was  found  out  that  there  exist  positional correlation of Fault solution plots (features) with the geothermal manifestation  in  Tendaho  geothermal  field.    Close  inspection  of  figure  8.   When  magnetic  sources  positions  were  estimated  using  inversion  of  Euler  homogenous  equations  of  the  magnetic  field  based  on  fault  model. northeast.1. In  this  case  the  magnetic  features  may  have  outlined  ring  fractures  and  faults  while  the  gravity gradient mapped volcanic plug underlying collapse structures. These are.  with  the  northwest  striking  feature. At the rift margins the Afar stratoid basalt is fractured   78    .

  Figure 8. Fault locations and craters  79    .1: Map showing Superposition of Horizontal gradient.

 is volumetric  heat  capacity.(1­1/β)/[ρm  (1­αv.  and  also  assumed  the  crustal  and  lithospheric  extension  to  be  the same (uniform stretching). R.3X10‐5  0C. A.  1975).. J. and 1.  is  density  of  sediment.. ρm  /2}.  EW. and resistivity as well as from deep boreholes are compiled in table 5 to compare  the different results. The quantitative model of uniform stretching is given by:        Ys= yl {(ρm ­ρc).  All  the  constants except the crustal thickness are taken from published literature (e.Tm.  and  β  is  stretching  factor.  is mantle temperature αv=3.yc/yl)­ αv.yc/yl (1­ αv.  trending  NW.  & Allen. and these variations have  been mapped by the resistivity methods and fault solution plots.74. Allen.Tm.  ρs  =2060  kg/m3  ..    yc  =  25  km  crustal  thickness  for  Tendaho  is  taken  from  the  estimation  of  wide  angle  refraction  (Berckhemer  H. Depths  to Afar stratoid basalts vary due to fault controlled subsidence.Tm)­ ρs ]   Where  Ys  is  fault  controlled  subsidence.  The calculated Fault controlled subsidence. P.  ring  fractures  and  faults  have  also  severely  affected  the  graben.  yl=125  km. Tm =  13000C.  ρc  =  2700kg/m3.  is  density  of  crust.by  grid  faults  and  those  observed  in  all  the  maps  are  subsurface  continuations  of  such  faults.  et  al.  The  Tendaho  graben  is  then  severely  affected  by  four  fault  systems.g. Depth estimates from the  magnetic. 1970).37 for β = 1.. Ys = 1.  is  lithospheric thickness.          80    .  NE.  Subsidence due to fault extension can be computed using McKenzie’s (1978a) mechanical  stretching model.  and  NS.  ρm  =  3200  kg/m3.  is  mantle  density.  Other  than  this. It is assumed that volcanism in Tendaho has a negligible effect in rising  up  or  uplifting  the graben.6 for β = 2.

  They  are  separated  by  hinged  high  blocks  with  a  central  wedge  shaped  depression.  At this stage it is possible to construct fault blocks using the magnetic fault and sill models  by drawing lines from solution peaks. TD1        1430  1197…. Taking β=1. In  general.. two half‐grabens made up of synthetic fault blocks  face  each  other.0      More  or  less  the  various  results  in  the  above  table  are  similar. with a little overestimation by the  model.   As pointed out in the previous section. The slight difference may arise probably due to the effect of weathering of the upper  surface  of  the  Afar  stratoid  that  could  result  in  the  loss  of  the  magnetic  property. is equal to the average of the drilling  depth and closerto other estimates than with the depths estimated using β = 1.75).        81    . with a stretching factor of 1.75.TD3       1375  Magnetic  spectral analysis  (meters)  Resistivity  basement  (meters)  Subsidence(meters) 955. The line inferred in such a way form fault blocks as  shown in upper section of figure 8.75 is then enables us  to estimate the lithospheric thickness to be equals to 71 km (yl/β =125/1.  The  estimated subsidence.75  1200  1415 for β=2.2.3 for β= 1..5 and 2. such result tells that the assumptions and the constant values used in calculating  the subsidence depth are reasonable and likely to be true.  Table 5: Depth estimates as obtained from different methods    Drilling  (meters)  Magnetic  Sill/dyke  Model(meters)  Depth  1397….TD2       1150  1251….  Drilling  depth  to  Afar  stratoid basalt and depth to sill/dyke are well correlated.5  1200  From 1000 to  1228 for β= 1.

  Temperature  in  the  order  of  13000C  is  a  melting  point  for  most  igneous  rocks.   Also. Haggerty (1978) cautioned that assuming a single curie‐ point temperature for continental crust may not be right. 6.2.17  km  below  the  ground  surface. since curie temperature as low as  3000C may exist in the crust owing to the low‐temperature of oxidation of titanomagnetite. low resistivity diapirs occur at  depths  varying  from  4. the  corresponding  temperatures  as  read  off  from  curves  3  &  4  (see  figure  below)  are  1250‐ 1350  0C.  assumed  to  exist  below  Afar. magnetite‐ulvospinel) with curie temperatures of  less  than  about  5700C  and  an  increase  in  titanomagnetite  causes  a  reduction  in  Curie  temperature.                                                                                                                                                                82    . at an average  depth of about 6. probably with insignificant Ulvospinel  (TiFe2O4. Nevertheless..1.    Figure  8. according to Byerly P.3.5  to  7.  Berktold  et  al  (1972)  compiled  (from  Khitarov.2  is  a  reproduction  of  such  curves  in  order  to  estimate  possible  temperature  which  corresponds to the measured MT resistivity discussed in the previous section. in the Tendaho case. E.     From the MT sections. For resistivity values of 1 to 2 Ohm‐m.). & 6.75  km  with  an  average  depth  of  6. as portrayed in figures 6..  1970  and  Schult. the most common magnetic mineral in igneous  rocks is titanomagnetite (Fe3O4. et al (1977).As cited by Connard et al (1983).   This is consistent with the interpretation of the low resistivity to be caused by a magmatic  melt.TiFe2O4.  1974)  experimental  resistivity‐temperature  curves  for  some  rock  types. the corresponding magnetic mineral to the  predicted temperature of 6070C could be magnetite.17 km.

2: Graph showing relationship between Resistivity & Temperature from laboratory  experiment (Khitarov. 1974)  as compiled by Berktold. 1970 & Schult.                   Figure 8. et al.. 1974                   83    .

 given below. Such  results imply a high gradient of 8190C/km. summarizes the results  obtained  in  this  and  previous  (spectral  analysis.17  >1300  ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ convective Melt rocks    The central bottom part of figure 8.17  607 to 1300  753 conductive Hot rock capping the magma below  4  > 6. probably of  basaltic (Adoli or Dahla) origin. The overlying rock is a magmatic basement.92 km with temperature range from 607 to 13000C.16   40 to 449  108 2  4.  it  is  capped  by  a  hot  rock  whose  top  part is defined by a curie isotherm.  temperature  gradient  &  MT  resistivity)  sections. and temperature gradient   No  Depth range  Temperature (range)  Average gradient Transfer of Heat Remark conductive Igneous rocks capped with sediments  in km  in 0C  0C /km  1  0 to 4.      Table 6: Summary of results for temperature & depth ranges.  At  this  depth lithostatic pressure due to the overlying rock alone might not be sufficient to prevent  magmatic rise.25 to 6.  The data in this table is used for constructing the lower section of figure 8.  As  pointed  above.The layer of the hot rock below the base of the magnetic basement caps the magmatic melt  and has an average thickness of 0.  Table 6.25  449 to 607  108 3  5.16 to 5.3.     84    . The hot rock is bottom part of the magnetic basement and  because  of  high  temperature  plastic  deformation  may  contain  the  rise  of  magma.3 portrays a magmatic melt defined by resistivity lows  and  high  temperature  of  13000C.

  Figure 8.3: Interpretative schematic cross sections portraying possible geometries     85    .

  This  review  work  revealed  the  existence  of  east  west  trending  structures. and the DC & MT resistivity sections clearly  define the rift configurations of Tendaho. ring fractures and faults have also severely affected the  graben.   z  The  Tendaho  graben  is  severely  affected  by  four  fault  systems.  z The residual gravity & magnetic fields. Other than this.1 Conclusion  The  applied  geophysical  methods  give  a  revealing  insight  into  the  subsurface  geological  formations and rift configuration of Tendaho geothermal fields. where the geothermal  reservoirs occur. Southeast of Dubti well area and Aerobera could be sites of deep reservoirs.  EW.  z The NW‐SE and NE‐SW structural systems crisscross each other at the rift margins.   z Several linear features that bound the grabens and the ridges are revealed by high  gravity gradient.  coincides  with the axial region of the Tendaho rift . This provides a sound basis  to draw the following conclusions.  Their  interactions  at  the  ridge  axis  have  geothermal  significance  in  that  they  are active sites of the present day extensions.  trending  NW. By the same  token  other  curvilinear  features  are  interpreted  as  buried  caldera.  and  volcanic vents. the rift margins are characterized by step  fault blocks and the central up lift. and NS. which is flanked by graben structures.17  km.  subsurface  continuations  of  northeast  trending  structures    and  ring  fractures  associated with buried caldera.  As  a  first  86    .  craters.  NE. and vents   z Estimated  temperature  of  the  low  resistivity  diapiric  feature  from  temperature‐ resistivity relation is nearly 13000C. Mantle temperature from various literatures is  identical  to  such  temperature  probably  indicating  continues  magmatic  supply  to  attain temperature equilibrium   z Temperature gradient map outlined areas of high heat flow. continuously generating fractures to counteract the sealing effect of hydrothermal activity.  showing  that  both  are  active  faults. The axial rift region coincides with the high heat flow area and the  magmatic  melt  occurs  just  below  it  at  an  average  depth  of  6. craters. Daorre crater occurs within circular gravity gradient.9 conclusion and Recommendation  9.

   Thermal  surveys  consisting  of  temperature  gradient. This specifically is at the intersection of “rift axis line” and Dubti  fault.  Other  highly  recommended  drilling  site  is  at  southeast  position of the mud pools.  delineate  high heat flow area and quantify the magnitude of conductive and convective heat flows.  contour  closure  of  1200C/km  may  have  delineated  the  geothermal  reservoir.  heat  flow  and  temperature  measurements  are  recommended  to  assess  the  geothermal  resource  potential.2 Recommendation    It is highly recommended to drill at Airobera where faults and ring fractures intersect and  coincide  with  steaming  grounds.approximation.  Detailed MT survey and compiled results of all the available geoscientific studies will have  to confirm the selected sites for drilling. fluid movement and subsidence during power production.  Microseismic survey within Tendaho graben and high resolution gravity survey restricted within the axial region of the rift are recommended to map fractures and monitor mass change.    9.                  87    .

  C.. Journal  of African Earth Sciences.  A.  Ethiopia. EIGS‐Government of Italy. M.  Report H9548  Aquater. Passerini.  2006:  New  evidence  for  Afro‐ Arabian plate separation in southern Afar. 1996: Sutures and shear zones in the Arabian–Nubian shield. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Tendaho Geothermal Project.  Cara. (eds). Tectophysics 241.  M.A.  MME.  EIGS‐ Government of Italy..  Aquater. MME. (unpub. Ebinger.  1980:  Geothermal  resources  exploration  project‐Tendaho  area.. 1994c: Regional isotopic Survey.  pre‐feasibility  study  ‐  phase II.  Report H8418.  EIGS‐Government  of  Italy. Tendaho Geothermal Project.K.  Aquater. Volume I and II.  Tendaho  geothermal  project. and Allen.  Report H4207.  1990:  Well  TD‐1‐  Geological  and  Geo‐engineering  Activities  during  Drilling  and  Well  Testing.    Aquater.  1995b:  Micro  seismic  Survey..  Final  Report.. Final Report.  Tendaho Geothermal Project.  Tendaho Geothermal project.  1994e:    Well  TD‐3‐  Geological  and  Geo‐engineering  Activities  during  Drilling  and  Well  Testing. 1‐28..).‐J.  Langston.  Aquater.                                                           References  Abbate.   Aquater.  Nyblade. L.. Tendaho Geothermal Project.  Aquater.  Aquater.  Tendaho Geothermal Project.  tech.  Aquater.G. Tendaho geothermal project.  Aquater 1995d: Surface geochemical monitoring.  report  H8368  (unpub. In Yirgu. Report H8463. San Lorenzo in Campo. & Stern.  1994a:  Well  TD‐2‐  Geological  and  Geo‐engineering  Activities  during  Drilling  and  Well  Testing. (1995a): Well TD‐3‐ Drilling Report..).  Report H8016. Final report. MME. P.J.   Aquater 1996: Tendaho Geothermal Project.  Report H8900. J. 289–310.  J. R.. 1977: Basin Analysis Principles and Applications. E.  Tendaho Geothermal Project Report H9087.  East Africa.H. Final report. San Lorenzo in Campo. 1994b: Well TD‐1‐ Drilling Report.  A. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. San Lorenzo in Campo.  Ministry  of  Foreign Affairs. G. 1994f: Well TD‐2‐ Drilling Report. & Maguire.   Aquater  1995c:  Well  TD‐4‐  Geological  and  Geo‐engineering  Activities  during  Drilling  and  Well  Testing. San Lorenzo in  Campo. R.. 23. H9802  (unpub). Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The Afar  88    .   Aquater.  MME. Zan.  1991:  Geochemical  study  of  the  Dubti  and  Alalobeda  Geothermal  areas  in  the  Tendaho  Graben..  A.  Ayele. P.J. C. 1995: Strike slip faults in a rift area: a transect in the Afar triangle.    Allen.  &  Leveque. EIGS‐Government  of Italy. A. Blackwell Science Ltd. P. Tendaho geothermal project. Final Report. 67‐92     Abdelsalam.

..  R.  Behle.  Geothermal  Resources Exploration and Assessment Core Process. M. 1996: Potential Theory in Gravity & Magnetic Applications.  V. 347‐352     Barberi. pp. Cambridge University Press  Berckhemer. starting September. Columbia University Press. pp. I. A. Muller. 1. in the light of K/Ar age determinations.  Gebrande.. Stuttgart...  In:  A.    In:  A. vol. Geol.). M. vol.. D. Revue  De Geographie et de Geologie dynamique (2) Vol.  Bartlesen. L. 4. 2004: Consequences of asthenospheric variability on continental rifting. N. 133–141    Ayele. Bad Bergzabren. pp.  Journal of African Earth Science 41.  J.  Pilger and A R®osler (Editors). (Eds.  H.  H.. M.  vol. Stuttgart. sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.  Pilger  and  A  R®osler  (Editors).  Stuttgart. M. F. Lett. Sci.  H. Proceedings of an International Symposium on the  Afar  Region  and  Rift  Related  Problems.Volcanic  Province  within  the  East  African  Rift  System.  A.  1974.    Chessex. New York. and Lirer. I. Ethiopia. De Fino. Schweizerbart. I.  Ferrara.  B. 1.  1.    Barberi F.  2009:  Report  on  a  comprehensive  web  based  geothermal  database.  R. 259.  Special  Publications.  E.. Fasc. Stuttgart..R. In: Pilger.  Afar  Depression  of  Ethiopia..  Burkhardt. et al. Afar  Depression of Ethiopia. and Weidmann..  London. pp.  Beyene..  Makris. 187–197. G.L. G.  Barberi.  Civetta. 41‐59  Buck.. In: A. Schweizerbart. Driscoll. Rosler. Ghiara.. 174–178.. Germany. A..  Schweizerbart. Geological Survey of Ethiopia  Blakey R.  H.Miller.  Germany...F... 83: 363‐373. XV. & Kohlstedt..W.. Germany.  Proceedings  of  an  International Symposium on the Afar Region and Rift Related Problems.  H.  Baier. 1975: Evolution of the volcanic region of Ah  Sabieh (T.A.  and  Varet. 89ñ107. J. La Volpe.  Afar  Depression  of  Ethiopia. 2005: Tectonics of the Afar Depression: A review and synthesis.  1975:  Magnetotelluric  measurements  in  Afar.  &  Vees.  Menzel.  F.  89    ...  Santacroce.D. A.  Bad  Bergzabren... R.. 1975: Structural meaning  of central eastern Afar. (eds) Rheology and Deformation of  the Lithosphere at Continental Margins. 1975: Recent volcanic units of Afar and their structural significance. L.I. Stuttgart.  1975:  Deep  seismic  soundings  in  the  Afar  region  and  on  the  highland  of  Ethiopia. Afar Depression of Ethiopia.. Cheminee J‐L. 2005. L...). J.  In:  A. Pilger and A.R. In:  Karner. J. Varet.. B.  H.  A. Rosier (Editors).  J.  G. Taylor...  Geological  Society. Earth  planet. 221‐227.. 1–30...  and  Angenheister.  Berktold.  1975:  Structural  evolution  of  the  Afar  triple  junction. 2007a: The volcano‐seismic crisis in Afar. J.  Schweizerbart_sche Verlagsbuchhandlung..  A. P. 89ñ107... Gasparini.. 89ñ107.  G. M. Delaloye. E. and Abdelsalam. 255.  Schweizerbart. and Varet. Afar Depression of Ethiopia. 1973: Long‐Lived Lakes of Erta Ale Volcano.  Haak.  Pilger  and  A  R®osler  (Editors).  1974.    Bekele  B. W..

 M..  Lahitte. Feraud.  Earth  and  Planetary Sciences 332 (2001) 13–20  90    . J.‐Y. C. Special Publications..    Ebinger.  Electro consult.    Demessie.H.  Pilger  and  A  R®osler  (Editors).  R.  P. Journal of Petrology.  Schweizerbart.  Afar Regional  State.  Geology 29. H. and P.  Gulf  of  Aden  and  Ethiopian  rifts  (  a  preliminary report).  Kalberkamp. p. London.  G.. Geological Survey of Ethiopia (GSE)     Ebinger. I.. Ebinger C.  E. 121–130  Ebinger.  and  Sleep. Philos.  1998:  Current  plate  motions  across  the  Red  Sea.. R.  In:  A. J. C. ELC. Rochette (1997). (eds) The Afar Volcanic Province within the East African Rift System.  Ethiopia. 1987: Geothermal reconnaissance study of  the selected sites of the Ethiopian  rift system‐Geological Report. Lapierre. & Maguire.      Kidane  T. 23‐42    Gass. London.  Timing of the Ethiopian  flood event:  Implications for plume birth and global 899 changes. 45(4) pp 793‐834. 838– 841..  In:  Series  of  Project  Proposals.  ‐U. Arndt..   Hofmann.J. Milan Italy   Garfunkel.. Gezahegn Yirgu... Constraint on structural development of Afar imposed by kinematics of  the major surrounding plates. 788–791. Gulf of Aden and Ethiopian  rifts.  Weis. F.W. R.. D. & Beyth. A 267: 369‐382  Girdler.. v.  Magnetotelluric  surface  exploration  at  Tendaho.  D. Z. M.  Report  to  GSE and BGR  Kieffer.  1998:  Cenozoic  magmatism  throughout  East  Africa  resulting  from  impact of a single plume: Nature.  Afar  (Ethiopia). (eds) 2006: The  Afar volcanic province within the East African rift system. F.K. In: Yirgu. 259.  and  Gillot. B..  Coulié. Courtillot. & Casey.J.. P.  A.. 395...H.  R. 527–530.  Schaefer  H..  B... Dereje Ayalew.K. C. Lond.  Ethiopia.  A.H.  Afar  Depression  of  Ethiopia. Pecher.  Jerram.  2011:  Proposal  for  a  prefeasibility  stage  geothermal  exploration  project  in Tendaho  graben.. Lond..  B.  and  Schonfeld  M.  Gordon.  Keller. 2001: Continental breakup in magmatic provinces: An Ethiopian example... G.  Geophysical  Journal  International 135.. Geological Society. Soc.. A 267: 359‐365.  and  Meugniot.Christiansen  T.  1970:  An  aeromagnetic  Survey  of  the  Red  Sea.  2004:  Flood  and  Shield  Basalts  from  Ethiopia:  Magmas from the African Superswell. 89ñ107.  Stuttgart. Trans...  D.  K. Nature.  C. 256.  C.. Philos.  D. V.  1975:  Geology  of  southern  and  central  Afar. 1970: The evolution of volcanism in the junction of the Red Sea..  N. Bastien.. 313–328. Trans.  N.G.  Special publications.  2010. 389. N. Soc..  and  Bekele.  Geological Society. G.. Bosch.  U.  P. P.  Chu. & Maguire.  Mercier.  2001:  Chronologie  K–Ar  et  TL  du  volcanisme  aux  extrémités  sud  du  propagateur  mer  Rouge  en  Afar  depuis  300  ka.

J.Lahitte. 126 – 144.  letters.1029/2001JB001689. Sci.  T.  K. C.  R.. 213: 664‐ 665  Mohr..J. 1978a: Some remarks on the development of sedimentary basins. 75: 7340‐7352  Mohr.  Res.  M. Yelland. P. and Wood. G.  M..  Nyblade..  Special Paper..  Baker.  doi:10.. Earth Planet.  Reid. P. 2003: Long lasting epeirogenic uplift from mantle plumes and the origin  of  the  Southern  African  Plateau.  Bosence.  D. Sci. N. 1970: The Afar Triple Junction and sea‐floor spreading.  Kidane. S. 303. Euler magnetic structural index of a thin bed fault.  Davidson.B.  El‐Nakhal. 2003: Short note.  I. P.  Dart.  &  Abebe. 1967: Major volcano‐tectonic lineament in the Ethiopian rift system.  (Eds.. P. Geophys.  Terra Nova 2..  V...  Al‐Khirbash. D. Millet A.‐Y.. Nature.. J.1029/2003GC000573. & Baker. A. P.. A. Tectonophysics.B. P..C.A.H.(eds) Volcanic Rifted Margins. Ebinger. 577‐584  Nyblade. A. Res.  B. pp 25‐32  Menzies. M.  Mohr..    Mckenzie.).  1105.  Bosence.. 340–350...  A.. Nature. A.  J. 1971: Ethiopian Rift and Plateaus: Some volcanic petrochemical difference. 1990: Magnetic interpretation in three  dimensions using Euler deconvolution... Addis Ababa. Granser.  S.  Al  Subbary. A. A.. 1972: Surface structure and plate tectonics of Afar..  geophys. 1976: Volcano spacing and lithospheric attenuation in the Eastern Rift  of Africa.. Obs. A. A.A. A.  McClay.  Klemperer. uplift and crustal extension:  preliminary  observations  from  Yemen.  Menzies. Earth Planet. Geophys.. A.  Courtillot. Somerton I.  D...  Al‐Kadasi... Bull. Allsop J. Published  electronically  Reid.  Hurford. Geophysics.  Res.A... Geophy.  4.  P.. Lett. 1‐65  Mohr. 33. A...A. J.  T. A. Geological Society of America.  In:  Storey..  Alabaster..  Mohr.. P. W.A.  Pankhurst.  M. 2002: Crust and upper mantle structure in East Africa.  doi:  10.  in  the  presenceof  propagating  rifts.. implications for the origin of  Cenozoic  rifting  and  volcanism  and  the  formation  of  magmatic  rifted  margins. H. A. 76: 1967‐1984  Mohr.  In:  Menzies.  Geological  Society  (London)  Special  Publication 68.  Geochemistry. Geophys. A. C.  Nichols.  P.  M.  2003:    New  age  constraints  on  the  timing  of  volcanism  in  central  Afar.L.A.  Magmatism  and  the  Causes  of  Continental  Break‐up. 1967: The Ethiopian rift system.  Geosystems. 11. 55. J.  B. 1983: Ethiopian flood basalt Province.  1990.  Al_Kadasi..  Gillot. 293–304..  H.  Geophysics...  Mohr.  Lithospheric  extension  and  the  opening  of  the  Red  Sea:  sediment–basalt  relationships  in  Yemen.  A.  J.  108. Vol. 40.. 3 – 18. 15–26. P.. 362.. & Sleep. 1992: The timing of magmatism.  C. Al_Subbary.  M. 15.. J. pp 80‐90  91    .

  D. 1970: Statistical models for interpreting aeromagnetic data.. 213–228     Wolfenden..  P.Rooney.  &  Ayalew.  Varet.  Deino.  and  Gasse.. Lett..  F. A.. Keir D.  35.  T. New York.  S. G. Bull.  Ph.  G.  E.. Geochim.  G...  Yirgu.  &  Ayalew. 224.. E.  Yirgu... and Grant F.  C. 6715–6736    Silver..  H.  2003:  Evolution  of  the  southern  Red  Sea  rift:  Birth  of  a  magmatic  margin.  1978.  G. Yirgu4. Acta     Sleep  N..  T.  C.. Geol.1038/nature04978      92    .  J  Geophys. pp 293‐302  UNDP. Earth Planet.  E. Geophysics.  A. & Stork..  Centre  Nationale  de  la  Recherche Scientifique (pub)  Wolfenden.  D.  and  Kelley..  B  Solid  Earth Planets 95.  Ebinger.  Sci.  Rev.. Sci.. Ayele3. pp 275.  D.  Furman. Ebinger C.  Thesis Royal Holloway University of London      Wolfenden.  Res.  1973:  Investigation  of  geothermal  resources  for  power  development  Geology.  P..  Geochemistry  and Hydrology of hot springs of the east African Rift System within Ethiopia.  P.  G.  J..  Geology  of  Central  and  Southern  Afar.  A.  24.  (1990)  Hotspots  and  mantle  plumes—some  phenomenology.  Ebinger. Cosmochim.    Spector. DP/SF/UN 116‐technical  report.  (1996):  Seismic  anisotropy  beneath  the  continents. 1025 Soc.... United Nations.  385–432.  Annu.  Earth  Planet.  E.  2004:Evolution  of  the  northern  Main  Ethiopian rift: Birth of a triple junction. 117. Biggs J.  Structure  of  the  Ethiopian  lithosphere:  evidence  from mantle xenoliths.    Renne..  Yirgu.  2005:  1024  Evolution  of  the  southern Red Sea rift: Birth of a magmatic margin. A. Am. 846– 864    Wright J T.  O. 2006: Magma‐maintained  rift  segmentation  at  continental  rupture  in  the  2005  Afar  dyking  episode  Vol  442|doi:10.

Appendix 1a: Regional Gravity Field Map of Tendaho 

                                      
                              
93 
 

Appendix 1b: Regional Total Field Map of Tendaho 

 
 
94 
 

                                        
                                         Appendix 2a: Three Dimensional Solution plot of Dyke/Sill 

 
 
 
 
 
95 
 

Appendix 3a: Profiles of Elevation Fault and Dyke/Sill                    96    .