You are on page 1of 228

 

 
PAT  METHENY:    
TECHNIQUES  IN  IMPROVISATION  
 
 
NOEL  THOMSON  
 
 
A  THESIS  SUBMITTED  TO  THE  FACULTY  OF  GRADUATE  STUDIES  IN  
PARTIAL  FULFILMENT  OF  THE  REQUIREMENTS  FOR  THE  DEGREE  
OF    
MASTER  OF  ARTS    
 
 
GRADUATE  PROGRAM  IN  MUSIC  
YORK  UNIVERSITY,  
TORONTO,  ONTARIO  
 
NOVEMBER  2014  
 
 ©  NOEL  THOMSON,  2014  
 
 
 
 

 
 

ii  

 
 
 
 
Abstract  
 
 

This  thesis  illustrates  Pat  Metheny’s  formulaic  system  within  a  unique  

three-­‐tier  approach  that  divides  formulaic  information  into  a  connected  system  
of  categories,  species,  and  components.    Using  four  transcribed  improvisations  
as  source  material,  Metheny’s  formulaic  system  is  defined  with  consideration  for  
both  analytical  and  pedagogical  insight,  with  the  aim  of  demonstrating  the  
practical  application  of  formulaic  concepts.    This  formulaic  system  is  highly  
nuanced  and  comprises  a  large  portion  of  this  study.    Metheny’s  process  of  
forming  is  covered,  and  prototypical  and  contemporary  approaches  to  jazz  
improvisational  analysis  are  discussed.    Metheny’s  elements  of  style  are  
examined,  including  formulaic,  melodic,  structural  and  motivic  forms  that  
contribute  toward  overall  musical  coherence.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

iii  

Table  of  Contents  
 
 

 
 

 

Abstract  

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

       ii    

Table  of  Contents  

 

 

 

 

 

     iii  

Preface  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 viii  

 

Preamble  

 

 

 

 

 

 

     xi  

 

Object  of  Study  

 

 

 

       

 

 xiv  

Process  of  Forming    
 
 
 
 
 
 
1.1  Early  Models  for  Development      
 
 
 
 
1.2  Ear  Training  and  Performance  Opportunity  
 
1.3  Competitive  Environment  
 
 

 

       1  

 

       2  

 

       3  

 

       5  

1.4  Path  of  Commitment  

 
Chapter  1  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  2  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  3  
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

       6  

1.5  Individualistic  Dedication  

 

 

 

       7  

1.6  Summary    

 

 

 

     

       9  

Prototypes  for  Jazz  Analysis    

 

 

 

   10  

2.1  Andre  Hodier  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   11  

2.2  Gunther  Schuller    

 

 

 

 

   13  

2.3  Thomas  Owens    

 

 

 

 

   15  

2.4  Lawrence  Gusheee  

 

 

 

 

   18  

2.5  Henry  Martin  

 

 

 

 

   24  

A  Contemporary  Approach  to  Jazz  Discourse  

 

   29  

3.1  Pedagogical  vs.  Analytical  

 

 

 

   29  

3.2  Pedagogical  Continuity    

 

 

 

   33  

 

 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

iv  

 

3.3  Reductive  vs.  Processual    

 

 

 

   35  

 

3.4  Formulaic  Analysis  

 

 

 

 

   38  

 

3.5  Music  and  Meaning  

 

 

 

 

   39  

 

3.6  Music  and  Cognition  

 

 

 

 

   43  

 

3.7  Summary:  Contemporary  Outlooks  in      
             Musical  Analysis    
     
 
 

 
 

   46  
     

Jazz  Pedagogy  and  Analysis:  Elements  of  Style  

     

   50  

 
Chapter  4  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  5  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  6  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  7  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4.1  Alternative  Analytical  Readings/Analytical  Overlap      51  
4.2  Components  of  Style  

 

 

 

 

   53  

4.3  Metheny’s  Elements  of  Style  

 

 

 

   56  

A  Formulaic  System    

 

 

 

   61  

5.1  Metheny’s  Formulaic  Components  

 

 

   63  

5.2  Formulaic  Categories  

 

 

 

 

   72  

5.3  Formulaic  Species  

 

 

 

 

   74  

Enclosure  Chromaticism  Formulas    

 

 

   75  

6.1  Enclosures:  (Species  A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  F  &  G)  

     

   76  

6.2  Enclosures:  Patterns  of  Use  

 

   83  

6.3  Enclosure  Chromaticism:  Conclusions    

 

101  

Passing  Tone  Chromaticism  Formulas  

 

 

102  

7.1  Passing  Tone  Chormaticism:  Species  A    

 

103  

7.2  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Species  B    

 

104  

7.3  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Species  C    

 

107  

 

 

     

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  8  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  9  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  10  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

v  

7.4  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Species  D  

 

109  

7.5  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Patterns  of  Use    

109  

7.6  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Conclusions  

 

111  

Dominant  Cadence  Formulas  

 

 

 

112  

8.1  Dominant  Cadence:  Species  A    

 

 

113  

8.2  Dominant  Cadence:  Species  B    

 

 

116  

8.3  Dominant  Cadence:  Species  C    

 

 

118  

8.4  Dominant  Cadence:  Patterns  of  Use  

 

 

120  

8.5  Dominant  Cadence:  Conclusions  

 

 

126  

Melodic  Cliché  Formulas  

 

 

 

 

128  

9.1  Cliché:  Species  A    

 

 

 

 

128  

9.2  Cliché:  Species  B    

 

 

 

 

130  

9.3  Cliché:  Species  C    

 

 

 

 

132  

9.4  Cliché:  Species  D    

 

 

 

 

132  

9.5  Cliché:  Patterns  of  Use    

 

 

 

133  

9.6  Cliché:  Conclusions  

 

 

 

 

137  

Pentatonic  Formulas    

 

 

 

 

138  

10.1  Pentatonic:  Species  A    

 

 

 

139  

10.2  Pentatonic:  Species  B    

 

 

 

141  

10.3  Pentatonic:  Species  C    

 

 

 

142  

10.4  Pentatonic:  Patterns  of  Use  

 

 

 

143  

 
 

vi  

 
 
 
Chapter  11  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  12  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter  13  

10.5  Pentatonic:  Conclusions  

 

 

 

144  

Motivic  Formulas  

 

 

 

 

146  

11.1  Motivic:  Species  A  

 

 

 

 

147  

11.2  Motivic:  Species  B  

 

 

 

 

148  

11.3  Motivic:  Species  C  

 

 

 

 

150  

11.4  Motivic:  Conclusions    

 

 

 

150  

Reharmonization  Formulas    

 

 

 

151  

12.1  Reharmonization:  Species  A    

 

 

151  

12.2  Reharmonization:  Species  B    

 

 

153  

12.3  Reharmonization:  Species  C    

 

 

153  

12.4  Reharmonization:  Conclusions  

 

 

154  

Chapter  14  
 
References  
 
Appendix  A  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Appendix  B  
 
 
 
 
 
 

Summary  and  Conclusions    

 

 

 

161  

 

 

Analysis  of  Metheny’s  “Son  of  Thirteen”  Improvisation   155  

 

 

 

 

 

 

             

165      

Transcriptions  

 

 

 

 

 

168  

Solar    

 

 

 

 

 

 

168  

Old  Folks  

 

 

 

 

 

 

172  

Son  of  Thirteen  

 

 

 

 

 

176  

Snova    

 

 

 

 

 

185  

Formulaic  Components  

 

 

 

                      191  

Fig.  1  –  8  

 

 

 

 

 

                      191  

Fig.  9  –  16  

 

 

 

 

 

                    192  

 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 

vii  

 

Fig.  17  –  24    

 

 

 

 

                    193  

 
 

Fig.  25  –  32    
 
Fig.  33  –  34    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                           195  

Formulaic  Categories  and  Species    

 

                          196  

 
Appendix  C  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Enclosure  Chromaticism  (Species  A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  F  &  G)           196  
Passing  Tone  Chromaticism  (Species  A,  B,  C  &  D)                           199  
Dominant  Cadence  (Species  A,  B  &  C)  

 

                 

Cliché  (Species  A,  B,  C  &  D)    

 

 

                           205  

Pentatonic  (Species  A,  B,  C  &  D)  

 

 

 

207  

Motivic  (Species  A,  B  &  C)    

 

 

 

209  

Reharmonization  (Species  A,  B  &  C)  

 

 

211  

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

194  

202  

 
 

viii  

Preface  
 
One  of  the  more  influential  jazz  guitarists  of  recent  times,  Pat  Metheny  
has  garnered  more  critical  and  commercial  acclaim,  measured  in  both  album  
sales  and  Grammy  awards,  than  any  other  jazz  guitarist  of  the  period.    This  
ability  to  appeal  to  the  casual  listener  as  well  as  educated  critics  and  his  musical  
peers  makes  his  improvisational  style  a  compelling  object  of  study.    Metheny  is  
widely  regarded  for  developing  an  idiosyncratic  and  highly  personal  
improvisational  vernacular  that  is  uniquely  his  own.    Yet  despite  the  fact  that  
Metheny  is  recognized  as  a  masterful  improviser,  few  if  any  analytical  or  
pedagogical  resources  exist  that  explain  his  improvisation  style  in  any  great  
demonstrative  detail.      
Jazz  improvisation  is  at  its  best  varied  and  complex,  and  carries  an  
essential  element  of  oral  transmission  through  which  it  translates  coherence.    
Because  Metheny’s  style  is  diverse,  drawing  upon  many  influences  and  an  
intricate  system  of  stylistic  elements,  I  have  found  it  relevant  to  research  the  
details  of  his  musical  process  of  forming  as  well  as  his  philosophical  approach  to  
music  making  to  provide  further  insight.    For  many  jazz  performers,  theoretical  
knowledge  is  gained  from  internalizing  principles  learned  during  the  process  of  
listening  and  transcribing  recordings,  and  from  the  oral  transmission  of  fellow  
musicians.      

 
 

ix  

I  have  found  it  greatly  beneficial  to  investigate  and  detail  both  historical  
and  contemporary  approaches  to  jazz  discourse  through  Chapters  2-­‐3.    This  
information  provides  an  informative  survey  of  approaches  to  jazz  analysis  to  
provide  context  for  and  help  inform  the  approach  taken  to  the  discourse  of  jazz  
improvisation  in  this  study.    The  notion  of  a  performer’s  elements  of  style  and  
how  this  contributes  to  their  idiosyncratic  approach  to  improvisation  is  
discussed  through  Chapter  4,  with  reference  to  formal,  oral,  philosophical,  and  
functional  musical  aspects  and  their  contribution  in  establishing  a  performer’s  
improvisational  individuality.  
Metheny’s  highly  idiosyncratic  and  nuanced  approach  to  improvisation  
cannot  be  revealed  without  a  detailed  investigation  of  his  complex  formulaic  
system.    Due  to  its  intricacy,  Metheny’s  formulaic  approach  comprises  a  
substantial  portion  of  this  work.    The  detailing  of  this  formulaic  system  involves  
a  system  of  formulaic  components,  defined  in  Chapter  5.    These  formulaic  
components  combine  to  create  formulaic  species,  which  are  organized  into  
formulaic  categories  through  Chapters  6-­‐12.    Each  formulaic  species  is  defined  
by  its  application  in  relation  to  the  harmony  and  summarized  with  a  recounting  
of  its  quantifiable  patterns  of  use.    These  detailed  insights  are  meant  to  serve  
both  the  analyst  and  performer  alike,  for  both  pedagogical  and  analytical  
information  that  acts  to  strengthen  and  inform  the  other.  
I  have  found  through  my  research  that  improvisation  for  Metheny  is  a  
distinctively  processual  act,  with  repetition  through  variation  being  a  central  

 
 

x  

goal.    Beyond  formulaic  elements,  the  act  of  repetition  and  variation  translates  
into  a  highly  motivic  element  of  style,  which  is  essential  to  the  way  Metheny  
creates  unified  coherence.    A  strong  melodic  component  also  pervades  his  
approach,  as  well  as  a  structural  component  that  acts  to  outline  structures  of  
harmony  and  voice  leading.    Finally,  I  have  conducted  an  analysis  to  Metheny’s  
improvisation  on  “Son  of  Thirteen,”  with  an  integrated  approach  that  addresses  
multiple  forms  of  coherence.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

xi  

Preamble  
 
In  order  to  best  understand  how  Metheny’s  improvisational  style  
translates  idiosyncratic  coherence  through  the  spontaneous  use  of  formulaic,  
motivic,  melodic,  and  structural  devices,  I  have  transcribed  four  improvisations:  
“Solar,”  “Old  Folks,”  “Son  of  Thirteen,”  and  “Snova.”    These  improvisations  serve  
as  the  source  material  for  the  extraction  of  a  formulaic  system.    Beginning  my  
discourse  is  an  investigation  of  Metheny’s  development  as  an  improviser,  
involving  particular  models  for  development,  environmental  factors  and  paths  of  
commitment.    This  biographical  detailing  helps  to  illustrate  Metheny’s  approach  
in  conceptualizing  and  conveying  musical  meaning  and  is  in  many  ways  an  
informative  pedagogical  insight.      
From  here,  historically  influential  techniques  of  analysis  are  examined  
from  theorists  Gunther  Schuller,  Thomas  Owens,  Lawrence  Gushee,  and  Henry  
Martin.    The  techniques  of  these  theorists  are  distinctly  unique  and  have  helped  
to  inform  my  approach.    Henry  Martin’s  advocacy  for  the  combining  of  
pedagogical  and  analytical  discourse,  as  well  as  John  Brownell’s  critique  of  
processual  versus  reductive  analysis  are  observed,  as  models  for  the  analysis  of  
jazz  improvisation  as  a  distinctly  dynamic  process  that  is  designed  to  benefit  
both  the  listener  and  musician  alike.    Neuroscientist  Daniel  Levetin’s  discussion  
of  reference  and  meaning  in  music  through  repetition  and  variation  is  detailed,  
and  has  helped  to  inform  and  supplement  my  views  on  musical  coherence.    Steve  

 
 

xii  

Larson’s  notion  of  integrated  musical  scholarship  and  Bruno  Nettl’s  
encouragement  for  interdisciplinary  collaboration  is  touched  upon,  and  has  also  
influenced  the  inclusive  and  intentionally  progressive  nature  of  my  approach.      
There  is  an  extensive  focus  given  to  Metheny’s  formulaic  system,  as  not  
only  is  Metheny’s  formulaic  system  intricate  and  complex,  but  it  is  absolutely  
essential  in  establishing  both  the  foundation  for  and  many  of  the  idiosyncrasies  
of  his  improvisational  vernacular.    This  formulaic  system,  extracted  from  four  
transcribed  improvisations  “Solar,”  “Old  Folks,”  “Son  of  Thirteen,”  and  “Snova,”  
features  three  cumulative  units  of  structure:  formulaic  components,  formulaic  
species  and  formulaic  categories.    These  units  of  structure,  from  smallest  to  
largest  respectively,  build  upon  one  another  to  form  a  systematic  and  organized  
collection  of  formulaic  species,  belonging  to  one  of  seven  categories:  enclosure  
chromaticism  formulas,  passing  tone  chromaticism  formulas,  cadence  formulas,  
cliché  formulas,  pentatonic  formulas,  motivic  formulas,  and  Reharmonization  
formulas.    Each  formulaic  category  has  an  identifiable  function  for  the  purpose  of  
improvisation  and  a  manner  in  which  it  contributes  to  improvisational  
coherence.    This  functional  aspect  of  the  formulaic  species  helps  to  illustrate  its  
implications  within  Metheny’s  larger  continuity  of  thought.    Each  formulaic  
species  is  analyzed  with  respect  to  its  component  parts,  frequency  and  patterns  
of  use,  permutations,  and  particular  application  including  pitch  levels  and  
relation  to  the  harmony.    Each  species  is  comprised  of  formulaic  components,  of  
which  I  have  uncovered  thirty-­‐one  in  total,  possessing  an  adaptive  essential  

 
 

xiii  

structure.    These  smaller  units  of  structure  are  combined  and  permutated  in  a  
generative  way  that  forms  the  basis  of  Metheny’s  formulaic  system.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

xiv  

Object  of  Study  
 
For  the  object  of  study,  four  guitar  improvisations  have  been  transcribed  
and  notated;  two  from  the  album  Question  and  Answer  (1989):  “Solar”  and  “Old  
Folks,”  and  two  from  the  album  Day  Trip  (2005):  “Son  of  Thirteen”  and  “Snova.”    
Each  of  these  albums  presents  Metheny’s  improvisational  style  in  its  fully  
developed  form,  but  the  concept  for  each  album  is  unique.    Question  and  Answer  
features  jazz  standards  and  pieces  of  a  less  complex  harmonic  sensibility  where  
Metheny’s  improvisations  are  loose  and  free.      
When  improvising  upon  pieces  with  familiar  harmonic  progressions,  jazz  
improvisers  tend  to  take  more  liberties  as  their  ability  to  execute  voice  leading  in  
the  progression  is  already  implied.    Day  Trip  includes  Metheny’s  modern  original  
compositions,  featuring  more  complex  harmonic  progressions  upon  which  his  
improvisations  are  equally  as  creative  and  compelling  but  act  more  to  outline  the  
harmony.    An  up-­‐tempo  piece  has  been  chosen  from  each  album,  with  “Solar”  at  
250bpm,  “Son  of  Thirteen”  at  270bpm,  and  a  mid-­‐tempo  piece  has  been  chosen  
from  each  album,  with  “Old  Folks”  at  120bpm  and  “Snova”  at  134bpm.    It  will  
make  an  interesting  case  study  to  observe  change  in  Metheny’s  use  of  formulas  
over  a  16-­‐year  period,  his  adjustments  in  the  application  of  formulas  given  a  
simple  vs.  more  complex  harmonic  framework  and  considerations  with  respect  
to  the  tempo  of  improvisation.    

 
 

1  

Chapter  1  
Metheny’s  Process  of  Forming  
 
The  essential  goal  for  providing  a  biographical  sketch  of  guitarist  Pat  
Metheny  is  to  provide  a  further  window  into  his  development  as  a  jazz  
improviser,  or  what  Paul  Berliner  describes  in  his  book  Thinking  in  Jazz:  The  
Infinite  Art  of  Improvisation  (1994)  as  “the  process  of  forming.”      Berliner's  book  
collects  information  compiled  from  extensive  interviews  in  conversation  with  
prominent  jazz  musicians,  and  details  the  preparatory  measures  required  to  
develop  great  skill  as  an  improviser.    Additionally,  Berliner  chronicles  the  unique  
approaches  of  musical  conceptualization  that  jazz  musicians  attribute  to  
representation  and  meaning  within  the  mixed  oral/written  tradition  of  jazz.      
What  Berliner  reveals  is  a  lifetime  of  preparation  behind  the  development  
of  a  skilled  improviser,  and  pertinent  to  that  process  of  forming  are  early  models  
for  development,  ear  training  and  performance  opportunity,  a  competitive  
environment,  and  an  unwavering  commitment  to  music.    A  longtime  friend  and  
colleague  of  Metheny,  music  producer  Richard  Niles  conducted  a  series  of  
interviews  covering  Metheny’s  development,  influences,  creative  process  and  
philosophy,  compiled  and  published  in  his  book  The  Pat  Metheny  Interviews  
(2009).    A  comparative  assessment  of  Berliner’s  outline  for  development  in  the  
jazz  tradition  and  Metheny’s  own  experiences  are  examined.      
 

 
 

2  

1.  1  –  Early  Models  for  Development  
A  jazz  improviser’s  musical  development  begins  at  childhood,  often  
enhanced  by  a  strong  musical  presence  within  the  household;  family  members  
who  have  a  strong  appreciation  for  music  or  are  themselves  musical  contribute  
to  the  process  of  forming  at  the  early  stage  of  musical  development.    Metheny  
was  born  in  Lee’s  Summit,  Missouri  in  1954.    Metheny’s  grandfather,  father  and  
older  brother  were  all  accomplished  trumpet  players,  his  grandfather  having  
played  briefly  under  John  Philip  Sousa  and  his  older  brother  later  becoming  a  
professional  trumpet  player.    Metheny  recalls,  “Them  playing  trumpet  trios  
together  –  my  grandfather,  my  dad  and  my  brother  …  watching  my  brother  
practice  a  lot  …  that  was  very  formative  and  very  important”  (2009:8).      
Record  collections  are  also  pivotal,  as  aspiring  musicians  build  a  strong  
bond  with  particular  recordings.    For  Metheny,  The  Beatles  were  his  first  great  
musical  idols.    Their  overarching  melodic  sensibility  and  self-­‐directed  creative  
energy  provided  a  significantly  formative  model  for  inspiration.    Metheny  
recalls:  “Right  around  1963-­‐64  …  the  guitar  suddenly  appeared  in  the  panorama  
of  all  things  that  a  kid  might  be  interested  in  …  of  wanting  to  make  yourself  
distinct  from  the  world  around  you”  (Niles  2009,  8).    But  it  was  a  particular  Miles  
Davis  quintet  recording  that  sparked  Metheny’s  attraction  to  jazz:  “My  brother  
brought  home  a  record  called  Four  and  More,  Miles  Davis  Live  [1964]  …  I  would  
have  to  trace  every  early  attraction  to  wanting  to  understand  what  jazz  is  to  
something  in  that  quintet  …  it  was  fascinating  and  inviting  in  ways  that  I  had  

 
 

3  

never  experienced  before  …  and  had  an  immediate  resonance  to  me  in  terms  of  
what  I  was  feeling  in  the  culture”  (Niles  2009,  10).    The  sheer  depth  of  individual  
and  unified  artistic  expression  within  the  Davis  quintet  appealed  to  Metheny  on  
both  a  musical  and  cultural  level,  and  represented  a  musical,  social  and  cultural  
ideal  he  wanted  to  become  a  part  of.      
Finally,  Metheny’s  model  for  what  he  wished  to  accomplish  more  
specifically  as  an  improvising  guitarist  came  in  the  form  of  Wes  Montgomery:  
“There  was  one  Wes  record  in  particular  called  Smokin’  at  the  Half  Note  [1965]  …  
that  record  became  an  incredible  touchstone  for  me”  (Niles  2009,  14).    For  
Metheny,  Montgomery  embodied  a  playing  style  that  was  undeniably  personal  
and  idiosyncratic,  creating  an  aesthetic  that  made  him  instantly  identifiable  on  
record.    To  Metheny,  Montgomery  encompassed  “a  sonic  residue  that  pervades  
all  music,  not  just  jazz  …  there  are  very  few  musicians  who  represent  that  kind  of  
human  depth  in  their  sound  …  to  me  Wes  was  the  guitar  equivalent  of  Miles  
Davis  in  that  sense”  (Niles  2009,  14).    Much  like  Metheny’s  reaction  to  the  music  
of  the  Miles  Davis  Quintet,  he  notably  defines  the  strength  of  his  connection  to  
Wes  Montgomery  in  terms  of  conceptual,  qualitative  attributes.    
 
1.  2  –  Ear  Training  and  Performance  Opportunity  
Beyond  these  early  models  for  development,  ear  training  and  
performance  opportunities  become  critical  to  nurturing  the  early  connection  
established  with  music  into  a  more  developed  skill  set.    Berliner  notes  that  

 
 

4  

traditionally,  the  church  provided  many  future  jazz  musicians  with  their  first  
experience  as  performers;  some  churches  handed  out  instruments  during  the  
service  to  add  intensity  to  the  choir’s  performance,  with  youngsters  especially  
encouraged  by  the  older  generation.    Drummer  Max  Roach  explains:  “In  church,  
young  musicians  were  judged  on  the  basis  of  their  ability  to  stir  the  
congregation’s  feelings,  rather  than  on  the  basis  of  their  technical  proficiency  
alone”  (Berliner  1994,  29).    Roach’s  early  memories  of  music  are  notably  tied  to  
the  notion  of  communal  acceptance  from  the  older  generation,  and  based  on  
qualitative  musical  attributes.    Many  students  also  received  private  lessons  from  
professional  musicians,  which  included  instrumental  technique,  classical  music  
repertory,  and  in  some  cases  elementary  music  theory  and  composition.    
Metheny’s  brother  Mike  recalls,  “We  were  both  very  lucky  to  have  a  magnificent  
music  teacher  …  and  the  jazz  and  blues  scene  around  Kansas  City  when  Pat  
became  a  teenager  in  the  1960’s  was  really  vibrant  and  alive”  (Niles  2009,  7).      
Like  Roach,  Metheny  was  embraced  by  the  older  generation  of  jazz  and  
blues  players  in  Kansas  City,  and  as  a  teenager  was  constantly  in  a  position  to  
participate  in  jam  sessions  and  perform  concerts  with  musicians  much  more  
proficient  and  experienced  than  himself.    Metheny  recalls,  “I  was  starting  to  
work  gigs  when  I  was  fourteen  around  Kansas  City,  first  with  more  what  I  would  
call  amateur-­‐type  musicians  …  but  quickly  after  that,  by  the  time  I  was  fifteen,  
with  some  of  the  best  players  in  town”  (Niles  2009,  22).    
 

 
 

5  

1.  3  –  Competitive  Environment  
Great  skill  is  often  the  product  of  a  competitive  environment,  and  school  
systems  traditionally  offered  an  element  of  “healthy  competition,”  as  most  of  the  
strong  musicians  would  attend  a  central  high  school  with  an  influential  band  
director;  often  these  band  directors  would  be  responsible  for  the  development  of  
a  line  of  prominent  jazz  musicians.    For  example:  David  Baker,  the  Montgomery  
brothers,  and  the  Hampton  family,  were  all  a  product  of  the  same  band  director  
in  Indianapolis.    For  Metheny,  the  first  element  of  competition  instead  came  from  
within  the  family:  “The  key  to  everything  would  be  my  older  brother  Mike,  who  
was  an  amazing  musician  at  a  very  young  age  …  and  really  most  of  the  attention  
was  rightly  focused  on  his  musical  ability”  (Niles  2009,  3).    Later,  in  the  early  
stages  of  Metheny’s  professional  career,  he  became  a  member  of  Gary  Burton’s  
band.    A  professor  at  the  Berklee  College  of  Music  in  Boston,  Burton  has  a  long  
history  of  helping  cultivate  the  development  of  young  guitar  talents;  among  them  
Mick  Goodrick,  John  Scofield,  and  more  recently  Kurt  Rosenwinkel.    
Summarizing  his  three  years  in  Burton’s  group,  Metheny  recalls:    
I  could  never  overemphasize  enough  the  unbelievable  benefits  that  have  
come  to  me  as  a  musician  and  a  student  of  music  through  the  hours  that  I  
was  able  to  be  around  Gary  as  a  player,  and  also  things  that  he  would  
offer  off  the  bandstand  in  terms  of  the  way  you  analyze  music,  the  way  
you  look  at  chords,  the  way  you  fit  into  situations  dynamically,  texturally,  
in  terms  of  how  much  activity  is  required  in  order  to  achieve  this  or  that  
effect.    And  then  for  him  to  be  able  to  go  up  on  the  bandstand  and  
demonstrate  in  the  most  artful  way…the  impact  that  had  on  me  as  a  
developing  player  was  absolutely  enormous  (Niles  2009,  30).  

 
 

6  

Metheny’s  experience  in  Burton’s  band  is  indicative  of  typical  ear  
training,  theory,  and  performance  pedagogy  in  the  jazz  tradition,  with  concepts  
more  often  learned  through  the  process  of  oral  transmission  and  musical  
demonstration  than  from  a  written  resource.    As  comprehensive  publications  
concerning  jazz  theory  and  pedagogy  traditionally  did  not  exist,  older  and  more  
experienced  musicians  were  absolutely  central  to  the  process  of  a  jazz  
musician’s  development.    
 
1.  4  –  Path  of  Commitment  
Berliner  notes  that  a  jazz  musician’s  level  of  commitment  is  often  
informed  by  a  sense  of  communal  acceptance  and  rebellion;  acceptance  within  
the  musical  community,  and  a  rebellion  against  the  social  norms  of  middle-­‐class  
values.    Embraced  within  the  musical  community  of  Kansas  City,  Metheny  also  
recalls  the  sense  of  rebellion  as  a  source  of  motivation:  "As  much  as  rock  and  roll  
might  have  offered  me  a  window  into  rebellion  against  my  parents,  etc  …  it  
offered  me  a  far  wider  window  to  become  interested  in  jazz.    Because  not  only  
could  I  rebel  against  all  those  people,  but  I  could  rebel  against  all  my  friends  and  
everyone  else  I  knew  in  my  little  town  in  Missouri  as  well"  (Niles  2009,  10).    
Both  social  and  musical  factors  influence  interests,  tastes  and  the  
comprehension  of  learners,  influencing  their  interpretations  of  jazz  and  shaping  
their  musical  character.    Naturally,  the  role  of  cultural  milieu  in  the  development  
of  jazz  improvisers  is  critical  to  this  process.    Berliner  notes:  

 
 

 

7  

The  development  of  improvisers  would  not  be  complete  without  
considering  their  exposure  to  the  diverse  fabric  of  America’s  music  
culture  and  the  particular  demography  of  villages,  towns,  and  cities  
where  improvisers  grew  up…population  and  immediate  musical  
environment  may  be  distinctive  and  relatively  uniform,  but  are  as  often  
pluralistic,  representing  different  kinds  of  ethnic  mixtures  (Berliner  1994,  
35).    

For  Metheny,  the  global  trends  of  popular  culture,  the  shifting  social  and  political  
climate  of  the  United  States,  the  developments  of  expression  that  came  with  the  
power  of  the  civil  rights  movement,  the  immediate  folk  sensibilities  of  small-­‐
town  Lee’s  Summit,  and  the  more  sophisticated  urban  sensibilities  of  Kansas  
City,  were  all  elements  that  shaped  his  formative  years  in  the  1960’s,  and  have  
remained  strong  pillars  of  Metheny’s  style  throughout  his  career.    A  colleague  
and  longtime  admirer  of  Metheny’s  music,  bassist  John  Patitucci  describes  
Metheny’s  style,  referencing  the  mixture  of  these  cultural  elements  as  
idiosyncratic:    

 

If  I  had  to  use  a  word  to  describe  Pat's  music  it  might  be  “heartland”  
because  that's  where  he's  from.    It  reminds  me  of  Copland,  Americana  in  
the  idealistic  sense  combined  with  Pat's  incredible  sophistication.    It's  got  
all  the  natural  beauty  and  earthiness  of  the  Midwest  combined  with  a  
profound  understanding  of  the  jazz  canon  and  vocabulary  (Niles  2009,  
81).  

1.  5  –  Individualistic  Dedication    
Above  all  else,  perhaps  the  most  unifying  characteristic  of  great  jazz  
improvisers  is  their  unwavering  devotion  to  music:  listening,  collecting,  
practicing  and  performing  music  constantly  in  a  quest  for  further  self-­‐

 
 

8  

development.    This  sense  of  personal  responsibility  is  a  defining  characteristic  of  
the  jazz  community,  and  a  necessary  initiative  for  artistic  growth.    For  Berliner,  
“The  jazz  community's  educational  system  sets  the  students  on  paths  of  
development  directly  related  to  their  goal:  the  creation  of  a  unique  
improvisational  voice  within  the  jazz  tradition”  (Berliner  1994,  59).    The  often  
orally  transmitted  and  informal  course  of  learning  makes  a  high  level  of  
commitment  increasingly  important  however,  as  many  of  the  solutions  
accompanying  the  developing  jazz  musician’s  inquiries  are  often  elusive  or  
unpublished.    Metheny  speaks  about  his  relentless  commitment  to  learning,  and  
the  level  of  preparation  he  required  in  order  to  facilitate  improvising  at  a  high  
level:  
It  never  came  easy  for  me  …  I  went  through  a  stage  early  on,  which  was  
actually  of  great  concern  to  my  parents.    I  used  to  practice  eight,  nine,  ten,  
up  to  twelve  hours  a  day.    I  was  really  determined  to  find  out  as  much  as  I  
could  about  music.    This  was  during  the  time  when  I  was  supposed  to  be  
learning  how  to  read  and  write!  This  caused  me  to  be  nearly  illiterate  
until  much  later  in  life  when  I  started  to  learn  other  things  (Niles  2009,  
145).  
 
Through  Metheny’s  intensive  process  of  forming,  he  succeeded  in  
developing  an  innovative  approach  to  jazz  guitar  and  a  distinctive  sonic  
aesthetic.    In  doing  so,  Metheny  has  become  one  of  the  most  influential  and  
popular  jazz  guitarists  of  the  late  20th  Century,  garnering  more  commercial  and  
critical  acclaim  (in  both  album  sales,  Grammy  Awards,  various  “best  jazz  
guitarist”  polls,  etc.)  than  any  other  guitarist  of  the  era.    Since  his  debut  album  as  

 
 

9  

a  leader  in  1975  with  Bright  Size  Life,  Metheny  has  developed  an  expansive  
improvisational  style  that  has  included  not  only  traditional  bebop  and  blues  
influences,  but  also  elements  of  folk,  latin,  free-­‐jazz,  rock  and  popular  music.    
Much  like  the  musical  idols  he  held  throughout  his  early  development,  Metheny  
has  succeeded  in  blurring  the  line  between  various  stylistic  boundaries,  
distinctively  blending  and  incorporating  the  sensibilities  of  disperse  genres  with  
the  complexities  of  modern  jazz.    This  eclectic  and  versatile  use  of  musical  
vocabulary  is  perhaps  one  of  the  strengths  of  his  popularity.    Metheny’s  ability  to  
speak  to  a  broad  spectrum  of  musical  consumers  has  been  realized  through  
album  sales  totaling  roughly  20  million.      
 
1.  6  –  Summary  
In  outlining  a  biographical  sketch  of  Pat  Metheny’s  early  models  for  
development,  performance  opportunities,  and  the  path  of  his  commitment,  his  
process  of  forming  should  serve  to  provide  notable  insight  toward  the  approach  
Metheny  takes  in  conceptualizing  and  conveying  musical  meaning.    Music  for  
Metheny  is  defined  in  largely  qualitative,  conceptual  terms,  over  a  cerebral  
approach.    The  communicative  notion  of  reference  and  meaning  through  music,  
and  the  distinction  between  qualitative  versus  cerebral  conceptualization  of  
music  is  investigated  further  in  the  later  chapters  of  this  study  (see  Chapter  3.4).  
 
 
 

 
 

10  

Chapter  2  
Prototypes  for  Jazz  Analysis  
 
 

As  the  academic  study  of  jazz  improvisation  has  progressed  over  the  past  

five-­‐and-­‐a-­‐half  decades,  certain  articles,  books  and  studies  have  become  relevant  
for  their  analytical  approach  toward  the  perception  of  forces  that  create  
coherence  within  a  jazz  improvisation  and  in  many  cases  the  aesthetic  values  by  
which  jazz  improvisation  is  judged.    As  this  study  concentrates  on  musical  
meaning  within  the  improvisational  style  of  guitarist  Pat  Metheny,  it  is  
worthwhile  to  provide  an  investigation  of  the  research  methods  of  four  key  
analysts  concerned  with  this  field  of  research,  namely:  Gunther  Schuller,  Thomas  
Owens,  Lawrence  Gushee  and  Henry  Martin.    Each  of  these  analysts  have  
examined  the  structural  elements  that  they  perceive  as  creating  the  greatest  
level  of  coherence  within  a  given  performer’s  improvisational  style,  and  in  each  
case  has  developed  a  characteristic  theoretical  focus  and  set  of  aesthetic  values  
for  which  to  judge  coherence  in  jazz  improvisation,  summarized  below.    The  
methodology  of  these  analysts  provides  both  historical  context  and  distinctive  
templates  for  analytical  discourse  concerned  with  the  study  of  jazz  
improvisation.    Each  has  influenced  the  analytical  approach  applied  to  this  study  
of  the  improvisational  methodology  and  style  of  Pat  Metheny.  
 
 

 
 

11  

2.1  –  Andre  Hodier    
An  early  publication  of  note  in  the  discourse  surrounding  jazz  
improvisation,  Andre  Hodier’s  Jazz:  It’s  Evolution  and  Essence  discusses  the  
notion  of  continuity  of  thought  in  the  forming  process  of  the  improviser.    Hodier  
relates  that  the  concept  of  “telling  a  good  story”  among  improvisers  recognizes  
the  value  of  sound  development,  with  continuity  of  thought  being  vital  to  its  
success.    To  illustrate  this  discussion  of  continuity,  Hodier  carries  out  an  analysis  
of  a  Fat’s  Waller  solo  on  “Keepin’  Out”,  and  later  compares  this  analysis  in  
relation  to  the  forming  process  of  the  solos  of  Art  Tatum.      
Hodier  observes  Waller’s  “Keepin’  Out”  improvisation  to  involve  elements  
of  thematic  exposition  and  continuity,  melodic  paraphrasing,  and  free  variation.    
Through  examining  these  musical  attributes,  Hodier  aims  to  shed  light  on  the  
extent  to  which  Waller’s  improvisation  is  “worked  out”,  or  in  other  words,  pre-­‐
rehearsed.    Though  acknowledging  the  futility  of  making  an  objective  judgment  
on  an  improviser’s  internal  thought  process,  Hodier  states  that  an  estimated  
assumption  can  be  made  based  on  certain  musical  indications.    Hodier  arrives  at  
the  conclusion  that  “Keepin’  Out”  is  not  an  organized  composition,  nor  the  
product  of  creative  meditation,  but  the  result  of  a  crystallization  of  thought  in  
the  course  of  successive  improvisations,  and  therefore  partly  worked  out.    In  
other  words,  Hodier  believes  Waller’s  improvisation  to  be  a  rehearsed  version  of  
that  which  the  performer  has  developed  having  rehearsed  or  performed  the  
piece  often,  revising  details  of  the  performance  freely  according  to  his  

 
 

12  

spontaneous  preference.    To  contrast  Fats  Waller’s  approach,  Hodier  calls  to  
mention  the  solos  of  Art  Tatum.  Tatum’s  solos,  known  to  be  largely  pre-­‐
composed  compositions,  are  defined  by  Hodier  as  purely  worked  out.    Though  
Tatum  holds  a  great  gift  for  composition  Hodier  explains,  he  does  not  hold  the  
gift  of  spontaneous  continuity  of  thought.      
A  purely  pre-­‐planned  solo  reduces  the  weaknesses  in  continuity  that  a  
purely  spontaneous  free  variation  improvisation  may  hold.    However,  a  pre-­‐
planned  improvisation  also  has  disadvantages  in  that  it  leads  to  a  routine  
manner  of  performance  that  favors  security  over  the  satisfaction  of  spontaneous  
creation.    In  this  scenario,  the  performer  loses  the  essential  creative  passion  of  
spontaneous  jazz  performance,  while  listener  the  lacks  the  attraction  of  hearing  
something  fresh  and  new.    Hodier  acknowledges  that  one  form  of  expression  
does  not  exclude  the  other,  and  that  sound  development  in  the  continuity  of  
thought  trumps  to  what  degree  the  improvisation  uses  a  pre-­‐planned  forming  
process.    Consequently,  a  soloist  must  find  a  balance  within  the  spectrum  of  
spontaneous  creation  versus  a  pre-­‐planned  approach,  or  the  crystallization  of  
thought  achieved  through  the  successive  practice  of  improvisation  over  a  piece’s  
framework,  to  arrive  at  a  product  that  is  passionately  performed,  holds  sound  
development,  and  is  engaging  for  the  listener.        
 
 
 

 
 

13  

2.  2  –  Gunther  Schuller  
A  primary  article  on  the  analysis  of  jazz  improvisation  to  achieve  
attention  in  the  field  of  jazz  scholarship,  Gunther  Schuller’s  essay  “Sonny  Rollins  
and  the  Challenge  of  Thematic  Improvisation”  was  published  in  The  Jazz  Review  
in  1958  and  investigates  Rollins’  progressive  improvisational  method  through  an  
analysis  of  his  extended  solo  on  the  piece  “Blue  7.”    Schuller  first  recounts  jazz’s  
development  from  a  style  favoring  collective  improvisation  to  a  style  that  
propelled  the  featured  soloist  to  the  forefront  of  the  ensemble.    Noting  that  over  
time  major  historical  developments  in  improvisational  methodology  had  largely  
been  dictated  by  the  central  figures  of  the  musical  era  in  which  they  existed,  
Schuller  puts  forth  a  list  of  figures  that  includes  Louis  Armstrong,  Lester  Young,  
Charlie  Parker,  Miles  Davis,  and  lastly  Sonny  Rollins.    Schuller  argues  that  prior  
to  Rollins’  advancements,  developments  in  melodic  conception  and  originality  
had  existed  principally  through  either  a  “paraphrase”  or  “chorus”  style;  
paraphrase  referring  to  an  embellishment  or  ornamentation  of  the  melody,  and  
chorus  referring  to  an  improvisation  based  freely  on  the  chord  structure.      
It  is  noteworthy  that  Schuller  likens  this  dichotomy  to  the  distinction  of  
composers  and  performers  within  the  16th  to  18th  century  Western  art  music  
tradition,  customarily  differentiating  between  the  use  of  “elaboratio”  
(ornamentation)  and  “inventio”  (free  vibration).    Schuller  notes  that  beyond  the  
paraphrase  or  chorus  style,  Rollins  succeeded  in  introducing  a  more  progressive  
approach  to  the  jazz  solo,  deemed  “thematic  improvisation”;  one  possessing  an  

 
 

14  

overall  sense  of  structural  unity  throughout.    Prior  to  this  stylistic  advancement,  
Schuller  argues  that  the  jazz  solo  had  largely  suffered  from  a  general  lack  of  
cohesiveness  and  direction,  and  that  exceptional  solos  of  earlier  periods  had  
held  together  as  balanced  compositions  more  by  virtue  of  the  performer’s  
intuitive  talents  than  for  the  conscious  consideration  of  thematic  or  structural  
attributes,  counting  Louis  Armstrong’s  “Muggles,”  Coleman  Hawkin’s  “Body  and  
Soul,”  and  Charlie  Parker’s  “Koko“  as  exemplary  in  this  regard,  for  example.      
On  the  other  hand,  Schuller  denotes  the  average  improvisation  as  a  
“stringing  together  of  unrelated  ideas”  without  relation  to  the  melodic  content  of  
the  piece  or  a  preceding  improvisational  idea,  and  to  likely  include  quotations  of  
“irrelevant”  melodic  material.    To  Schuller,  Rollins’  new  thematic  style  signaled  a  
historical  advancement  in  the  method  of  jazz  improvisation  with  the  
sophistication  of  its  approach.    It  represented  the  maturation  of  jazz  
improvisation  beyond  not  only  expressions  of  melodic  embellishment  and  a  
series  of  seemingly  unrelated  ideas,  but  to  also  include  the  “intellectual  
properties  of  thematic  and  structural  unity.”    Tellingly,  Schuller  notes  that  just  as  
the  history  of  Western  classical  music  had  developed  from  largely  non-­‐thematic  
beginnings  in  the  early  middle  ages  to  the  great  thematic  masterpieces  of  the  
classical  era,  so  too  does  jazz  give  every  indication  of  following  a  parallel  course,  
with  thematic  relationships  becoming  increasingly  more  integral.      
Schuller  believes  that  by  building  on  the  paraphrase  and  chorus  style  
traditions  already  in  place  by  improvisers  such  as  Lester  Young  and  Charlie  

 
 

15  

Parker,  Rollins  effectively  expanded  and  renewed  stylistic  traditions.    The  
application  of  developing  and  varying  a  main  theme  beyond  just  a  secondary  
motive  or  unrelated  phrase  (in  other  words,  a  theme  that  stems  from  the  piece’s  
melody  or  principal  improvised  chorus)  establishes  to  Schuller  the  significance  
of  structure  and  logic  in  jazz  improvisation.    Based  on  these  insights,  Schuller’s  
analytical  methodology  can  be  seen  as  primarily  “motivic,”  in  that  it  is  concerned  
with  how  a  performer’s  application  of  motives  creates  coherence  throughout  an  
improvisation;  a  view  largely  tied  to  the  aesthetic  values  of  traditional  Western  
art  music  traditions.    
 
2.  3  –  Thomas  Owens  
An  impressive  and  comprehensive  study,  Thomas  Owens’  1974  UCLA  
dissertation  “Charlie  Parker:  Techniques  of  Improvisation”  is  one  that  stands  as  
a  landmark  in  the  field  of  jazz  scholarship  for  the  breadth  of  its  research  and  the  
depth  of  its  insight.    Within  the  study,  Owens  establishes  Parker’s  
improvisational  concept  as  formulaic,  separating  Parker’s  performances  into  
meticulously  labeled  motives  and  their  variants,  cataloguing  them  by  their  
frequency  of  use,  harmonic  implications,  melodic  length  and  structure,  and  their  
most  common  keys.    (Owens  1974,  17)  Owens  selects  approximately  250  
performances  for  transcription  and  study,  organizing  his  analysis  by  key,  
harmonic  structure  and  tempo,  focusing  largely  on  Parker’s  most-­‐performed  and  
recorded  repertoire.    Out  of  Parker’s  known  recordings,  his  most  prominently  

 
 

16  

performed  songs  were  based  on  the  harmonic  structure  of  the  blues  (175  
recordings)  and  “rhythm  changes”  (147  recordings),  and  various  pieces  under  
the  genre  of  “popular  song”  (with  approximately  10-­‐25  recordings  each)  which  
include  “What  is  This  Thing  Called  Love,”  “How  High  the  Moon,”  “Easy  to  Love,”  
“Out  of  Nowhere,”  “Scrapple  from  the  Apple,”  “All  the  Things  You  Are,”  
“Cherokee,”  “Night  in  Tunisia,”  and  “Groovin’  High”  (Owens  1974,  9).      
The  sheer  quantity  and  variety  of  material  that  Owens  draws  upon  in  his  
study  allows  him  the  ability  to  observe  Parker’s  style  in  a  variety  of  playing  
circumstances,  from  the  tense  atmosphere  of  the  recording  studio  to  bootlegged  
recordings  of  informal  jam  sessions  (Owens  1974,  10).    Based  on  Parker’s  use  of  
motives,  Owens  makes  the  categorical  distinction  of  separating  Parker’s  
recorded  work  into  an  “early”  and  “mature”  period,  with  Parker  said  to  be  fully  
developed  in  his  improvisational  style  by  age  24.    In  reference  to  Parker’s  
mature  period,  Owens  writes:  
From  September  1944  through  December  1954  the  recordings  show  no  
significant  changes  in  technique  or  conception,  and  only  a  few  subtle  
shifts  in  motive  preferences  can  be  documented  during  the  ten-­‐year  
period  (Owens  1974,  5).    
 
With  97  motives  in  total  as  variants  of  64  motive  groups,  the  length  of  Parker’s  
motives  varies  between  both  shorter  and  more  complete  phrases.    Short  phrases  
are  commonly  adaptable  to  a  variety  of  harmonic  contexts  and  are  the  most  
frequently  used  motives,  occurring  in  virtually  every  key  and  piece.    Longer  
phrases  outline  well-­‐defined  harmonic  implications,  and  are  correspondingly  

 
 

17  

less  frequent.    Additionally,  most  of  Parker’s  motives  occur  within  a  variety  of  
keys,  but  some  are  confined  to  just  one  or  two  pitch  levels  (Owens  1974,  17).    
Owens  defends  Parker’s  formulaic  improvisational  methodology  against  
criticism  –  stating  that  far  from  monotonous,  unduly  repetitious  or  
uninteresting,  it  is  found  to  be  intrinsically  spontaneous,  full  of  variety  and  
exciting  (Owens  1974,  35).    Here  Owens  further  justifies  Parker’s  reliance  on  
motives:  

 

Every  mature  jazz  musician  develops  a  repertory  of  motives  and  phrases  
which  he  uses  in  the  course  of  his  improvisations.    His  “spontaneous”  
performances  are  actually  pre-­‐composed  to  some  extent.    Yet  the  master  
player  will  seldom,  if  ever,  repeat  a  solo  verbatim.    (p.  17)  Each  new  
chorus  provided  [Parker]  an  opportunity,  which  he  invariable  took,  to  
arrange  his  stock  of  motives  in  a  different  order,  or  to  modify  a  motive  by  
augmenting  or  diminishing  it,  by  displacing  it  metrically,  or  by  adding  or  
subtracting  notes…no  one  could  create  totally  new  phrases  [at  200  beats  
per  minute].    Many  of  the  components  of  those  phrases  must  be  at  the  
fingertips  of  the  player  before  he  begins  if  he  is  to  play  coherent  music  
(Owens  1974,  35).  

Here  Owens  asserts  the  essential  value  of  a  formulaic  system,  highlighting  the  
demanding  mental  processes  required  for  the  conception  of  coherent  ideas  at  
high  tempos  of  improvisation,  and  places  aesthetic  value  on  the  inherent  
creativity  and  slight  variances  within  Parker’s  systematic  approach.      
With  insight  into  Parker’s  “early”  improvisational  period,  Owens  calls  to  
our  attention  two  solos  on  “The  Jumpin’  Blues”  that  were  recorded  five  months  
apart  and  are  largely  the  same;  providing  evidence  that  Parker  may  have  pre-­‐
composed  particular  solos  that  were  important  components  of  his  repertoire  at  

 
 

18  

the  time,  or  specifically  for  recording  session,  in  contrast  to  the  constant  
inventiveness  of  Parker’s  mature  period  (Owens  1974,  42).    Using  reductive  
Schenkerian  analysis,  Owens’  study  finds  little  to  no  connection  between  the  
improvisational  content  and  the  melodic  content  of  each  piece’s  theme,  nor  a  
prolonged  sense  of  “thematic  or  structural  unity”  throughout.    Owens  does  
however  find  “melodic  carryovers”  between  different  choruses  of  
improvisations,  illustrating  that  coherence  and  continuity  is  achieved  by  the  
arrival  at  similar  chord  tones  through  nested  scalar  descents,  relying  again  on  
Schenkerian  analysis  for  these  conclusions.    Though  Owens  does  not  find  motivic  
elements  as  contributing  towards  structural  unity  within  Parker’s  
improvisations,  he  does  find  that  structural  unity  exists  through  the  arrival  at  
background-­‐level  chord  tones,  and  places  aesthetic  value  on  the  creative  ways  
that  Parker  uses  his  formulaic  system  and  nested  scalar  descents  to  arrive  at  
them.      
 
2.  4  –  Lawrence  Gushee  
 

Lawrence  Gushee’s  1977  article  “Lester  Young’s  Shoe  Shine  Boy”  uniquely  

focuses  on  the  concept  of  jazz  improvisation  as  “oral  composition.”    A  leader  in  
the  fields  of  both  medieval  music  and  jazz  theory,  Gushee  is  influenced  by  the  
concepts  of  oral  transmission  first  introduced  by  Albert  Lord  in  his  study  of  
Yugoslav  epic  singer-­‐poets.    Gushee  values  the  transmission  of  musical  ideas  in  
jazz,  where  one  has  recordings  to  show  how  ideas  develop  from  one  take  to  the  

 
 

19  

next,  and  believes  that  studies  of  jazz  should  contextualize  each  recording  to  the  
whole  of  an  artist’s  body  of  music.    He  also  states  that  if  relevant,  transcriptions  
of  the  accompanying  musicians  and  not  just  the  solos  may  be  illustrated  to  show  
how  a  musician’s  interaction  with  others  contributes  to  the  improvisational  
process.    Gushee  believes  that  as  a  great  deal  of  the  musical  expression  in  the  
jazz  idiom  is  “oral,”  in  that  it  is  carried  on  without  the  aid  of  musical  notation,  the  
study  of  the  transmission  of  musical  ideas  in  jazz  is  worthwhile  (Gushee  1977,  
225).      
Though  owing  some  of  his  central  concepts  to  Albert  Lord,  Gushee  rejects  
the  specific  definitions  of  transmission  and  socially  defined  value  on  which  Lord  
relies,  believing  that  a  rigid  taxonomy  between  written  and  oral  transmission  
proves  misleading  in  an  analysis  of  the  creative  process  as  applied  to  jazz.    
Gushee  instead  recommends  versatility  in  his  analytical  style,  in  recognition  of  
the  fact  that  different  performers  operate  cognitive  processes  with  fluctuating  
levels  of  methodology,  emphasis  and  control  (Gushee  1977,  226).    Furthermore,  
Gushee  makes  the  case  that:  
There  is  no  commonly  accepted  method  of  jazz  analysis.    The  most  
thorough  and  consistent  applications  of  analysis  to  date  are  those  of  
Thomas  Owens  and  Gunther  Schuller  …  these  represent  in  my  opinion,  
two  distinct  approaches  which  I  designate  ‘formulaic’  and  ‘motivic’  
respectively  (Gushee  1977,  228).  
 
Gushee  summarizes  Schuller  and  Owens’  analytical  approaches  (Gushee  1977,  
237):  

 
 

20  

Motivic  (Schuller):  Demonstration  of  organic  relations,  development,  
climactic  (tension-­‐release)  structure,  and  logically  connected  ideas.      
Value  system:  A  criteria  of  logic,  the  aesthetic  merit  of  the  work.    
Formulaic  (Owens):  Labeling  of  phrases  according  to  the  performer’s  
individual  lexicon,  description  of  melodic/harmonic  function,  relaxed  
logical  requirements.    
Value  system:  The  generation  of  a  substantial  vocabulary,  choice  of  
compatible  formulas,  inherent  creativity  within  the  vernacular.    
Gushee  also  identifies  two  additional  analytical  approaches:  
Schematic:  The  production  of  continued  expression  by  transformation  of  
a  fundamental  structure,  including  a  phrase,  harmonic  structure  or  
general  outline  as  well  as  other  patterns.    
Value  system:  Structural  aptitude,  skill  in  the  process  of  forming.    
Semiotic:  Meaning  as  given  by  the  system  of  signs  –  as  defined  by  the  
culture  and  popular  literature  of  jazz.      
Value  system:  Undefined.  
Gushee  advocates  the  eclectic  mixture  of  these  analytical  approaches,  as  well  as  
recognizing  other  unquantifiable  musical  attributes,  noting  that:  “often  such  
decisions  as  to  incoherence  do  not  take  into  account  such  features  as  timbral  
continuity  or  a  characteristic  [rhythmic  sensibility]”;  attributes  that  can  be  
applied  both  to  the  sensibilities  of  the  overall  ensemble  or  to  the  individual  
soloist.    With  regard  to  motivic  structural  attributes,  Gushee  sees  immediate  

 
 

21  

repetition  as  relatively  weak,  and  repetitions  coming  after  significantly  
contrasting  material  at  the  same  duration  level  as  strong  (Gushee  1977,  239).    
More  than  any  other  analytical  system  however,  Gushee  chiefly  uses  the  
“schematic”  method  to  compartmentalize  his  analysis  of  Lester  Young’s  solo,  
doing  so  with  the  components  of  technique,  expressivity  and  logic.    In  simple  
terms,  Gushee  states  his  analytical  intent:  
The  [soloist’s]  goal  is  to  demonstrate  “chops,  “soul”  and  “ideas”  …  while  
these  need  not  be  used  [in  every  case  to]  separately  to  mark  off  one  part  
of  a  solo  from  another,  or  used  in  the  service  of  a  rhetoric  corresponding  
to  the  social  and  formal  articulations  of  a  solo,  I  believe  that  they  are  in  
the  performances  of  “Shoe  Shine  Boy”  by  Lester  Young.      
 
Within  the  overarching  schematic  focus,  Gushee  finds  evidence  of  the  use  of  
formulas,  but  makes  the  distinction  between  the  use  of  a  formula  (a  more  or  less  
literal  motive  or  phrase  repetition),  versus  the  use  of  a  “formulaic  system”  (a  
more  generalized  structure  outline  embracing  many  formulas)  –  stating  that  in  
the  case  of  a  mature  improviser,  transformation  and  varied  repetition  is  
assumed  to  be  a  fundamental  forming  process  (Gushee  1977,  239).    Additionally,  
Gushee  gives  the  distinction  of  “superformula”  to  that  which  is  frequently  
recurring  and  recognizable,  but  ultimately  variable.      
Throughout  the  study,  Gushee  makes  clear  his  aim  to  address  not  only  the  
“what”  and  “how”  of  formulas  in  his  analysis  (ie.    melodic  structure  and  
harmonic  function)  but  also  the  “why”  –  how  the  formulas  function  within  the  
forming  process.    For  example,  some  formulas  may  exist  as  a  means  to  allow  the  

 
 

22  

improviser  time  to  consider  what  to  play  next.    Relating  back  to  Lord’s  
discussion  of  the  epic  poet-­‐singer,  Gushee  states  in  much  the  same  way  the  jazz  
improviser  is  comparatively  “always  thinking  ahead  and  has  perhaps  already  
forgotten  what  he’s  playing  while  doing  it,”  an  argument  that  holds  particular  
weight  especially  at  high  tempos  and  when  dealing  with  complex  harmonic  
information  (Gushee  1977,  248).    Additionally,  Gushee  notes  that  factors  such  as  
a  decision  to  be  less  chance-­‐taking  and  more  technically  conservative  over  the  
desire  to  play  something  more  adventurous  and  challenging,  or  the  choice  to  
construct  a  more  comprehensible  sequence  of  ideas  for  the  listener  over  
something  more  abstract  may  be  at  play  in  the  composition  of  an  improvisation.      
In  response  to  the  analytical  use  of  the  term  “motives,”  Gushee  believes  it  
to  imply  a  shift  in  analytical  focus  from  that  of  the  oral  to  the  composed,  and  
unprofitable  as  it  refers  to  the  performance  as  not  one  possible  arrangement  
among  many  but  to  the  performance  as  a  fixed  creation  –  from  the  variations  of  a  
basic  form  to  the  repetitions  or  transformations  of  a  motive  that  make  form  
(Gushee  1977,  248).    Though  Gushee  does  acknowledge  that  intentional  pre-­‐
composed  elements  do  exist  in  the  oral  poetic  of  jazz,  he  prefers  to  see  Young’s  
structural  approach  as  more  flexible.    Consequently,  Gushee  sees  Lester  Young  as  
making  use  of  a  schematic  “rhetorical  plan”  in  his  approach  to  improvisation,  
divided  into  three  parts  including:  
1. An  intelligible  musical  idea  –  to  attract  focus  from  the  band  to  the  
soloist.    

 
 

23  

2. Demonstration  of  instrumental  talent  –  including  technical  facility,  
expressivity/musicality,  originality  of  ideas,  and  to  some  degree  logic.    
3. A  recognizable  or  clichéd  lick  –  to  essentially  “wrap  up”  the  
performance.      
Gushee  states,  “there  is  no  reason  why  [the  rhetorical  plan]  should  be  
complicated;  after  all,  it  only  determines  the  course  of  musical  events  in  a  
general  way,  and  over  relatively  long  durations.    Perhaps  it  is  in  this  respect  not  
unlike  the  general  thematic  plan  of  the  epic  poet-­‐singer,  or  the  sequence  of  
movements  in  a  [classical]  concerto”  (Gushee  1977,  251).    Though  there  is  an  
overarching  focus  on  a  schematic  rhetorical  plan,  Gushee  believes  that  deeper  
internal  structural  elements  work  to  create  further  coherence  in  the  
improvisation,  resulting  in  a  greater  degree  of  “memorability”  in  the  
performance,  contributing  to  the  ability  of  the  work  to  be  notable  and  
aesthetically  valued.      
An  additional  criticism  Gushee  holds  towards  common  methodology  in  
jazz  analysis  includes  the  excessive  description  of  formulas  in  an  overtly  vertical  
“melody-­‐over-­‐harmony”  approach  that  neglects  the  more  advanced  dimension  of  
how  the  phrases  work  together  to  create  a  schematic  system.    Gushee  states:  
Jazz  performance  is  sometimes  explained  as  based  on  harmonic  
progression.    This  is  often  meant  in  some  fairly  strict  sense,  that  is,  jazz  
uses  the  pitches  of  the  “vertical”  harmonies  as  the  primary  constituents  of  
“horizontal”  phrases.    An  extreme  example  would  be  a  solo  consisting  
only  of  the  arpeggiation  of  the  changes.    Approaches  to  such  an  extreme  
do  exist  but  are  not  generally  admired,  unless  in  some  instances  as  tours  
de  force  (Gushee  1077,  247).  

 
 

24  

 
Gushee  also  makes  note  of  incautious  assumptions  among  analysts  of  what  the  
chord  changes  actually  are,  relying  on  a  lead  sheet  or  fake  book  rather  than  from  
the  rhythm  section  as  actually  recorded.    Constantly  referring  to  jazz  
improvisation  as  “oral  composition,”  Gushee  makes  clear  his  belief  that  as  jazz  
improvisation  is  a  distinctly  oral-­‐written  tradition,  the  nature  of  its  composition  
quite  often  proceeds  along  several  structural  tracks  at  once,  requiring  multiple  
angles  of  analysis  to  uncover  what  contributes  to  the  profundity  or  coherence  of  
an  improvisation  (Gushee  1977,  253).    
 
2.  5  –  Henry  Martin  
 

Henry  Martin’s  analysis  of  Charlie  Parker’s  improvisational  style  in  his  

1996  book  Charlie  Parker  and  Thematic  Improvisation  recounts  Parker’s  
improvisational  approach  as  one  that  is  beyond  simply  formulaic  attributes,  and  
deemed  structurally  “thematic.”    Martin  makes  the  case  that  more  than  simply  a  
stringing  together  of  unrelated  formulas,  Parker’s  solos  are  closely  tied  to  the  
thematic  material  of  the  composition’s  melody,  stating:  
What  is  slighted  in  Owens’  study  is  how  Parker  transcends  the  
mechanical  application  of  formulas;  and  how  in  many  instances  their  
effectives  lies  in  unexpected  motivic  connection  to  the  original  thematic  
material…this  book,  then,  is  a  corrective,  redistributive  balance  of  Owen’s  
assessment  (Martin  1996,  5).      
 

 
 

25  

Possessing  many  similarities  to  Owens’  study,  Martin’s  musical  source  
material  is  largely  the  same  (including  the  three  categories  of  blues,  rhythm  
changes  and  popular  standards),  and  uses  an  adapted  Schenkerian-­‐style  method  
of  analysis.    However,  Martin  prefers  the  use  of  the  term  “voice-­‐leading”  analysis  
over  “Schenkerian”  analysis,  as  Schenker  did  not  develop  for  or  apply  his  
techniques  to  jazz,  and  because  Martin’s  analytical  method  is  based  on  the  voice-­‐
leading  and  harmonic  practices  of  bebop.    Furthermore,  Martin  finds  that  a  
single,  definitive  answer  for  Schenker’s  highest  level  (background)  of  voice-­‐
leading  analysis  as  applied  to  the  highly  chromatic  melodies  of  bebop  
improvisation  proves  futile,  due  to  the  increased  status  of  extended  chord  tones,  
and  the  function  of  sevenths  as  consonances  requiring  no  further  resolution.    
Instead,  Martin  prefers  to  base  his  analytical  conclusions  closer  to  the  
foreground  level  of  the  Schenkerian  system:  
The  criteria  for  a  pitch  to  be  “advanced”  to  a  more  background  level  are  
unclear.    The  consonance-­‐dissonance  requirement  that  often  suffices  at  
the  foreground  is  simply  impossible  to  apply  unarbitrarily  to  high  levels  
where  evidence  of  “support”  is  more  equivocal  (Martin  1996,  20).  
 
The  subjectivity  and  ambiguity  of  note  significance  is  further  increased  as  
applied  to  jazz,  where  perhaps  only  avoid-­‐tones  (non-­‐triadic  pitches  that  create  
a  minor  ninth  interval  against  a  structural  chord-­‐tone)  can  be  conclusively  found  
to  hold  less  significance  among  other  available  diatonic  pitches  at  a  given  time.    
Martin  observes  that  in  practice,  Schenkerian  analysis  derives  higher  
(background)  levels  by  invoking:  

 
 

26  

1. Dimunition  from  the  foreground:  the  value  of  a  pitch’s  hierarchy  
based  on  the  supremacy  of  the  triad.    
2. The  completion  of  implied  patterns:  quite  often  descending  figures  
that  resolve  ultimately  to  the  tonic  pitch.    
3. The  prominence  or  importance  of  favoured  pitches:  (most  vaguely)  
through  repetition,  accent,  or  registral  placement.    
Regardless  of  these  subjective  and  often  vague  qualifications  for  structural  pitch  
heirarchy,  the  function  of  individual  notes  can  be  classified  perhaps  more  
objectively,  with  Martin  seeing  them  as  belonging  to  one  of  six  categories:    
-­‐

Chord-­‐Tones  (notes  that  build  the  essential  structure  of  the  chord)  

-­‐

Passing  Tones  (notes  moving  stepwise  from  one  chord  tone  to  another)  

-­‐

Neighbour  Tones  (complete:  leaves  and  returns  to  the  same  chord  tone  
by  step  –  incomplete:  essentially  skipping  over  a  chord  tone,  leaves  by  
step  or  leap,  and  approaches  a  different  chord  tone  by  leap  or  step)  

-­‐

Suspensions  (chord  tones  acting  to  prolong  a  chord  after  its  completion)  

-­‐

Anticipations  (chord  tones  acting  to  anticipate  a  chord  before  it  begins)  

-­‐

Appoggiaturas  (notes  that  act  to  enclose  around  a  chord  tone,  or  that  
begin  a  new  phrase  by  approaching  a  chord  tone  by  step  or  leap)  

Despite  the  ambiguity  and  subjectivity  of  background  structure  in  Schenkerian  
analysis,  Martin  nonetheless  believes  that  an  investigation  of  background-­‐level  
voice-­‐leading  interpretations  can  in  fact  reveal  some  of  the  overall  processes  of  
an  individual  piece:  

 
 

 

27  

For  the  power  of  voice-­‐leading  analysis  lies  in  its  advocacy  of  harmony  as  
primary  in  large-­‐scale  tonal  progressions:  it  shows  how  tonal  
compositions  are  unified  through  nested  harmonic  structures,  and  how  
these  may  be  related  to  foreground  material  (Martin  1996,  21).    
Martin  argues  that  most  relevantly,  the  issue  of  thematic  relatedness  

must  be  examined  from  the  perspective  of  either  the  player  or  listener;  either  as  
intentionally  projected  by  the  artist  or  inferred  by  the  analyst  (Martin  1996,  34).    
Martin  believes  that  a  shift  to  the  point  of  view  of  the  listener  proves  profitable  
to  his  study  of  thematic  improvisation,  as  “what  is  important  [to  my  study]  with  
respect  to  its  structure  is  what  can  be  heard  and  felt,  not  what  was  intended”  
(Martin  1996,  36).    Martin  admits  however,  that  “potential  musical  connections,  
even  cogent  ones  are  numerous  –  theoretically  even  infinite  –  such  plethora  of  
musical  relatedness  cannot  possibly  be  at  the  conscious  grasp  of  any  musician,  
however  gifted”  (Martin  1996,  36).    On  the  other  hand,  Martin  believes  that  
studies  in  the  field  of  pedagogy  or  historiography  are  more  suited  to  an  
investigation  of  the  player’s  intentions:    
…  musicians  who  wish  to  improvise  well  naturally  would  like  insight  as  to  
the  thought  processes  of  players  they  emulate.    And  certainly  most  of  us  
would  like  to  know  what  highly  regarded  players  were  thinking  or  
intending,  for  its  own  obvious  interest  (Martin  1996,  36).    
 
Martin’s  study  of  thematic  relatedness,  investigated  from  the  perspective  
of  the  listener  and  using  an  adapted  Schenkerian-­‐style  approach  to  analysis,  
finds  evidence  of  many  unifying  features  in  Parker’s  improvisations  that  tie  them  
to  the  underlying  foreground  motives,  large-­‐scale  voice-­‐leading  structures  and  

 
 

28  

large  scale  thematic  elements  of  the  piece’s  melody  on  which  they  are  based.    
Though  acknowledging  the  formulaic  elements  within  Parker’s  playing,  Martin  
makes  a  case  that  the  use  of  a  formulaic  system  does  not  preclude  a  group  of  
notes  from  being  all  or  partly  thematic.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

29  

Chapter  3  
A  Contemporary  Approach  to  Jazz  Discourse  
 
3.  1  –  Pedagogical  vs.  Analytical  
 

In  addition  to  distinctions  of  motivic,  formulaic,  schematic  and  thematic  

structural  coherence  and  aesthetic  value  discussed  in  Chapter  2,  discourse  in  
jazz  improvisation  can  also  be  identified  with  regard  to  the  function  it  serves:  as  
belonging  to  the  sphere  of  either  pedagogical,  or  analytical  discourse.    These  
functional  distinctions  are  observed  by  Henry  Martin  in  his  article  “Jazz  Theory:  
An  Overview”  (1996)  from  the  Annual  Review  of  Jazz  Studies.    In  the  article,  
discourse  is  defined  as  such:  
Pedagogical:  “musician-­‐based”  –  focused  on  fundamental  rudiments  or  
speculative  techniques,  suggesting  the  creative  strategies  or  cognitive  
processes  in  which  a  musician  may  be  involved.      
Analytical:  “listener-­‐based”  –  focused  on  elements  of  structure,  general  
stylistic  trends,  and  musical  connections,  often  concerned  with  aesthetic  
issues  of  relevance.      
In  some  cases,  pedagogical  and  analytical  discourse  may  overlap:  a  jazz  theorist  
may  adopt  an  analytical  point  of  view  in  order  to  establish  elements  of  style  in  a  
given  artist,  and  then  switch  to  a  pedagogical  point  of  view  to  show  how  the  style  
of  that  artist  functions  or  may  be  emulated.    Within  Martin’s  paper,  the  
proposition  of  some  unifying  principles  for  jazz  discourse  are  also  provided:    

 
 

 

30  

We  should  never  neglect  what  brought  us  to  jazz  itself:  the  music,  and  our  
emotional  and  aesthetic  response  to  it  …  attempting  to  fathom  what  is  
happening  sonically  to  the  extent  that  it  can  be  pinned  down  …  to  pursue  
a  closer  scrutiny  of  how  jazz  works  as  music  (Martin  1996,  4).    
Emotional  and  aesthetic  responses  are  highly  relevant  to  Metheny’s  

music,  and  the  qualitative  meanings  associated  with  what  is  being  expressed  and  
felt  in  the  music  will  be  recognized  in  this  study’s  discourse.    Qualitative  
meanings  can  sometimes  go  unaccounted  for  in  the  theoretical  discourse  of  jazz  
improvisation,  with  aesthetic  judged  solely  on  their  structural  and  quantifiable  
features.    In  the  excerpts  of  Schuller,  Owens  and  Martin  we  observed  in  Chapter  
2,  aesthetics  were  judged  on  solely  structural  and  quantifiable  features.    A  
principal  rationale  for  a  focus  on  quantitative  attributes  is  understandable,  being  
that  written  elements  can  be  convincingly  defined  as  objective,  with  
demonstrative  musical  connections  justified  beyond  what  could  otherwise  be  
defined  as  speculative.    Yet  much  of  what  is  internalized  and  indeed  conveyed  by  
the  practicing  jazz  musician  is  learned  by  the  process  of  audiation:  the  process  
by  which  the  brain  assigns  meaning  to  musical  sound.      
More  than  simply  the  perception  of  sound,  developed  audiation  includes  
the  necessary  understanding  of  music  to  enable  the  conscious  prediction  of  
patterns  in  unfamiliar  music  and  sound,  particularly  important  in  the  
performance  practice  of  improvisation.    In  the  distinctly  oral/written  tradition  of  
jazz  improvisation,  developing  musicians  learn  not  just  through  the  study  and  

 
 

31  

use  of  sheet  music,  but  owe  much  of  their  development  to  the  act  of  oral  
transmission.    These  oral  elements  most  often  include:    
-­‐

The  verbal  explanation  of  conceptual  elements  and  the  musical  
demonstration  of  jazz  vernacular,  by  way  of  fellow  musicians,  who  are  
most  often  older  and  more  experienced  

-­‐

The  imitation  of  performances  from  recordings  –  jazz  musicians  often  
encounter  periods  throughout  their  development  where  they  become  
engrossed  in  emulating  the  recordings  of  particular  musicians  

-­‐

The  development  of  unique  and  individual  cognitive  ideas,  that  
generate  from  knowledge  the  musician  has  already  gained  through  
written,  recorded,  or  orally  transmitted  means  

For  Metheny,  his  development  as  an  improviser  had  a  great  deal  to  do  
with  his  emulation  of  the  recordings  of  Wes  Montgomery  and  the  successive  
cognitive  ideas  that  lead  to  the  development  of  his  own  improvisational  voice.    
Metheny  recounts:  
My  earliest  success  as  a  player,  around  Kansas  City  when  I  was  thirteen,  
fourteen  years  old,  was  under  the  auspices  of  sounding  as  close  to  Wes  
Montgomery  as  I  could  (Niles  2009:20).    The  way  Wes  was  playing  just  
made  me  want  to  listen  to  it  again  and  again  and  again.    Through  that  
process  of  listening  you  naturally  memorize  things;  you  memorize  not  
only  what  Wes  or  Miles  [Davis]  was  playing  but  what  was  happening  
underneath  them  and  around  them  …  really  understanding  a  few  records  
kind  of  allows  you  a  window  into  the  [mechanics  of  jazz  as  a  whole]  (Niles  
2009,  14).    
 

 
 

32  

On  Metheny’s  advancement  towards  the  development  of  his  own  
distinctive  improvisational  aesthetic:    

 

[But]  wouldn't  it  be  better  to  look  at  Wes  and  say,  'Wow.    This  guy  found  a  
way  of  playing  that  was  all  his  own'  …  Why  not  find  my  own  thing,  as  a  
tribute  to  Wes  rather  than  the  overt  'Here's  some  octaves'  and  so  
forth…then  there's  a  period  of  roughness  after  that  because  that  is  part  of  
what  your  vocabulary  is,  but  it  was  a  worthy  moment  for  me  to  get  to  that  
place  (Niles  2009,  21).    
The  study  of  written  and  quantifiable  elements  is  simply  one  out  of  a  

collection  of  pertinent  non-­‐written  oral  and  cognitive  details  involved  in  the  
process  of  forming  for  a  jazz  improviser.    Yet,  as  many  of  these  details  are  
processed  verbally  and  internally,  the  theoretical  meanings  associated  with  
them  remain  non-­‐standardized,  consequently  making  the  notion  of  oral  
transmission  somewhat  problematic  for  the  jazz  theorist.    Martin  relates  his  
grasp  of  this  particular  dilemma  in  his  article:    

 
 

It  can  be  argued  that  in  learning  to  play  by  ear,  a  player  internalizes  rules  
in  the  broad  sense,  but  does  not  learn  terms  or  engage  in  the  linguistic  
conventions  commonly  associated  with  those  rules.    Nor  can  such  a  
player  develop  speculative  models  to  extend  musical  ideas  beyond  what  
can  be  heard  informally  (Martin  1996,  5).  
While  addressing  the  need  for  a  system  of  terms,  Martin’s  argument  holds  

the  assumption  that  the  jazz  musician  who  learns  orally  is  therefore  verbally  
incapable  of  articulating  musical  meaning.    Hypothetically,  if  a  jazz  musician  
were  to  learn  to  improvise  purely  through  the  imitation  of  musical  recordings,  
the  musician  would  then  lack  the  ability  to  verbally  articulate  musical  ideas  in  

 
 

33  

widely  accepted  terms,  however  this  scenario  is  rarely  if  ever  the  case.    More  
often,  a  combination  of  oral  transmission,  the  study  of  written  elements,  and  the  
emulation  or  transcription  of  recorded  music  will  guide  the  development  of  the  
improviser.    Paul  Berliner  echoes  this  same  sentiment  in  his  book  Thinking  In  
Jazz:  The  Infinite  Art  of  Improvisation:    
Traditionally,  jazz  musicians  have  learned  without  the  kind  of  support  
provided  by  formal  educational  systems.    There  have  been  no  schools  or  
universities  to  teach  improvisers  their  skills;  few  textbooks  to  aid  them.    
Master  musicians,  however,  did  not  develop  their  skills  in  a  vacuum.    They  
learned  within  their  own  professional  community  -­‐  the  jazz  community  
(Berliner  1994,  35).  
 
Because  much  of  the  process  in  forming  for  the  jazz  improviser  has  historically  
occurred  outside  the  realm  of  institutionalized  formal  training,  the  verbal  
articulations  that  illustrate  musical  meaning  often  do  not  belong  to  a  
standardized  system  of  terms  in  the  purest  sense.    Martin  asserts  that  “the  
analyst  aims  to  show  how  the  music  works  in  and  of  itself”  (Martin  1996,  10),  a  
purely  analytical  stance  that  circumvents  these  oral  elements.    It  is  however  in  
the  interests  of  this  study  that  qualitative  components  are  incorporated  to  
encompass  the  realm  of  jazz  pedagogy,  as  pedagogy  must  reach  beyond  only  
written  elements.      
 
3.  2  –  Pedagogical  Continuity  
Yet,  while  there  is  no  shortage  of  pedagogical  studies  in  jazz,  their  quality  
may  be  lacking,  as  Martin  states:  “What  the  field  [of  pedagogy]  most  urgently  

 
 

34  

needs  is  more  articles  and  books  discussing  in  musical  detail  either  specific  
musicians,  stylistic  periods,  or  bodies  of  repertory…what  is  most  urgently  
needed  is  a  sense  of  continuity  in  the  field”  (Martin  1996,  13).    It  is  the  aim  of  
this  study  then,  to  provide  a  resource  enhanced  by  the  recognition  of  oral  
transmission  and  qualitative  meaning,  beyond  a  purely  quantitative-­‐analytical  
approach.    Outlining  the  difficulties  in  developing  studies  for  jazz  pedagogy  in  an  
oral  tradition,  Martin  writes:    
[Jazz]  musicians  nowadays  prefer  putting  their  ideas  directly  into  
practice  –  rather  than  publishing  material  about  them.    Perhaps  the  time  
is  ripe  for  the  pedagogical  expertise  developed  over  the  past  centuries  in  
European  music  to  be  adapted  to  the  special  needs  of  jazz  improvisation  
(Martin  1996,  13).  
 
The  notion  that  jazz  musicians  have  been  historically  more  focused  on  
directly  applying  theoretical  ideas  than  publishing  information  about  them  is  
one  of  the  difficulties  of  an  orally  transmitted  art  form,  and  a  primary  motive  for  
the  importance  of  pedagogical  research  in  jazz.    It  would  however,  prove  
misleading  to  approach  jazz  pedagogy  primarily  from  the  values  of  the  Western  
art  music  tradition,  a  largely  non-­‐oral  art  form.    Even  more  so,  many  elements  of  
traditional  classical  technique  prove  non-­‐applicable  for  the  jazz  musician.    With  
reference  to  Lawrence  Gushee’s  notion  of  jazz  improvisation  as  a  distinctly  
mixed  oral/written  tradition  requiring  multiple  approaches  of  discourse,  my  
study  of  the  improvisational  style  of  Pat  Metheny  acts  to  serve  both  analytical  
and  pedagogical  functions  through  a  process  of  defining  aesthetics  in  not  only  

 
 

35  

their  structural  and  quantifiable  components,  but  also  to  address  the  qualitative  
musical  meanings  that  are  expressed  through  oral  transmission,  from  a  uniquely  
jazz-­‐oriented  perspective.      
 
3.  3  –  Reductive  vs.    Processual  
 

Just  as  the  function  of  improvisational  study  is  a  matter  of  focus,  John  

Brownell  in  his  1994  Jazzforschung  article  “Analytical  Models  of  Jazz  
Improvisation”  discusses  in  greater  depth  the  object  of  study  in  jazz  analysis,  
regarding  the  treatment  of  the  improvisation  as  chiefly  “reductive”  or  
“processual.”    Brownell  explains  that  the  ambiguity  surrounding  improvisation  
lies  in  the  dual  nature  of  its  definition,  being  both  an  act  and  a  product:  “It  is  not  
always  clear  just  what  is  being  discussed:  is  the  activity  a  performance,  a  
composition,  or  a  kind  of  editorial  activity  which  blurs  the  
performance/composition  distinction  altogether?”  (Brownell  1994,  10).    In  other  
words,  are  we  discussing  the  record  of  the  improvisation  after  it  has  been  
completed?    Brownell’s  definition  of  improvisation  as  “performing  music  as  an  
immediate  reproduction  of  simultaneous  mental  processes,”  establishes  it  as  
something  to  be  distinguished  from  composition;  a  distinct  subset  in  fact:  
composition  processed  in  real-­‐time.    Would  it  then  be  valid  to  apply  the  
analytical  methods  developed  within  the  context  of  pre-­‐composed  European  art  
music  to  the  largely  internal  processes  of  improvisation?    If  improvisation  is  to  
be  judged  by  the  same  structural-­‐aesthetic  standards  of  composed  art  music  

 
 

36  

without  the  merits  of  its  spontaneity  accounted  for,  it  is  to  undoubtedly  fall  short  
of  the  carefully  pre-­‐composed  art  form  by  comparison.    Jazz  then,  must  be  
judged  by  different  standards.    Brownell  identifies  four  common  goals  and  
attitudes  often  inferred  by  the  jazz  analyst,  classifying  these  approaches  as  
distinctly  critical,  categorical,  ethnomusicological  or  pedagogical  in  nature:  
Critical:  To  apply  aesthetic  value  to  structural  features,  with  the  subtle  
context  of  legitimizing  jazz  within  the  realm  of  music  scholarship  –  to  be  
comparably  as  complex,  profound,  and  subtle  as  Western  art  music.    
Categorical:  To  identify  styles  or  commonalities,  especially  evident  when  
used  in  comparative  analysis  –  Kernfeld,  (1980)  identifies  “Two  
Coltranes,”  in  a  study  that  distinguishes  improvisational  creativity  from  
uninspired  pattern  playing  between  stylistic  periods.    
Ethnomusicological:  To  define  improvisation  as  a  specific  manifestation  
of  a  general  form  of  human  musical  behaviour,  especially  regarding  the  
act  of  oral  transmission.    
Pedagogical:  To  provide  a  written  resource  for  the  advancement  of  
improvisational  proficiency,  that  supplements  the  traditional  socio-­‐
cultural  processes  of  skill  acquisition  in  the  oral  tradition.    
Though  the  common  approach  in  jazz  discourse  has  been  to  treat  the  
analysis  of  jazz  improvisation  as  a  subset  of  composed  music,  with  the  
transcribed  solo  as  equivalent  to  the  score  (often  with  more  of  a  “critical”  or  
“categorical”  attitude),  certain  analytical  models  have  developed  an  

 
 

37  

understanding  of  improvisation  inspired  by  Albert  Lord’s  studies  of  the  
formulaic  methodology  of  epic  singer-­‐poets,  and  have  concentrated  more  on  the  
improvisational  process  than  its  product,  (often  with  a  more  
“ethnomusicological”  or  “pedagogical”  attitude).    Brownell  divides  these  two  
analytical  attitudes  into  “reductive”  and  “processual”  models:  
Reductive:  improvisation  observed  as  a  static  object.    
Processual:  improvisation  as  the  unfolding  of  a  dynamic  process.    
Brownell  is  an  advocate  of  the  processual  model,  and  puts  forth  a  
criticism  deemed  “notism”:  the  fixation  on  the  object  of  analysis  over  the  process  
from  which  it  is  formed,  arguing  that  what  results  from  a  “notist”  analysis  is  a  
frozen  record  of  what  is  really  a  dynamic  process.    Brownell  asserts  that  one  of  
the  most  prominently  reductive  forms  of  analysis  in  common  practice  is  
Schenkerian  analysis,  a  technique  that  serves  primarily  to  define  harmonic  and  
melodic  structuralism  to  the  neglect  of  several  other  significant  attributes.    A  
reductive,  notist  perspective  within  the  formulaic  method  of  jazz  analysis  would  
be  to  provide  a  taxonomy  that  establishes  a  principal  formula  and  rigidly  
distinguishes  its  variants.  However  the  formula,  both  in  the  literal  and  musical  
sense,  is  not  a  specific  arrangement  of  elements  but  is  rather  a  form  or  template,  
which  is  filled  according  to  the  needs  of  the  moment.    The  process  of  identifying  
a  formulaic  system  is  therefore  a  processual  mode  of  analysis  and  is  
fundamentally  distinct.      
 

 
 

38  

3.  4  –  Formulaic  Analysis  
While  reductive  models  borrow  the  majority  of  their  analytical  
techniques  from  the  theory  of  western  art  music,  Brownell  contends  that  
processual  models  rely  chiefly  on  paradigms  derived  from  two  non-­‐musical  
sources:  literary  theory  and  linguistics.    In  literary  theory,  the  ability  of  
individual  epic-­‐poets  to  memorize  extremely  long  passages  of  poetry  was  long  
regarded  as  more  the  stuff  of  legend  than  a  tangible  performance  practice.    It  
was  not  until  Albert  Lord’s  literary-­‐theory  study  The  Singer  of  Tales  (1960),  that  
mechanisms  for  the  reproduction  of  epic  poetry  in  a  culture  without  writing  
were  made  clear.    Lord  explained  that  the  bard  in  the  Serbo-­‐Croation  epic  
tradition  is  constrained  in  his  choice  of  words  by  customary  patterns  of  meter,  
syntax  and  sound,  and  as  a  result  of  these  constraints,  he  tends  to  cast  his  most  
common  ideas  in  similar  phrasing,  deemed  formulas.    These  formulas  serve  as  
solutions  to  the  problem  of  expressing  a  narrative  within  a  particular  set  of  
restraints  and  the  added  demands  of  a  live  performance.    They  may  also  serve  as  
the  basis  for  the  creation  of  unique  expressions,  as  the  singer  can  substitute  key  
words  in  a  phrase  and  create  entirely  new  phrases  modeled  on  the  pattern  of  his  
formulas.      
Thomas  Owens’  1974  UCLA  dissertation  “Charlie  Parker:  Techniques  of  
Improvisation”  was  directly  influenced  by  Lord’s  formulaic  concept,  and  was  the  
first  to  apply  the  notion  of  formulaic  devices  to  the  discourse  of  jazz  
improvisation.    Another  prominent  study  in  the  field  of  jazz  improvisation  to  be  

 
 

39  

influenced  by  Lord’s  theory  is  Gregory  Smith’s  “Homer,  Gregory,  and  Bill  Evans?  
The  Theory  of  Formulaic  Composition  in  the  Context  of  Jazz  Improvisation”  
(1983),  where  Smith  argues  that  the  parallels  between  the  creative  process  of  
the  oral  epic  poet  and  the  improvising  jazz  musician  are  exact,  with  both  
performers  operating  in  the  processual  mode.    For  Smith,  Lord’s  work  shifted  
the  focus  from  a  literary  analysis  based  solely  on  the  content  of  epic  poetry  to  a  
theory  based  on  the  facts  of  oral  composition.    But  while  formulaic  analysis  
offers  a  more  complete  view  of  a  complex  activity,  its  use  alone  lacks  addressing  
something  essential  to  both  language  and  music,  the  problem  of  meaning.      
 
3.  5  –  Music  and  Meaning  
Since  both  language  and  music  are  primarily  forms  of  communication,  the  
social  relationship  between  performer  and  listener  is  relevant.    Though  musical  
communication  has  been  an  area  of  some  concern  for  ethnomusicologists,  it  has  
received  little  attention  in  the  field  of  musical  analysis  or  pedagogy.    A  primary  
reason  for  this  neglect  may  come  from  some  inherent  assumptions  held  by  the  
music  theorist,  assumptions  which  may  illustrate  a  fundamental  lack  of  what  
constitutes  a  socio-­‐cultural  understanding  of  music.    For  example:  Alan  Perlman  
and  Daniel  Greenblatt  in  “Miles  Davis  Meets  Noam  Chomsky:  Some  Observations  
on  Jazz  Improvisation  and  Language  Structure”  propose  an  implicit  hierarchy  in  
a  jazz  audience  based  on  the  musical  awareness  of  its  members;  the  authors  

 
 

40  

divide  listeners  into  “inside”  (those  with  knowledge  of  jazz  music  and  style)  and  
“outside”  (those  with  no  special  knowledge).    The  authors  assert  that:  
The  rest  of  the  audience  –  the  outside  audience  –  really  do  not  hear  or  
understand  improvised  solos.    For  the  outside  audience,  jazz  
improvisation  does  not  have  structural  or  historical  meaning…they  have  
no  sense  at  all  of  what  to  expect  from  a  solo  (Perlman  and  Greenblatt  
1981,  181).    
 
It  is  true  that  few  members  of  the  jazz  club  or  concert  hall  audience  have  studied  
music  to  the  extent  that  the  musician  has  –  but  does  this  make  their  
understanding  of  music  imperfect?  Perlman  and  Greenblatt’s  assumption  
overlooks  the  fact  that  each  member  of  the  audience  has  undoubtedly  been  
surrounded  by  tonal  music  throughout  their  entire  lives:  they  have  listened  to  
the  radio,  been  to  performances,  bought  records,  talked  to  others  about  music,  
sung  in  a  choir,  played  in  a  band,  the  list  goes  on.    Simply  because  the  listener  
does  not  grasp  a  rapid  course  of  notes  one  by  one  or  comprehend  the  
movements  of  complex  harmony  does  not  make  their  perception  of  meaning  
through  music  false  or  imperfect;  if  this  were  the  case,  jazz  clubs  and  concert  
halls  simply  would  not  exist.      
These  listeners  simply  understand  what  they  hear  in  a  more  fundamental  
way:  they  are  following  the  arc  of  the  melody,  the  mood  of  the  harmony,  the  
vitality  of  the  rhythm,  the  texture  of  the  timbre,  impacts  of  the  dynamics,  
recognitions  of  the  form,  and  so  on.    This  “non-­‐expert”  element  of  understanding  
is  often  not  addressed  in  jazz  discourse,  but  jazz  music’s  incorporation  of  art-­‐

 
 

41  

music  elements  within  an  essentially  informal-­‐oral  tradition  makes  it  a  strong  
candidate  for  studies  that  acknowledge  the  expression  of  meaning  between  
performer  and  listener.    This  question  of  meaning  through  expression  leads  us  
again  to  the  study  of  language,  where  attempts  have  been  made  to  find  parallels  
between  musical  elements  and  linguistics.    The  first  logical  step  here  might  be  to  
observe  the  methodology  developed  for  the  analysis  of  poetry  to  the  analysis  of  
music;  in  other  words,  the  study  of  semantics.    Yet,  the  same  semantic  
categorizations  that  apply  to  poetry  do  not  apply  to  music.    Lerdahl  and  
Jackendoff  in  “A  Generative  Theory  of  Tonal  Music”  contend  that:  

 

[Music’s  meaning  is]  in  no  sense  comparable  to  linguistic  meaning;  there  
are  no  musical  phenomena  comparable  to  sense  and  reference  in  
language,  or  to  such  semantic  judgments  as  synonymy,  analyticity,  and  
entailment.    Likewise  there  are  no  substantive  parallels  between  
elements  of  musical  structure  and  such  syntactic  categories  as  noun,  verb,  
adjective,  preposition,  noun  phrase,  and  verb  phrase  (Lerdahl  and  
Jackendoff  1983,  5-­‐6).  
Though  formulas  have  semantic  value  for  the  epic  poet,  the  same  cannot  

be  said  for  the  musical  fragments  identified  by  Thomas  Owens  or  Gregory  Smith.    
Further  attempts  then,  to  define  musical  meaning  were  made  through  the  search  
of  a  set  of  universal  principles  that  act  to  convey  meaning.    A  fundamental  idea  in  
structural  linguistics,  the  concept  of  “deep  structure”  is  the  web  of  relationships  
between  grammatical  units  (the  syntax)  that  underlies  language,  popularized  by  
Noam  Chomsky  and  others.    Music  theorists  quickly  attempted  to  find  parallels  
for  deep  structure  within  musical  analysis,  most  notably  by  focusing  on  the  

 
 

42  

analytical  models  of  Heinrich  Schenker,  with  their  background,  middleground  
and  foreground  levels  of  structural  organization.    Yet,  it  can  be  argued  that  music  
need  not  abide  by  such  specific  structural  requirements  to  possess  meaning.    
Leonard  B.    Meyer  in  Emotion  and  Meaning  in  Music:  
Beneath  the  profusion  of  seemingly  disparate  styles,  it  was  argued,  lay  
fundamental  absolute  principles,  which  governed  the  structure  and  
development  of  music  everywhere…but  when  these  laws  were  not  
discovered,  this  form  of  monism  was  discredited  and  went  out  of  fashion  
(Meyer  1956,  49).    
 
Yet  despite  this,  many  music  analysts  continue  to  place  emphasis  on  the  
background  structures  that  they  believe  to  govern  music’s  meaning,  often  citing  
Schenkerian-­‐style  analysis.      
Another  angle  on  the  musical  comparison  to  linguistics  in  practice  is  the  
“well-­‐formedness”  criteria,  or  the  aesthetics  that  “allow”  music’s  formation  to  be  
meaningful.    An  example  of  this  would  include  the  rules  of  counterpoint  and  
functional  harmony  that  dictated  acceptable  melodic  and  harmonic  motion  in  
the  Western  Baroque-­‐era  art  music  of  Bach  and  his  contemporaries.    Yet  if  one  is  
to  compare  music  to  linguistics  in  this  sense,  it  can  be  seen  that  the  structure  of  a  
word  is  not  the  only  criterion  that  creates  its  meaning:  for  example,  a  well-­‐
formed  word  need  not  be  meaningful  –  the  construction  “dorg”  is  well-­‐formed  in  
that  it  follows  the  rules  for  word  construction  in  English,  but  holds  no  
widespread  meaning.    Another  combination  of  the  same  letters,  “rgdo,”  is  neither  
well-­‐formed  nor  meaningful.    Yet  both  of  these  words  could  conceivably  hold  
meaning;  one  need  only  read  the  post-­‐modernist  literature  (see  Douglas  

 
 

43  

Coupland  and  others)  or  observe  the  Internet,  to  find  that  traditional  semantics  
have  been  altered  in  the  modern  era;  as  colloquial  slang  and  vowel-­‐less  
acronyms  become  increasingly  more  widespread  and  pervasive.    The  rules  that  
define  effective  semantics  in  language  no  longer  lie  solely  in  the  hands  of  
published  literary  professionals,  and  the  “non-­‐expert”  linguist  has  gained  greater  
influence.    Therefore,  above  semantics  or  the  notion  of  aesthetic  requirements,  
the  fundamental  element  in  the  perception  of  meaning  through  language  is  
simply  that  it  possesses  a  referent:  an  attribute  allowing  it  widespread  
familiarity  or  contextualization.    Consequently,  some  have  argued  that  this  same  
principle  applies  to  inherent  meanings  within  music.      
 
3.  6  –  Music  and  Cognition  
 

Theorist  Daniel  Levitin  in  his  book  This  Is  Your  Brain  on  Music  presents  an  

understanding  of  music  based  on  neuroscience,  concerning  himself  with  the  way  
the  brain  assigns  meaning  to  music.    Levitin  finds  that  the  brain  is  responsive  to  
perceptions  of  expectation  based  on  previous  experience  over  preferred  
aesthetic  qualities  that  impose  intrinsic  value,  writing:  
Our  ability  to  make  sense  of  music  depends  on  experience,  and  on  neural  
structures  that  can  learn  and  modify  themselves  with  each  new  song  we  
hear,  and  with  each  new  listening  to  an  old  song.    Our  brains  learn  a  kind  
of  musical  grammar  that  is  specific  to  the  music  of  our  culture,  just  as  we  
learn  to  speak  the  language  of  our  culture  (Levitin  2006:  108).    
 

 
 

44  

Perhaps  then,  that  just  as  in  the  perception  of  language,  the  fundamental  
requirement  for  creating  meaning  through  music  is  simply  that  it  possesses  a  
“referent,”  being  that  it  holds  representation  tied  to  experience  and  familiarity.    
To  process  music,  starting  at  the  purely  physiological  level,  the  brain  manages  to  
sort  a  disorganized  mixture  of  molecules  (soundwaves)  that  beat  against  a  
membrane  (the  eardrum)  through  a  process  of  feature  extraction,  followed  by  a  
process  of  feature  integration.    First,  specialized  neural  networks  in  the  brain  
extract  elements  of  pitch,  timbre,  spatial  location,  loudness,  reverberant  
environment,  note  durations  and  onset  times  through  a  process  called  “bottom-­‐
up  processing”;  these  operations  can  be  processed  concurrently  or  
independently  of  one  another,  and  are  the  building  block  attributes  for  the  
cognitive  perception  of  music.      
The  brain  then  combines  these  basic  elements  to  coalesce  an  integrated  
representation  of  form  and  content  through  a  process  called  “high-­‐level  
processing.”    The  higher-­‐level  areas  of  our  brain,  mostly  the  frontal  cortex,  are  
receiving  a  constant  flow  of  information  about  what  has  been  extracted  so  far,  
continually  rewriting  older  information.    Meanwhile,  the  brain  works  diligently  
to  predict  what  will  come  next  in  the  music.    It  is  the  setting  up  and  subsequent  
manipulating  of  expectations  that  is  at  the  heart  of  music’s  meaning;  the  source  
of  which  can  be  a  reaction  to  any  number  of  the  aforementioned  “bottom-­‐up”  
elements.    The  manipulation  of  expectations  to  these  elements  can  be  
established  in  a  few  major  ways:  

 
 

45  

-­‐

What  has  already  come  before  in  the  piece  of  music  we’re  hearing  

-­‐

What  we  remember  will  come  next  if  the  music  is  familiar,  based  on  
previous  exposure  to  the  particular  piece  

-­‐

What  we  expect  will  come  next  if  the  genre  or  style  is  familiar,  based  
on  previous  exposure  to  this  type  of  music    

-­‐

Any  additional  information  we’ve  been  given,  such  as  a  summary  of  
the  music  we’ve  read,  visual  or  other  sensory  stimulus  (Levitin  2006,  
104)  

How  then,  does  music  actually  manifest  into  cognitive  representations  of  
meaning  and  emotion?  
Music  then,  can  be  thought  of  as  a  type  of  perceptual  illusion  in  which  our  
brain  imposes  structure  and  order  on  a  sequence  of  sounds.    Just  how  this  
structure  leads  us  to  experience  emotional  reactions  is  part  of  the  
mystery  of  music.    After  all,  we  don’t  get  all  weepy  eyed  when  we  
experience  other  kinds  of  structure  in  our  lives,  such  as  a  balanced  
checkbook  or  the  orderly  arrangement  of  first-­‐aid  products  in  a  drugstore  
(Levitin  2006,  109).  
 
Levitin  goes  on  to  explain  that  in  the  brain  the  amygdala,  long  considered  the  
seat  of  emotion  in  mammals,  sits  adjacent  to  the  hippocampus,  long  considered  
the  centre  for  memory  storage  and  retrieval.    Neurological  studies  have  shown  
that  the  amygdala  is  highly  activated  by  experiences  that  trigger  memories  
holding  a  strong  emotional  component,  and  that  much  of  our  sensory  
perceptions  are  bound  to  emotion  through  memory.    Scent  is  widely  accepted  to  
be  the  strongest  sense  tied  to  memory,  with  the  ability  to  evoke  memories  and  

 
 

46  

emotions  associated  with  a  particular  smell.    An  image  of  a  significant  time  or  
place  can  trigger  emotions  tied  to  specific  memories.    And  not  least,  the  words  
that  comprise  the  language  that  we  hear  and  read  can  provoke  emotion  through  
a  depiction  of  the  human  experience.    Much  like  language,  music  is  a  readily  
generative  experience:  in  that  one  learns  to  recognize  a  system  of  identifiable  
components  through  which  to  create  a  vast  number  of  potential  outcomes.    
Music’s  widely  varied,  multi-­‐dimensional  set  of  parameters  act  to  create  any  
number  of  cognitive  abstractions  of  structure  and  form  in  our  minds,  recognized  
through  the  subsequent  setting  up  and  manipulation  of  expectation.  
 
3.  7  –  Summary:  Contemporary  Outlooks  in  Musical  Analysis  
Many  contemporary  theorists  in  musical  analysis  are  perhaps  moving  
towards  a  more  processual  and  less  reductive  approach.    A  more  reductive  
analytical  framework  chiefly  aims  to  provide  objective  quantifiable  evidence  
related  to  structure  and  form,  often  circumventing  subjective  and  speculative  
detail.    Schenkerian  analysis  is,  for  example,  one  of  the  more  reductive  
frameworks  for  analysis,  aiming  to  illustrate  large-­‐scale  structural  continuity  
within  a  piece  of  music,  and  value  it  accordingly.    Nicholas  Cook,  in  his  article  
“Schenker’s  Theory  of  Music  as  Ethics”  in  The  Journal  of  Musicology  (1989),  
reveals  some  of  Schenker’s  incentive  behind  his  popular  analytical  methodology.    
Cook  details  that  in  the  original  edition  of  Schenker’s  Das  Meisterwerk  in  der  
Musik  (1925),  various  philosophical  or  political  views  were  closely  tied  to  his  

 
 

47  

insights  into  musical  structure  and  performance.    Schenker  perceived  there  to  be  
a  fundamental  lack  of  musicianship  and  intellect  among  performers  and  
audiences  alike.  In  Schenker’s  words:    
The  audience  as  well  as  performers  …  plod  along  from  one  passage  to  the  
next  with  the  laziest  of  ears  and  without  the  slightest  musical  
imagination.  All  they  hear  is  the  constant  change  between  tonic  and  
dominant,  cadence  and  cadence,  melodies,  themes,  repetitions,  pedal  
point  (Cook  1989).    
 
Such  metaphysical  excerpts  have  since  been  removed,  perhaps  through  a  
revisionist  approach,  as  they  are  absent  from  Oswald  Jonas’  1954  edition  of  
Schenker’s  “Harmony”  (Cook  1989).  Nonetheless,  Schenker’s  method  suppresses  
foreground  contrast  in  order  to  stress  the  large-­‐scale  continuity  of  the  music;  in  
other  words,  the  connections  that  he  believed  performers  failed  to  acknowledge  
or  convey.      
Alternative  approaches  to  analysis  have  found  success  in  the  field  of  
music  scholarship  as  well.    Theorist  Steve  Larson  in  his  article  “Integrated  Music  
Learning  and  Improvisation:  Teaching  Musicianship  and  Theory  Through  Menus,  
Maps  and  Models”  in  College  Music  Symposium  (1995)  details  his  view  that  the  
study  of  music  is  achieved  best  when  “integrated”:  that  is,  the  combining  of  
different  ways  of  understanding  musical  relationships.    Larson’s  ways  of  musical  
understanding  include  intellect  (mind),  visual  (eyes),  aural  (ears),  vocal  (voice),  
digital  (fingers),  emotional  (heart),  kinesthetic  (body)  and  that  to  integrate  two  
or  more  of  these  ways  of  knowing  strengthens  one’s  understanding.    For  

 
 

48  

example:  someone  may  know  intellectually  that  the  fourth  and  seventh  scale  
degrees  are  active  tones  that  tend  to  resolve  to  the  third  and  eighth  degrees  
respectively,  and  may  also  recognize  these  resolutions  as  an  aural  event.    
However,  until  that  person  associates  these  two  ways  of  knowing,  the  learning  is  
not  integrated  and  thus  the  person  would  not  be  able  to  identify  the  resolution.    
In  integrating  two  ways  of  knowing,  each  form  of  understanding  is  strengthened  
by  the  other  (Larson  1995).    In  the  same  way,  an  element  of  musical  structure  
may  be  observed  as  more  than  purely  one  type  of  structure;  what  is  deemed  
structural  or  motivic  may  also  be  seen  as  melodic  or  formulaic,  and  the  
acknowledgment  of  the  structure  as  more  than  one  type  may  only  strengthen  an  
analytical  understanding  of  it.    Noted  musicologist  Bruno  Nettl  has  also  
championed  the  integrated  approach  to  musical  analysis,  favoring  cooperation  
among  all  domains  of  music  scholarship,  encouraging  the  interdisciplinary  
potential  of  music  research  that  embraces  all  levels  of  music  education  in  his  
article  “Thoughts  on  Improvisation:  A  Comparative  Approach”  from  The  Musical  
Quarterly  (Nettl  1974).    As  we  observe,  as  an  alternative  to  a  more  objective  
approach,  musical  analysis  may  also  be  subjective:  a  prominent  example  of  a  
speculative  study  in  jazz  analysis  is  George  Russell’s  Lydian  Chromatic  Concept  of  
Tonal  Organization,  Volume  One:  The  Art  and  Science  of  Tonal  Gravity  (2001).    
Based  on  the  theoretical  concept  of  “tonal  gravity,”  Russell  argues  that  the  
Lydian  mode,  not  the  Ionian,  is  the  true  centre  for  harmonic  resolution.    Though  
controversial,  Russell’s  unique  concept  managed  to  inspire  Miles  Davis,  John  

 
 

49  

Coltrane  and  countless  others  to  experiment  with  different  tonal  centers,  and  
was  a  catalyst  for  the  modal  movement  in  jazz.    Henry  Martin  has  commented,  
“One  is  hard  pressed  to  think  of  any  creative  thought  in  music  theory  as  having  
as  much  power  in  jazz  since.  ”  (1996:13).    Bold  in  its  assertion  and  admired  for  
its  meticulousness,  Russell’s  theoretical  study  managed  to  make  an  indelible  
impact  on  jazz  history;  the  use  of  alternate  tonal  centers  is  arguably  as  much  an  
inherent  attribute  of  contemporary  jazz  today  as  is  functional  harmony.    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

50  

Chapter  4  
Jazz  Pedagogy  and  Analysis:  Elements  of  Style  
 
 

In  developing  coherence  through  improvisation,  musical  components  

may  transmit  musical  meaning  from  performer/composer  to  listener  by  way  of  
general  style  familiarity  or  particular  idiosyncrasies  of  a  performer’s  musical  
approach.    These  attributes  of  a  particular  performer’s  musical  approach  may  be  
termed  “elements  of  style,”  and  a  listener’s  recognition  of  familiar  musical  
elements  may  be  termed  “style  familiarity.”    Elements  of  style  are  compiled  
through  the  performer’s  process  of  forming,  a  process  that  varies  greatly  from  
one  musician  to  another.    In  traditional  Western  art  music  traditions  this  
pedagogical  process  is  deemed  formal  training,  being  that  it  is  held  in  
accordance  with  conventional  requirements  and  customs.    In  jazz  training  
however,  the  notion  of  pedagogy  more  often  includes  greater  variances  in  
development  and  methodology,  in  an  ongoing  process  that  constantly  shapes  an  
improviser’s  musical  lexicon.      
Paul  Berliner  (1994)  has  noted  how  in  the  early  stages  of  development,  
the  methodology  of  a  jazz  performer  often  manifests  itself  in  unique  forms  of  
musical  representation  that  may  vary  from  musician  to  musician.    Many  jazz  
musicians,  particularly  those  with  a  deficiency  in  formal  musical  training,  may  
think  of  music  in  more  graphic  visualizations,  by  memorizing  corresponding  
finger  patterns  and  positions,  or  in  abstract  “shapes.”    Indeed,  the  use  of  a  

 
 

51  

standardized  system  for  representation  is  not  a  prerequisite  for  musically  
conveying  musical  ideas.    In  fact,  musical  literacy  has  varied  greatly  among  
virtuosic  improvisers  over  time.    Louis  Armstrong  was  not  known  to  be  a  prolific  
sight-­‐reader,  but  his  sense  of  relative  pitch  was  quite  advanced,  allowing  him  the  
ability  to  reproduce  the  melody  and  bass  accompaniment  to  a  piece  after  a  single  
hearing  (Berliner  1994,  28).    With  reference  to  varied  processes  of  forming  
among  musicians,  Berliner  notes:  
The  varied  and  subtle  ways  in  which  a  music  culture  actually  shapes  the  
sensibilities  and  skills  of  its  members  are  not  always  apparent  to  the  
members  themselves  until  they  encounter  individuals  whose  
backgrounds  differ  from  their  own  (Berliner  1994,  30).  

 
This  is  a  worthwhile  consideration  for  the  jazz  analyst  as  well;  though  an  artist’s  
conceptualization  should  not  dictate  a  theorist’s  style  of  analysis,  a  reflection  on  
the  varied  ways  in  which  an  improviser  or  composer  conceptualizes  their  music  
may  indeed  prove  valuable.  
 
4.  1  –  Alternative  Analytical  Readings  /  Analytical  Overlap  
Often  in  musical  analysis,  a  theorist  may  observe  a  musical  component  or  
element  of  style  in  one  representative  or  conceptual  light  and  not  another.  The  
analysis  of  a  piece  in  a  more  notist  style  of  analysis  may  lack  the  
acknowledgment  of  an  alternative  analytical  reading  or  an  area  of  analytical  
overlap.    For  example,  we  can  observe  a  disparity  between  Gunther  Schuller’s  
interpretations  of  Sonny  Rollins’  motivic  style  (in  his  The  Jazz  Review  paper  on  

 
 

52  

Rollins’  “Blue  7”  solo,  see  Chapter  2),  versus  Rollins’  own  self-­‐proclaimed  
conceptual  approach  to  improvisation.    Schuller  observes  the  strong  semblance  
of  seemingly  purposeful  thematic  development,  where  motives  emerge  and  
reappear  in  similar  or  developed  forms  much  later  in  the  improvisation;  the  idea  
being  that  they  are  employed  to  create  a  structure  of  logic  not  dissimilar  to  the  
aesthetic  values  of  Western  art  music  traditions.    However  in  a  2009  Q  radio  
interview  with  Jian  Ghomeshi  (CBC),  Rollins  elaborated  on  his  conceptual  
approach  to  improvisation,  and  where  he  strives  to  have  his  cognitive  activity  
focused:  
I  want  to  be  connecting  to  the  subconscious  …  that’s  where  I  want  to  
go…where  everything  is  blotted  out  and  where  creativity  happens.    To  get  
there  I  practiced  –  I’m  a  prolific  practicer,  I  still  practice  everyday.    You  
really  have  to  have  the  skills  –  then,  you  want  to  not  think  when  you’re  
playing.    When  I  play  in  concert  sometimes  I  play  things  that  surprise  me  
–  I  say,  ‘Wow,  where  did  that  come  from,  how  did  I  think  of  that?’  It  brings  
me  back  to  consciousness  for  a  moment,  when  I  realize  that  I’m  thinking.    
But  in  general,  you  want  to  be  away  from  consciousness  (CBC,  2009).  
 
Rollins’  recounting  of  his  own  improvisational  process  provides  some  
evidence  that  his  cognitive  activity  is  focused  on  the  moment  at  hand.    Though  
this  does  not  discount  long-­‐term  structural  planning  in  his  improvisation,  his  
desire  for  the  evasion  of  conscious  thought  leaves  additional  conceptual  
readings  of  musical  components  open  to  interpretation  as  well.    While  the  
motivic  connections  and  structural  planning  observed  by  Schuller  in  his  
improvisations  are  one  analytical  reading,  another  could  observe  the  phrases  as  
“formulaic”  or  idiosyncratic  elements  of  style;  the  characteristic  use  of  a  

 
 

53  

distinctive  phrase  favored  by  Rollins.    Nonetheless,  we  can  observe  that  an  
alternative  analytical  reading  or  area  of  analytical  overlap  is  perceivable,  and  
though  not  dictated  by,  it  may  be  informed  by  the  artist’s  conceptualization.      
Rollins  is  not  the  only  jazz  improviser  to  acknowledge  the  desire  for  
cognitive  focus  on  the  present  moment.  Drummer  Max  Roach  also  defined  his  
conceptual  approach  to  improvisation  as  a  response  to  the  moment  at  hand,  
based  on  what  directly  precedes  it:  
After  you  initiate  the  solo,  one  phrase  determines  what  the  next  is  going  
to  be.    From  the  first  note  that  you  hear,  you  are  responding  to  what  
you’ve  just  played:  you  just  said  this  on  your  instrument,  and  now  that’s  a  
constant.    What  follows  from  that?  And  so  on  and  so  forth.    And  finally,  
let’s  wrap  it  up  so  that  everybody  understands  that  that’s  what  you’re  
doing.    It’s  like  language:  you’re  talking,  you’re  speaking,  you’re  
responding  to  yourself.    When  I  play,  it’s  like  having  a  conversation  with  
myself  (Berliner,  1994:192).  
 
Further,  Max  Roach  has  noted  that  not  only  does  he  observe  a  communication  
with  himself  when  he  improvises,  but  also  a  communication  with  the  
accompanying  musicians  in  the  ensemble,  the  audience,  and  notably  his  
“influences,”  or  the  lineage  of  musicians  that  have  influenced  his  elements  of  
style.      
 
4.  2  –  Components  of  Style  
In  visual  art,  the  process  of  assimilating  ideas  from  another  artist’s  work  
is  commonly  referred  to  as  “appropriation.”    This  process  is  much  the  same  in  
music,  as  musicians  transcribe  and  develop  elements  of  musical  vocabulary  from  

 
 

54  

other  musicians  in  order  to  generate  their  own  individual  musical  lexicon,  
typically  referred  to  as  “musical  borrowing.”    In  Metheny’s  own  words,  his  
musical  output  is  broadly  defined  as  an  appropriation  of  many  his  favorite  
musical  attributes:  whether  that  be  the  appropriation  of  a  particular  musician’s  
style,  the  idiosyncrasies  of  a  genre,  or  a  more  conceptual  element.    
I  started  writing  tunes  that  referenced  everything  I  loved.    That  includes  a  
lot  of  qualities  about  having  grown  up  in  Missouri,  a  lot  of  qualities  that  
are  in  fact  related  to  what  was  happening  in  pop  music  at  the  time  (Niles  
2009,  19).    I  can't  really  say  too  much  more  than  what  [what  my  musical  
output]  is:  a  very  accurate  picture  of  where  I  was  at  that  moment  that  in  
many  ways  reflects  things  that  I  still  believe  to  be  true  (Niles  2009,  35).    
 
In  an  effort  to  best  categorize  and  define  elements  of  style,  the  New  Grove  
Dictionary  of  Jazz  has  described  three  main  approaches  to  improvisation  in  the  
entry  “Jazz  Improvisation”:  a  paraphrase,  formulaic  and  motivic  style.1  
Paraphrase  Improvisation:  the  variation  or  excerpt  of  a  recognizable  
melodic  theme.    Introduced  by  Andre  Hodier  (1956)  
Formulaic  Improvisation:  the  building  of  new  material  from  a  diverse  
body  of  fragmentary  ideas.    Introduced  by  Thomas  Owens  (1974)  
Motivic  Improvisation:  the  building  of  new  material  through  the  
development  of  a  single  fragmentary  idea.    Introduced  by  Gunther  
Schuller  (1958)  

                                                                                                               
1  The  aforementioned  approaches  to  improvisation  are  outlined  by  Gushee  
(1977)  as  frameworks  for  analysis,  however  New  Grove  defines  them  through  a  
pedagogical  lens.  

 
 

55  

The  New  Grove  Dictionary  elaborates  that  paraphrase  improvisation  grew  out  of  
simple  ornamental  flourishes  on  the  original  melody  of  a  piece’s  theme  (an  early  
approach  to  improvisation),  but  can  also  include  allusions  to  recognizable  
themes  from  other  pieces.    Formulaic  improvisation  (other  terms:  ideas,  figures,  
gestures,  motifs,  fragments,  licks)  is  usually  distinguished  by  rhythmic  and  
intervallic  shape,  tonal  relationships  and  principal  harmonic  goals.    Motivic  
improvisation  is  achieved  through  the  use  of  one  or  more  (but  never  more  than  a  
few)  motifs  that  form  the  basis  for  a  section  of  improvisation,  that  are  then  
developed  through  transposition,  rhythmic  displacement,  diminution,  
augmentation  or  inversion.      
Though  some  improvisers  may  favor  the  use  of  one  of  these  approaches  
more  than  another,  it  is  more  likely  that  a  combination  of  these  three  approaches  
is  employed  throughout  the  course  of  an  improvisation.    Deliberate  versus  
spontaneous  use  of  stylistic  elements  is  also  an  area  of  concern.    In  the  same  
article,  New  Grove  also  cites  the  notion  of  risk  and  repetition  as  a  fundamental  
concern  for  the  jazz  improviser:  
The  essence  of  improvisation  in  jazz  is  the  delicate  balance  between  
spontaneous  invention  and  reference  to  the  familiar.    With  spontaneous  
invention  comes  the  danger  of  loss  of  control  but  also  the  opportunity  for  
creativity  of  a  high  order,  yet  without  reference  to  the  familiar,  
paradoxically,  creativity  cannot  truly  be  valued.  
 
In  the  process  of  experimentation,  musicians  learn  to  transform  accidents  into  
creative  readjustments  of  the  improvisational  line.    Through  taking  risks,  jazz  

 
 

56  

improvisers  aim  to  redefine  conventional  standards  of  virtuosity  through  
spontaneous  ingenuity.    Yet  the  element  of  risk  may  vary  greatly  from  
improviser  to  improviser.    Charlie  Parker’s  performances  based  on  the  same  
piece  were  often  startlingly  different,  achieved  through  his  varied  use  of  
formulas.    By  contrast,  Louis  Armstrong  often  repeated  many  details  of  a  solo  in  
different  performances  of  the  same  piece.    Yet,  where  his  well-­‐rehearsed  
reiterations  lack  surprise,  they  maintain  all  other  qualities  of  great  melodic  and  
rhythmic  improvisation.    Returning  to  Hodier’s  concept  of  continuity  of  thought,  
a  consideration  of  an  improviser’s  process  of  forming  for  becomes  relevant  when  
making  aesthetic  observations.    As  we  have  observed,  sound  development  and  
coherence  for  an  improviser  can  be  achieved  in  various  ways,  ranging  from  
spontaneous  free  variation,  deliberate  pre-­‐planning,  to  the  crystallization  of  
thought  over  time  and  with  much  practice.  
 
4.3  –  Metheny’s  Elements  of  Style  
As  Pat  Metheny  is  the  subject  of  my  research,  an  investigation  of  his  
approach  to  conceptualization,  pre-­‐planning,  risk  and  repetition  is  valuable:  
The  ideal  result  is  to  walk  out  on  stage  warmed-­‐up,  prepared,  and  ready  
to  go  without  ever  having  ‘thought’  of  any  particular  idea,  so  that  the  first  
solo  of  the  first  tune  is  really  the  first  moment  of  the  day  that  I  am  fully  
engaged  in  the  more  narrative  type  of  playing  that  I  aspire  to  (Metheny  
2011).    
 

 
 

57  

This  quote  comes  from  Metheny’s  book  Pat  Metheny:  Guitar  Etudes,  in  which  
presented  warm-­‐up  etudes  are  not  pre-­‐composed  pieces,  but  rather  
transcriptions  of  improvised  scalar  patterns  and  intervals  as  performed  by  
Metheny  that  mimic  the  unstructured  and  spontaneous  quality  of  improvisation,  
while  avoiding  any  formulaic  elements  of  style.    The  idea  for  Metheny  when  
warming  up  is  to  improvise  abstract  ideas  in  a  variety  of  keys,  and  manipulate  
their  development  through  its  “natural  conclusion”  to  new  ideas,  over  an  
improvised  harmonic  framework.    Because  Metheny  is  so  well-­‐versed  in  specific,  
standard,  and  generalized  frameworks  in  the  jazz  idiom,  he  aims  to  avoid  
practicing  them  prior  to  a  performance  so  as  to  allow  himself  an  unequivocal  
element  of  risk,  and  to  rid  himself  of  the  repetitive  or  unintentional  structural  
planning  that  inhibits  the  “narrative”  style  of  improvisation  he  speaks  of.      
For  Metheny,  spontaneous  creation  is  a  primary  goal.    Structural  pre-­‐
planning  of  the  improvisation  is  not  of  primary  concern.    As  Hodier  in  Jazz:  It’s  
Evolution  and  Essence  discusses,  the  crystallization  of  thought  over  successive  
performances  on  a  piece  will  play  a  large  part  in  the  sound  development  of  
Metheny’s  improvisations.    Lawrence  Gushee’s  concept  of  the  “schematic  
rhetorical  plan”  might  be  another  sufficient  method  to  express  this.    Throughout  
the  course  of  an  improvisation,  musical  events  act  to  create  overall  continuity  
and  coherence.    To  develop  this  coherence,  we  can  observe  four  large-­‐scale  
categories  of  musical  events  at  work  to  create  coherence  in  the  improvisational  
style  of  Pat  Metheny:  Melodic,  Structural,  Motivic,  and  Formulaic.    The  New  Grove  

 
 

58  

Dictionary  of  Jazz  article  “Improvisation”  outlines  three  of  these  categories  of  
improvisation  (see  above),  labeling  the  Melodic  category  as  “Paraphrase”  and  
excluding  the  Structural  category.    We  will  expand  upon  these  definitions  to  best  
describe  the  way  in  which  Metheny  is  observed  to  employ  them.      
Melodic:  More  than  simply  paraphrase  improvisation  (embellishments  on  
a  melodic  theme),  the  Melodic  category  of  improvisation  is  that  which  is  
readily  tuneful,  accessible  and  ultimately  memorable.    Though  
sophistication  is  often  a  mandate  of  the  jazz  vernacular,  simple  more  
step-­‐wise  diatonic  melodic  content  is  an  element  of  improvisation  that  
can  also  be  used  to  great  effect  and  is  often  overlooked.    Metheny’s  use  of  
the  Melodic  category  adds  accessibility  to  his  improvisations  and  often  
gives  them  a  singable  quality.    In  this  category,  an  improviser  may  utilize  
‘ear  playing’,  more  than  in  any  other.      
Structural:  Structural  improvisation  is  the  use  of  arpeggiation  to  outline  
chord  tones,  extensions,  and  voice-­‐leading  structures.    Fluency  in  this  
category  of  improvisation  is  achieved  through  the  dedicated  practice  and  
application  of  musical  fundamentals,  including  triads,  tertial  seventh-­‐
chord  sequences,  arpeggiated  intervallic  chord  structures,  and  upper-­‐
structure  triads.    Metheny  is  able  to  generate  non-­‐formulaic  structural  
content  through  a  strong  grasp  of  these  musical  fundamentals.    
Motivic:  The  manipulation  of  a  melodic  phrase  (motive)  that  follows  the  
development  of  a  musical  idea  for  a  prolonged  period.    This  manipulation  

 
 

59  

of  melody  makes  the  Motivic  category  the  most  readily  generative,  and  
the  most  similar  to  the  compositional  techniques  of  European  art  music  
traditions.    As  our  brains  crave  structure  and  form,  this  generative  
manipulation  of  melody  acts  to  create  memorable  content  by  virtue  of  
inherent  merits,  outside  the  realm  of  style  familiarity  or  a  formulaic  
approach.      
Formulaic:  Calling  upon  a  diverse  body  of  fragmentary  ideas,  it  is  the  
development  of  an  idiosyncratic  collection  of  formulas,  distinguishable  by  
rhythmic  and  intervallic  shape,  tonal  relationships  and  harmonic  goals.    
Distinctive  and  individualistic,  Metheny’s  formulas  play  a  large  role  in  
defining  personalized  characteristics  of  his  style.    Additionally,  formulas  
may  also  contain  Melodic,  Structural  and  Motivic  components,  making  
them  the  most  inclusive  and  versatile  improvisational  mode  for  study.    
Though  equally  adept  in  each  of  these  improvisational  categories,  
Metheny’s  use  of  a  formulaic  system  will  receive  the  greatest  attention  for  the  
purposes  of  this  study.    The  formulaic  category’s  distinguishable  features  and  
harmonic  relationships  establish  style  familiarity  and  recognition,  readily  
encouraging  systematic  classification  and  qualitative  definition  of  characteristic  
elements  of  style.    Thomas  Owens  (1974)  asserts  that  a  formulaic  system  is  
necessary  to  allow  for  the  conception  of  coherent  ideas  at  high  tempos  of  
improvisation,  and  it  should  be  no  secret  that  the  consistent  level  of  coherence  
maintained  throughout  Metheny’s  improvisations  owes  much  of  its  fluency  to  

 
 

60  

formulaic  elements  of  style.    Formulaic  systems  also  contain  a  myriad  of  
appropriated  elements  from  a  performer’s  process  of  forming,  including  
theoretical  concepts,  stylistic  vernacular  and  appropriated  genres,  typifying  a  
performer’s  style  and  transmitting  a  high  degree  of  musical  meaning.    
Furthermore,  with  the  aim  of  this  study  as  both  analytical  and  pedagogical,  the  
analysis  of  Metheny’s  use  of  formulas  sheds  light  on  not  only  on  how  they  
contribute  to  overall  coherence,  but  also  their  theoretical  applications;  providing  
a  primary  resource  for  any  musician  interested  in  effectively  appropriating  
elements  of  Metheny’s  improvisational  style.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

61  

Chapter  5  
A  Formulaic  System  
 
 In  the  three-­‐tier  formulaic  analysis  of  Pat  Metheny’s  improvisational  
approach  that  follows,  we  will  define  the  musical  considerations  that  unify  a  
collection  of  formulas  into  “formulaic  categories”,  grouped  and  defined  by  their  
quantitative  structural  attributes  and  qualitative  function  they  serve  within  an  
improvisation.    These  formulaic  categories  are  comprised  of  “formulaic  species”  
and  their  variants,  categorized  based  on  primary  structural  attributes  and  
variants  thereof.    Finally,  the  smallest  units,  which  we  will  identify  as  “formulaic  
components”;  we  will  examine  their  interrelationship  with  larger  formulas  
herein.      
Let  us  begin  by  establishing  style  familiarity:  Metheny’s  improvisational  
style  is  grounded  in  the  vernacular  of  mainstream  jazz  concepts,  with  a  flair  for  
spontaneity  and  free  variation.    This  is  a  musical  tradition  that  originated  in  the  
late  1930’s  with  musicians  like  Coleman  Hawkins,  was  established  in  the  late  
1940’s  by  Charlie  Parker  and  his  contemporaries,  and  further  developed  by  
musicians  like  John  Coltrane  and  Ornette  Coleman  in  the  1950’s,  Wayne  Shorter  
and  Herbie  Hancock  in  the  1960’s,  Michael  Brecker  and  Chick  Corea  in  the  
1970’s,  and  beyond.    Jazz  soloists  such  as  these  established  and  popularized  
many  of  the  customary  elements  of  style  that  are  still  used  in  jazz  improvisation  
today  and  inform  the  melodic  devices  used  by  Pat  Metheny.    These  elements  of  

 
 

62  

style  include  the  devies  like  melodic  chromaticism  through  melodic  enclosures  
and  passing  tones,  the  establishment  melodic  vocabulary  for  harmonic  cadences,  
the  application  of  structural  devices  like  tertial  seventh  chord  arpeggios  and  
triads,  melodic  devices  based  on  both  paraphrase  or  free  variation,  pentatonic  
vocabulary  evoking  the  aesthetic  of  blues  and  folk,  the  use  of  generative  motivic  
devices,  and  the  use  of  melodic  reharmonization  inferring  temporary  alterations  
to  a  theme’s  harmonic  framework.    Each  of  these  melodic  devices  are  manifested  
in  the  improvisational  style  of  Pat  Metheny,  both  at  the  formulaic  component  
level  and  formulaic  species  level,  and  ultimately  inform  the  formulaic  categories  
that  comprise  Chapters  6-­‐12.      
Much  as  Owens  or  Martin  depict  Charlie  Parker’s  improvisational  style  as  
embracing  a  significant  formulaic  component,  so  too  does  the  improvisational  
style  of  Pat  Metheny.    It  can  be  argued  that  in  order  to  enable  a  high  level  of  
melodic  coherence  while  engaging  with  the  chromaticism  and  sophisticated  
elements  of  style  that  typify  mainstream  jazz  vernacular,  the  development  of  a  
formulaic  system  for  jazz  improvisers  is  essential.    The  development  of  this  
formulaic  system  is  for  many  performers  a  central  part  of  what  gives  their  style  
much  of  its  individuality  and  character.    Pat  Metheny’s  formulas  are  uniquely  his  
own,  largely  acting  to  “avoid  the  cliché”  while  still  keeping  in  line  with  
mainstream  jazz  concepts.      
 
 

 
 

63  

5.  1  –  Metheny’s  Formulaic  Components  
 

Pat  Metheny’s  formulaic  elements  of  style  are  complex,  and  therefore  it  is  

useful  to  first  observe  small-­‐scale  idiosyncratic  “formulaic  components”  before  
examining  larger-­‐scale  formulaic  excerpts  from  his  improvisations.    Large-­‐scale  
formulaic  phrases  are  observed  to  be  the  sum  of  these  smaller  formulaic  
components,  and  an  examination  of  them  will  help  prepare  us  for  the  more  
complex  “formulaic  species”  that  lie  in  the  chapters  ahead.    These  formulaic  
components  are  presented  in  their  most  distilled  form,  within  the  most  
straightforward  harmonic  context.    Fingering  markings  have  been  provided  as  
an  additional  consideration  for  guitarists  to  provide  an  understanding  of  how  
these  components  are  executed  along  the  fretboard,  and  slur  markings  indicate  
technical  considerations  of  hammer-­‐ons  and  pull-­‐offs.    We  will  continue  to  refer  
to  formulaic  components  with  the  term  “figures”  throughout  this  research.    Each  
formulaic  component  is  named  and  described,  with  its  formulaic  application  

Formulaic Components

explained:

Figure 1

&4

C

Figure 2

C

C

œ œ œ ‰ Ó

œ œ ‰ Ó

4

1

3

œ œ œJ ‰ Ó

1

C

C

 

1  T
Figure  
enclosure.  
b3œ1:  Diatonic  
b œ 2he  1œtarget  note  is  a  scale  
b œ œtone,  approached  
œ

&

œ J ‰ Ó

œ

4
from  
a  scale  tone  above  and  below.    

C

Figure 3

 
7


C

Figure 4

& œ #œ

œ #œ

œ

9

Figure 5

1

j ‰
œ

œ #œ

1

1

C

j ‰
œ

Œ

‰ Ó

J ‰ Ó

C

Œ

Œ

œ

j ‰
œ

œ bœ

3

C

œ bœ

œ bœ

j
œ

3

4

j ‰
œ
Œ


Œ

Formulaic Components

 
 
Figure 1

Figure 2

&4

C

4

Figure 3

3

1

Formulaic Components

C

C


& 4C œ œJ ‰ Ó

4
&4 œ œ ‰ Ó

bœ œ œ ‰ Ó
1
œ 3œ 1œ ‰ Ó

1

3

Figure 1

C

œ œ œ ‰ Ó

œ œ ‰ Ó

1

C

2

64  

1

C

Formulaic Components

œ œ œJ ‰ Ó

C

œC b œ œJ ‰ Ó
œ œ œJ ‰ Ó

 

Figure  C2:  Non-­‐diatonic  
 The  target  note  
C
C is  a  scale  tone,  
j enclosure.  

‰ Œ
Œ
j ‰ ‰ ‰
& Œ3
œ
1
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
2 1
œ
b œ C œ 1œ ‰ Ó
bœ œ œ ‰ Ó 3
7
œC b œ   œJ ‰ Ó
Figureapproached  
1 &
fJrom  a  non-­‐diatonic  
note  above  or  below.  
4
1
3
1
4C œ
œ œ œ ‰C Ó
Figure 4 4
œ œ œJ ‰ Ó
&4 œ œ ‰ Ó
C
Figure 3
‰ Œ Components
‰ Œ
& Cœ # œ œ # œ œjFormulaic
œ b œ œ b œ œj
j ‰ CŒ
C4 j ‰
Œ3
‰ ‰
Figure 2 9& 1ŒC
1 œ
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
1
œ
1
3
2
C
Figure 5 7
b œ C œ 1œ ‰ Ó
bœ œ œ ‰ Ó 3
œC b œ œJ ‰ Ó
Figure 1 &
 
J
4
1
3
1
C œ
‰ œ œ œŒ ‰ Ó
œ œ œ ‰ C jÓ
Figure 4 4& 4
œ
œ

Ó
&4
œ

œ  Uses  a  chromatic  
J
œ
b œŒ fragment.  
passing  
jFormulaic
‰ t2one  
C1
Figure Figure  
3 11& 1C 3:  Chromatic  
j ‰ pŒassing  
1
Components
2
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
C
Figure
C
3
j tones  
Figure 62 9 1ŒC
‰ C Œon  an  uŒpbeat.  
1scale  
&b3etween  
note  
two  
  b œ 4 j ‰ ‰ ‰
œ
1
1
2
œ
#
œ
œ
CbӜ C
j ‰ ŒœC b œœ œ Ó ‰ Ó
Figure

Figure 51 7 &
& 4 œ 1 œJ ‰ Óœ œ 1œ œ3 b œœ1 ‰ œ Ó 3
J
œ œ œ ‰ C jÓ
12 4
‰ œ œ œŒ ‰ Ó
C œ œ œ ‰1 Ó 4
Figure 4 4& 4
J

œ
Figure 7
œ


C
Figure 3 11 1C
j
1
1
‰ Œ
& œ #œ 2 œ #œ œ ‰ 2 Œ
œj b œ ‰ œ ŒCb œ œjÓ
C
ÓŒC
6 9& C
Figure 2
j
œ b œ ‰ œ Œ œ Œ 3œ
‰ ‰ ‰
& 13
4 j
1
 
2 1
œœ # œ 13 œ
œ
b
œ
j
14 C
b
œ
b
œ
b
œ
Ó

Œ
Ó
œ ‰ Ó
œ 1J ‰ Óœ œ œ œ b2œœ ‰ œ Ó 3
œ
Figure 5 7 &
J
CC 4:  Chromatic  passing  tone  sequence.  
Figure 8Figure  
12
 Uses  
chromatic  
C
1
4
Figure 4 4

Œ passing  
j
j
Figure 7 & C
œ
b
œ

œ
C œœ
Figure 3 11& C
b œ j ‰ b œœŒ
jŒ ‰ Œ  
1 œ adjacent  
& 1œœin  a#  œscale  
1 œ featuring  
2 œ fragment  
2
b
œ
notes,  
t
wo  
m
a2  
i
ntervals.  
#
œ
œ
b
œ
16 1Ó
2
œ œj1b œ ‰ œ Œ2 œ Œ13œj ‰ Œ 4 j œ Ó‰ ‰ ‰
Figure 6 9& 1ŒC
1
œ #œ 3
œ bœ œ
2
Figure 5 714 CÓ
j ‰3 Œ
1
Ó
&
œC
œ œ œ bœ
CC
Figure 8
Figure 4 12

Œ
jj
1

bb œœ4j
œ
œ
b
œ
Figure 7 & C

Œj ‰ Œ
œ
œ
‰ 2 œŒ
11& œ

1
1 œ

b
œ
 
#
œ
œ
b
œ
œ #œ 2
œ
1
16
2
1
j
Figure 6 9 11CÓ

Œ
Ó
3
4

&
bœ œ œ
œ
C 5:  Descending  
enclosure  c2hain.  
 Ejach  ‰chromatic  
mÓ3  interval  acts  to  
Figure 5Figure  
Œ
14& Ó
3
œ

œ
œ
œ
Figure 8 12 C

Œ
j a  target  
4
& œ the  next,  d1 escending  
encircle  
ub œntil  reaching  
note.    
b
œ
œ
œ
Figure 7
j
C
11

Œ

1 bœ

& 1œ

Figure 6 16& 1CÓ
Ó
2
œ 1b œ œ 2 œ 1 œj ‰ Œ
j ‰ Œ
14
Ó
3
2


œ œ œ bœ
Figure 2

Figure 8

Figure 7

12

C


& 1Ó
C

16

14

Figure 8

2

4


œ 1b œ

3

œ

œ

2

œ

2

j
œ
1 j
œ

C

16

œ

1

1

œ

2

1

œ

2

1

j
œ

Œ

Œ

Œ

 

Ó

Figure 3

Figure 4

 
 

Figure 4

Figure 5

Figure 5

7

C
C

9

1C

C

1

j ‰ Œ

œ #œ œ j ‰ Œ
7&
œ #œ 1 œ #œ œ
C

11

Œ

1C

2

j ‰ Œ
œ #œ œ
œ 1 bœ

1

j ‰ ‰ ‰
œ bœ œ j ‰ Œ
œ b œ3 œ b œ œ

3C

1

& œ #œ
9&

3

C

4

œ bœ
3j
œ

œ‰ b œ
4

1

2

j ‰
œŒ

65  

Œ

Figure  
C 6:  Diatonic  enclosure  featuring  an  ascending  chromatic  passing  



œ
Ó
11&fragment.  
tone  
1
2    
œ1 œ

Figure 6

Figure 6
Figure 7

Figure 7

12

C
C

1

4

C
C

œ

3

œ
b4œ


12& Ó
14

Ó
14& œ

j
œj

œ2 b œ

j
œj
œ


œ

œ
œ

2

j
œ



Œ

Œ
Œ
Œ

Ó
Ó
Ó

Œ

 

Ó

& 7:  Descending  
œ chromatic  
b œ œ pœassing  
Figure  
œjtone  fragment  to  enclosure.    

Figure 8

Figure 8

16

œ

1C

2

1

œ

2

2

1

2

1

œ

16

3

œ

1

2

1

j
œ

Œ

Œ

 

Figure  8:  Expanded  ascending  enclosure.    In  this  example  the  target  note  
is  approached  from  a  m3  below,  two  descending  chromatic  notes  above,  
and  a  ma2  below.  
2
Figure 9

Formulaic Components

C

17

3

œ

œ

j ‰
œ

œ

4

Œ

Ó

C
Formulaic Components
C 9:  Triad  arpeggiation  with  enclosures.    The  enclosures  are  
Figure Figure  
9

Figure 10 2

 


Œ
Ó
j ‰

œ œ œ
œ
Ó
j ‰ Œ
19& Œ
œ dFormulaic
œ third  
b œ an3œnd  fifth  
featured  
on  the  
b2œegrees  
1 of  aœ  major  triad.    
Components
2
œ
Figure 11

Figure 9
Figure 10

17

CCma7
œC

1

&

21& Ó
17

Figure 12 19
Figure 10
Figure 11

œ

4

3

3

CC
C ma7

œ

œ

œ œ
b œ‰ n œ
œ
3

4

j j ‰ ‰ ŒŒ
œ bœœ œ
œ
Œ
œ j œ‰
œ 4 œ 3 œ1
2

1

&
œ ‰œ m
j  œ  j‰ ‰ Œ Œ
œ a2  b œœto  enclosure.  
&1 œÓ 10:  4œœDescending  
œ
œ
Figure  
œ
œ j ‰ Œ
œ œ œ œ
œ
23&1
19
œ2 2œ 1 1œ
3
Figure 13 21 C
Figure 11
Figure 12

C ma7

œ
&

25&
21 1œ
1C

Figure 14 23 C
1C
Figure 12
C
Figure 13

œœ
œ

4

&
& œœ # œœ
27&1
23 1œ
œ

C
Figure13
15 25 1C
Figure
Figure 14
C

Ó
&
&œ œ
29& œ

25

Figure 16 27 11C

3

1

œœ
23 œ

j ‰
œœjj ‰‰
1 œ
1

2

1

ÓÓ
Ó
ÓÓ
Ó

jj ‰‰ ŒŒ
œ
œj ‰ Œ
1

ÓÓ
Ó

œœ
œ

œ
œ
œ

œœ œ
œ
œ bœ

œœ
œ

Œ
œ
œ

nœ œ œ
œ
œ bœ
œ œ œœ 2 œ

‰ Œ
œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œjj ‰ Œ
œ
œ j ‰ Œ
n œ 1œ œ œ

œ
1
œ
2

2

ÓÓ

ŒŒ
Œ

œ
œ

œœ
œ

Ó

1

Ó !
Ó

 

 

2

 
 

Formulaic Components

C

Figure 9

17

Figure 10

3

œ

C

2

œ

j ‰
œ

œ

4

Œ

Ó

66  

Formulaic Components

Œ
Ó
j ‰
œ Formulaic
œ
œ
2
Ó
j ‰ Œ
œ b2œ Components
œ bœ
1
œ
œ
Figure Figure  
11
11:  Descending  pentatonic  run  to  diatonic  enclosure.    In  this  
&
19& Œ

Figure 9

17

Figure 9

CC ma7

œ

3

œ

œ
3

4

Œ

Ó

œ œ œ scale  outlines  
j
‰ Œ
Ó
& Œ a  V  m
&
example  
œ ajor  
b œ pentatonic  

œ j a  Ima7  chord.      
bœœ œ

Figure 10

1

1721

4

Figure1012 19 CC
Figure
Figure 11 2 C ma7
Figure 9
1C
4

3

3

œ

œ

4

œ

3

œ j œ‰
œ1

Œ

Ó

2
1
Formulaic Components

ÓÓ
j œj ‰ ‰ Œ Œ
œ ‰œ œœ b œœ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ 3œ œ
Ó
j ‰ ‰ ŒŒ
Ó
2 1 1œ j
œ
2
œ
œ
œ
bœ nœ
bœ 3 œ
œ
Figure 11
C
ma7
1
17
4
1 C 12:  
4 A3scending  scale  fragment  
Figure  12
Figure  
t
o  
descending  
passing  
œ
ÓÓ
œ
jj ‰ ŒŒ chromatic  
Figure 10 &
& Cœ œ œœ œœ œ œ
Formulaic
2
œ œComponentsœ j ‰ Œ
Ó
25
œ
21&f1C
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
Ó

Œ
Ó
tone  
ragment  
t
o  
e
nclosure.  
 
œ 23 œ j11 œ ‰
Figure 9

œ
Figure 14 23 C
œ
œ 2 œ 1
Figure 12
1C
19
Œ
Ó
3
j ‰ Œ
&
œ
2
1
œ œ bœ nœ
C
Figure 13
b
œ

Œ
ÓÓ
œ
Figure 11 &Cœma7 # œ
j
œ
17
& 1œ œ4 3 œ œœ nœœ b œœ 4 œœ œ œœj ‰ Œ
œ
Ó
27 1œ
j ‰ Œ
œ œ œ œ
Figure 10 23&
Ó
&1 CCœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ 22œ 11œj ‰ Œ
œ
Figure
œ
C
Figure
1315 25
1
1
21
2
Ó

Œ
Ó
j1 ‰
3
Figure 14 & C
œ
œ
Ó
Œ

Œ
œ
j
œ
Figure 12 & C

Œ
Ó !
œ
œ œ 3œœ œœ œ œ œ œj
19
&
œ
œ
œ
1
Figure  13:  Ascending/descending  
 
œ j r‰un  to  
Œ enclosure.  
Ó
œ 1œ n œ 1 œ 2 pœentatonic  
Figure 11 2529&Cœma7 # œ

Œ
Ó
œ
j
1
1
œ
&
œ
œ
œ
Figure 16
œ bœ œ 2 œ


œ
Figure 14 27 1Cœ
1
2
œ œ œ
23 1C
Ó
j ‰ Œ
&
œ
1
2
C
œ œ œ
Figure 15
œ
Œ
Figure 13 21& C
œ
Ó
œ œŒ b œ œœ œ œœ 3 œ1 j ‰‰ Œ Œ
& Œœ
!
32& Ó
j
œ
1C
Figure 12
œ
œ
œ
œ

Œ
Ó
21 œ
œ œ œœ œ
27&
2 œ 1œj
œ
œ
œ œ
29
œ
1
1
Figure 15 25 C
Ó
j ‰ Œ
1
œ
Figure 16 &1C
œ
2
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Figure 14
Figure  
C 14:  Descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  descending  
23 1Ó
Œ
&
œ œ œ2 œ 1 œj ‰ ‰œ Œ Œ Œ Ó !
œ
œ
Figure 13 & Cœ
œ j
# œ run  œœto  e1œnclosure.  
œn œ 1 œ   œ œ
29&
pentatonic  
œ
œ
Figure 16 32 11
27 C
‰ Œ
Ó
1j
& œ œ 2œ œ œ œ œ 2
œ
œ
Figure 15 25 C
Œ
1
& 1œ
œ 2 œ j ‰ œŒ
Figure 14
œ

œ
Œ
!
32&1
2
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
29
Ó
j ‰ Œ
& œ # œ œ 1œ n œ 1 œ œ
œ
Figure 16
œ
C
27 1
& Ӝ
&
œ
23
19 &1Œ
&
Figure 13 21 C

œœ

 

 

 

 

1

2

Figure  
C 15:  Ascending/descending  major  scale  fragment  Œ(root,  ma2,  ma3,  


œ
œŒ
32
Ó a3,  ma2,  
&1m
ma4,  
r
oot).  
2
œ œ

Figure 15

Figure 16

29

1

C

32

1

2

œ

œ

œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ œ œj ‰ Œ

!

1

œ

œ

œ

Œ
 

 
 

67  

Figure  16:  Enclosure  to  ascending  scale  fragment.    

3

Formulaic Components
Figure 17

C m(ma7)

&

Figure 18

33

œ

œ

1

œ

œ

2

œ

1

œ

œ

 

C

3
Figure  
minor  
scale  fragment  to  œtertial  
œ ‰ Œ  TÓhe  p3hrase  
œ œ arpeggio.  
Ó 17:  Melodic  

Components
j
J
œ œ œ
œ Formulaic
œ
œ
œ
œ
34
#
œ
C m(ma7)
begins  
on  the  ma6  degree,  with  tertial  arpeggiation  beginning  on  the  m3  

&

Figure19
17
Figure

2

C

&  
degree.  
œŒ

&

33

Figure1817
Figure
Figure 20

37

Figure
Figure 21
19

1

C

œœ

G
C m(ma7)
Ó

&

1

œ

œ
œ

Œ
1

1

2

œ

œ

jœ ‰
œ bœ
œ2
Formulaic Components

bœ œ

œ œœ

Œ

7

&

œ
39
33 1
C

34

1

Ó

3

œ
œ œ œ œ œ J ‰ Œ Ó
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ
œ Œ
œ‰
œ
bœ j
œœ
1
3

œ

œ

œ

1

j
œ

2

Œ

1

Ó

 

1
Formulaic Components
G 7Ñ9
Figure 18
C 18:  Ascending  root  position  V  major  triad  arpeggio  to  Ima7  
Figure Figure  
17

œ

œ

œ ‰Œ Œ
1 jœ œ œ ‰ œ
‰œ j œ
2
&
&7
œ
œ
œfœragment  
œ from  the  mJa6.  
arpeggio  
from  the  ma7  
tœo  œscale  
œ
G
1
40
œ
œ

Figure 20 34&
œ
Figure 22
bœ 1
b
œ2
œ
œ2
G 7œ( 9)
C
37 C m(ma7)
bӜ

& 1œC

Figure 19 33

œ

3

œ

œ

j
œ

2

1

Œ

3

Ó
œ

œ œ ‰ bœ 1 œ
ÓÓ
&
& Cӌ
œ 3 b œ œ œ b œ œ œj ‰ Œ Œ
Figure 21 41 CG
m(ma7)
7Ñ9
‰ j 2
œ œ œ œJ ‰ Œ Ó
37& Ó
2œ œ 1œ
 
œ
Figure 23
alt
77
œ œ
Figure 20 34
œ
Œœ
&
j C ‰œ
œ # œ œœ œ
&GbGœ
œœ

1 œ2 2

40
œ œ œb œroot  b œp2osition  
Figure  
m
triad  
Figure 19
33 ŒC 19:  Descending  
2 ‰ to  
Œc1hromatic  
Œ Ó passing  
&
œ 1œ ajor  
&17œ(b 9) 1 œ
j
œ
œ
œ
Figure 18
22 43 G
Cœ j ‰
œ œ
Figure
Œ
Œ
Ó
39& 1C
œ 3 b œ   1 œ b œ1
tone  
f
ragment  
t
o  
e
nclosure.  
œ
Figure 24 & CÓma7

Œ
Ó
œ
Figure 21 37 GÓ7Ñ9
‰ j b œ œ œ 2 œœC 1œ œ œ œ J ‰ Œ Ó
&
2 œ œ
41
œŒœ œ
Figure 20 34 G 7
œ
œ
#
œ
b
œ
n
œ

b œjC œ b œ‰ œ œjŒ ‰ Œ
&
&Gb7œalt n œ œ2

œ
Figure
Figure 23
19 4540 21C

1
‰ 4
Œ
21
&Œœ
j
2
1œ œ œ
b
œ
Œ
Ó
1
œ
b
œ
œ
&
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
Figure 22 39& 1Œ7 (b 9)
œ œ bœ œ 1
‰ Œ
Ó
1
43 G
 
b œ Cœ
Figure 21 37 G 7Ñ9
1
Ó

Œ
Ó
2
b
œ
&C ma7
œ
œ C
Figure
Figure24
20
G 720:  Descending  root  position  II  mœinor  triad  
Figure  
V7  chord.    Begins  
41& b œ
2
œœ ‰ Œ
j Œ‰ Œ
jœ b œ ‰ œ over  
b
œ
n
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
b
œ
&
œ
Figure 23
J
œ Œ
œ C ‰
40 G
œ1 7 alt
j
3
4
œ
45& 2
1
2
œ
1
on  the  P5  of  I1Im  a2nd  resolves  to  
a  ma3  oœ f  V7.  
Figure 22 39 17 (b 9)
œ œ bœ bœ 1 œ
Œ
Ó
&GŒ
œ œ C œ
Figure 21
‰ bœ
Œ
Ó
43&GÓ7Ñ9
œ
œ 1 œ
Figure 24

Œ
Cj
41& Cbma7
œ
œ
œ2
œ
Figure 23
œ
alt
7
1
40 G
b1œ Cœ b œ œ œj ‰ Œ
& b œ n œ 1 b œ n œ œJ ‰ 2Œ
 
Figure 22
7 (b 9)
œ 21œ b œ b œ
C
Œ
Ó
3
45&GŒ2
4
œ œ
œ
‰ bœ
Œ
Ó
43& Ó
œ
œ 1 œ
Figure 24
Figure 18 39
Figure 17

Figure 23

41

1

C ma7

1

G
& bœ nœ 1 bœ nœ
7 alt

2

œ
J

Formulaic Components

Œ

C

œ bœ

C

œ

j ‰
œ

3

Œ


œ
œ
œ2
1
2
3
1
Formulaic Components
œ
Figure 18
j
Œ
œ

Œ
Ó
C
Figure 17 &
œ 3 bœ œ bœ
œ
C
m(ma7)
 
68  
‰ j
œ œ œ œJ ‰ Œ Ó
37& Ó
1
œ
œ

œ
œ
7
œ
 
œ
Figure 20
œ
34& G
#œ œ œ
œ
b
œ
œ
2
œ
œ
œ
Figure 19 33 C
&1œ
j 2 ‰ 1 Œ
1 œ
œ
œ
œ j ‰ Œ
œ œ
Figure 18 39 1C
Ó

œ 3 bœ 1 œ bœ
œ
œ
œ
œ V7b9  J chord.  
Figure Figure  
21 37 GÓ7Ñ9
‰ j II  diminished  
‰ Œ  BÓegins  on  the  
1œ oœver  
triad  
& 21:  Descending  
œ œ œ 2œ œ
œ
Figure 20 34 G 7
#œ œ

Œ
& ob œf  IIdim  aœ2nd  
œ to  a  œma3  of  Vœj7b9.  
dim5  
resolves  
Figure 19 40 1C

Œ

j

1 œ
1
œ
œ
œ
j ‰ Œ
Figure 22 39& 1Œ7 (b 9)
œ œ bœ 1 œ
Ó
G
b œ Cœ
Figure 21 37 G 7Ñ9
1
‰ bœ
Œ
Ó
& Ó7
œ
œ2
œ
Figure 20
G

Œ
41& b œ
2
j
 
œ
œ
œ
Figure 23
œ
7 alt
1
C

Œ
40& G
œ
j
œ
2
1
œV7  altered  
œ
œ
1
Figure  
2
2:  
D
escending  
d
ominant  
s
cale  
f
ragment  
(b9,  root,  m7),  
2
b
Figure 22
œ œ bœ bœ 1
39 1Œ7 ( 9)
Œ
Ó
&G
œ œ C œ
Figure 21
‰ of  bIœ  major.  
Œ
Ó
43&GÓ7Ñ9 to  the  ma3  
œ
resolving  
œ 1 œ
Figure 24 41 C ma7

Œ
Cj
2
& bœ
œ
œ
œ
Figure 23
alt
œ
7
1
40 G
b1œ Cœ b œ œ œj ‰ Œ
& b œ n œ 1 b œ 2n œ œJ ‰ 2Œ
Figure 22
œ 1œ b œ b œ
7 (b 9)
Ó
45&GŒ2

œ œ3 C œ
‰ bœ
Œ
Ó
43& Ó
œ
 
œ 1 œ
Figure 24
œ
1C

Figure 19 33

C
41 C ma7
2
Figure 23
alt
7
Figure  23:  Expanded  descending  altered  dominant  fragment  (P5,  ma3,  #9,  

G
b œ Cœ b œ œ
& b œ n œ 1 b œ n œ œJ ‰ Œ
2
Œ2 m7),  œresolving  
b œto  tbhe  

œ ma3  

œ of  œI  3major.  
b9,  45&
root,  
œ

Figure 24

43

1

C ma7

& bœ nœ bœ nœ

45

2

1

œ
J

C

Œ

œ bœ

3

4

œ

j ‰
œ
Ó

Œ

j ‰
œ

Œ

 

Figure  24:  Chromatic  passing  tone  sequence  featuring  two  adjacent  ma2  
4

intervals  until  reaching  scale  tone  
target  note.    
Formulaic Components

Figure 25

4

C

47

3

1

œ

j
œ ‰

œ

Œ

1
Formulaic2 Components

Ó

 

C 25:  E3nclosure  to  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  
Figure  
j ‰ Œ
Œ
Ó

&

&49 Œ

Figure 27
47

Figure 26

49

Figure 27

51

C m(Ñ9)

G&
7#5(#11)

51

œ

C

52

Figure 29

G 7#5(#11)
3

Figure 28

enclosure.    

Figure 28

C

Figure 26

Figure 25

G7

1

C m(Ñ9)
53

3

œ
œ


œ

1

œ

œ

2

œ

œ

œ

œ


2

2

1

œ

œ

œ

1

1

2

1

2

œ

2

3

œ

œ

œj

œ

Œ

Œ

œ

j
œ

1

œ
2

œ

œ

Ó

œ

œ

Ó
œ

 

Formulaic Components

4

 
 

Figure 25

C

47

Figure 26

3

œ

1

œ

1

2

j
œ ‰

Œ

69  

Ó

C

Formulaic Components j ‰
Œ
Ó
& Œ 26:  C#hromatic  
œ n œ #pœ assing  
œ fnragment  
œ to  enclosure  chain.      
Figure  
# œ tnone  
œ
3

4

Figure 25 49 C
Figure 27
G 7#5(#11)

Figure 26
Figure 28

4


&
œ
47

51

C

1

2


œ
3

b œ œn œ

1

2

b œ# œ œ

#œœ

1

2

1

j
œ œ‰

Œ œ

Ó

 

j ‰  OŒbften  
Components
& Œ 27:  W#hole  
œ ntœone  #sœcale,  
Figure  
cn œhord  
œ aÓpplied  through  
œœ
# œV7  Formulaic
nœœapplication.  
C m(Ñ9)

3

& bœ

œ

œ

nœœ
œ

bœ #œ œ

49
1
1
2
C
2
Figure 25 52
the  uGse  
o
f  
a
ugmented  
t
riads  
t
o  
a
chieve  
#
4  
and  #5  scale  tones  on  over  a  
Figure 27
7#5(#11)
G7
Figure 29
3
2
2
1
dominant  
c
hord.  
 
1
47
3
1
2


& œœ
&

bœ bœ
œœ

51

Figure 26 53
4Figure 28
Figure 30

C
CCm(Ñ9)
&CŒ

j ‰ Œ œ Ó
œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œ

j1C ‰ œ Œ 1 2 Ó
#œ nœ #œ #œ nœ nœ
œ
œ œ œ œb œ Ó
Figure 25
& œb œ œ œ b œ Ó
œ œ œ œœ1 2Ó œ 1
&
49
œ
œ
2
j
Ó
52 Œ
n œ 1b œ œ 1 œ2
Figure 27 54&G17#5(#11)b1œ 2 b œ
œ ‰ Œ
4
3
1
3
G7
œ
Figure 29 47
2 3 #1œ
2 œ
œ
2
œ
Figure  
 Applied  
&Cœœ128:  Whole  tone  scale,  I  #cœhord  application.  
Figure 26
œ over  either  a  
œ
œ
&
œ
3
œ
51
j ‰ Œ
Œ or  major  
Ó
# œ tnonic  
œ #cœhord,  
n œ application  
Figure minor  
28 53& C m(Ñ9)
œ achieves  b2,  b3,  4,  5,  6  and  
# œ this  

C 1
C œ4
1
2
Figure 30 49 C
2
b œ1 2
1
œ
Figure 27
œ
G 7#5(#11)
&
œ
œ
œ
œ
ma7  
sbcale  
t
ones.  
 
b
œ
œ
œ Ó
Ó
Ó
& œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
52 œ
#
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
&œ 7
54
1
2
Figure 29 51

Figure 28

1G

œ
&C m(Ñ9)

3

1

3

œ

1

& bœ

53

Figure 30 52

Formulaic Components

C

C

1

4

2

œ

œ

2
3

œ
œ

œ

C

4

2

œ

œ


4
œ

C

œ

 

1
1 2
Figure  729:  Descending  IV  triad  œto  ascending  V  triad,  
œ in  tœhis  
œ example,  over  

Ó 2
Ó
&Gœ1 œ œ 2 Ó
œ
œ3 œ
œ
œ m7  V7  œ scale  tones.  
a  V54&
7  cœ1hord.    T1 œhe  2 IV  triad  
P
œ 2ma2  and  
1
œ outlines  
1 4,  
4
3

Figure 29

53

Figure 30

C

C

1

1

Ó
&œ œ œ
œ

54

3

1

2

œ

œ
4

œ œ
1

Ó

1

C

œ

œ

4

œ 1 œ2 Ó

2

 

 

Figure  30:  Motivic  interval  structure.    These  interval  structures  (ma3-­‐
ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root,  ma3-­‐root-­‐ma3-­‐root,  and  ma3-­‐ma3-­‐ma3-­‐root)  are  applied  
in  a  motivic  ascending  or  descending  sequence.    Notably,  the  third  note  in  

 
 

70  
Formulaic Components

4
Figure 25

4

C

j ‰

œ

Œ

Ó

œ attack,  but  is  a  sustained  
œ pick  
each  
phrase  
is  not  played  1 with  a  new  
47
3
1
2
Formulaic Components

C
continuation  
3 of  the  first  note  of  the  phrase;  therefore  a  slur  marking  is  
C
Figure 25
Figure 26

j ‰ Œ
Ó

#œ nœ #œ #œ nœ nœ
œ ‰ Œ
j
Œ
Ó
b
œ
b œ these  
n œ tb2wo  
œ n1œotes.  2œ  In  fact,  
49&
applied  
to  connect  
œ1 the  note’s  attack  is  cleverly  

Figure 27 47

1
1
G 7#5(#11) 3
2
œ the  second  note  of  
Figure 26
C
œ
produced  
on  the  guitar  with  a  “deadened  
from  
# œ pull-­‐off”  


œ
j ‰ Œ
Ó
nœ #œ #œ nœ nœ
the  phrase  with  the  third  
or  fourth  finger.  œ  This  is  both  a  technical  

Œ
51&

Figure 28 49

œ

3

C m(Ñ9)
G 7#5(#11)

1

2

1

2


consideration  
wœishing  to  
œ emulate  
&
œ
œœ this  cœomponent  and  also  a  
b œfor  guitarists  

Figure 27


œ

œ

52

notable  
51
G 7 demonstration  of  Metheny’s  thoughtful  ingenuity  with  which  he  

Figure 29
Figure 28

2
œ
œ just  three  
œ
&
œ requires  
œ the  phrase  
crafts  his  formulas.    Since  
b œ pick  strokes  for  a  
œ
œ
53&
œ
œ


4
52 C
C
C tœo  
Figure 30
four-­‐note  
arpeggiated  phrase,  
it  allows  Metheny  
perform  the  formula  
1
œ
œ 1 œ2 Ó
G7 œ
œ
Figure 29
Ó
3 Ó
2
& œ1
2
œ eœase  
œ tempos.  
œ œ
œ
with  
gœ reater  
at  higher  
œ
œ
54&
œ
œ
1
1
1 2
1
2
Figure 30
31
Figure

3

C m(Ñ9)
œ1

53

4

3

CC

C

Œ œ
Ó Ó
œ
œ œ

&
& bœœ œ œ œ Ó
œ
57
2
54

1

C7

2

1

3

1

2

1

4

1

œ

C

œ

4

œ 1 œ2 Ó

2

 

Figure 32
3
C 31:  Chromatic  approach  tone.  A  non-­‐diatonic  note  on  a  downbeat  
Figure  
Figure 31
j

œ
œ

& œ

Ó
Œ

j
Œ1
&
1
58
4
b
œ
œ
1
œ a  scale  tone.  
acts  to  ornament  or  approach  
57

Figure 32

œ

& œ

59

2

1

C7
j

œ

3

1

4

1

œ
Ó

œ

1

 

Figure  32:  Chromatic  descending  cliché.  A  chromatic  descent  from  ma6  to  
P5  featuring  the  root  as  a  pedal  point,  in  this  example  over  a  V7  chord.  
5
Formulaic Components

Figure 33

G 7 alt

&

59

Figure 34


2

œ

C ma7(#11)

&

61

3

œ
1

œ

1

4

œ

œ


œ

4

œ #œ

C

œ

2

œ

œ

Œ

œ
œ

œ

Ó

œ

Ó

 

 
 

71  

Figure  33:  Pentatonic  superimposition.  This  example  uses  a  descending  
5

Formulaic
Components
Db  major-­‐based  pentatonic  run  
(ma2,  
dim2,  root,  ma6,  P5,  ma3,  root)  as  a  

G 7 alt

tritone  
b œ substitute,  to  achieve  b13,  P5,  #11,  #9,  b9,  m7,  #11  G7alt  scale  

Figure 33

œ

&

60
2resolving  through  
1
tones,  
enclosure.  
4

Figure 34

œ

C ma7(#11)

&

61

3

œ

œ

œ

œ

1

œ #œ

œ

œ

4

œ

œ

œ


2

œ

Ó

 

Figure  34:  Motivic  P5  intervals,  used  in  a  diatonic  sequence.  In  this  
example,  the  sequence  descends  from  the  ma7  and  ma3,  to  the  ma2  and  
P5  of  Cma7#11,  accessing  each  P5  interval  and  avoiding  the  dim5  interval  
between  root  and  aug4.  
 
Many  of  these  formulaic  components  are  derivative  in  the  sense  that  they  are  
simply  expansions,  developments  upon,  or  combinations  of  other  formulaic  
components.    Therefore,  it  follows  that  the  assembly  of  Metheny’s  formulaic  
system  builds  its  complexity  through  the  sophisticated  manipulation  of  these  
fragmentary  ideas.    The  creation  of  larger  phrases  deemed  “formulaic  species”  
occurs  as  the  sum  of  these  component  parts,  and  each  of  these  melodic  
fragments  are  commonly  adapted,  expanded  and  combined  to  create  unique  
variations.    It  should  be  noted  that  an  alteration  such  as  that  of  an  enclosure  
from  diatonic  to  non-­‐diatonic  in  a  melodic  line  is  an  easily  interchangeable  and  
minor  consideration.    This  adjustment  may  at  times  be  made  to  accommodate  a  

 
 

72  

fingering  preference  of  Metheny’s  in  the  midst  of  an  improvisational  line.    
However,  a  component  that  begins  on  a  non-­‐scale  tone  versus  a  scale-­‐tone  
becomes  a  significant  consideration,  as  this  translates  into  a  deliberate  fingering  
consideration,  and  therefore  requires  a  degree  of  pre-­‐planning  for  how  it  lays  on  
fingerboard  of  the  guitar.    The  interval  structure  of  formulas  may  also  adapt  to  
the  harmonic  context  (major  vs.  minor,  etc.),  and  may  begin  and  end  at  different  
pitch  levels  when  applied  in  context.    Finally,  the  rhythmic  placement  of  these  
examples  is  not  definitive;  the  pitch  level,  intervallic  structure  and  rhythmic  
displacement  of  these  fragments  are  assumed  manipulations  of  formulaic  
components  when  approaching  full-­‐scale  improvisation.    
       
5.  2  –  Formulaic  Categories  
This  study  categorizes  Metheny’s  system  of  formulas  under  seven  
formulaic  categories.    These  formulaic  categories  that  will  be  the  subject  of  
analysis  for  Chapters  6-­‐12,  including:  Enclosure  Chromaticism  Formuals,  Passing  
Tone  Chromaticism  Formulas,  Cadence  Vocabulary  Formulas,  Melodic  Cliché  
Formulas,  Pentatonic  Formulas,  Motivic  Formulas,  and  Reharmonization  
Formulas.    Their  definitions  outline  the  quantitative  and  qualitative  
characteristics  that  unify  the  formulaic  species  within  each  category,  and  
provide  some  insight  into  their  implications  within  the  scope  of  a  larger  
coherence:  

 
 

73  

1.    Enclosure  Chromaticism  Formulas:    Melodic  sophistication  achieved  
by  the  encircling  of  target  notes,  through  the  use  of  diatonic  or  non-­‐
diatonic  chromatic  notes.    
2.    Passing  Tone  Chromaticism  Formulas:    Melodic  sophistication  
achieved  by  the  addition  of  non-­‐scale  passing  tones  in  the  melodic  line,  
often  placed  on  up-­‐beats.  
3.    Dominant  Cadence  Vocabulary  Formulas:    The  use  of  nuanced  
mixolydian,  mixolydianb2b6  (harmonic  minor),  altered  (melodic  minor),  
diminished,  or  whole  tone  scale  phrases.    Creates  melodic  tension  and  
resolution  over  a  V7-­‐I  or  V7-­‐Im  harmonic  cadence,  and  illustrates  
harmonic  voice-­‐leading  structures.      
4.    Melodic  Cliché  Formulas:    Consistent  melodic  phrases  that  become  
formulaic  through  repeated  featured  use.    These  phrases  might  be  
individualistic,  or  a  paraphrase  of  another  performer  or  indicative  of  a  
greater  musical  lexicon  or  era.    Establishes  a  simpler  evocative  style  
familiarity  among  other  more  complex  formulaic  events.  
5.    Pentatonic  Formulas:    The  application  of  the  pentatonic  scales  to  jazz-­‐
based  harmonic  contexts.    Often  associated  with  the  melodies  of  blues  or  
folk  music,  pentatonic-­‐based  phrases  incorporate  style  familiarity  beyond  
the  realm  of  jazz.    
6.    Motivic  Formulas:    Consistent  interval  structures  applied  to  various  
pitch  levels.    Purely  generative  and  conceptually  simple  for  the  

 
 

74  

improviser,  they  are  both  easily  identifiable  and  tangible  for  the  listener.    
Used  to  create  melodic  and  rhythmic  interest  through  consistent  motivic  
repetition.      
7.    Reharmonization  Formulas:  Phrases  that  imply  harmony  other  than  
the  harmonic  framework  of  the  theme.    Similar  to  a  cadence,  
reharmonization  involves  a  diatonic  resolution  to  achieve  both  the  
release  of  tension  and  an  aesthetic  of  melodic  sophistication.  
 
5.3  –  Formulaic  Species  
 

Finally,  each  formulaic  category  is  comprised  of  formulaic  phrases  of  the  

same  type,  deemed  “formulaic  species.”  A  formulaic  species  can  be  defined  as  the  
application  of  a  formulaic  component  of  a  specific  variety  as  a  melodic  
centerpiece  or  focus,  whose  frequency  of  use  warrants  the  acknowledgement  of  
it  as  such.  This  melodic  centerpiece  component  may  be  expanded  upon  by  the  
addition  of  other  formulaic  components  or  species,  and/or  in  combination  with  
components  from  other  formulaic  categories.    This  three-­‐tier  system  for  
categorization  including  formulaic  categories,  formulaic  species,  and  formulaic  
components,  will  allow  us  to  view  Metheny’s  formulaic  improvisational  
approach  in  a  highly  comprehensive,  logical,  and  systematic  way.  
 
 
 

 
 

75  

Chapter  Six  
Enclosure  Chromaticism  Formulas  
 
In  this  category,  we  may  observe  seven  major  formulaic  species  of  
enclosures.    As  discussed  in  Chapter  5,  the  device  of  an  enclosure  is  employed  to  
produce  melodic  sophistication  through  the  generative  encircling  of  target  notes,  
often  prolonging  the  arrival  of  chord  tones  on  downbeats.    First,  a  definition  of  
the  formulaic  component  that  is  the  centerpiece  of  each  species  will  be  outlined:  
Species  A:  Enclosure  to  ascending  scale  fragment  (fig.  16)  
Species  B:  Descending  passing  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  (fig.  7)  
Species  C:  Expanded  ascending  enclosure  (fig.  8)  
Species  D:  Descending  chromatic  enclosure  chain  (fig.  5)  
Species  E:  Enclosure  to  descending  passing  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  (fig.    25)  
Species  F:  Chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  chain  (fig.  26)  
Species  G:  Descending  ma2  to  enclosure  (fig.  10)  
Each  of  these  formulaic  phrases  are  excerpts  taken  from  one  of  the  four  source  
material  Metheny  improvisations:  “Solar,”  “Old  Folks,”  “Son  of  Thirteen”  or  
“Snova.”    Their  component  parts,  application,  and  relation  to  the  harmony  will  be  
defined.  It  should  be  noted  that  a  formulaic  component  may  begin  in  the  midst  of  
a  previous  component,  as  some  formulaic  components  begin  with  the  same  
interval  structure  as  others  end.  This  may  be  seen  as  an  advantageous  feature  as  
formulaic  improvisation  is  designed  to  flow  lucidly.    It  should  also  be  noted  that  

 
 

76  

some  formulaic  species  make  use  of  only  one  component,  where  most  species  
make  use  of  combinations  of  multiple  components.    The  formulaic  species  in  
each  formulaic  category  chapter  recount  each  occurrence  of  their  use  within  the  
source  material  improvisations.    
 

Enclosure Chromaticism

6.1  –  Enclosure  Chromaticism  (Species  
,  B,  B,
C,  C,
D,  ED,
,  FE
 &&
 G)  F
SpeciesAA,
Species A
Solar: Bar 29

Species B
Solar: Bar 4

F ma7

b 4
&bb 4 Œ

j
nœ œ

Fig. 16

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Ó
 

Enclosure Chromaticism
F

B, C, D
& E from  the  ma7  of  
Ex.  1  –b  Sb pecies  
ar  
 diatonic  
ejnclosure  
œ BSpecies
b œ 29:  œAA,
Ó A  –  Solar:  
‰ Œ
Ó
C7

ma7

& b

3

Species A
Fig. 7
F ma7scale  fragment  
Solar: Bar
Fma7  
to  29
ascending  
(root,  ma2,  m3,  P5)  (fig.  16),  the  m3  scale  tone  
F ma7
bb 4 Œ
& b b nœ

j

œ Œ
œ

Ó

Solar: Bar &
b b4 melodic  function  
œ
creating  
a5  minor  
œ oœf  the  œFma7  
œ n œ b œœin  place  
œ harmonic  framework.    
Species C

5

Species B
C 7Fig. 8
Solar: Bar 4
Species A +3 B & C
B b7
Solar: Bar 200
Species A 6
F ma7
Solar: Bar 29

œ

Fig. 16
Enclosure
Chromaticism

œ

b
Eœbma7 b œ
œœ œ bœœE bm7œ n œj A b7‰ ŒD bma7 Ó
&bb Ó
bœ œ œ bœ
b Ó œ œ b œ Fig.
œ 7œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ œ b œj ‰
b
b
n
œ
&
Species C
b 4
j
Ó
10
Solar: Bar 5& b b F4ma7Œ Fig. 7 ‰
œ Fig.œ 8 Œpassing  
Fig. 19
œ œ Fig.chromatic  
5 2–  Species  B  –  Solar:  
nFig.
œ B16ar  œ 4:  Aœ  descending  
Ex.  
tone  
bb F ma7
Species F
œ
b
œ
œ
Fig.
16
œ
F m7 œ
& b nœ
œ
Solar: Bar
Species
B 53 10
œ
œ
b
œ
fragment  
t
o  
n
on-­‐diatonic  
e
nclosure  
f
rom  
t
he  
r
oot  
o
f  
C
7  
t
o  
t
he  
m
a3  
o
(fig.  
œ
C
7
F
ma7
b
n
œ
b
œ
œ
Solar: Bar 4
œ bœ
œ œ n œ b œ n œ f  F‰ ma7  
Œ
bœ bœ
3
b Ó8
&b b Fig.
Species A + B &b C Ó
œ 26 b œ œ b œbFig. 30 n œj b ‰ Œ b
Ó J
bma7
7).  
& b B b7
EFig.
E m7
DFig.
ma7
Fig. 1A 7
Solar: Bar 200
31 Fig. 28
œ œ b œ œFig.œ7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ
Species E 6
œ
b
n
œ
b œ n œ œ C 7 œ b œ b œ œ œ œ b œj ‰
G m7
Species
C 62 b b ÓC m7
Solar: Bar
&
13
F
ma7
Solar: Bar 5
b
5
œ n œ16 œ œ œ b œ n œ # œ
&b b b b œ Fig.œ 7 œ œœ b Fig.
œ œ n œ œFig.œœ8 # œ # œ Œ Ó

œ
Species D +&
B b nœ
œ
Fig. 5
Fig. 27
F ma7
F m7
Fig. 25
Solar: Bar 53
10
œ
œ b œ œ œ n œDbm7b5
Species E + A &b D Fig. 8
œ b œ G 7b9œ œ C m7œ n œ b œ n œ ‰ b œ
Species
A +&
B &b Cb ÓE b m7 A b 7Œ
D bma7
Solar: Bar
106

b œ nEœbm7œ œ b œ n œ b œA b7
œD bma7
Jfrom  
B b7
E bma7
œ:  œAn  
Solar: Bar 20016
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Ex.  
3
 

 
S
pecies  
C
 

 
S
olar:  
B
ar  
5
e
xpanded  
a
scending  
e
nclosure  
œ
b
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
6
b œb28œ ‰ Œ Ó jn n b
œ œ5 b œ œ œ œn œFig.
œb œ7œ œFig.œ œ5 œ œ Fig.œ30b œ Fig.
&b b b bÓ Ó œ‰ œ b œFig.
b
œ J œ œ œ bœ ‰

Species E & b
C m7
G m7 Fig. 25
C7
F ma7

Species A, B, C, D & E

Fig. 24root  
the  m
a3  
Fma7  
F5  major  triad.    
Solar:
Bar
62to  the  P5  of  Fig.
Fig. 30 Fig.
16 (fig.  8)  to  a  descending  
Fig.p2osition  

Fig. 8
b
bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ #œ
œ
œ
Species D +&
B b b
œ
œ
œ n œ Fœm7 œ # œ # œ Œ Ó
F ma7
Solar: Bar 53
10
œ œFig.n œ5 b œ b œ œFig. œ27 œ œ b œ n œ
Fig. œ
25 b œ
b Ó
b
Œ

‰ bœ bœ
&& Db
Species E + A
J
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
Solar: Bar 106
E b m7 A b 7
D bma7
Fig. 7
Fig. 5
b œ Fig. 30 Fig. 5
13

Fig. 7

Fig. 16

 

 

b
&bb Ó

Solar: Bar 4
3

  Species C
  Solar: Bar 5
5

œ

œ

Fig. 7

F ma7

b
& b b nœ

œ

j

Œ

Ó
77  

œ

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 8
E bma7

6

b
&bb Ó

Species A
Species
E&
Solar: Bar
29D
Solar: Bar 62

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

œœ œ
œ œ b œ œEnclosure
bœ œ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ Chromaticism
œ nœ bœ bœ œ
j
œœ
œ œ bœ ‰
Species A, B, C, D, E, F & nG

Species B, A, G & C
Solar: Bar 200
B b7

Fig. 7

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

F ma7
C m7

Fig. 8

Fig. 19

Ex.  b4b  b–  4Species  
B‰,  A,  G  j&  C  –  Solar:  Bar  200:  Aœ  descending  
œ Œ chromatic  
Œ
Ó
G m7

 

C7

& bb 4
œ
œ œ

#œ Œ Ó
& b œ œ œ œ nnœœ œ œ œœ b œ n œ œ # œ n œ
œ 7  o# f  œ Bb7  to  the  ma2  
œ m
16
passing  tone  fragment  to  nFig.
on-­‐diatonic  
enclosure  from  the  
Fig. 5
10

Species B
Fig. 27
Fig. 25
C7
F ma7
Solar: Bar 4
Species F
of  
Ebma7  
(fig.  
7),  to  an  enclosure  from  the  ma2  of  Ebma7  
F ma7
F m7to  ascending  scale  
3
Solar: Bar
53

j ‰ Œ
b
œ bœ œ bœ
Ó
n
œ
&bb Ó
œ
œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ
bb b Ó
œ
13
œ ‰ bœ bœ
œ dœiatonic  
Œ a3,  Fig.P75)  (fig.  16),  to  a  descending  
n œ b œ pnhrase  
&(root,  ma2,  m
fragment  
from  
J the  
Species C
Solar: Bar 5

F ma7

Fig. 31 Fig. 28
ma7,  t5o  a  descending  
mœa2  to  enclosure  
from  the  œ root  of  Ebm7  
to  the  ma3  of  Ab7  
b
b
œ
b
œ
b bn œ b
œm7
Species A,&
E&D
œ
D
m7b5
b
G
7b9
C
D ma7
Solar: Bar 106 E m7 A 7
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
b
œ
(fig.  10),  to  an  
expanded  
ascending  
n œ b tœhe  
Fig.
8
œ bmœ a3  
œ b œ œ enclosure  from  
œ of  œ Ab7  to  the  P5  of  a  
Fig. 26

Fig. 1

Fig. 30

b
œ bœœ nœ
œ œnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó n b
n
& b b Ó ‰œ œ
J
œœ œ
bœ œ œ bœ
œ nœ bœ bœ œ
bb Ó œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
j
b
nœ œ
œ œ bœ ‰
&
passing  tone  fragment  from  the  root  to  m7  of  the  suspended  Ab7  (fig.  19).    
16

Species B, A, G & C
E bma7
E b m7
A b7
D bma7
Solar: Bar 200 Ab7  
B b 7(fig.  8),  to  a  descending  root  position  Ab  major  triad  to  chromatic  
suspended  
Fig.
25
Fig.
24
Fig.
30 Fig. 5
Fig. 16
Fig. 2
6

Fig. 7

Species E & D.1
C m7
Solar: Bar 62
10

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

Fig. 8

G m7

b

& b b œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ œ
Fig. 25

Species F
Solar: Bar 53

Fig. 5

Fig. 27

Fig. 19

C7

#œ #œ Œ

Ó
 

Ex.  5  –  Species  E  &œ  Db  œ–  Solar:  
œ Bar  62:  Aœn  ascending  diatonic  phrase  from  
F ma7

œ œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ
J bœ
the  P4  of  Cm7,  to  an  enclosure  to  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  
13

b
&bb Ó

F m7

Œ

œ nœ bœ bœ

Fig. 26

Fig. 30

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

Species A, E & D
D m7b5
b (fig.  b 25),  Dtbo  
from  
the  dim2  
from  m3  of  Gm7  to  the  
G 7b9 chain  
C m7
ma7descending  enclosure  
Solar: Bar 106 E m7 A 7

œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó n b
n in  
aug5  of  &
C7  (bfig.  5),  to  a  whole  tone  scale  application  anticipating  the  
J C7  chord  
16

Fig. 16

Fig. 25

Fig. 24

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

the  form  of  two  adjacent  descending/ascending  augmented  triads  (aug5,  ma3,  
root)  (ma2,  aug5,  m7)  (fig.  27).  

b
& b b n œF ma7
b 4 8Œ
& b b Fig.
4

Solar: Bar 5
Species A
Solar: Bar 29

œ

j
nœ œ

œ

œ

œ
œ

œ

Œ
Ó
œ
œ œ œ
78  
B b7
E bma7
E b m7
A b7
D bma7
Fig. 16
œœ œ
b œ Fœma7œ b œ
œ nœ bœ bœ œ
Species B
bb CÓ7 œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
j
nœ œ
œ œ bœ ‰
Solar: Bar 4 3& b
j
b
œ bœ œ bœ
Ó
nFig.
œ 10 ‰Fig. 8 Œ
Fig. 16
& b b Ó Fig. 7
Fig. 19

 Species A + B & C
 Solar: Bar 2006

Species F
Solar: Bar 53 10
Species C
Solar: Bar 5 5

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ bœ
Œ
œ

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
Fig. 26
Fig. 30 Fig. 1
Fig. 28
Fig. 7

F ma7

b
& bb b Ó
& b b nœ

F ma7

F m7

 

Fig. 31

Species E
Fig. 8
C m7
G m7
C7
Solar: Bar 62
13 C
Species A,Ex.  
B&
6  –  Species  
F
 

 
S
olar:  
B
ar  
5
3:  
A
 
d
escending  
c
hromatic  
passing  tone  
b
b
b
b
B 7
E ma7
E m7
A 7
D bma7
Solar: Bar 200

b
#œ Œ Ó
& bb b œ œ œœ œ œb œb œœ n œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ bœœ œn œ œ œb œ# œœ œn œ
#
œ
œ
œ
n
œ
b œ mœ 7  of  fm7  
j‰
œ
œ chain  
œ to  btœhe  
fragment  t&
o  dbescending  
enclosure  
m27a2  b œonf  œFma7  
b Ó
œ
Fig. 5from  the  
œ
b
œ
Fig.
Fig. 25
6

Fig. 8
D m7b5 (m3,  
bma7
G 7b9
m7root)  giving  m7,  P4,  
(fig.  
7),  
to  a  Cm7  
structure  
m7,  mC3,  
E b m7motivic  
A b7
Dinterval  
Solar:2Bar
Species
E 106
Fig. 7

Species E + A & D

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

œ bœ œ
œ
œ n œ b œ œ œG m7 n œ œ b œ n œ b œ œ b œ œ œ Cœ 7œ n œ b œ œ
bb C m7
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
JŒ‰ aŒ n  ÓÓ
m7,  P5  F  m&
inor  
b b sÓcale  ‰ tones  b œanticipating  the  Fm7  (fig.  30),  within  which  
#
œ
& b b œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œFig.b œ25 n œ Fig.œ 24# œ n œ
œ #œ
Fig. 16
Fig. 2 œFig. 30 Fig. 5
Fig. 19

Solar: Bar 6216
10

nb
n

enclosure  from  m7  to  ma6  
ccurs  (fig.  Fig.
1)  5 to  a  chromatic  
approach  tone  from  m6  
Fig. 27
Fig.o25
Species F
Solar: Bar 53

to  ma6  (fig.  
13 31),  to  a  whole  tone  scale  application  
œ through  a  descending  
œ bœ
F ma7

b
&bb Ó

Œ

œ œ nœ bœ bœ

F m7

augmented  triad  (ma6,  P4,  dim2)  (fig.  28).  
Species A, E & D
Solar: Bar 106

E b m7

A b7

Fig. 26

D bma7

Fig. 30

œ œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ
J bœ

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó
& b
J

16

Fig. 16

D m7b5

Fig. 25

G 7b9

Fig. 24

C m7

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

nb
n

Ex.  7  –  Species  A,  E  &  D  –  Solar:  Bar  106:  An  enclosure  from  the  ma7  of  
Dbma7  to  ascending  scale  fragment  (root,  ma2,  ma3,  escape  tone  m3,  P4,  P4,  
ma6,  ma7)  (fig.  16),  to  an  enclosure  to  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  
fragment  from  the  ma7  of  Dm7b5  to  the  #9  of  G7b9  (fig.  25),  to  a  descending  
passing  tone  sequence  from  the  #9  of  G7b9  to  the  dim5  of  Cm7  (fig.  24),  to  a  an  
enclosure  from  the  dim5  to  P4  of  Cm7  (fig.  2),  to  a  Dm7  motivic  interval  
structure  (m3,  m7,  m3,  root)  giving  P4,  root,  P4,  ma2  C  minor  scale  tones  (fig.  
30),  to  a  descending  enclosure  chain  from  P4  to  m3  (fig.  5).  

 

 
 

79  

2

&b

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E

C m7
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
!
D b7

Species A & G
Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7
21

œ

Fig. 16

œ bœ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

F7

Fig. 10

Species A & C
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

Fig. 16

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

B ma7(#11)

Ex.  
23 8  –  Species  A  &  G  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  51:  An  enclosure  from  the  ma2  of  

bœ ‰ Œ

Ó

J 16),  to  a  
Dm7  to  ascending  scale  fragment  (m3,  P4,  P5,  m7,  m3,  root)  (fig.  
Fig. 16

2

Fig. 8

n

 

b

Fig. 11

œ œ œ
œ œœb œœ œ œ b œ b œ œ œ n œ n œ œ
nœ œ œ
œ œ œ bœ
œ œ Œœ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
! Fig. 8 œ
‰ Fig. 1œ b œ
Fig. 1

Species B & C ma2  to  enclosure  from  the  P5  of  Dm7  to  the  P4  of  Cm7  (fig.  10),  to  an  
descending  
Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D, E, F & G
B bma7
Old Folks: Bar 36
F7
Species A &26G
D b 7to  ascending  scale  
C m7
F 7 P4,  P5,  m7)  (fig.  
Old Folks: Barfrom  
51 D m7
enclosure  
the  P4  of  Cm7  
fragment  (m3,  

& b œÓ
b
1 F7.    
16),  to  an  &ascending  diatonic  Fig.
phrase  
(ma6,  P5,  m7)  Fig.
over  
7
21

Species C, D & Fig.
E 16
Old Folks:
Species
A &Bar
C 45 G 7( #11)
28
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 99 B m(ma7)

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

b
œ #œ #œ nœ œ
œ b œ œ œ œBb œma7(#11)
b
œ
b
œ
#
œ
n
œ
bœ œ nœ œ nœ œ œ
œ œ b œ œ œ# œ œn œ œ œ œ œ
& bŒ n œ ‰ j # œ
œ
b

œ
&
œ œJ ‰ Œ Ó
Fig. 25

23

Fig. 8

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Fig. 16
Son of Thirteen:
Species
B & C Bar 251
B m(ma7)
Old Folks: Bar
36
F7

Fig. 27
Fig. 8

n

Fig. 9

Fig. 11

n
b

C # 7alt

œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
2
œ œ œ
œ œ bœ
œ
Œ
n œ - œSpecies A, bB,œ C, D &œ En œ œ œJ ‰ Œ Ó
Enclosures
&b Ó
ma7  
f  B
to  ascending  scale  fragment  (root,  ma2,  m3,  P5)  (fig.  16),  
SpeciesoA
&m(ma7)  
G
Fig. 1
b7 7 œ
Fig. 26
Fig. 8
C m7 Fig. 1 Fig. 1 F 7
Fig. 5 DFig.
Old Folks: Bar 51
D
m7
œ
œ
Species E 21
&D
œ œ œ bœ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Species
C,
D
&
E
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ ascending  !enclosure  
œ begins  
œ mF3  
within  
which  
an  153
expanded  
of  Bm(ma7)  n
#7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Bar
œ bthe  
‰ from  
Old Folks: Bar
& b45G ma7G 7(#11)
33
28
œ œœ# #œœ œ nnœœ œœ # œ œ n œ # œ œ œb œ œ b œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ

10
œ (fig.  
bn
# œBma7#11  
n œœœajor  
to  the  aug4  
b f  na16œn  anticipated  
œ b œ8),  tœo  aœ  d# escending  
œ n œŒ œ Ó œ
& oFig.
œ n œ b œ œFig.
œ œFig.œ16œ b#œœœCœ  m
Species A & C
œ the  œ
œ œ œA  &b œ  Cb  –œ  Son  
Ex.  
9  –œ  Sbpecies  
26
œ of  Thirteen:  

30
œBar  99:  An  enclosure  from  
B bma7

j
œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
b
& Œ ‰ #œ #œ œ œ œ
œ b œJ ‰ Œ Ó
#
n
œ
b
œ
ma2  to  enclosure  
resolving  
oot  (fig.  11).   œ œ b œ n œ
Cœ7altœ
r œ to  œ tœhe  
B m(ma7)
œ #rFig.
œ 11
nœ #œ bœ nœ n
œ
8 œ œ b œ bFig.
.
œ
b
œ
b
Œ

œ
n
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
Fig.
16
œ
b
œ
30&
œ

œ œ nœ œ bœ œ
œ
b
œ
œ ‰ Œ Ó
Species B & C
bma7
& 36
Fig. 14 J
B
Old Folks: Bar
FFig.
7 16
Fig.
Fig. 8
Fig. 1
œ5 œ œ
26
Fig. 26
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
œ
Fig. 5
œ bœ nœ œ

œ nœ
Œ
Species E &
&D b Ó
#
Fig.
25 99 B m(ma7)
Son of Thirteen:
Bar

Fig. 25

 

B ma7(#11)

Fig. 5
Fig. 9
Fig.
2 Fig.
Fig. 8
11
23 fragment  
pentatonic  
(ma3,  
ma2,  
iving  
Bma7#11  
scale  tones  
aug4,  ma3,  
5 root)  
Fig.g27
Fig. 11 Fig.

Species
C&
SpeciesA,
F&
DD
Old
Bar 47Bar
C 7 251
SonFolks:
of Thirteen:
37

Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

8
Fig. 1 Fig. 1
œ œ # œ œ n œ œ Fig.# 7œ œ n œ Fig.
 
œ
œ
œœ œœ Œ Ó
#
œ
œ
œ œ #œ
b
Species C, D&
&E
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)
Ex.  
0  –  Species  B  &  C  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  36:  A  bdœescending  chromatic  
28 1
Fig. 25 œ # œ
Fig.
5
b œ 11œ
œ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ œ nœ œ
# œ n œ œ # œ œ n œ b œ œ Fig.œ b2œFig.
b nœ
n
œ
Species A, C&
&D
b
passing  
t
one  
f
ragment  
t
o  
e
nclosure  
f
rom  
t
he  
r
oot  
o
f  
F
7  
t
o  
t
he  
m
a3  
o
f  
B
bma7  
(
fig.  
B
7
(Em9)
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7
Fig. 25
37
Fig. 8
œ œ9 n œ b œ
Fig.
r œ11 Fig.œ5 œ œ # œ Fig. 27œ b œ b œ œ œ b œ n œ n œ b œ Fig.
#œ nœ n
.
‰ œ œœ
nœ œ
Species F &&
D b Œ

Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

œ b œ œ Fig.œ 16b œ b œ Fig.œ 8
œ

B m(ma7)

30

F 7alt

G ma7

33

&

Fig. 1

#
Fig. 14 C 7alt

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ
Fig. 1

Fig. 5

œ ‰ Œ
J

Ó

D 7
C m7
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
!

Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7
21

œ

&b

 
  Species A & C

Fig. 16

Fig. 10

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

23

œ bœ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

F7

Fig. 16

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

B ma7(#11)

bœ ‰ Œ
J

n

80  

Ó

b

Fig. 8
Fig. 16
7),  to  an  expanded  ascending  
enclosure  
from  mFig.
a3  11to  P5  (fig.  8),  to  an  enclosure  

œ

œ
œ
from  P5  26to  aug4  (fig.  1),  to  a  diatonic  enclosure  
œ b œ from  aug4  to  
n œP5  (fig.  1),  to  a  
Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

F7

&b Ó

Œ

B bma7

œ œ bœ
nœ œ

bœ œ œ nœ

œ

diatonic  enclosure  from  aug4  to  P5  repeated  up  the  octave  (fig.  1).  
Fig. 7

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

& b nœ

28

2

Fig. 8

œ #œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
Enclosures - Species A, B, Fig.
C, D25& E

Fig. 9

C m7
F7
œ œ
œ
œ œ œ bœ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ  Species  œ Cœ,  D  &  E  –  Old  Folks:  Bœar  œ45:  An  expanded  
œ œ b œ Cœ#7altaœscending  
Ex.  B1m(ma7)
1  

!

& bœ b œ œ œ b œ b œ œ
bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ
30
œ
œ A‰  mŒajor  Ó
Fig. 16
Fig.(10
16
enclosure  
fig.  8),  to  an  dFig.
escending  
&from  the  ma3  to  m7  of  G7#11  
J

Species A & G
Species
F&
Old
Folks:
BarD51 D m7
21
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 251

D b7

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

n

Fig. 27

 

n

Species A & C
B ma7(#11)
Fig.Bar
26 99 B m(ma7)
Son of Thirteen:
Fig. 5
23
pentatonic-­‐based  
run  (m6,  P5,  ma3,  root)  giving  m7,  ma6,  aug11,  ma2  G7#11  
Species E &
D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
F # 7alt

ŒG ma7 ‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ œ # œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ ‰ Œ Ó
b
&
J
33
œ
scale  tones  (fig.  œ11),  
begins  from  
#œ w
œ nithin  
œ œ which  
œ œ œenclosure  chain  
# œ œaFig.
n  œdescending  
8œ # œ
b
œ # œ œ œ œ # œœœ œœœ Œ Ó
Fig. 11
&
Fig. 16
Species
& a3  
C (fig.  5),  to  an  ascending  whole  tone  scale  fragment  (ma3,  aug4,  
aug4  
to  Bm
Fig. 25
bma72 Fig. 11
Fig. 5
BFig.
Old Folks: Bar 36
F7
œ œ œ
26
Species A, C & D
œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ b œto  descending  
aug5,  
m7)  
chromatic  passing  tone  
Old Folks:
Bar(47
b CÓ727),  to  an  Œ enclosure  
nœ œ
& fig.  
37
bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ bœ
r
œ
œ œ œ # œ n œ Fig.
œ œ8 b œ b œ Fig.œ 1 Fig. 1
œ
# œ1 n œ n
.
Fig.
b
Œ

œ
œ
œ
7 ma7  to  P5  (fig.  25),  to  a  G  major  root  position  
fragment  &
to  enclosure  chain  Fig.
from  
Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11) Fig. 16

Fig. 14

triad  arpeggio  
with  
28
œ an  enclosures  surrounding  the  m
b œa3  (fig.  9),  before  ending  on  

#œ #œ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ
œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ

& b nœ

the  root.    

Fig. 8

Fig. 8

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

B m(ma7)
30

&

Fig. 26

Species E & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

Fig. 1

Fig. 27

Fig. 5

œ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ œ nœ œ

Fig. 25

Fig. 9

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

Fig. 5

C # 7alt

œ ‰ Œ
J

œ

n

Ó

#

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ

F 7alt
G ma7
Ex.  
33 12  –  Species  F  &  D  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  251:  A  descending  passing  

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
b
# œœœ œœœ Œ Ó
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
tone  fragment  from  the  P4  to  m3  to  a  lengthy  descending  enclosure  chain  from  
&

Fig. 25

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

Species
A, Co&
the  
ma2  
f  BDm(ma7)  resolving  to  the  #9  of  the  C#7alt  chord  (fig,  26),  (fig.  5).  
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

&b Œ

37

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

 

œ œ œ b œ bœœn œ ‰œ n œŒ œ Ó
&&b Œn œ ‰ ##œœ # œ #œœ œ n œœb œ œœ œ b œ œ
œ
œ J
Fig. 8

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D

  Son
Species
B & C Bar 251
of Thirteen:
Old
Folks:
Bar
36
B m(ma7)
 
26

Fig. 25
Fig. 11

Fig.
Fig.27
8

Fig. 16

Fig. 9

B bma7

œ œ œ

C # 7alt

œ b œ œ œ b œ b œ œœ œ b œ b œ
œ bœ
nœ œ
œ
b Ó
Œ
n œ b œœ œ œ bn œ œ bœ n œœ œ ‰ Œ
&
&
J
F7

Fig. 26

Fig. 5

Fig. 8

Fig. 7

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

F # 7alt

œ œ #œ # œ #nœœ n œ œ # œ œ n œ # œ œ bœœ b œ œ b œ œ œ œ bœ œ
# œ œ n œ b œœ œ œ œ œ # œ
b œ n œŒ Ó œ b
&& b n œ
œ œ œ # œœ œœ œ n œ œ
G ma7

3328

Fig. 25
Fig. 8

Fig. 5

Species
A,FC&&DD
Species
Old
Bar 47 CBar
7 251
SonFolks:
of Thirteen:

81  

Ó

30

Species
SpeciesEC,&DD.2
&E
Son
Thirteen:
Bar G153
7( #11)
Old of
Folks:
Bar 45

n b

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Fig. 2
Fig. 27 Fig. 11
B b7

Fig. 25

Fig. 9

 

n

37 13  –  Species  D  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  153:  
Ex.  
b œ œ C #7altto  descending  
œ b œAn œn  neœnclosure  
r

œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
B m(ma7)
. œ œ œ œb œœ œ œ œœ# œ n œ œ b œœ b œ b œ œ
b
Œ

n
œ
b
œ
&
30
œ

œ œ nœ œ bœ œ
œ
b
œ
chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  from  the  root  to  ma6  of  Gma7  (œfig.  ‰ 25),  
to  
Fig. 14
Fig. 16
&
JFig. 5 Œ Ó
Fig. 8
Fig. 1
(Em9)

26
5 from  aug5  to  aug4  (fig.  5),  to  a  non-­‐diatonic  
descending  Fig.
enclosure  
cFig.
hain  

Species E & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

F # 7alt

G ma7
enclosure  
33 from  aug4  to  P5  (fig.  2),  to  a  descending  D  major  pentatonic  run  (fig.  
œ

œ #œ œ nœ œ

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
# œœœ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
11),  to  an  F#7alt  chord  structure.  
&

Fig. 25

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

&b Œ

37

 

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

B b7

œœ Œ Ó
œ

b

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

(Em9)

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

Ex.  14  –  Species  A,  C  &  D  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  12:  An  enclosure  to  ascending  

scale  fragment  from  the  ma6  of  C7  (fig.  16),  to  an  expanded  ascending  enclosure  
from  root  to  ma2  (fig.  8),  to  an  enclosure  from  the  ma2  of  C7  to  the  non-­‐diatonic  
m3  of  Bb7  (fig.  1),  to  an  ascending  Bb  Dorian  scale  fragment  (m3,  P4,  P5,  ma6,  
m7),  to  the  P4  of  an  anticipated  Em9,  to  a  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  
fragment  from  the  P5  to  P4  of  Em9  to  a  dim2  to  ma2  (fig.  14),  to  a  descending  
enclosure  chain  from  the  root  (fig.  5).  
 
 

 

 
 

82  

B b maj7( # 11)

Species G.1
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 101 39

œ

& b œJ

3

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E

œ
J

œ

œ

œ

F ma7(#11)

œ

œ

œ

Œ

œ

Fig. 10
Species G & D
A ma7(#11)
C ma7(#11)
  Son of Thirteen:
Ex.  15  –  Species  G.1  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  101:  
A  ma7  interval  from  the  
Bar 120


J

œ œ #œ
#œ.
œ nœ œ

‰ Ó
&
Enclosures
- Species
A, B,aC,
& iEnterval  from  aug4  to  
root  to  ma7  of  Bbma7#11  falls  to  
the  ma6,  
before  
 mDa2  
41

 

3

Species G.1
Fig. 10 Fig. 5
b
F ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen: B maj7( # 11)
39
ma3  
to  
enclosure  
(fig.  10),  before  a  tertial  
Species
G.2
Bar 101
C 7sus from  ma3  to  the  P5  of  Fma7#11  
#
C 7sus
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 147

œ
œ œ œ œ
˙
b
œ
J bœ œ

œ
& J
œ

43 down  a  F  major  root  position  triad.  
descent  
&
Fig. 10
Species G & D
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 120
41


J

A ma7(#11)

&‰

œ

Fig. 10

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

#œ.

C ma7(#11)

œ

œ

œ
J

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E

Œ

Œ

Ó

3

Species G.1
Fig. 10 Fig. 5
b
F ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen: B maj7( # 11)
39
Bar
101
Species G.2
C 7sus
C # 7sus Bar  120:  A  descending  phrase  
 Son of Thirteen:
Ex.  16  –  Species  G  &  D  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  
Bar 147

œ

œ œ œ œ

œ J bœ œ
œ

œ œ
Œ
& ˙b œJ
œ
œ
œ
43
#œ œ ‰ Œ
&a3  of  Ama7#11  leads  to  Fig.
from  the  m
a  d10iatonic  m2  interval  from  Jroot  to  ma7  to  

J

 

Species G & D
A ma7(#11)
Fig. 10
C ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
enclosure  
f
rom  
m
a7  
(
fig.  
1
0),  
beginning  a  descending  enclosure  chain  from  ma7  
Bar 120
41

&‰

œ

œ

to  the  aug4  of  Cma7#11  (fig.  5).  

˙

Species G.2
C 7sus
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 147
43

&

œ

Fig. 10 Fig. 5

œ bœ
Fig. 10

œ

œ

œ

C # 7sus

#œ.

œ

œ
J

Ó

Œ

Ex.  17  –  Species  G.2  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  147:  A  descending  phrase  from  
the  P4  of  C7sus  leads  to  a  m2  interval  from  m7  to  ma6  to  enclosure  from  ma6  to  
the  P5  of  C#7sus  (fig.  10),  to  a  tertial  descent  down  a  C#  major  root  position  
triad.  
 
 

 

 
 

83  

6.2  –  Enclosure  Chromaticism:  Patterns  of  Use  
 
 

2
Figure 9

Formulaic Components

C

For  each  Formulaic  Species  of  Enclosure  Chromaticism,  we  may  draw  

Ó
j ‰ Œ
b
œ
œ
œ
conclusions  
17 as  to  how  their  Formulaic  Components  are  most  prominently  used,  
Figure 10

3

œ

C

œ

4

based  on  the  evidence  compiled  in  this  chapter.    Drawing  these  conclusions  is  

Œ
Ó
j ‰
œ
œ
19 helpful  to  the  improviser  who  desires  to  apply  them,  as  it  is  vital  for  
enormously  
C ma7

Figure 11

3

œ

œ

2

1

1 to  4correlate  the  tonalities  and  scale  tones  to  which  they  are  
an  improviser  
œ œ

œ

&

œ

œ

œ

œ

j
œ

œ

Œ

Ó

21
associated  
and  understand  what  function  3they  1serve  in  the  improvisational  line  

C

Figure 12

in  order  to  begin  to  use  them  effectively.    I  will  analyze  
Œ Formulaic  
Ó
j ‰ the  

23 1

œ

œ

œ

œ bœ

œ

œ

œ

1
2 Species,  
Component  associated  with  each  Formulaic  
and  describe  their  related  

C

Figure 13

tonalities,  &
scale  tones  œand  œmelodic  
Ó with  the  
j ‰ Œbeginning  
œ functions  accordingly,  
25

œ

1

œ

œ

œ

œ

1

œ

2 working  towards  the  most  complex  or  
simplest  
or  mC ost  frequent  application  and  
Figure 14

least  frequent  
& œ application.  
# œ œ œ     n œ
 

27

Figure 15

1

C

Ó 16):     Œ
Species  A  (&
Fig.  
Figure 16

29

C

32

œ

1

2

œ

1

œ œ
œ

œ

2

œ

1

j ‰
œ

Œ

Ó

œ œ œ œ œj ‰ Œ

!

1

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Figure  16:  Enclosure  to  ascending  scale  fragment.    We  will  observe  this  
intervallic  arrangement  to  be  the  component’s  “essential  structure.”  
Enclosure  Chromaticism  component  Species  A  (Fig  16)  is  a  relatively  ordinary  
phrase  in  the  jazz  vernacular  and  not  particularly  exclusive  to  Metheny,  being  
that  it  consists  of  an  enclosure  followed  by  an  ascending  scale  fragment.    It  is  

 

 
 

84  

also  the  only  component  featured  in  this  chapter  that  is  purely  diatonic.    It  is  in  
Metheny’s  varied  application  of  the  component  where  we  may  find  complexity  
and  insight:  
Firstly,  the  most  simple  and  relatable  application  of  Species  A  begins  with  

Enclosure Chromaticism
Enclosure
EnclosureChromaticism
Chromaticism

an  enclosure  of  the  root  of  a  ma7  
chord,  
s  found  
hree  
Species
A,and  
B, iC,
D, E,in  
F t&
G excerpts  of  the  
Enclosure  
Chromaticism  
formulaic  
category:  
Species
A, A,
B, B,
C, C,
D,D,
E, EF &
&FG
Species
Species A
F ma7

b 4
& b b F4ma7FŒma7
b 4b 4
& b&b b4b Œ4 Œ
Species B

j
Ó
œ œ Œ
nœ œ œ œ œ
Ó
‰ ‰ Fig.jn œ16j œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ ŒŒ

œ
C7
F ma7
Solar: Bar 4 3
16
j
Fig.Fig.
 
b
œ16 b œ œ b œ
Ó
Species B & b b CÓ 7
œ ‰ Œ
Species
Fnma7
C7
F ma7
Solar: Bar 4 3
Solar:
j component  
Ex.  18  3 –  Species  
2œ 79):  biœn  this  
tjhe  
begins  
with  an  
Fig.
b b b bÓb AÓ  (Solar:  Bar  
œ example,  
‰ ŒŒ
Ó
n
œ
œ
b
œ
&
b
œ
b
œ

Ó
n
œ

F ma7
Species C &
Fig. 7 chord.    This  is  a  unique  example,  in  that  the  
Solar: Bar 5 5of  the  root  of  an  Fig.
enclosure  
F
ma7  
b
œ 7 bœ
œ
œ
œ
SpeciesCC & b b Fn œma7
Species
œ
F ma7
5
Solar:
Bar
5
Solar: Bari5ncludes  
melody  
a
 
m
3  
o
ver  
t
he  
m
a7  
c
hord,  
i
n  
a
 
b
rief  
r
eharmonization.  
 In  this  

œ
œ
bb b b b Fig.n œ8 œ œ
œ
5
b
œ
&
œ
œ
œ
b nœ
œ
œ
Species A, &
B&C
b
b
b
b
example  
t
he  
c
omponent  
e
xists  
i
ndependently  
a
s  
i
ts  
o
wn  
p
hrase.  
B
7
E
ma7
E
m7
A
7
D bma7
Fig. 8
Solar: Bar 200
6
Fig. 8
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
œ nœ bœ bœ œ
Species A + B & C b
j
œ

E bma7
E b m7
A b 7n œ œ D bma7
œ œ bœ ‰
Species
B, 200
A, &
G &b Cb BÓb 7
Solar: Bar
œ
b
b
b
b
œ
6
E ma7
E m7
A 7
D ma7
Solar: Bar 200
B
b b7 Ó œFig.œœb7œœ b œ œ Fig.œ 16œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œb œb œ œFig.œ b10œ Fig.œ 8œ n œ b œ Fig.
b œ 19œ
j‰
b
b
n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
&
œ
b
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
n
œ
b
œ
6
œ
b
œ
b
œ
œ œ œ b œj ‰
Species E & b b Ó
nœ œ
Solar: Bar 29
Species
A
Species A
Solar:
Bar
29
Solar: Bar 29

Solar: Bar 62

C m7

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Fig. 16
Fig. 16

G m7

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

C7

Fig. 19
b

 
& b b Fœma7 œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ b œ n œ œœ # œ n œ F m7 œ # œ # œ Œ Ó
œ C 7b œ n œ
C m7
œ b œ œG m7œ n œ b œ b œ
œ27xample,  
œ œ n œthe  
Fig.
5
Ex.  19  –  Species  
G  (25
Solar:  Bar  
200):  
in  this  
component  
b b b BÓ,  A,  G  &Œ  Fig.
‰ bœ bœ
Fig. e
&
b
10

b
œ
œ
œ
Species F& b b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
Œ
œ
n
œ
#
œ
b œ Fig.œ30# œFig.n œ1 F m7œ # œ
œ F ma7
Fig. 26
Solar: Bar 53
Fig. 28
begins  with  
s  p31receded  
by  a  
13 an  enclosure  of  the  root  of  an  Ebma7  
œ chord,  œ and  iFig.
Species E
Fig. 5n œ
œ
Fig. 27
Fig. 25 œ b œ
b
b
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
C
m7
G
m7
C
7
b
Ó
Œ
n
œ

b
œ bœ
Solar: Bar 62 & b
13
Species
F
J
brief  prefix  (fig.  
phrase.  
F ma7
F m7
b 7)  to  begin  b œthe  
Solar: Bar 53
œ œ œ b œ Fig.
n
œ
Œ
26
1
n
œ
#
œ
30œœ #Fig.
&b b b œ œ œ œ Fig.
œ
#œœ31n œFig. 28 Ó
œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ
n œœ œ œ œ Fig.
œ
13
b
Πb

‰ bœ bœ
Species A,&
E &b Db Ó
Fig. D
5 m7b5
Fig. 27
G 7b9
C m7
Fig.
25
J
E b m7 A b 7
D ma7
Solar: Bar 106
b œ Fig.
œ30œ b œFig.
œ
n
œ
Species E + 16
A&D
n
œ
b
œ
Fig. 26 œ b œ œ œ œ
1
œ Cb œm7œ œ Fig.
œ œ31n œ Fig.
D m7b5
œ nœ
G 7b9
b œ 28œ ‰ Œ Ó n n b
Solar: Bar 106 b b b E bÓm7 ‰Aœb 7œ œ Db bœma7
b
œ
&
œ
œ
œ
16
œ n œ b œ œ Cbm7
Species A, E & D
b œ œ œ D m7b5n œ œGb7b9
œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ
bbm7 A b7 œ œDœbma7
œ
œ
n
œ
E
b
œ
Solar: Bar 106
Fig.
25
‰ 16
‰ Œ Ó nnb
Fig. 24 Fig. 2 Fig. œ30 Fig. 5
b
œ
& b b Ó Fig.
J
œ
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
b
œ
nœbœ œ bœœœ œœnœbœ œ
b Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œn œb œ œ
n b  
16
Fig.
25
b

Œ
Ó
Fig.
24
b
n
Fig.
30
Fig. 16
Fig. 5
&
J
Fig. 2
10

Species F
Solar: Bar
53D10
Species
E&
Solar: Bar 62

Fig. 16

Fig. 25

Fig. 24

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

Fig. 19

 
 

85  

Ex.  20  –  Species  A,  E  &  D  (Solar:  Bar  106):  in  this  example,  the  component  begins  
with  an  enclosure  of  the  root  of  a  Dbma7  chord,  and  begins  a  period  of  extended  
2

phrasing.  

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E
Species A & G
7
m7
7
51 D m7related  and  Drbelatively  
 Old Folks:A  Bar
second  
simple  aCpplication  
of  SFpecies  
A  begins  
21

œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
!

œ

b

œ bœ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

with  an  e&
nclosure  of  the  root  of  a  m7  chord,  found  in  one  excerpt:  
Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Species A & C
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

23

Fig. 16

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

Fig. 8

Fig. 16

n

B ma7(#11)

Fig. 11

bœ ‰ Œ
J

Ó

b
 

œ

Ex.  21  –  S26pecies  A  &  C  (Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  99):  Here  the  component  bœegins  œwith  
Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

F7

&b Ó

Œ

B bma7

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ

an  enclosure  of  the  root  of  Bm(ma7).    Only  the  m3  is  adapted  to  suit  the  
Fig. 7

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D o
&therwise  
E
harmony,  
the  essential  structure  is  identical.    The  component  acts  to  
#

œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ

Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( 11)


begin  a  larger  
& b npœhrase.  
28

 

Fig. 25

n

Fig. 9
Fig. 8
Fig.
Fig. 11 o
A  third  
application  
f  S5pecies  Fig.
A  27
is  to  begin  with  an  enclosure  
of  the  m3  of  

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

C # 7alt

œ b œ œ œ b œ b œ œEnclosuresb œ- Speciesœ A, B, C, D & E
30
œ

œ nœ œ bœ œ œ
Species A & G
‰ Œ Ó
& 51 D m7
D b7
C m7
F7 J
Old Folks: Bar
œ
œ
œ bœ
œ
21
œ œ œ œ
Fig. 26
œ œFig.œ 5œ œ
œ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
!

Species E &&
Db

a  2m7  chord,  
found  in  one  excerpt:  
B m(ma7)

Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

œFig. 16œ # œ œ n œ œ

F # 7alt

n

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
b
# œœœ œœœ Œ Ó
&
# œ œ œ Bœma7(#11)
Ex.  22  –  S23pecies  A  &  G  (Old  Folks:  Bar  51):  Here  the  component  begins  with  an  
Fig. 25
Œ ‰ # œj # œ œ œFig.œ5 œ # œFig.n œ2 Fig.œ 11œ œ œ œ b œ ‰ Œ Ó
b
&
Species
A,
C
&
D
J
enclosure  
of  the  m3  of  a  Dm7  chord,  and  recurs  with  an  enclosure  of  the  m3  of  a  
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7
Fig. 8
37
Fig.
r œ16 œ œ œ # œ œ b œ b œFig.œ11 œ b œ n œ n œ b œ œ œ n œ # œ b œ n œ
.
Œ essential  
‰ œ œsœtructure  niœs  identical,  
œ
Species
B&
Cm7  
chord.  
and  only  the  target  note  of  the   n
&C b  The  
B bma7
Old Folks: Bar 36
F7
œ œ œ
26
Fig.
14
œ
b
œ
n
œ
Fig. 16
œ 8œ b œ Fig.œ1
œ Fig. 5
Fig.
bœ œ œ nœ
enclosure  has  
& b Óchanged,  bŒeing  the  m3.  n œ  In  each  case,  the  component  begins  its  
33

G ma7

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

Species A & C
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

phrase.  

Fig. 7

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

& b nœ

28

Fig. 8

Species F & D

œ #œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Fig. 27

Fig. 25

Fig. 9

n

 

Fig. 8

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

 
 

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

B m(ma7)
30

&

Fig. 26

Species E & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

Fig. 27

Fig. 25

Fig. 9

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

C # 7alt

Fig. 5

Ó

F # 7alt

G ma7
A  33fourth  
œ application  of  Species  A  is  to  begin  with  an  enclosure  of  the  m7  

œ #œ œ nœ œ

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
# œœœ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
of  a  dom7  chord,  found  in  one  excerpt:  
 

œ ‰ Œ
J

86  

&

Fig. 25

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

&b Œ

37

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

B b7

œœ Œ Ó
œ

b

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

(Em9)

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

Ex.  23  –  Species  A,  C  &  D  (Old  Folks:  Bar  47):  Here  the  component  begins  with  an  
enclosure  of  the  m7  of  C7.    In  this  particular  example,  an  ascending  pair  of  ma3  
intervals  interrupts  the  essential  structure.    However  like  many  other  examples  
of  Species  A,  the  component  marks  the  beginning  of  a  larger  phrase.  
Overall,  a  significant  characteristic  of  the  Enclosure  Chromaticism  
component  Species  A  (Fig.  16)  is  the  fact  that  the  component  is  consistently  used  
as  a  starting  point  in  a  melodic  phrase.    In  some  cases  the  component  stands  on  
its  own  as  an  independent  phrase.    Additionally,  the  component  is  applied  in  a  
variety  of  contexts  (ma7,  m7,  m(ma7)  and  dom7  chords),  and  the  target  note  of  
the  initial  enclosure  is  applied  to  a  variety  of  chord  tones  (including  the  root,  m3,  
and  m7).  There  is  clear  evidence  that  Metheny  is  adept  in  his  use  of  Enclosure  
Chromaticism’s  Species  A  component,  and  favours  its  use  as  an  initial  phrase  or  
starting  point  for  enclosure-­‐based  phrasing  in  his  improvisations.  
 
 
 
 

 

& œ #œ

9

 
 

Figure 5

1

11

Figure 6

1

C


1

2

C

œ

Species  B:  & Ó
Figure 7

12

14

1

Œ

œ bœ

1

2

j ‰
œ

œ bœ

3

4

j
œ

Œ

œ

4

œ

j
œ

Œ

Ó

œ

œ

œ

j
œ

Œ

Ó

1

3

2

C

Œ
87  

œ

C

Figure 8

j ‰
œ

œ #œ

 

Figure  7:  Descending  chromatic  passing  jtone  fragment  to  enclosure.    We  

œ

œ

œ

Œ

1
16 1
2
1
will  
observe  t2his  intervallic  
arrangement  
to  be  the  component’s  essential  

structure.  
Where  Species  A  is  a  phrase  common  within  the  general  jazz  vernacular,  
Enclosure  Chromaticism  component  Species  B  (Fig.  7)  is  more  idiosyncratic  in  its  
essential  form.    Where  many  jazz  improvisers  may  use  simply  a  chromatic  
interval  below  the  target  note  to  complete  this  component’s  enclosure,  Metheny  
uses  either  a  ma2  or  m3  interval  below  the  target  note  to  add  an  idiosyncratic  
sophistication  to  the  component.    An  added  bonus  is  the  fact  that  the  m3  interval  
falls  more  readily  under  the  hand  on  the  guitar  than  its  chromatic  alternative,  
which  involves  a  larger  four  
or  five-­‐fret  stretch.  
 
Enclosure
Chromaticism

Species A, B, C, D, E, F & G

 

Firstly,  a  relatively  simple  use  of  the  Species  B  component  targets  an  
Species A

F ma7
enclosure  
Solar: Bar 29 of  the  ma3  of  a  ma7  chord,  approached  from  the  root  of  a  dom7  chord,  

j
b b b 44 Œ

&
nœ œ
found  in  two  excerpts:  
Species B
Solar: Bar 4
3

Fig. 16

C7

b
&bb Ó

Species C
Solar: Bar 5

œ bœ
Fig. 7

œ

œ

œ

F ma7

œ bœ

œ

œ

œ bœ

Œ

œ

Ó

œ

œ

Fig. 8

œ

F ma7

Ex.  24  
5 –  Species  
œ Bar  4):  
b œHere  the  œ Species  œB’s  enclosure  targets  the  ma3  
b b B  (Solar:  

& b nœ

œ

œ

 

of  Fma7  from  Fig.
the  
8 root  of  C7,  with  the  note  preceding  the  target  note  a  m3  below.    
Species B, A, G & C
Solar: Bar 200
B b7
6

b
&bb Ó

E bma7

b

b

b

E m7
A 7
D ma7
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
œ
b œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ œ b œj ‰

Fig. 7

Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Fig. 8

Fig. 19

  2
 Species A & G

C m7
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
!
D b7

Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7
21

&b

œ

88  

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E

œ bœ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

F7

n

Fig.
16 component  is  followed  
Fig.b
10y  component  Fig.
16
Additionally,  
the  
Species  
C  (Fig.  8).    Note:  

Species A & C
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

B ma7(#11)

the  root  23of  C7  can  conversely  be  observed  as  the  P5  of  Fma7,  as  the  use  of  this  

bœ ‰ Œ

Ó

component  may  not  necessarily  warrant  the  presence  of  a  V7  Jchord.  
Fig. 8
Fig. 11
Enclosure
Chromaticism

Fig. 16

Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

& b Ó F ma7
bbb 4 Œ
Species C,&
D&E 4

F7

Species A
Solar: Bar 29

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ

j
nœ œ

Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

œ œ œ

Species A,B bma7
B, C, D, E, F & G

Œ

26

Fig. 7

Fig. 8

œ

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 1

œ

Œ

Fig. 1

b

Ó

Fig. 1

 

Ex.  25  –  28Species  Bœ  &  C  (Old  Fig.
Folks:  
Bar  36):  Here  Species  
16
b œ B’s  enclosure  targets  the  

#œ #œ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ
œ
n
œ b œ œ œ b œ b œ F ma7 œ œ b œ b œ œ n œ œ n œ œ œ
& b nCœ7
ma3  o3f  Bbma7  
j the  target  note  being  a  m3  
b from  the  root  œ of  Fb œ7,  the  œnote  preceding  
n œFig. 25‰ Œ Fig. 9 Ó
Fig. 27 b œ
Fig. 11 Fig. 5
& b bFig.Ó 8
Species B
Solar: Bar 4

Species FA&gain,  
D
below.  
the  component  
Fig. 7precedes  Species  C  (fig.  8).  

Son of Thirteen: Bar 251
C # 7alt
Species C B m(ma7)
F ma7
  Solar: BarA  305second  application  of  Species  B  targets  an  enclosure  of  the  ma2  of  a  
5

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bb
œ
bœ œ
&& b n œ

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ
œ
œ
œ

œ ‰ Œ
J œ

Ó

ma7  chord,  Fig.
approached  
from  the  m7  of  a  dom7  chord,  found  in  one  excerpt:  
26
Fig. 5

Fig. 8

Species E & D
Species
B, A, G &
C 153
Son of Thirteen:
Bar
G ma7
Solar: Bar 200
B b7
33
6

E bma7

b

b

b

F # 7alt

E m7
A 7
D ma7
œb œ # œ œ œœnbœœ œœ œ # œ œ œœn œœ œ #œœ œœ œœ b œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ œ # œb œ n œ œ œ # œœn œ b œœœb œ Œœ œÓ œ b œj ‰b
&&b b Ó
œœ œ œ œ

Fig. 25

Fig. 7

Fig. 2 Fig. 11 Fig. 10

Fig. Fig.
16 5

Species
C&
SpeciesA,
E&
DD
Old
Folks:
7
Solar:
Bar Bar
62 47 CC m7

Fig. 8

Fig. 19

Ex.  26  –  37Species  B,  A,  Gr  &  C  (Solar:  Bar  200):  We  cœan  œobbserve  
of  the  
œ n œ n œ baœn  œenclosure  
œ
G m7

C7

nœ bœ
b
bœ œ œ #œ œ bœ bœ
#œ Œ#œ Ó nœ n
&&b bb Œœ œ‰ . œ œ œœ œ œn œ œœ œ n œ œ b œ œn œ œ # œ n œ
#
œ
œ note  preceding  the  
œ the  
ma2  of  Ebma7  from  the  m7  of  Bb7  (or  the  P4  of  Ebma7),  
10

Fig. 16Fig. 25

Fig. 8

Fig. 5

Fig. 14

Fig. 27

Fig. 1

Fig. 5

Species F
target  
note  being  
precedes  Species  
F ma7 a  ma2  below.    In  this  example,  the  component  
F m7
Solar: Bar 53

b
A  (Fig.  1&
6).  b b Ó

Œ

13

Conclusion:  

Species A, E & D
b
Solar: Bar 106 E m7

A b7

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ bœ
J

Fig. 26
D bma7

Fig. 30

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

œ b œ n œ œ œ b œCnhromaticism  
A  significant  characteristic  
œ b œ œ b œ œ œ œ œcœomponent  
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ œoœf  Enclosure  
nœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó
16
& b
J
D m7b5

G 7b9

C m7

Species  B  (Fig.  7),  is  that  it  is  used  to  pFig.
recede  
other  components,  namely  
25
Fig. 16

Fig. 24

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

nb
n

Enclosure  Chromaticism  component  Species  C  (Fig.  8)  and  Species  A  (Fig.  16).    In  

 

7

1

Figure 4

 
 

3

C

& œ #œ

œ #œ

œ

9

Figure 5

11

1

1

C

1

j ‰
œ

2

1

C

Œ

œ bœ

œ bœ

j
œ

3

1

4

j ‰
œ

Œ

89  

Œ

that  sense,  wCe  could  label  Species  B  a2  ‘prefix’  component,  rather  than  a  melodic  
Figure 6

j ‰intervallic  
Œ
Ó
&  ÓIt  is  idiosyncratic  
centerpiece.  
structure,  
and  the  
b œ essential  
œ
œ œboth  œin  its  
12

1

4

Figure 7 considerations  
technical  
of  its  ease  of  use.      
C

Species  C:  &
 
14

Figure 8

Ó

3

œ

j
œ

œ

2

C

16

œ

1

œ

2

1

œ

2

1

j
œ

Œ

Ó
Œ

 

Figure  8:  Expanded  ascending  enclosure.    In  this  example  the  target  note  
is  approached  from  a  m3  below,  two  descending  chromatic  notes  above,  
and  a  ma2  below.    We  will  observe  this  intervallic  arrangement  to  be  the  
component’s  essential  structure.  
With  Enclosure  Chromaticism  component  Species  C  (Fig.  8),  Metheny  takes  the  
concept  of  a  three-­‐note  enclosure  and  expands  it  to  five  notes.    The  concept  of  
expanding  the  number  of  notes  in  an  enclosure  is  not  unique  to  Metheny,  
however  the  intervallic  arrangement  of  the  essential  structure  is.    The  interval  of  
a  ma2  below  preceding  the  target  note  avoids  a  typical  chromatic  arrangement  
and  adds  idiosyncrasy.    Species  C’s  intervallic  structure  also  frees  the  hand  to  
descend  positions  linearly  along  the  neck  of  the  guitar,  with  the  component  
typically  displacing  the  first  finger  from  its  preliminary  note  to  the  target  note  of  
its  enclosure.    
 

Firstly,  the  most  prominent  application  of  Species  C’s  enclosure  targets  

the  P5  of  a  ma7  chord,  approached  from  the  ma3,  found  in  two  excerpts:  

Solar: Bar 29

 
  Species B

F ma7

b 4
&bb 4 Œ

j
nœ œ

Fig. 16

C7

Solar: Bar 4

b
&bb Ó

œ

3

2

SpeciesAC& G
Species
Solar:
Bar Bar
5 51
Old
Folks:

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

j

F ma7

œ

Œ

Ó

Œ

Fig. 7 Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E

90  

Ó

D b7
C m7
F7
œ œ
œ
œ œ œ bœ
œ
œ
bb œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
œœ
&
! œ

œ
& b b nœ

5
21

F ma7
D m7

Fig. Fig.
16 8

Species A +
&BC& C
b7 B m(ma7)
Solar:
200 BarB99
Son ofBar
Thirteen:

Fig. 10

E bma7

n

Fig. 16

E b m7

A b7

D bma7
B ma7(#11)

 

œ œ component’s  
Ex.  27  –  623Species  C  (Solar:  
enclosure  targets  the  P5  
œ bœ
œ œ b œ Bar  5):  Here  
œ œ the  
j
b
œ œ œ œ # œ n œ œ œ œ œœ b œ œ œb œ n œ‰ b œŒb œ œÓ
j
n œœ
œ œ b œ ‰b
& bŒ b Ó ‰ # œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ
J major  triad.  
of  Fma7,  approached  from  the  ma3,  followed  by  a  descending  
Fig. 7
Fig. 16

Species D + B
Species
B 53
&C
F ma7
Solar:
Bar
Old Folks:10Bar 36

Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 8

Fig. 11

Enclosureb Chromaticism
F

B ma7
œ E, F & G
œ œ œ
œ bSpecies
œ œ œ A,
B,
C,
D,
n
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
Œ
n
œ

bœ bœ
œ œ bœ
œ
bœ œ œ nœ
Œ
nœ œ
J
m7

b
& bb b Ó Ó
&
Species A

F7

26

Fig. 7
Fig. 5
Fig. 7

F ma7

Fig. 30 Fig. 5
Fig. 1

 
b 4
j œ G m7
œ C Œ7

Ó
œ
&bb 4 Œ
œ

œ œ
b œ n œ Bœar  œ36):  
Ex.  28  –  28S&pecies  
 C  (œSolar:  
H
b b b œ œBœ#  &
œ
œ
nœœb œthe  
# œ Œ œ Ótargets  
b nœœœ œ œ bœœ # œeœ nclosure  
b œere  
œ # œ n œ œ Fig.
œœ #cœomponent’s  
16
b
#
œ
n
œ
b
œ
n
œ œ nœ œ
œ
b
n
œ
œ
œ
n
œ b œ Fig. 5
Species B &
C7
F ma7
Fig.
27
Fig.
25
Solar:
Bar
4
the  P5  of  Bbma7,  approached  form  the  ma3.    It  is  
by  component  
Fig.
25
Fig. 9
jpreceded  
Species E
3 + A &b DFig. 8
5 b œ Fig.œ27
Fig. 11 Fig.
œ
b
Ó

Œ
Ó
D
m7b5
b
n
œ
b
b
b
G
7b9
C
m7
&
b
œ
Solar:
BarF 106
E m7 A 7
D ma7
Species
&D
b
œ
œ œ b1œ)  n œobf  œtœhe  b œP5  fœrom  the  aug4.  
16
Species  
B  and  
followed  by  an  enclosure  
œ œ n(œFig.  
Son of Thirteen:
bBar Ó251 ‰ œ œ œ b œFig.œ œ7n œ b œ œ
œ œ œ œC #n7alt
œbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó n b
B m(ma7)
b
n
J
Species C & œ b Fbma7
œ
œ
b
œ
bs  œan  
œ application  
b œ œ œ iFig.
œ œ n œ oœ f  btœhe  œP5  of  a  dom7  chord,  
b25œenclosure  
  Solar: BarA  305second  related  
Fig. 4
Fig. 16
Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig.œ5 ‰ Œ
b
Ó
5
œ

œ
&
J œ
b
œ
b
n
œ
œ
&
Solar: Bar 29
Species E
Solar:
BarC,62
Species
D & E C m7
13
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

Fig. 8

Fig. 28Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig.f26
approached  
rom  the  m
Fig.a3,  
5 found  in  one  excerpt:    

Species E & D Fig. 8
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
Species B, A, G G&ma7
C
33
Solar: Bar 200
B b7
6

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

F # 7alt

œ œ # œ œ n œ œ # œ n œ œ œœ œ
bœœ œœ œ# œb œœ œœ # œœœn œ b œœœœb œ Œ Ó j b
&b b Ó œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ # œ
œ œ œ bœ ‰
n œœ œ
& Fig.b 25

Species A, C & D
Species
E&
Old
Folks:
BarD47 C 7
C m7
37
Solar: Bar 62

Fig. 5
Fig. 16

Fig. 7

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

Fig. 10

Fig. 8

b œ n œ n œ bCœ7 œ

Fig. 19

r
œ œthe  component’s  
œ n œ e# œnclosure  
œ ere  
bœ nœ n
Ex.  29  –  Species  
œ œ # œ nBœ ar  œ 200):  
b Œ B‰,  . A,  Gœ  &  Cœ  (œSolar:  
œ b œ bH
G m7

 

œ bœœ
&b
& b b œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
#œ #œ Œ Ó
œ
œ
Fig. 14
Fig. 16approached  
targets  the  P5  of  Ab7,  
from  
the  mFig.
a3.  27  The  essential  
structure  
is  
Fig. 5
Fig. 8
Fig.Fig.
5 1
Fig. 25
10

Species F

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ
to  outline  the  voice-­‐leading  of  a  II-­‐V-­‐I  progression.    It  is  preceded  by  aJ   b œ

F ma7
F m7
identical  
Solar: Bar 53and  only  the  chord  quality  is  altered;  in  this  context  the  component  acts  
13

b
&bb Ó

Œ

Fig. 26

Fig. 30

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

descending  
Species A, E & Dma2  to  enclosure  (Fig.  10)  and  followed  by  a  descending  major  triad  
E b m7

A b7

D bma7

œ œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœœœ œ œ nœ œ
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
n
œ
to  chromatic  
p
assing  
t
one  
f
ragment  
(Fig.  19).    
16

œ bœ ‰ Œ Ó
& b b Ó ‰œ œ
J
Solar: Bar 106

Fig. 16

D m7b5

Fig. 25

G 7b9

Fig. 24

C m7

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

nb
n

&b

!

Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Species A & C
  Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

 

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

23

 

n

Fig. 16

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

Fig. 8

Fig. 16

œ

B ma7(#11)

bœ ‰ Œ
J

Fig. 11

Ó

91  

b

B ma7
œ œ œof  the  
A  26third  and  Fm7 ore  complex  application  
of  Species  C  is  an  enclosure  

Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

&b Ó

b

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ

Œ

m7  of  a  dom7  chord,  approached  from  the  ma3,  found  in  one  excerpt:  
Fig. 8

Fig. 7

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

& b nœ

28

Fig. 8

œ #œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Fig. 25

Fig. 27

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

n

Fig. 9

 

C # 7altof  the  
Ex.  30  –  Species  
B m(ma7) C,  D  &  E  (Old  Folks:  Bar  45):  In  this  application  

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

œ

Ó m7  
component,  
& the  target  note  is  adjusted,  making  the  distance  between  
J ‰ Œ the  
30

Fig. 26

Fig. 5

Species E
D and  the  preliminary  ma3  a  larger  aug4  interval.    Other  than  this  
target  
n&
ote  
F # 7alt

Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

œ œ # œ tœhe  
n œ essential  
œ # œ œsntructure  
particular  interval,  
The  #cœœomponent  
œ œ # œ œ iœs  iœdentical.  
œœ Œ Óis  
œ
G ma7

33

&

#œ œ œ œ œ

2
Fig. 5
2 cFig.
followed  
bFig.
y  a25  descending  pentatonic  
un  
omponent  
(Fig.  
11
EnclosuresrFig.
- Species
A, B, C, D, E,
F &1
G1).  

b

œ

Species
C&
SpeciesA,
A&
GD
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7
D b7
F 7 of  an  aug4  that  
Old
Folks:
Bar
51 D m7complex  application  
 
A  37fourth  
of  Species  CCm7
 is  an  enclosure  

œ œ

nœ bœ
œ
r
œ
œ
œ
b œœ œ œ œ b œ n œ œ bœœ œœn œœ# œœ b œœ n œœ n
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
b
Œ

œ
n
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
&
!

& ab  ma7(#11)  chord,  approached  
anticipates  
from  the  m3  of  a  m(ma7)  chord:  
21

Fig. 16

Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig.Fig.
1 10

Species A & C
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

23

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

Fig. 5

Fig. 16

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

Fig. 8

Fig. 16

Fig. 14

B bma7(#11)

Fig. 11

bœ ‰ Œ
J

Ó

n
b

œ

œ of  
œ note  
Ex.  31  –  S26pecies  A  &F  C7  (Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  99):  The  first  note  and  target  
Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

&b Ó

Œ

B bma7

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ

the  phrase  are  adjusted,  making  the  distance  from  the  aug4  target  note  and  the  
Fig. 7

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & Em3  a  smaller  ma2  interval.    Otherwise,  the  essential  structure  is  
preliminary  
#

œ #œ nœ

œ bœ œ

Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( 11)

b œ A  cœomponent  
œ b œ b œ œ (n Fig.  
# œ œis  # œpreceded  
œ aœnd  
œ œ n 1œ 6)  
identical.  &
 The  
b ncœomponent  
œ n œ b œ œby  œa  bSœpecies  
28

Fig. 25

8
followed  by  aFig.
 descending  
entatonic  
run  
5
Fig.
27 component  (Fig.  11).  
Fig. 11pFig.

 

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

n

Fig. 9

A  fifth  
complex  application  of  Species  C  is  an  enclosure  oCf  #t7alt
he  ma2  of  a  
B m(ma7)

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

30

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

dom7  chord,  
& the  phrase  beginning  on  the  root:  
Fig. 26

Species E & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
33

&

Fig. 5

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ
G ma7

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œ
# œ œ œ œ # œœ

œ ‰ Œ
J
F # 7alt

Ó

œœ Œ Ó
œ

b

 

œ œ bœ bœ œ œ

30

&

 
 

Fig. 26

Species E & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
33

&

Fig. 5

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ
G ma7

Fig. 25

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

&b Œ

37

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œ
# œ œ œ œ # œœ

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

B b7

œ ‰ Œ
J

Ó

F # 7alt

œœ Œ Ó
œ

92  

b

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

(Em9)

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

 

Ex.  32  –  Species  A,  C  &  D  (Old  Floks:  Bar  47):  The  preliminary  and  target  note  of  
the  component  are  adjusted,  making  the  interval  between  the  ma2  target  note  
and  the  preliminary  root  note  smaller.    In  addition  to  this,  the  note  preceding  the  
target  note  is  a  semi-­‐tone  lower  than  the  preliminary,  unlike  the  essential  
structure  where  this  note  is  typically  a  semi-­‐tone  higher  than  the  preliminary.    
The  component  is  preceded  by  Species  A  (Fig.  16),  and  followed  by  an  enclosure  
of  the  m3  of  Bb7  (Fig.  1).  
 

Species  C  is  another  Enclosure  Chromaticism  formula  with  both  melodic  

and  technical  idiosyncratic  considerations.    Its  essential  structure  frees  the  
hands  to  descend  positions  along  the  neck  of  the  guitar,  and  as  such,  each  
example  of  the  component  is  followed  by  a  phrase  at  a  lower  pitch  level,  often  a  
descending  component.    In  two  instances,  the  Species  C  is  followed  by  a  
descending  major  triad  (including  Fig.  19),  it  is  followed  by  a  descending  
pentatonic  run  (Fig.  11)  twice,  and  followed  by  an  enclosure  (Fig.  1)  that  begins  
at  a  lower  pitch  level  twice.    In  addition,  Species  C  is  preceded  by  Species  A  (Fig.  
16)  twice,  Species  B  (Fig.  7)  twice,  and  Species  G  (Fig.  10)  once.    These  excerpts  
show  definite  patterns  of  use  for  Species  C  and  other  components  that  Metheny  
has  clearly  practiced  as  preceding  and  following  the  phrase,  allowing  Metheny  to  
apply  them  to  the  varied  pitch  levels  and  harmonic  contexts  that  are  evident  in  

C

Figure 2

 
 

&

4

Figure 3

7

bœ œ œ ‰ Ó
J
C

1

Species  D:  &
  œ
Figure 5

1

C

11

Figure 6

1

C

1

2

œ

1

œ b œ œJ ‰ Ó

1

C

Œ

j ‰
œ

œ #œ

C

bœ œ œ ‰ Ó
2

j ‰
œ

œ #œ

the  aFigure
bove  
C
4 excerpts.  
9

C

1

3

Œ

j ‰
œ

œ bœ

3

C

Œ

œ bœ

œ bœ

j
œ

3

1

2

4

j ‰
œ

93  


Œ

Œ

Fig.  5:  ÓDescending  enclosure  chain.    In  this  
j e‰xample,  
Œ the  cÓhromatically  

&

12

œ

œ

œ

œ

descending  target  notes  are  encircled  by  m3  intervals,  or  put  another  

Figure 7

1

4

C

way,  
this  
‰ observe  
Œ
Ó to  be  the  
&aÓpproached  from  
œ baœ  ma2  below.    We  j will  
14

3

Species’  
essential  structure.  
C

œ

œ

œ

2

Figure 8

j

‰ takes  
Œ the  common  
œ
b œ Species  œD  (Fig.  5œ),  Metheny  
With  Enclosure  
& œ Chromaticism  
16

1

2

1

2

1

idea  of  a  descending  chromatic  enclosure  chain  and  once  again  personalizes  the  
component  by  way  of  an  idiosyncratic  interval.    In  the  jazz  vernacular,  a  typical  
descending  enclosure  chain  may  feature  descending  ma2  intervals,  approaching  
each  target  note  from  a  chromatic  note  below.    In  the  case  of  Species  D,  the  
enclosure  chain  generally  features  descending  m3  intervals,  with  target  notes  
approached  from  a  ma2  below.  
 

A  preliminary  and  relatively  simple  application  of  Species  D  is  from  the  

P4  to  the  m3  of  a  m7  chord:  
 
 
 

 

b

& b b œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ œ

#œ #œ Œ

10

Fig. 5

Fig. 25

  Species F
  Solar: Bar 5313

F ma7

b
&bb Ó

2Species A, E & D
E b m7
Solar: Bar 106
16
Species A & G
Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7

Œ
A b7

Fig. 27

Ó
94  

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ bœ
J
F m7

Fig. 26
D bma7

Fig. 30

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œDœb7œ n œ bœœ œ œ
œ œ Fœ7 œ n œ b œ œ ‰ Œ Ó n b
C m7
b
&
œ
21
œJœ œ b œ n
œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
! Fig. 25 Fig. 24 Fig.
‰ 2 Fig.œ30 Fig. 5
n  
Fig. 16
&b
D m7b5

7b9
Enclosures - Species A,GB,
C, D &CEm7

Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

Ex.  
33  A–&
 SCpecies  A,  E  &  D  (Solar:  Bar  106):  Here  the  P4  scale  tone  occurs  on  a  
Species

n œ œon  œa  wœ eak  
strong  beat  Œthree,  
to  bthe  
# œ the  
œ œ # œaug4  
œ beat  b œfour,  
‰ #wœjith  
‰ Œresolving  
Ó
œ cœhromatic  
B ma7(#11)

Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)
23

&

m3  on  beat  one.  
 

Fig. 16

œ

Fig. 8

Fig. 11

J

Enclosure
Chromaticism
Bb

ma7
F7
œ aug4  
œ œthe  
A  26second  and  
related  Species
application  
Species  
is  aG  descent  from  
A, B,of  C,
D, E, FD  &

Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

&b Ó

Œ

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ

to  
the  m
Species
A a3  of  a  dom7(#11)  chord:  
F ma7

Fig. 1

b 4
j

Ó
œ œ Œ
&bb 4 Œ
nœ œ œ œ œ
28
œ # œ # œ n œ œ Fig. 16
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
b
n
œ
&
Species B
C7
F ma7
Solar: Bar 4
Fig. 25
Fig. 8
j ‰ Œ Fig. 9Ó
Fig.
5
Fig.
27
Fig.
11
bb Ó
3
œ
b
œ
b
œ

Species F &
&D

Solar: Bar 29

Fig. 7

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

n
 

7 Folks:  Bar  45):  In  this  case,  an  a
C #ug4  
7alt scale  tone  
Ex.  34  –  Species  
Old  
B m(ma7) C,  D  &  E  (Fig.

Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

œ Fbma7
œ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ œ
Œ three,  
Ó
occurs  
oJn  ‰beat  
b upbeat  of  œ beat  two,  
&tbhe  
5 on  
b œ the  non-­‐diatonic  
œ P4  occurs  
œ
b 26n œ
œ
& Fig.
œ
Fig. 5
Species C 30
Solar: Bar 5

Species E & D
resolving  
to  tFig.
he  8ma3  on  the  upbeat  of  beat  three,  and  prolongs  into  beat  four.  

Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
F # 7alt
Species B, 33
A, GG&ma7
C
b
b
E bma7
A b7
  Solar: BarA  200
third  Bab7pplication  
of  Species  D  is  Etm7
o  be  preceded  
bDy  ma7
Species  E  (Fig.  25),  

œ œ # œ œ n œ œ # œ œ n œ #œœ œ œ
œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœœ œœœ# œ œ œ œœ # œœœn œ œœœb œ Œ Ó j b
&b
6
œ
bœ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ ‰
b b 25Ó
&
Fig.
Fig.
5
2
continuing  the  descending  chromatic  Fig.
movement.  
 Found  in  two  excerpts:  
Fig. 11

Fig. 7
Species A, C & D
Old
Folks:
Bar
47
C
7
Species E &
D.1
37
C m7
Solar: Bar 62
10

Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Fig. 8

Fig. 19

r œ œ œ œ # œG m7 œ b œ b œ œ œ b œ n œ n œ bCœ7 œ œ n œ # œ b œ n œ
.
b
Œ

nœ œ
n
œ bœœ œ
&b
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
Œ
Ó
b
œ
n
œ
#
œ
& œ

œ # œ n œ œ Fig.
œ 14# œ Fig. 5
Fig. 16
Fig. 8
Fig. 1

Fig. 5

Fig. 25

Species F
Solar: Bar 53

Fig. 27

 

Ex.  35  –  Species  E  &  D.1  (Solar:  
œ b œ œBar  62):  Here  œwe  can  observe  Species  D  to  begin  
F ma7

œ œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ
J bœ
on  a  m3  chord  tone  over  a  Gm7  on  beat  one,  descending  chromatically  to  the  
13

b
&bb Ó

F m7

Œ

œ nœ bœ bœ

Fig. 26

Fig. 30

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

Species A, E & D
D m7b5
b
b C7  
aug5  
anticipating  
the  
chord  on  beat  
three;  G a7b9ll  while  
C m7continuing  the  chromatic  
D bma7
Solar: Bar 106 E m7 A 7
16

b Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œn œb œ œ œ
b
& b
Fig. 16

œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó
J
Fig. 25

Fig. 24

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

nb
n

Fig. 8

Fig. 7

 
 

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

œ #œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ œ nœ œ
b
œ
#
œ
n
œ
b
n
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
&
œ
Fig. 8

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Fig. 25

Fig. 27

95  

n

28

Fig. 9

#

C 7alt
descent  oBf  m(ma7)
Sœpecies  
b œ E  (Fig.  25)  from  the  dim2  of  Cm7  begun  in  beat  three  of  bar  
30

one.

&

œ œ bœ bœ œ œ

Fig. 26

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ

Species A & G
Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7
21

&b
Species A, C & D

œ

Fig. 25

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D, E, F & G

D b7

B b7

Ó

F # 7alt

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
# œœœ F 7
C m7# œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ5
œ œ
œ œ œ œ Fig.
œ
œ œ bœ
Fig.
! 2 Fig.œ11

G ma7

&

œ ‰ Œ
J

Fig. 5

Species E & D.2
2Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
33

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

œœ Œ Ó
b
œ œ œ œ bœ
œ œ

 

n

C7
Fig. 10
Fig. 16
Ex.  36  –  37Species  
E  &  Dr.2  (Son  of  Thirteen:  
Bar  153):  
n œ bsœecond  
œ excerpt  we  can  
œ bIœn  n œthis  

œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
Species A & C
œ
bœ œ
b Bar
Œ 99‰ .B m(ma7)
n
œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ
B bma7(#11)
&
Son of Thirteen:
23
observe  a  descent  from  
acting  to  set  up  an  
j the  aug5  to  aug4  
# œ on œver  œ a  m
œ a7  
œ chord,  
œ Fig.œ 14 b œ ‰ Fig.Œ 5 Ó
b
# œ 16# œ œ Fig.œ 8 œ œFig. 1
& Œ ‰ Fig.
J
Old Folks: Bar 47Fig. 16

(Em9)

enclosure  of  the  P5,  continuing  the  chromatic  descent  of  Species  E  (Fig.  25)  that  
Fig. 8

Fig. 16

Fig. 11

Species B & C
began  
on  the  root  of  F 7Gma7  in  beat  on  of  Bbbma7
ar  one.  
Old Folks: Bar 36

 

œ bœ

œ

œ

œ œ œ

nœ œ

œ boœf  naœpplication  
biœs  a  lengthy  
œ
œ n œ descent  from  one  
b Ó and  different  
Œ
A  &
fourth  
type  
26

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1
Fig.the  
7 previous  application,  
scale  tone  to  another,  and  like  
it  continues  a  

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

28
descending  
chromatic  
movement;  this  time  of  a  descending  
chromatic  passing  
œ

& b nœ

#œ #œ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ
œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ

œ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ œ nœ œ

œ

tone  fragment  to  enclosure,  or  Species  F  (Fig.  26).    Fig.
Found  
in  one  excerpt:  
25
Fig. 8

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

B m(ma7)
30

&

Fig. 26

Fig. 9

Fig. 27

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

C # 7alt

Fig. 31

Fig. 5

Species E & D.2
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ

œ ‰ Œ
J

Ó

F # 7alt

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œœ œœ Œ Ó
#
#
œ
œ
œ
œ œ chain  
œ enclosure  
descent  of  Species  F  (Fig.26)  from  the  P4  of  Bm(ma7),  the  

Ex.  37  –  S33pecies  
G ma7 F  &  D  (Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  251):  Continuing  the  chromatic  

&

Fig. 25

Fig. 5

n

 

b

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

Species A, C &
D the  ma2  to  the  ma6,  to  eventually  resolve  not  by  enclosure  but  
descends  
from  
b

œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
rcœhromatic  
œFig.  
œ
b
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
.
chromatically  
t
hrough  
a
pproach  
t
one  
(
31)  to  resolve  to  the  #9   n
nœ œ
&b Œ ‰ œ œœ
B 7

Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

(Em9)

37

scale  tone  of  C#7alt.  Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

Fig. 8

 
 

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

&

Fig. 26

Fig. 9
C # 7alt

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

B m(ma7)
30

Fig. 25

Fig. 27

œ ‰ Œ
J

Fig. 5

Species E & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

96  

Ó

F # 7alt

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
b
# œœœ œœœ Œ Ó
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
phrase  acts  to  anticipate  the  harmony  of  the  following  bar,  found  in  one  excerpt:  
 

G ma7
A  33fifth  
and  more  complex  application  of  Species  D  occurs  where  the  

&

Fig. 25

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

B b7

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n

&b Œ

37

Fig. 16

Fig. 8

(Em9)

Fig. 14

Fig. 1

 

Fig. 5

Ex.  38  –  Species  A,  C  &  D  (Old  Folks:  Bar  47):  Anticipating  an  Em9  chord  in  the  
following  bar,  the  enclosure  chain  descends  from  the  root  of  Em9,  to  resolve  on  
the  m7  in  the  following  bar.  

3
Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D & E
Species G.1
b
F ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen: B maj7( # 11)
  Bar 101 A  39sixth  and  more  complex  application  occurs  where  Species  D  bridges  

œ
œ œ œ œ
J
& b œJ
two  tonalities,  found  in  one  excerpt:  

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 10

Species G & D
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 120
41


J

A ma7(#11)

&‰

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

œ

#œ.

C ma7(#11)

Fig. 10 Fig. 5

Ó

Species G.2
C 7sus
C # 7sus
Son of Thirteen:
Ex.  
3
9  

 
S
pecies  
G
 
&
 
D
 
(
Son  
o
f  
T
hirteen:  
B
ar  
120):  In  this  excerpt,  Species  D  
Bar 147
43

&

˙

œ bœ

œ

œ

œ

œ
J

 

Œ

descends  from  the  ma7  chord  tone  of  Ama7(#11),  and  resolves  to  the  scale  tone  
Fig. 10

aug4  of  Cma7(#11).  
 

It  should  be  noted  that  in  each  excerpt,  Species  D  is  preceded  by  an  

already  descending  phrase,  therefore  it  can  be  said  that  Metheny  prefers  the  use  
of  this  component  to  extend  an  already  descending  improvisational  line.  There  
are  some  patterns  of  use,  where  Species  E  precedes  the  component  twice,  and  
Species  F  precedes  the  component  once.    In  other  cases,  Species  D  is  used  to  
connect  two  ideas  or  components.    Like  Species  B  and  C  before  it,  Species  D  is  

 
 

97  

melodically  idiosyncratic  through  use  of  wider  ma2  intervals  preceding  the  
target  note,  and  like  Species  B  and  C,  allows  the  Enclosure  formula  to  fall  more  
readily  under  the  hand.  
Species  E:  

Formulaic Components

4

C

Figure 25

47

3

œ

1

œ

1

2

j
œ ‰

Œ

Ó

 

C

Figure 26

2

Figure  
j ‰ chromatic  
Œ
Ó passing  tone  
& Œ 25:  C#hromatic  
œ n œ enclosure  to  descending  
3

49

# œ Enclosures
# œ n -œSpecies
n œ A, B, œC, D & E

œ
œ œ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
œ essential  structure.  

n
œ this  #t!œo  be  the  component’s  
below.  
&&b œ  We  wœill  observe  

1
1
2
Species A & G
2 the  target  
fragment  to  enclosure,  
with  
nm7ote  approached  
from  a  ma2  
b
D
7
C
F7
Old Folks:
Figure 27Bar 51
G 7#5(#11)
D m7

œ

21

51 Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

FigureA28&
Species  
E  Cof  C m(Ñ9)
Enclosure  Chromaticism  is  an  expansion  of  Species  B,  being  
Species

œ

&
œ oœbserve  
œ œ Species  
preceded  
‰ # œjb œ# œ œenclosure.  
œœ œ œ  œ#Wœ e  n œwill  
Ó
b and  
&by  Œbaœ  chromatic  
œ b œ E‰ ’s  Œapplications  
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

œ

23

52

7

Figure 29 of  uGse:  
patterns  

Fig. 16
2

Species B & C œ
&
Old Folks: Bar 36

œ
F7

1

 

Fig. 8

3

œ

Fig. 11 2

B ma7(#11)

J

œ

œ

œ œ œwhere  
A  26p53 reliminary  application  of  Species  E  occurs  over  a  dom7  chord,  

Figure 30

& bCÓ

Œ

œ

B bma7

œ œ bœ
œ œ b œ b œ œ œC n œ n4œ œ
C nœ
œ

the  target  note  of  the  initial  enclosure  is  the  m7:  

œ

œ œ

Species C, D54& E
Old Folks: Bar 451 G 7(3#11) 1

& b nœ

28

Fig. 8

Ó

Fig. 7

œ

1

œ

œ œ

Fig. 8

Ó

1

Fig. 1

œFig. 1 œ 1 œ 2 Ó Fig. 1

œ #œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
2

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

1

4

2

Fig. 27

Fig. 25

n

Fig. 9

 

#7alt
Cc
Ex.  40  –  Species  
hord,  the  
B m(ma7) C,  D  &  E  (Old  Folks:  Bar  45):  Over  a  G7(#11)  

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

œ

Ó m7,  
component  
& begins  on  the  ma7  with  a  chromatic  enclosure  targeting  
J ‰ Œ the  
30

Fig. 26

Fig. 5

Species E & Ddown  a  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  the  m6,  before  an  
continues  
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
F # 7alt

œ œ # œ the  
œ n œP5  œ target  
enclosure  reaches  
# œ œnnote  
œ œf#rom  
œ deviation  from  
œ œ aœ  mœ 3  œbelow,  in  a#  sœœlight  
b
&
# œ œ œ œ œ œœ Œ Ó
33

G ma7

Fig. 25
the  essential  
structure.  

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

&b Œ

37

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

D 7
C m7
F7
œ

j
œ œ œ œ œœ œb œ œ œ œ bœœ œ œ n œ ‰ œ œŒ b œ œ œ Óœ œ œ
!

b
& b b b œÓ
&

Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7
3 21

Fig. 7

Fig. 16
  Species C
F ma7
Species
A &5 C
Solar: Bar
  Son of Thirteen:
b Bar 99
5

Fig. 10

98  

Fig. 16

B bma7(#11)

B m(ma7) œ

œ
23 b b n œ
&
j
# œ œn œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ ‰ œŒ
œ
#
œ
œ
Œ

œ
œ
& Fig. 8 # œ
œ J

b

n

b

b

b

Ó

b

E ma7
E m7
A 7
D ma7
Bar 200
B b 7 application  of  Species  
  Solar:
Species BA  
&sCecond  
œ œEœ  is  œone  that  is  followed  by  Species  D  (Fig.  

Species B, A, G & C

Fig. 8

Fig. 11

b Ó Fœ7 œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ B bma7 b œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ b œ œœ œ œ j ‰
b
b
œ œ bœ
26
&
œ b œ b œ œ œn œ n œ n œ œ
5),  found  in  two  excerpts:     œ œ b œ
œ

Fig. 10
& b Ó Fig. 7 Œ Fig. 16
Fig. 19
Fig. 8
Fig. 16

6
Old Folks:
Bar 36

Species E & D.1
C m7
Solar: Bar 62
Species C, D & E
10
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

Species F

Fig. 7

G m7 Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Fig. 1 C 7

bbb œ œ œ œ b œ n œ œ œ œ b œ n œ œ # œ n œ
#œ Œ Ó
&
#
œ
28
œ
œ
œ #œ #œ nœ œ
œ bœ œ
œ 5 œ b œ b œ Fig. 27 œ œ b œ b œ œ n œ œ n œ œ œ
Fig. 25# œ œ n œ b œFig.
& b nœ

n  

Solar: Bar 53
Fig. 5
Fig. 27
Ex.  
41  –  Species  E  &  DFig.
.1  11(Solar:  
œ b œ œBar  62):  Over  œa  Cm7  chord,  Species  E  begins  with  
Species F & D
Fig. 25F m7

F ma7
Fig.
8

Fig. 9

b
œ œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ
œ nœ bœ bœ
Œ
&bb Ó

J assing  
C # 7alt
B m(ma7)
a  chromatic  
e
nclosure  
o
f  
t
he  
r
oot,  
a
nd  
d
escends  
t
hrough  
a
 
c
hromatic  
p
œ b œ œ œ bFig.
œ b26œ œ œ b œ bFig.
30
œ 30œ œFig.n œ1 œ b œ œFig. 31œ Fig. 28
Species A, E&& D
J ‰ Œ Ó
D m7b5
b to  the  
b m3,  
tone  
fragment  
before  continuing  
wGith  
7b9 Species  
C m7 D.  
D bma7
Solar: Bar 106 E m7 A 7
œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
Fig. 26
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œFig.b œ5 œ œ n œ b œ œ œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó n b
Species16E & D.2
b
n
&
J
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
F # 7alt
G
ma7
33
25
5
œ œ #Fig.
œ œ16n œ œ # œ œ n œ Fig.
œ œFig.œ 24 Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig.
#
œ
œ
b
œ # œ œ œ œ # œœœ œœœ Œ Ó
&
13

Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

Fig. 25

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

B b7

 

Ex.  42  –  37Species  E  &  Dr.2  (Solar:  Bar  153):  Over  a  Gœma7,  
E  begins  with  
œ b œSpecies  
b œ n œ tnhe  
œ

&b Œ

œ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ

(Em9)

œ nœ #œ bœ nœ

n

a  chromatic  enclosure  of  the  ma7,  and  descends  through  a  chromatic  passing  
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

tone  fragment  to  the  ma6.    In  a  break  from  the  essential  structure,  the  rhythm  
strays  from  straight  eighth-­‐notes,  to  a  more  syncopated  one  with  rhythmic  
pauses,  before  continuing  with  Species  D.  
 

A  third  application  occurs  over  a  m7b5  chord,  where  the  target  note  of  

the  initial  enclosure  is  the  m7:  
 
 

b

& b b œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ œ

#œ #œ Œ

10

Fig. 5

Fig. 25

  Species F
  Solar: Bar 5313

F ma7

b
&bb Ó

Species A, E & D
Solar: Bar 106

Œ

E b m7

A b7

Fig. 27

Ó

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ bœ
J

Fig. 26

Fig. 30

D bma7

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó
& b
J

16

99  

F m7

D m7b5

Fig. 25

Fig. 16

G 7b9

C m7

Fig. 24

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

nb
n

 

Ex.  43  –  Species  A,  E  &  D  (Solar:  Bar  106):  Here  Species  E  begins  on  the  ma7  of  
Dm7b5,  and  continues  with  a  chromatic  enclosure  of  the  m7,  followed  by  a  
chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  the  m6.  This  is  followed  by  an  expanded  
chromatic  passing  tone  phrase  that  ends  on  the  non-­‐diatonic  dim5  of  Cm7  on  
beat  one  of  the  following  bar.  
 

In  each  excerpt,  Species  E  is  preceded  by  an  ascending  phrase,  providing  

some  evidence  that  Metheny  favours  the  application  of  this  component  to  change  
directions  
in  the  improvisational  line.    Formulaic
For  pComponents
atterns  of  use,  Species  D  follows  
4
C two  excerpts.    
Figure 25 E  in  
Species  

&:  
Species  F
47

Figure 26

Œ

3

3

49

 
chain.  

1

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

1

2

j
œ ‰

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

C

Figure 27

œ

1

2

j
œ

1

2

G 7#5(#11)
œenclosure  
œ
Figure  26:  Chromatic  passing  t#one  
# œ to  descending  
œ fragment  

œ

œ

51

 

C m(Ñ9)
Species  F  is  simply  a  combination  of  Species  B  and  Species  D,  combining  
the  

Figure 28

& bœ

œ

œ

œ

œ

52 passing  tone  fragment  of  Species  B  as  a  prefix  to  the  enclosure  chain  
chromatic  

G7
Figure 29
3
2
of  Species  D1.    We  will  t2he  observe  the  component’s  
applications  
and  any  patterns  

of  use:   53
Figure 30

C

54

Figure 31

1

C

œ

œ
3

œ œ
1

2

Ó

C

œ

1

œ
4

œ œ
1

2

œ

œ

œ

œ

Ó

1

C

œ

œ

4

œ 1 œ2 Ó

Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

F7

&b Ó

Œ

26

 
 

œ œ œ

B bma7

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ
Fig. 7

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

œ # œ # œ n œ œ Enclosure bChromaticism
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
Species A, B, C, D, E & F
The  first  application  begins  on  the  P4  of  a  m(ma7)  chord:  
Fig. 25
& b nœ

28

 

Fig. 8

Species
F ma7
SpeciesAF & D
Solar:
29
Son ofBar
Thirteen:
Bar 251

Fig. 11 Fig. 5

100  

Fig. 1

n

Fig. 9

Fig. 27

b 4
œ œ ŒC #7alt Ó
&œb bb œ 4 œŒ b œ ‰ n œj œ œ œ œ
30
œ
bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ
œ ‰ Œ Ó
Fig. 16
&
J
Species B
C7
F ma7
Solar: Bar 4 3 Fig. 26
Fig. 5
 
j ‰ Œ
Species E & D b b Ó
œ bœ œ bœ
Ó
b
n
œ
&
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153
F # 7alt
G ma7 F  &  D  (Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  251):  Here  Species  F  begins  its  
Ex.  44  –  33Species  
Fig.
7
œ œ #œ œ nœ œ #œ œ nœ #œ œ œ
œ
œ œ #œ
b
# œœœ œœœ Œ Ó
F ma7
Species C &
œ
œ
œ
Solar: Bar 5 5 chromatic  fragment  on  the  P4  of  Bm(ma7),  targeting  the  ma2  which  
descending  
b
œ Fig. 5b œ
Fig. b25
Fig. œ
2 Fig. 11 œ
b nœ
œ
&
œ
B m(ma7)

Species A, C & D

begins  
he  47
descending  
enclosure  chain.  
Old Folks:tBar
C 7 Fig. 8

r œ œ œ œ #œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
.
b
Œ

n œ œœ
n
œ œœ
&6
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ bœ œ
bœ œ œ bœ
œœ
œ nœ bœ
j
b b b Ó Fig. 16 œ Fig. œ8 œ Fig. 1
n œ œFig. 14 b œ Fig.œ 5 œ œ b œ ‰
&
where  the  target  note  anticipates  the  harmony  of  the  following  bar:  
37

Species A + B & C
bm7
b7
B ba
7 pplication  
E bma7
D bma7
200
 Solar: BarA  
second  
of  Species  E  bEegins  
on  Athe  
ma2  
of  a  ma7  chord,  

Fig. 7

Species F
Solar: Bar 53 10

F ma7

b
&bb Ó

Species E
Solar: Bar 62

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

Œ

C m7

Fig. 8

Fig. 19

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ bœ
J
F m7

Fig. 26

Fig. 30 Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

G m7

C7

 

Ex.  45  –  S13pecies  
b F  (Solar:  bBœar  53):  Here  the  component  begins  on  the  ma2  of  

&bb œ œ œ œ

nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ
nœ œ œ

#œ #œ Œ

Ó

Fig. 5
Fma7,  continues  its  descending  
enclosure  
chain  
rom  the  root  and  resolves  to  the  
Fig.f27
Fig. 25
m7b5
b7 m7  Dh
bma7
G 7b9
C m7
E b m7
Solar:aBar
106
m7,  
nticipating  
the  A F
armony  in  
tDbhe  
following  
bar.  
 
œ
œ
œ
16
œ
n
œ
œ
b
œ
nœbœ œ bœ œ
bœ œ

Species E + A & D

 

œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó n b
bbb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ n œ
&
J unique:  n one  
Both  excerpts  of  Species  F  begin  on  scale  tones,  and  both  are  
Fig. 16

Fig. 25

Fig. 24

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

excerpt  features  an  elongated  chromatic  descent,  where  the  other  features  an  
anticipation  of  harmony.    In  both  excerpts,  the  component  acts  to  begin  the  
phrase,  and  in  both  cases  the  component  begins  on  a  scale  tone.  
 
 
 

 
 

101  

6.3  –  Enclosure  Chromaticism:  Conclusions  
 

The  definition  of  component  parts,  application,  and  relation  to  the  

harmony  is  somewhat  exhaustive,  as  enclosure  chromaticism  is  the  formulaic  
category  where  combinations  of  formulaic  components  are  most  prominent.  
Therefore,  formulas  don’t  follow  an  “essential  structure”  as  do  formulas  in  
further  formulaic  categories,  which  we  will  observe  in  the  following  chapters.    
Despite  its  complexity,  enclosure  chromaticism  is  one  of  the  most  fundamental  
elements  of  vocabulary  required  for  jazz  improvisation,  and  Metheny  
demonstrates  a  strong  command  of  it  with  lucid  application.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

102  

Chapter  7  
Passing  Tone  Chromaticism  Formulas  
 
 

In  this  category,  we  may  observe  four  major  formulaic  species  of  passing  

tones.    As  previously  discussed,  the  device  of  passing  tones  are  employed  to  
produce  melodic  sophistication  through  chromatic  notes  placed  between  scale  
tones,  often  placed  on  up-­‐beats.  First,  a  definition  of  each  formulaic  species  will  
be  outlined:  
Species  A:  Passing  tones  within  an  ascending,  then  descending  melodic  contour.  
Species  B:  Passing  tones  within  an  ascending  melodic  contour.  
Species  C:  Passing  tones  within  a  descending  melodic  contour.  
Species  D:  Descending  major  triad  to  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  (Fig.  19)  
In  each  phrase  that  follows,  the  use  chromatic  passing  tones  are  a  focal  
point,  adding  sophistication  to  the  melodic  line.    Each  species’  component  parts,  
application,  and  relation  to  the  harmony  will  now  be  defined.    To  conclude  at  the  
end  of  the  chapter,  we  will  observe  unique  features  and  frequency  of  use  of  
chromaticism  between  individual  scale  tones.  
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

103  

PassingSpecies  
ToneA:  Chromaticism
7.1  –  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 60

b 4 #œ
&bb 4

D m7b5

œ

œ

œ

Species A, B, C & D

œ

G 7b9

œ nœ

œ

C m7


J

Ó

Fig. 31
Fig. 12
 
Species A.2
C m7
G m7
C7
Solar:
Bar
Ex.  
46  
–  205
Species  A.1  –  Solar:  Bar:  60:  An  ascending  passing  tone  fragment  from  
3

bb b œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ ‰ œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ ‰
& b

œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ
J ‰

the  ma3  to  dim5  to  b13  of  Dm7b5  (implying  D7alt)  to  a  descending  chromatic  
Fig. 3

Passing Tone
Chromaticism
F

passing  6tone  fragment  
œ # œ œ fœrom  
n œ ntœhe  b œroot  
b œ mn7  œ to  the  ma3  
n œ of  œ G7b9  tœo  n aœ n  n œebnclosure  
œ œ n œ from  

Speciesœ A,œ B, C & D

œ

ma7

b
&bb
b 4 #œ
&bb 4
&b Ó
b bœ nœ
b
& b
& œ . C7
œ #œ
6
Fig. 4
b
Species B.3
&bb
Son of Thirteen: Bar 171
13
G ma74 œ
# œFig.
Species B.1 &
E b9

J ‰ Œ

nnb

Species A.1
m7b5ma3  acts  as  a  G
C m7 approach  tone  resolving  
of  
Cm7  
fig.  12),  Dthe  
d7b9
ownbeat  chromatic  
Solar:
Bar(60
Fig. 4
Fig. 2 Fig. 3
Fig. 2 Fig. 5
Species B.1
F
to  
m3  
f  Cm7  
E b 9 (fig.  31).  
3
Oldthe  
Folks:
Baro40
3
9
Fig. 31
Fig. 12
Species A.2
C m7
G m7
Solar: Bar 205
Fig. 3
Fig. 31
3
Species B.2
G ma7
Son of Thirteen: Bar 152
F 7alt
11
Fig. 3

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ nœ

œ


J
œ

‰ Ó
œ œ

!
Œ
n
b œ œ n œ œ n œ œJ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ bœ œ
œ nœ œ œ nœ bœ œ
J ‰
J
J ‰

œ
œ #œ œ nœ œ
#œ œ œ œ #œ
F ma7
œJ œ n œ n œ b œ nFig.
œ 4 œ œ œFig.œ 25n œ n œ b œ œ n œ œ b œ b œ n œ
J ‰ Œ nnb
B bma7(#11)
˙
œ # œ œ Fig. 2œ Fig.#3œ œFig. 2 Fig. 5
 
Ó
F
3
Old Folks: Bar 40
3 œ
œ sequence  
œ
Ex.  47  9 –  Species  A.2  –  Fig.
Solar:  
Bar  205:  This  chromatic  
passing  
tone  
3
Fig. 3
œ
œ
b
Ó
!
œ
n
œ
n
œ
Œ
n
b
œ
Species B.4&
J
œ b œ œ Fig. 3
Son of Thirteen: Bar 196
gradually  ascends  
by  half-­‐step  from  the  dim5  of  Fig.
Cm7  
31 to  the  root  note  of  the  C7  
G bma7(#11)
15
œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ ‰
b
œ
n
œ
Species B.2
b
œ
œ
Ó

b
œ
G
ma7
b
œ
& Bar 152 b œ b œ œ b œ
Son of Thirteen:
J
chord  11(fig.  3)  Fi7alt
n  bar  205-­‐207,  tœhen  œcontinues  
œwith  an  œascending/descending  
#
œ
#
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
œ

Fig. 25
Fig. 3
& œ.
J
Species B.5
C ma7(#11)
G ma7(#11)
chromatic  
passing  
from  
root  
Fig.
4 the  Fig.
25 to  the  m3  of  Fœma7  tœo  an   œ œ
Son of Thirteen:
Bar
Fig.
4 208 tone  sequence  
œ


œ
#
œ
œ
Species18B.3
œ
B bma7(#11)
Ó

œ
‰ J J ‰
œ #œ œ
&
#
œ
˙
Son
of
Thirteen:
Bar
171
œ
œ
enclosure  
the  m3  œ to  ma2  (fig.  7),  tœo  a  c#hromatic  
passing  tone  fragment  from  
13 from  
Fig. 31
# œG ma7 œ Fig.œ18 # œ œ
Ó
&
ma2  to  ma3  (fig.  3),  to  a  non-­‐diatonic  enclosure  from  the  m3  to  aug4  of  Fma7  
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Species B.4
(fig.  
),  beginning  
Son of2Thirteen:
Bar 196 a  descending  enclosure  chain  from  aug4  to  ma3  (fig.5).  
15

 

G bma7(#11)

Species
B.5
 
Son of Thirteen: Bar 208
18

bœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
b
œ
b
œ
œ
bœ bœ

Fig. 3

œ œ #œ œ œ
œ
#œ œ

C ma7(#11)

œ
œ #œ

Fig. 18

bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
J ‰

Fig. 25

#œ œ ‰ œ

G ma7(#11)

Fig. 31

œ œ
‰ J J ‰

Fig. 31

Fig. 12

 
 

G m7
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ n œ œ œ b œ œ œ 104  
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
bb
J ‰
J
J ‰

& b
Passing Tone Chromaticism

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 205
3

C m7

Fig. 3

Species A, B, C & D

F ma7
œ #Dœm7b5œ œ n œ n œ b œ n œG 7b9 œ œ œ n œ n œ bCœm7 œ n œ œ b œ b œ n œ
b
œ œ œ œ œœ n œ œ

bœ ‰ JÓ‰ Œ
& bb bbTb one  
4 # œChromaticism:  
7.2  –  Passing  
S
pecies  
B
 
& 4
J
Fig. 5

Species A.1
6
Solar: Bar 60

Species B.1
Species
A.2Bar 40
Old
Folks:
9 205
Solar: Bar
3

C7

Fig. 4
Fig. 12

Fig. 2 Fig. 3

b9
E
C m7

Fig. 2
Fig. 31

nnb

3 m7
G
œœ n œ œœ œœ b œ œ œ
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
b
Ó
!
œ
n
œ
n
ΠJ n
b
œ
& bbb
J ‰J

œ bJœ ‰ œ Fig. 3
&

F

3

Fig. 31

Species B.2
Fig. 3
Son of Thirteen: Bar C
152
7

 

F ma7
F 7alt
œ ndœiatonic  
Ex.  48  11–  S6 pecies  
n  
# aœ scending  
œ œ # œpn œhrase,  
œb œ tno  œ a  chromatic  
Chromaticism
œB#.1  
œ –œ  Solar:  
œPassing
nœœ Bn œar  
œb œ40:  œ ATone
œ
G ma7

nœ œ œ œ œ nœ bœ

œ bœ nœ
& œb b.b
J ‰ Œ
J
Species
A,
B,
C
&
D
&
passing  tone  fragment  from  the  mFig.
a4  4to  P5  oFig.
f  F25
ma  (fig.  3),  to  a  chromatic  

nnb

Species A.1 Fig. 4
G 7b9
C
m7 2 b Fig. 5
Fig.D4m7b5
Fig. 2 Fig. 3
Fig.
Solar:
BarB.3
60
Species
B ma7(#11)
Species
B.1
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 171
approach  
t
one  
f
rom  
a
ug4  
t
o  
P
5  
(
fig.  
3
1)  
b
efore  
a
scending  
a  ma6  interval  to  the  
b
F
E 9
3
Old Folks:13Bar 40 G ma7
3

bb 4 # œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ n œ# œ œ œ n œ ˙ b œ ‰ Ó
& # œb 4 œ œ # œ
œJ œ Óœ
9
œ
œ
&
b
Ó
!
œ
n
œ
n
œ
Œ
n
Fig. 31 J
Fig. 12
œ bœ
ma3.     &
b
œ
œ
Fig. 3
Species A.2
C m7
G m7
Fig.Fig.
3 3 Fig. 31
Solar:
Bar
205
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ
Species
B.4
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
Species3B.2
b
J ‰
Son
196
G ma7
J ‰
b Bar
J ‰
bbma7(#11)
Son of
of Thirteen:
Thirteen:
Bar
152
&
G
F 7alt
15
11
œ œ œ # œ b œœ b œ n œ œœ #bœœ œ œœ œn œb œ œœ b œ ‰
& Óœ .Fig. 3 ‰ #bœJœ b œ œ b œ b œ b œ œ
J
C7
F ma7
Fig.
4
Fig.
25
Fig.
25
Fig.
3
Fig.
4
œ
œ #œ œ nœ nœ bœ nœ œ œ œ nœ nœ bœ œ b nœ œ bœ bœ nœ
6
 
œ
SpeciesB.5
B.3 b
Species
Bma7(#11)
ma7(#11)
n
C
ma7(#11)
G
J
bBar208171
˙# œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ Œ œ n b
SonofofThirteen:
Thirteen:
& b Bar
Son
œar  152:  
#œœ # œAn  œœascending  
œ
œ
G ma7
Ex.  49  18–  S13pecies  
B
.2  

 
S
on  
o
f  
T
hirteen:  
B
phrase,  first  
œ
#
œ
œ
œ 3
J J ‰
Ó# œFig. 4 ‰ # œ œ # œ Fig.
œ2 Fig.
Fig. 2 Fig. 5
&
œ
Ó‰
&
œ
Species B.1
b
Fig. 31anticipating  the  
through  
the  
13  
o3f  F7alt,  to  a  G  major  
scale  
3 Fig.
Old Folks: Bar
40P5  Ea9nd  bFig.
18
Fig.
3 F fragment  
3 œ
œ œ
9
Species B.4 b Ó
œ
œ
!
œ
n
œ
n
œ
Œ
n
& 5  to  
œ bœ
Jfrom  m7  to  root,  to  an  
Son of Thirteen:
196
b
œ
Gma7  
from  PBar
r
oot  
f
eaturing  
a
 
c
hromatic  
p
assing  
t
one  
œ
Fig. 3
G bma7(#11)
15
b œ b œFig.n œ31 œ b œ œ œ œ b œ œ b œ ‰
œ

b
œ
Species B.2 & Ó
b
œ
J
G ma7 chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  
enclosure  
from  
the  root  
b œ btœo  mœ a7  btœo  a  descending  
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 152
F
7alt
œ
#Fig.
œ 25 œ n œ œ
Fig. 3œ
11
œ.
#œ œ œ œ #œ
Species B.5&
C
ma7(#11)
G
ma7(#11)
J 25).  
from  
ma7  to  ma6  (fig.  
Son of Thirteen: Bar 208
œ œ
#œ œ ‰ œ
Fig. 4
Fig.œ25# œ œ œ
18 Fig. 4
œ
‰ #œ œ #œ œ œ
‰ J J ‰
Species B.3& Ó
B bma7(#11)
œ
˙
Son of Thirteen: Bar 171
œ #œ œ
13
Fig. 31
# œG ma7 œ Fig.œ18 # œ œ
Ó
&
Fig. 3

Species B.4
Son of Thirteen: Bar 196

 

Fig. 3

Ex.  50  15–  Species  
B.3  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  171:  An  ascending  
G bma7(#11)
b œ phrase  featuring  a  

œ œ œ bœ œ bœ ‰
bœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
b
œ
b
œ
œ
b œ bbœetween  the  ma2  and  ma3  degrees  of  Gma7  (fig.  3),  J to  a  
chromatic  passing  tone  

Fig. 25
Fig. 3
Species B.5
C ma7(#11)
G ma7(#11)
chromatic  
assing  
Son of Thirteen:pBar
208 tone  from  the  ma4  an  P5  degrees  of  Bb  major  anticipating  
18

Bbma7(#11)  (fig.  3).  

œ
œ #œ

Fig. 18

œ œ #œ œ œ
œ
œ

#œ œ ‰ œ

Fig. 31

œ œ
‰ J J ‰

F ma7
œ # œ #œœ œ nœœ n œ œb œ n œœ #œœ œ œœ n œ n œ b œœ œ # œn œ œœb œ b œn œn œ œ
6
œ
.
œ
& bb
J
J ‰ Œ
& b
Fig. 4
Fig. 25
G ma7

Son of Thirteen: Bar C
152
7

nnb

F 7alt

11

Fig. 4
 
Fig. 4
Species B.3
  Species
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 171
B.1


&
b
& Ó

13

b

E 9
Old Folks: Bar 40 G ma7
9

Fig. 3

Species B.4
Species B.2
Son of Thirteen: Bar 196
Son of Thirteen: Bar
b 152

& Ӝ .

G ma7(#11)
F 7alt

15
11

œ

œ

Fig. 4
Species
SpeciesB.5
B.3
Son
SonofofThirteen:
Thirteen:Bar
Bar208
171

Fig. 5
Fig. 2 B bma7(#11)

˙
# œ œF
3 œ
œ
œ
!
œ
n
œ
n
œ

J
œ b œ œ Fig.Fig.
3 3
œ

Fig. 2 Fig. 3

œ

105  

œ Óœ
Œ

3

Fig. 31

n


œ
‰ # œ œ œ œb œ b œœ b œ# œ œ b œ b œ n œ œœ # œ œ œ œ œn œb œ œœ b œJ ‰
bJœ b œ
G ma7

Fig. 4

Fig. 25

Fig. 25 Fig. 3

bma7(#11)
GBma7(#11)

œ

˙

œ

œ
#œœ # Aœ n  œœascending  
œ # œ œphrase  
‰ featuring  
Ex.  51  18–  S13pecies  
œ Bœar  œ196:  
œ of  #Tœhirteen:  
œ –  Son  
J J a  
# œG ma7B.4  
Ó
&
&

C ma7(#11)

œ
œ #œ

#œ œ œ

Ó‰

Fig. 31
chromatic  passing  tone  
b3etween  the  m7  and  
root  of  Gma7(#11)  
(fig.  3),  to  an  
Fig.
18
Fig.
Fig. 3

 

Species B.4

bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
Ó

bœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
b
œ
&
b
œ
œ
J ‰
œ
ma7  to  ma6  to  diatonic  
from  ma6  to  P5  (fig.  25).  
b œ eb nclosure  

Son of Thirteen:
Bar r
196
enclosure  
from  
oot  to  ma7  to  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  from  
b
G ma7(#11)

15

Fig. 25

Fig. 3

Species B.5
Son of Thirteen: Bar 208

18

#œ œ ‰ œ

œ œ #œ œ œ
œ
œ

C ma7(#11)

œ
œ #œ

Fig. 18

œ œ
‰ J J ‰

G ma7(#11)

Fig. 31

 

Ex.    52  –  Species  B.5  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  208:  An  ascending  D  major  root  
position  triad  (V)  arpeggio  to  Gma7  arpeggio  from  ma7  to  P5  to  a  G  major  scale  
fragment  anticipating  Gma7#11  (fig.  18),  to  a  chromatic  approach  tone  from  m3  
2

to  ma3  of  Gma7#11  (fig.  31),  ending  on  the  P5.  
Passing Tones - Species A, B, C & D
Species B.6
Son of Thirteen: Bar 250
21

&


J

#œ.

B m(ma7)

œ

œ

œ bœ

œ

Fig. 3

Species B.7
Snova: Bar 44

Ó

 

A ma7(#11)
œ # œ œ Bœ  m‰elodic  
œ œminor  
23 –  Species  
Ex.    53  
B.6  3 –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  
# œascending  
œ œAn  
œ 2#50:  
F ma7(#11)

J ‰ Œ
œ #œ #œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
#œ œ
œ
#
œ
scale  fragment,  to  an  ascending/descending  chromatic  passing  tone  from  the  m3  
&!

Fig. 31

Species B.8

Fig. 24

Fig. 18

#
œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ F 7sus
b
œ
n
œ
œ #œ œ
œ #œ œ #œ #œ
! œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ
œ!Œ Ó

7b9
to  
P4  tBar
o  m
Snova:
713  of  b Bm(ma7)  (fig.  3G).  
25

A ma7

œ nœ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ
œ

Species C.1
Old Folks: Bar 22 E b 9
28

&b Ó

Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 39 E b 9
30

&b Œ

Fig 4 Fig. 31 Fig. 7 Fig. 2 Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Fig. 18

Fig. 14

‰.

œ œ œ
R

œ œ œ
œ bœ œ

A7

Fig. 31 Fig. 21

bœ œ œ œ bœ

œ œ œ Œ

Ó

b

Œ
n

2
Passing Tones - Species A, B, C & D

  Species B.6
Bar 250
  Son of Thirteen:
B m(ma7)
21

&

Species B.7
Snova: Bar 44
23

œ

œ


J

#œ.

œ bœ

106  

œ

Fig. 3

œ #œ
#œ œ #œ œ #œ
#
œ
œ
&!
#
œ
œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ

Ó

œ œ ‰ œ œ
J ‰ Œ

F ma7(#11)

A ma7(#11) 3

Fig. 31

Fig. 24

Fig. 18

 

F #7sus
œ œ bœ œ
œ
b
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
A
ma7
œ œ #tœone  
2 54  
25–  Species  B.7  –  Snova:  Bar  
Ex.  
the  m3  to  
b œ œ 4# œ4:  œ A  chromatic  approach  
œ #fœrom  
#
œ
œ
Ó
!
b
œ
œ
!Œ Ó
b
b
œ
&
bœ œ œ
Passing Tones - Species A, B, C & D

Species B.8
Snova: Bar 71

G 7b9

2 Fig.
ma3  
of  B.6
Ama7#11  
(fig.  
a  31
B  mFig.
ajor  
(V)  
triad-­‐based  
arpeggio  (ma2,  
Fig 4 Fig.
7 Fig.
Fig.
18 31),  beginning  
11 Fig. 5
Species

B m(ma7)
œ A 7b œ œ
œ #œ
Old Folks:
Bar
œ b#œ tones  
œ œ Ema7  
ma3,  
ma5)  
21
# œ œ œsncale  
#gœ22iving  
. E b9 Ama7#11  
œ œma3,  aug4,  ma6,  to  an  aœscending  
28

Son
of Thirteen:
Bar 250
Species
C.1

bœ bœ
œ

J

&
&b Ó

œ bœ œ ‰

Ó

Œ

arpeggio  (ma7,  root,  ma3,  
5)  giving  Fig.
Ama7#11  
scale  tones  aug4,  P5,  ma7,  ma2  to  
3
Fig.P14
Fig. 31 Fig. 21
Species
SpeciesB.7
C.2
F ma7(#11)
Bar
44
a  Snova:
scale  
fragment  
from  m3  to  ma6  (fig.  18),  to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  series  
Old
Folks:
Bar 39

œ œ œ
A ma7(#11)
E b9 3
œœ # œ œ # œ œ # œ œ œ ‰ œ œJ ‰ Œ
#
œ
#
œ
b
œ
!
œ
R
œ œ bœ œ œ Œ
Ó
n
&
& b Œ # œ #‰œ.anticipating  
œ œ # œ the  Fma7#11  
from  the  ma2  œto  # œaug4  
(fig.  24),  œending  on  the  ma3.    
23
30

Fig. 724

Fig. 31
Fig. 18
Species C.3
Species
B.8
Son of Thirteen: Bar 214
Snova: Bar 71 A
bma7
B m7
32
25

& Ó‰
&

F #7sus
œ œ b œ œF #m7
œ
œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ
œ
œ #œ œ bœ nœ
‰ # œ œÓ ! Œ Ó
! œ#bœœ œ b œœœ b œ b œ œ b œ œ

#œ.
G 7b9

Fig 4

Fig. 18
Species
C.1
Species C.4
Old
Bar 22 Bar
SonFolks:
of Thirteen:
E b 9252

œ

Fig. 31Fig.Fig.
3 7 Fig. 2 Fig. 11 Fig. 5

b

C maj7( 11)
b œ 71:  
œ position  
œ Aœn  ab œscending  
œ œroot  
Ex.    5285  –  Species  
B.8  –  Snova:  n œBar  
Eb  m
œ œ
C # 7alt

b œajor  œ triad  

#

 

A7

œ
œ
Œ
& bœ Ó œ b œ œ œ
b œ b œ œœ œ œ œ œ
&
œ
Fig. 14arpeggio  from  ma7  to  P5  (fig.  18),  to  a  chromatic  
triad  (V)  arpeggio  to  Abma7  
34

Fig. 31 Fig. 21
Fig. 5
Fig. 4
Fig. 17
Species C.2
Species
C.5Bar 39 #E b 9
Old Folks:
F # m7
passing  
tone  bFetween  
the  
m7  and  root  of  BGma7(#11)
7b9  (fig.  4),  to  a  chromatic  approach  
7
Snova:30Bar 42

œ œ
œ Rœ # œ nœœ œb œb œ œ œ
#
œ
œ
.
.
b
Œ

&

! b œ œ! bbœœ ! œb œ œ !œb œ Œœ œ Ó b œ
b bnb
&
tone  from  m3  to  ma3  (fig.  31),  to  a  descending  
chromatic  
passing  tone  fragment  
Fig.
7
36

3

Fig. 1
Species C.3
Son of Thirteen: Bar 214

Fig. 3

3

from  m7  to  m
6  to  an  enclosure  from  m6  to  P5  (fig.  7F),  #m7
to  a  descending  pentatonic  
B m7
32

&‰

œ

œ

Ó

œ b œfrom  œma2  t#o  œ .b9  (fig.  11),  within  which  a  
fragment  (P5,  ma3,  ma2)  to  an  enclosure  
Fig. 3
Species C.4
descending  
enclosure  chain  had  begun  from  the  m# a2  of  G7b9  resolving  to  the  
Son of Thirteen: Bar 252
C maj7( 11)

œ œ
C # 7alt
œ
œ
œ
œ triad  giving  
root  of  F&#7sus  (œfig.  b 5œ ),  descending  
œ œ œ down  
b œ ab  œB  major  
œ rœoot  pœ osition  
34

Fig. 5

Fig. 4

root,  ma6,  P4  F#7sus  scale  
tones.  
# m7
Species C.5
F
#
7
F
Snova: Bar 42

 

36

&

œ.

Fig. 1

œ

Fig. 17

œ #œ nœ œ bœ bœ
! ! bœ ! bœ ! bœ œ
3

Fig. 3

B ma7(#11)

3

œ bœ

bbb

Fig. 3
Species B.7
Snova: Bar 44
23

 
 

œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ
#
œ
#
œ
!
œ
&

œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ

œ œ ‰ œ œ
J ‰ Œ107  

F ma7(#11)

A ma7(#11) 3

Fig. 31

Fig. 24

Fig. 18

#
œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ F 7sus
b
œ
n
œ
25
œ #œ œ
œ #œ œ #œ #œ
Ó ! œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ
œ!Œ Ó
&
b œ Chromaticism:  
7.3  –  Passing  Tone  
Species  
C   A, B, C & D
Passing
Tones - Species
Species B.8
Snova: Bar 71

2

A bma7

G 7b9

Fig. 18
Species B.6
Son
of Thirteen:
Bar 250
Species
C.1
B m(ma7)
Old Folks:
Bar
22 E b 9
21
28

#œ.
&b Ó

Fig 4

Fig. 31 Fig. 7 Fig. 2 Fig. 11 Fig. 5

œ A 7b œ œ
œ
# œ œ œn œ b#œœ œ œœ b œ# œ
b œ œ œ b œ œ œ ‰ Óœ
J
Fig. 3

Fig. 14

2
Species
SpeciesB.7
C.2
Snova:
Bar 44
Old Folks:
Bar 39

Fig. 31 Fig. 21

b

Œ

 

œ œPassing
A ma7(#11)
#Dœ œ œ p‰assing  
œ œ tone  
23
E b 9 3 –  Old  Folks:  
œ Cœ&chromatic  
#escending  
œ œA,# B,
Ex.  56  
Bœar  
30 –  Species  C.1  
#2:  
œ A-œ  dSpecies
# œ2Tones
J
F ma7(#11)

Ó ‰ Œ n
&
& !b Œœ # œ # œ #‰œ. œ œR # œ œ b œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ Œ
Fig.ajor  
724œ pentatonic-­‐based  
m(ma7)ma6  to  P5  to  a  descending  
bœ œ
fragment  Fig.
fBrom  
run  (P5,  
œm
31
œ # œ œ E#b  
Fig. 18 # œ
Species21C.3 # œ .
J
Species
B.8
Ó
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 214
F #7sus‰
&
œfrom  
G 7b9
F # m7
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
Snova: 32
Bara2,  
71 root,  
b
ma3,  
m
m
7)  
t
o  
a
 
d
iatonic  
e
nclosure  
t
he  
m
7  
t
o  
t
he  
ma3  of  A7  (fig.  
B
m7
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
A ma7
œ
œ
#
œ
25
œ
œ #œ
œ œ ‰# œ # œ Ó
œ!Œ Ó
b
& Ó‰ ! b œ œ#bœœ œ b œœœ b œ b œ œFig. 3b œ œ
Species B.7
. 3F1),  
#
œ
ma7(#11)
14),  
t
o  
a
 
c
hromatic  
a
pproach  
t
one  
f
rom  
m
3  
t
o  
m
a3  
(
fig.  
t
o  
a
n  
a
scending  
Snova: Bar 44
Fig 4 Fig. 31Fig.Fig.
Fig. 183
3 7 Fig.
A ma7(#11)
œ 5œ œ ‰ œ œ
23
œ 2# œFig.œ11#Fig.
#
œ
œ
#
œ
#
œ
J Œ
Species
SpeciesC.1
C.4 !
œ
A 7 21),  resolving  to  the  ‰root  
&
# œ œmœa3,  
C#dim7  
arpeggio  
g#iving  
7  (# 11)
fig.  
of  
œ n œ# Pœ b5,  œ m7,  b9  over  CAmaj7(
œ
Old
Bar
22 Bar
SonFolks:
of Thirteen:
œ
œ
E b 9#252
œ
œ œ œ
œ œ b œ b œ Fig. 24 b œ œ œ
28
C # 7alt
34
bœ 31
Ó œ Fig.b œ18 œ
Œ
œ œœ œ œ œ œ
&Fig.
œ
b
œ
A7.  
œ
Species B.8
#
&
œ
b
œ
F 7sus
Fig. 14 G 7b9
œ œ œ b œFig.œ 31
œ œ Fig.
21
Snova: Bar 71 A bma7
b
œ
n
œ
Fig. 5
œ
Fig. 4
œ
#
œ
25
œ
#
œ
œ
Fig. 17

œ #œ #œ œ ! Œ Ó
Species C.2
œ
Ó
!
b
œ
b
b
œ
#
Species
C.5
&
œ
œ
B
ma7(#11)
Old Folks: Bar 39 F #E7b 9 b œ
F m7œ œ
30
Snova: Bar 42
œ
36
œ nœ4œ Fig.
œb œb œ31 œ Fig.
b# œŒ Fig.œ .18‰ . ‰ Rœ #Fig
œb œ7 Fig.
œ! bb2œœ Fig.! œb11œ Fig.
&
!
!œb5œ Œœ œ Ó b œ
b bnb
&
œ
Species C.1
A7
 
Old Folks: Bar 22 E b 9
œ 3 n œ Fig.
b œ 3 œ3 œ b œ Fig. 7
Fig. 1
Species28C.3
œ œ œ
œ
b
œ
b
œ
b Bar
Ó 214
Œ
Son of Thirteen:
œ Fœ#m7
Ex.  57  
–  &
Species  
B m7 C.2  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  39:  A  descending  P5  interval  from  ma6  to  
32
œ # œ Fig.œ 14
&‰
b œ œ b œ œ Fig. 31. Fig. 21 ‰ Ó
# œ passing  tone  fragment  
Species
ma2,  
to  C.2
an  Eb  Mixolidan  scalar  descent,  to  a  chromatic  
Old Folks: Bar 39 E b 9
Fig. 3
œ
œ
30
œ bœ œ
Species C.4 b Œ
R
‰.
œ m
Ó
n
œ a2  
b œ (fig.  
from  
a
ug4  
ma3  
& to  Bar
œ 7œ).  œ Œ
Son of Thirteen:
252to  an  enclosure  from  ma3  tCo  
maj7( # 11)
œ
#
Fig. 7
C 7alt
34
œ œ œ
Species C.3 œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ F #m7
& Bar 214
œ

Son of Thirteen:
B
m7
32
œ Fig.#4œ œFig. 5
Fig. 17

‰ Ó
&
b œ œ bBœma7(#11)œ
# m7
Species C.5
F
#
.
#
œ
F 7
Snova: Bar 42
36

œ . œ œ # œ n œ œ b œ Fig. 3 b œ

! ! bœ ! bœ ! bœ œ œ bœ
b b b  
&
Species C.4
3
3
Son of Thirteen: Bar 252
C maj7( # 11)
Ex.  
58  –  Species  
C
.3  
B
ar  
Fig.
1–  Old  Folks:  
Fig.
3 39:  A  descending  tertial  B  minor  phrase  œ
#
œ P4,  
C 7alt
œ
34
œ œ bœ œ œ
œ
bœ bœ
œ œ œ œ
&P5,  to  a  chromatic  passing  
œ tone  
ma2,  m7,  
from  the  ma6  to  P5  anticipating  the  
Species B.6
Son of Thirteen: Bar 250

Species (C.5
F#m7  
fig.  3).  F #7
Snova: Bar 42
36

&

Fig. 4

œ.
Fig. 1

F # m7

œ

Fig. 5

Fig. 17

œ #œ nœ œ bœ bœ
! ! bœ ! bœ ! bœ œ
B ma7(#11)

3

Fig. 3

3

œ bœ

bbb

œ #œ #œ œ œ œ
œ
R
‰.
&b Œ

Old Folks: Bar 39 E b 9
30
Fig. 31
Fig. 18
Species B.8
Snova: Bar 71 A bma7
 Species25C.3
 Son of Thirteen: Bar 214

24
b œ œ œ Fig.
Ó
œ b œ œ œ #Œ
œ
F
7sus
œ
G 7b9
œ b œ7 œ œ œ
œ Fig.
œ œ #œ œ #œ
œ bœ nœ
œ
#
œ
b
œ
#œ œ ! Œ Ó
œ
Ó
!
b
œ
b
œ
#
& B m7 b œ œ œ
F m7
32
4 Fig. 31 Fig. 7 Fig. 2 Fig. 11 Fig. 5 ‰
# œ œ bFig
‰ œFig. 18
Ó
&
œ
œ bœ œ
Species C.1
#
Aœ7 .
Old Folks: Bar 22 E b 9
œ n œ b œ œ Fig. 3
œ œ œ
28
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
b
œ
œ
Species C.4
Œ
œ
&b Ó

n

b

108  

œ œ
Fig. 31 Fig. 21
œ
œ
œ
œ bœ œ œ œ bœ bœ
Species C.2
œ œ œ œ
&
Old Folks: Bar 39 E b 9
œ
œ
30
Fig. 4
R 5 œ b œ œ œFig.œ 17b œ œ
. # Fig.
b
Œ

Œ
Ó
n  
&
œ
Species C.5
B ma7(#11)
m7
F
#
œ
7
F
Fig. 7
Snova: Bar 42
36 –  Species  
# œ Cœ.4  . –  Sœon  of  œT#hirteen:  
œ n œ œ bBœar  252:  
Ex.  
59  
phrase  b
Species
C.3
b
œ

! A!  bdœescending  
!# b œ ! b œ C#  
œ altered  
bb
& Bar 214
œ
Son of Thirteen:
b
œ
F m7
3
3
B m7
32
1# œ
#9,  b9,  
root,  
to  aFig.
chromatic  
passing  tone  fragment  from  
œ  descending  
Fig. 3

‰ rÓoot  to  m7  to  
œ
&
bœ œ bœ œ
.

C # 7alt

Son of Thirteen: Bar 252
34

C maj7( # 11)

Fig. 14

an  enclosure  chain  from  m7  to  the  ma6  Fig.
of  C3ma7#11  (fig.  26)  to  a  diatonic  C  

Species C.4
Son of sThirteen:
Bar 252 ma6,  ma7,  root,  ma2,  ma3  
C maj7(
major  
cale  fragment  
to  # 11)
tertial  arpeggio  ma3,  P5,  ma7,  
34

ma2.  

#

œC 7alt œ b œ
&

Species C.5
Snova: Bar 42
36

&

F #7

Fig. 4

œ.
Fig. 1

œ

F # m7

œ

œ

Fig. 5

œ bœ bœ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 17

œ #œ nœ œ bœ bœ
! ! bœ ! bœ ! bœ œ
B ma7(#11)

3

Fig. 3

3

œ

œ bœ

bbb
 

Ex.  60  –  Species  C.5  –  Snova:  Bar  42:  A  diatonic  enclosure  from  the  ma2  to  m3  of  
F3m7  (fig.1),  to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  sequence  from  the  aug4  to  ma3  
anticipating  the  Bma7#11  (fig.  3),  to  a  Bma7#11  tertial-­‐based  descending  phrase  
ma2,  ma7,  P5,  ma6,  ma7,  P5,  ma3.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

109  

7.4  –  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  
Species  
D   A, B, C & D
Passing
Tones - Species
Species D.1
Solar: Bar 83
38

D bma7

b œ
&bb

3

œ

Fig. 3

œ

œ

Fig. 19

œ

nnn

œ

Species D.2
Snova: Bar 73 F #7sus
Passing
- Species A,pB,
C & D tone  fragment  from  
Ex.  6391  –  Species  
D.1  –  Solar:  Bar  
83:  Tones
A  chromatic  
assing  

#œ #œ
&
b
Species D.1

œ

D ma7

œ

!

œ.

œ

œ

œ #œ

œ bœ

œ bœ

œ bœ

œ bœ

 

3

ma3  
nd  83ma2  (fig.  3),  to  a  descending  
Ab  root  position  major  triad  to  chromatic  
Solar:aBar
Fig. 11

nnn
œ
b
œ
œ (fig.  19).      
passing  tone  fragment  from  P5  to  ma4  to  an  enclosure  from  P4  to  ma3  
38

b
&bb

Fig. 3
Species D.2
Snova: Bar 73 F #7sus
39

#œ #œ
&

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 19

œ

!

œ.

œ

Fig. 19

œ

Fig. 11

œ #œ
Fig. 19

 

Ex.  62  –  Species  D.2  –  Snova:  Bar  73:  A  descending  B  major  root  position  triad  
giving  root,  ma6,  P4  F#7sus  scale  tones,  to  a  descending  B  major  pentatonic  
based  run  (root,  ma6,  P5,  ma3)  giving  F#7sus  scale  tones  P4,  ma2,  root,  ma6  
within  which  begins  an  enclosure  from  root  to  m7  (fig.  11),  to  a  descending  
tertial  arpeggio  m7,  P5,  m3  to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  from  m3  to  
ma2  to  enclosure  (fig.  19).  
 
7.5  –  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Patterns  of  Use  
 

For  each  Formulaic  Species  of  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism,  we  may  draw  

conclusions  as  to  how  their  Formulaic  Components  are  most  prominently  used,  
based  on  the  evidence  compiled  in  this  chapter.    I  will  analyze  the  frequency  that  
passing  tones  are  used  between  individual  scale  tones,  to  examine  trends  in  their  

 
 

110  

application.    I  will  begin  with  the  passing  tone  between  R-­‐b2-­‐2  and  work  
sequentially  through  to  R-­‐7b7,  describing  their  related  tonalities  and  melodic  
functions  accordingly.    
 
Frequency  and  Patterns  of  Chromatic  Passing  Tones:  
R-­‐b2-­‐2:  A.2  (C7)  
 
2-­‐b3-­‐3:  A.2,  B.3,  B.7  (Fma7,  Gma7,  Fma7)  
 
b3-­‐3-­‐4:  A.2,  B.6  (Gm7,  Bm(ma7))  
 
b3-­‐3  (Approach  Tone),  (Fig.  18):  B.5,  B.8  (Gma7,  G7b9)  
 
b3-­‐2-­‐b2:  D.2  (F#7sus)  
 
3-­‐4-­‐b5:  A.1  (Dm7b5)  
 
3-­‐4-­‐#4:  B.7  (Fma7#11)  
 
3-­‐b3-­‐2:  D.1  (Dbma7)  
 
4-­‐#4-­‐5:  B.1  (Eb9)  
 
b5-­‐5-­‐b6:  A.2  (Cm7)  
 
#4-­‐4-­‐3:  C.2  (Eb9)  
 
5-­‐#5-­‐6:  B.2  (F7alt)  
 
5-­‐b5-­‐4:  D.1  (Dbma7)  
 
b6-­‐6-­‐b7:  A.2  (Cm7)  
 
6-­‐#5-­‐5:  A.2,  C.1,  C.3  (Cm7,  Eb9,  F#m7)  
 
b7-­‐7-­‐R:  B.2,  B.4,  B.8  (Gma7,  Gbma7,  G7b9)  
 
b7-­‐6-­‐b6:  B.8  (G7b9)  

 
 

111  

 
7-­‐b7-­‐6  (Fig.  25):  B.2,  B.4  (Gma7,  Gbma7)  
 
R-­‐7-­‐b7:  C.4  (C#7alt)  
 
R-­‐7-­‐b7  resolving  to  m3  of  tonic:  A.1,  A.2  (G7b9  |  Cm7,  C7  |  Fma7)    
 
R-­‐7-­‐b7  resolving  to  ma3  of  tonic:  C.5  (F#7  |  Bma7#11)  
 
7.6  –  Passing  Tone  Chromaticism:  Conclusions  
We  can  observe  a  remarkable  adaptability  with  Metheny’s  use  of  passing  
tone  chromaticism,  with  18  unique  permutations  and  21  unique  applications.    
For  each  permutation,  the  scale  degree  is  accompanied  by  which  Species  it  
belongs  to,  as  well  as  the  chord  to  which  it  applies.    Chord  symbols  which  are  
underlined,  indicate  a  non-­‐diatonic  application,  or  a  reharmonization.    In  two  
cases,  the  permutation  is  found  within  a  formulaic  component  (Fig.  18,  Fig.  25).    
Certain  permutations  are  used  over  the  identical  or  similar  harmonic  
application,  displaying  some  evidence  that  their  applications  are  practiced.    
Metheny’s  use  of  passing  tone  chromaticism  is  also  notable  in  his  ability  to  
anticipate  the  harmony  of  the  following  bar  within  the  last  two  beats  of  the  
current  bar,  evidenced  in  Species  B.1,  B.2,  B.7,  notably  all  with  an  ascending  
contour.    Metheny  is  also  impressively  adept  in  his  ability  to  place  non-­‐chord  
tones  on  downbeats  and  resolve  them  within  the  flow  of  the  melodic  line.    
Notably,  the  contour  of  descending,  then  ascending  is  vacant  as  a  passing  tone  
chromaticism  species.      

 
 

112  

 
Chapter  8  
Dominant  Cadence  Formulas  
 
Most  jazz  improvisers  possess  a  collection  of  Dominant  Cadence  
Formulas  to  apply  over  perhaps  the  most  common  chord  progression  in  jazz:  the  
II-­‐V7-­‐I.    Metheny  shows  evidence  of  three  main  dominant  cadence  formula  
species,  which  I  will  describe  below:  
 
Dominant  Cadence  A:    The  definitive  feature  of  this  formula  is  a  diminished  triad  
descending  from  the  dim5  to  the  root,  which  is  preceded  and  followed  by  varied  
components.  
Dominant  Cadence  B:    Descends  the  altered  dominant  scale  stepwise  featuring  
chromatic  passing  tones.  
Dominant  Cadence  C:  Typified  by  an  ascending  diatonic  phrase  over  the  IIm7  
chord,  to  an  enclosure  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  the  V7  chord,  followed  by  a  large  
interval  or  arpeggiated  triad.  
 
The  formulas’  component  parts,  application,  and  relation  to  the  harmony  are  
defined  below.    To  conclude  at  the  end  of  the  chapter,  we  will  observe  patterns  
for  frequency  of  use,  unique  applications  and  distinctive  features.  
 

 
 

113  

Dominant Cadence

8.1  –  Dominant  Cadence:  Species  A  
Species A.1
Old Folks: Bar 35

Species A

b

F7
B ma7
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ
œ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ
œœœ
Œ
nœ R ! ‰ Œ Ó

C m7

4
&b 4 Ó

Fig. 12

Fig. 21

Fig. 6

œ E 7b9œ

Fig. 7

œ

E b7sus

n
 

! sœcale  
n œ œfragment  
œ œ b Bœ ar  
œ 3œ 5:  
. b œ boœn  
Ex.  63  –  4Species  A.1  –  Old  
œ Aœ n  ascending  
œ Fœ olks:  
b œ œ bbœegins  
Species A.2
F ma7
Snova: Bar 55

Œ

B m7b5

!

œ

!

! J

Fig. 12
the  P5  of  Cm7  to  a  descending  
chromatic  
assing  
Fig. 21 pFig.
11 tone  fragment  from  ma3  to  
B bma7

œcbhord  
œ œ œ btœo  œabn  œ enclosure  
Snova:
63 F7  
ma2  
of  Bar
the  
Cm  
œ rœoot  to  œb9  (fig.  12),  to  a  descending  
œ œ n œ œ œ œ bfœrom  
j
Species A.3
7

F 7sus

&

B m7b5

E 7alt

A m7

œ œœ
œbœ
œ#œ œ#œ nœ bœ œ œ œ ! œ ‰ Œ Ó

diminished  Fig.
triad  
oot  
fig.  21),  the  
24 in  r
Fig. 12 over  F7  resolving  to  the  ma3  
Fig. (28
Fig.
7 position  
Fig. 21

D bma7

Fig. 6

Fig. 7

Species A.4
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
phrase  
up  
n œ b œ dnescent  
Solar: Barthen  
119 follows  its  tertial  
œ
œ the  octave  on  
œ the  b9  of  the  F7  
10


œ Cadence
œ #œ œ
Dominant
‰ œ ‰
J ‰ Œ
J

b
&bb Ó

bbb

Ó

beginning  a  diatonic  enclosure  with  ascending  
passing  tone  from  b9  
Specieschromatic  
A
Fig. 7
Fig. 21
Fig. 6
Species A.1
C m7
F7
B bma7
bma7
Old
Species
D m7b5
G 7b9tone  from  root  
C m7
to  
rFolks:
oot  A.5
(Bar
fig.  356),  Dto  
a  descending  chromatic  
passing  
to  m7  to  an  
Solar: Bar 167

œ bœœ œ œœ bœœ œ bœœ nœœ œ bbœœ b œ
œ
4
œ œœ œ œ n œ œœ œ b œ n œ# œ œ !œ ‰ Œ Ó
b b4 Ó
Œ
œ
13 &
b b tÓhe  root  of  F7  to  the  ma3  of  Bbma7  œ(fig.  
n œ 7).   ‰ R ‰ Ó
enclosure  &
from  
Fig. 12
Fig. 7

Fig. 6

Fig. 7
Fig. 2

B m7b5
œ E 7b9œ œ
E b7sus
œ n œ œ C œm7 b œ . b œ b œ
b œœ œ œ œ b œœ œn œ Dœm7b5œ n œ b œ !G 7b9
Ób b Œ Œ ‰ ! J
œ ! œ œ œ n œ b œ œ ! ŒJ Ó
&
& b

Species A.2
F ma7
SpeciesBar
A.655
D bma7
Snova:
Solar: Bar4 179
16

Fig. 21
Fig. 21

n

Fig. 12

Fig. 21 Fig. 11
Fig. 24
Fig. 21
Species A.3
F 7sus
B bma7
B m7b5
E 7alt
A m7
Species
A.763
F m7
B b7
Snova:
Bar
Ex.  
64  Bar
–7  S43
pecies  A.2  –  Snova:  Bar  55:  An  ascending  scale  fragment  begins  on  the  
Solar:
19

œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ
œœ œ
œœ
œ œbœ
j
b
n œ b œ œ œ œ# œœ œ # œn œ œ # œn œ bn œœ b œ œ œ œ ! œ ‰ Œ Ó b œ b b
& bbb Ó
&Fig. 24
œ
œ
Fig. 12
Fig. 28 œ

 

Fig. 7
P4  of  Bm7b5  to  a  descending  
passing  tone  
ragment  Fig.
from  
7 m7  to  m6  to  an  
Fig.f21

Fig. 6
Fig. 26
Fig. 20
Species A.4
D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
enclosure  
Solar: Bar 119from  m6  to  dim5  (fig.  12),  beginning  a  descending  B  diminished  triad  
10

nœ bœ nœ bœ

b
&bb Ó

œ œ

‰ œ ‰
J

œ œ #œ

œ
J ‰ Œ

Ó

in  root  position  (fig.  21),  
jumping  a  m13  
interval  to  tFig.
he  6#9  of  of  E7b9  beginning  a  
Fig. 7
Fig. 21
b

Species A.5
D ma7
m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
œ b œ œ b œrDun  
descending  
E  m
inor  pentatonic  
Solar: Bar 167
œgiving  #9,  root,  m7,  P5,  P4,  #9  E7alt  scale  
13

b
&bb Ó

nœ bœ œ
œ
œ œ nœ

œ
‰ #œ
‰ Ó

tones  to  an  enclosure  from  the  #9  to  the  ma2  of  Eb7sus  (fig.  11),  to  an  ascending  
Species A.6
Eb7sus  
scale  fragment.  
 
D bma7

b
&bb Œ

Solar: Bar 179
16

Species A.7
Solar: Bar 43
19

F m7

b
&bb Ó

Fig. 21

Fig. 7

Fig. 2

b œ œ œ œ n œ D m7b5œ n œ b œ G 7b9
œ
œ œ œ
‰ J

Fig. 24

nœ bœ

œ

œ

B b7

œ

C m7

Œ

Fig. 21

#œ nœ nœ bœ

œ

œ

Ó
œ

œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ
œ
œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ nœ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
Œ
R

4
&b 4 Ó

Old Folks: Bar 35

 
Species A.2
  Snova: Bar 55
4

F ma7

Fig. 12

Œ

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
!œœ
œ

Fig. 12

œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ

&

Fig. 24
D bma7

Fig. 7

Fig. 7

Fig. 6

œ E 7b9œ

B m7b5

Species A.3
F 7sus
Snova: Bar 63
7

Fig. 21

n
114  

E b7sus

! œ œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ. bœ bœ
! J

!

Fig. 21 Fig. 11

B bma7

œ œnœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ
j
œ œ#œ œ#œ œbœnœ bœ œ œ ! œ ‰ Œ Ó
œ
B m7b5

Fig. 12

E 7alt

Fig. 21

nœ bœ nœ

œ

Fig. 6

A m7

Fig. 7

bbb

Fig. 28

œ

 


œ
œ #œ œ
Ex.  65  –10  Species  
b b AÓ .3  –  Snova:  Bar  63:  A  descending  
‰ œ c‰hromatic  passing  
J ‰ Œtone  Ó
Species A.4
Solar: Bar 119

& b

D m7b5

G 7b9

J

C m7

21
Fig.#69  of  F7  to  the  ma6  of  
sequence  from  the  ma6  Fig.
of  F7 7sus  to  an  Fig.
enclosure  
from  

Species A.5
D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
Solar:
Bar
167
Bbma7  (fig.  24  +  fig.  7),  to  an  ascending  Bb  major  scale  fragment  from  the  ma6  to  
13

b
&bb Ó

œ bœ œ bœ

œ n œ b œ œ Cadenceœ
œ
Dominant
œ œ nœ
‰ #œ
‰ Ó
Species A

a  descending  chromatic  passing  
he  ma7  to  ma6  to  enclosure  from  the  
Fig. t21
Fig. 7 tone  from  
B bma7

œ œ œ b œDœm7b5
G
m7
œ 7b9
œœb œn œb œ bœœaœ  descending  
œ n œ œ œ bBœœ  ndœCiminished  
bŒ œ œ œ(œfig.  
œ 1œ2),  n œbeginning  
ma6  
o  the  
4 Óof  Bm7b5  
Solar:tBar
179 dbim5  
œ
œœR ! ‰ Œ Ótriad   n
&
4
œ œ œ
bb Œ ‰ J
16

Œ Ó
& b
Fig. 12
Species A.1
Old
Folks:
Bar 35
Species
A.6

D bma7

C m7

Fig. 2

F7

Fig. 7 to  the  b9  of  E7alt  
Fig. 21 a  mFig.
resolving  to  the  ma3  of  E7alt  (fig.  21),  raising  
a6  6interval  

œ œ œ
œ nœ œ

œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œœ ! !
b œ œ ! b œJ . b œ
Ó
Œ
!
& b
nœ bœ œ œ #œ nœ nœ bœ
19

&6b),  b to  Ó a  chromatic  
to  root  (fig.  
passing  
from  root  to  m7  to  aœn  enclosure  
Fig. 12
œ œ from  
Fig.tone  
21 Fig.
11
Fig.
26
Species A.3
F 7sus
B bma7
B m7b5
E 7alt
A m7
Fig.
20
œob f  œ Aœ m7  
m7  
to  Bar
the  
triad  giving  m3,  ma7,  
Snova:
63m3  
œ b œ(œfig.  
b œ 7œ ),  
ntœo  œaœ  dœescending  
b œ œ œ œ œ E  augmented  
œ
œ
j
7
œ œ # œ œ # œ œ b œ n œ b œ œ œ ! œ ‰ Œ Ó bbb
&
œ
Fig. 24
Fig.
Species A.2
E 7b921
F ma7
B m7b5
E b7sus
Snova:
Bar
55
Species
A.7
b
beginning  a  diatonic  
enclosure  with  ascending  
chromatic  passing  tone  from  b9  
F m7
B 7
Solar: Bar4 43

P5  A  melodic  
scale  tFig.
ones  
(fig.  28).  
Fig.m
24inor  
12
Fig. 7
Species A.4
Solar: Bar 119
10

D bma7

b
&bb Ó

Fig. 21

nœ bœ nœ bœ

œ œ

D m7b5

Fig. 7

Fig. 6 Fig. 7
G 7b9

‰ œ ‰
J

Fig. 21

Fig. 28

œ œ #œ

œ
J ‰ Œ

C m7

Fig. 6

Ó

Species A.5
D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
Solar:
Bar–  167
Ex.  
66  
Species  A.4  –  Solar:  Bar  119:  A  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  to  
13

b
&bb Ó

œ bœ œ bœ

œ nœ bœ œ
œ
œ œ nœ

œ
‰ #œ
‰ Ó

enclosure  from  ma6  to  dim5  
in  anticipation  
Fig. 21of  Dm7b5  (fig.  7),  to  a  descending  
Fig. 7

Fig. 2
b
Species A.6
D ma7
D m7b5
m7
second  
nversion  
F  minor  triad  giving  
Dm7b5  scale  Gt7b9
ones  dim5,  Cm
3,  m7  (fig.  21),  
Solar: Bari179
16

b
&bb Œ

bœ œ œ œ nœ
‰ J

œ nœ bœ œ
œ
œ œ nœ

œ

Œ

Ó

to  an  enclosure  featuring  an  ascending  chromatic  passing  tone  from  the  b9  of  
Fig. 24

Speciesto  
A.7
G7b9  
the  P5  Fom7
f  Cm7  (fig.  6).  

b
&bb Ó

Solar: Bar 43
19

nœ bœ

Fig. 26

œ

œ

B b7

Fig. 21

#œ nœ nœ bœ
Fig. 20

œ

œ

œ

 

œ b œ œ b œ œ œ n œ œ œ b œ œ œSpecies
A
œœ
œ
j
œ œ # œ œ # œ œ b œ n œ b œ œ œ !b œ ‰ Œ Ó b b b
Species A.1 &
œB ma7
C m7
F7
Old Folks: Bar 35
œ œ œ b œ œ œFig.
Fig. 24
12
œ
Fig.
28
Fig. 7 Fig.
œ
b
œ
œ
21
b œ œFig.
œ n œ7 œ œ b œ n œ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó 115  
b 44b Ó
Œ
œ œ6 Fig.
n
 
&
Species A.4
D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7 R
 Solar: Bar 119
nFig.
œ b12œ n œ b œ œFig.œ21
œ œ 7# œ œ
10
bb b Ó
Fig. 6 Fig.
œ


J ‰ Œ Ó
Species A.2 &F ma7
B m7b5
œ E 7b9Jœ œ
E b7sus
Snova: Bar 55
! Fig. œ6 n œ œ b œ œ b œ . b œ b œ
Fig.œ7œ œ b œ œ Fig.
21
œ
œ
œ
4
œ
Ó b Œ !
œ !
! J
Species A.5 &
D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
Solar: Bar 167
œFig.n œ21b œFig.œ11
Fig. 12
œ
#œ œ ‰ Ó
b Ó
13
œ
œ
b
n
œ

b
Dominant
Cadence
&
b
Species A.3
F 7sus
B ma7
B m7b5
E 7alt
A m7
Snova: Bar 63 œ b œ œ œ b œ œ b œ œ n œ œ œ œ b œ œ Fig.
Species
A
21
œFig. 7
œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ b Fig.
œ n œ 2b œ œ ! j ‰ Œ Ó b b  
7
œ
b
Species
A.1
&
#
œ
œCBœm7bma7œ
b
m7
F7
Species A.6
DCma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
œ
Old
Folks:
Bar
35
œ
b œ œFig.
œ œœ nb œ œ œb œn œ b œ œ
Solar: Bar 179 Fig. 24
œ Bœ12ar  
œ !m
œ Fig.
b21œ œ Fig.
n œœ7œ œfrom  
bFig.
œœn œ28the  
Fig.
Ex.  67  –16  Species  
A
.5  Fig.
–  SŒ7olar:  
167:  A  d
escending  
œ 6pœœhrase  
4
b
J
b
Ó
œ
‰ Œa2  
Œ oÓÓf   n
œ
b
Œ

n
œ
&
4
b
R
&
b
Species A.4
D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
n œ 12b œ pnFig.
Fig.
Solar: Bar f119
œ
œ
œ
Fig.
7
Dbma7  
eaturing  
a
 
c
hromatic  
assing  
t
one  
s
equence  
f
rom  
t
he  
m
Fig.
21
b
œ
œa7  of  Dbma7  to  
24
œ
œ
#
œ
Fig.
21
10
bb Ó
œFig.‰6
b

J ‰ Œ Ó
&
b
Species
E 7b9 J
SpeciesA.2
A.7 F ma7 F m7
B m7b5
E 7sus
B b 7œ
œ
œ œ n œ œroot  position  
Snova:
Bar

Solar:
Bar 55
43
the  
dim5  
of  Dm7b5  (fig.  Fig.
2œ4),  
! Fig.
œ7 tœbo  œbaœ  dœescending  
Fig.
21 D  diminished  
6
œ
œ
œ
b œ œ ! b œJ . btœriad  
4
œ
b
n
œ
19
œ
Ó
Œ
!
œ
!
#
œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ
& b Ó

b œ œ C m7 œ
Species A.5 & b D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
œ descent  
œ
b
œ
from  
the  167
dim5  resolving  
t
o  
t
he  
m
a3  
o
f  
G
7b9  
(
fig.  
2
1),  
f
ollowing  
its  tertial  
œ
b
œ
Solar: Bar
œFig.n œ21 b œFig. œ11
Fig. 12
œ
œ
#
œ
b
Fig.
26
13
œ Fig.
œ n20
b Ó
œ
‰ A m7 ‰ Ó
Species A.3 &F 7susb
B bma7
B m7b5
E 7alt
œ
b
œ
up  
t
he  
o
ctave  
w
ith  
a
n  
e
nclosure  
f
rom  
t
he  
b
9  
o
f  
G
7b9  
t
o  
t
he  
P
5  
of  Cm7  (fig.  6).  
œ
œ
Snova: Bar 63
œ b œ œ b œ œFig.
œ n œ7œ œ b œ œ œFig.œ œ21 œ œ # œ œ b œFig.
j
2
n
œ
7
œ
œœ#œ
b œ œ ! œ ‰ Œ Ó bbb
&
œC m7
Species A.6
D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
œ
Solar: Bar 179 Fig. 24
Fig.
28
Fig. 7 b œ Fig. 12œ œ n œ
œ
œ b œFig.œ6 Fig. 7
œ œ
Fig.n 21
b Œ ‰ J
16
œ œ nœ
b
Œ Ó
b
b
&
Species A.4
D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
n œ b œ n œFig.b 24
Solar: Bar 119
œ œ œ Fig. 21 œ œ # œ œ
10
bb Ó
 
b
‰ œ ‰
J ‰ Œ Ó
&
J
Species A.7
b
F m7
B 7
Solar:
Fig.
7 Bar  179:  Fig.
21
Fig. 6
Ex.  
68  Bar
–  S43pecies  
A
.6  

 
S
olar:  
A
 
d
escending  
from  the  ma2  of  
bb b Ó
n œ b œ œ œ # œ n œ phrase  
19
n
œ

b
b œ œC m7 œ
Species A.5 & D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
Solar: Bar 167
œ n tœone  
b œ sequence  
œ the  m# œa7  œof  Dbma7  to  
Dbma7  
featuring  
passing  
œ œ œ fnrom  
b Ó a  chromatic  
13
Fig. 26
b
œ

‰ Ó
Fig.
20
b
&
Snova: Bar 63
7

dim5  of  Dm7b5  (fig.  24),  to  
a  d
 dimished  root  position  triad  from  the  
Fig.D21
Fig.
7 escending  

Fig. 2
b
Species A.6
D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
C m7
dim5  
of  179
resolving  to  the  ma3  of  G7b9  (fig.  21),  following  its  tertial  descent  up  the  
Solar: Bar
16

b
&bb Œ

bœ œ œ œ nœ
‰ J

œ nœ bœ œ
œ
œ œ nœ

œ

octave  to  resolving  from  the  b9  of  G7b9  to  the  P5  of  Cm7.  
Species A.7
Solar: Bar 43
19

F m7

b
&bb Ó

Fig. 24

nœ bœ
Fig. 26

œ

œ

B b7

Œ

Fig. 21

#œ nœ nœ bœ
Fig. 20

œ

œ

Ó

œ


 

Ex.  69  –  Species  A.7  –  Solar:  Bar  43:  A  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  through  a  
descending  enclosure  chain  from  the  ma7  of  Fm7  to  the  ma2  of  Bb7  (fig.  26),  to  a  
descending  root  position  F  minor  triad  that  resolves  to  the  ma3  of  Bb7  (fig.  20),  
before  raising  a  ma6  interval  to  the  b9  of  Bb7.  

 
 

116  

 

Dominant Cadence

8.2  –  Dominant  Cadence:  Species  B  
Species B.1
Solar: Bar 24

b 4 œ
&bb 4

D m7b5

Species B

œ

œ

G 7b9

œ

Fig. 7

D bma7

Species B.2
Solar: Bar 71

Dominant Cadence

œ

 

œ b œ Bar  
Ex.  70  –2  Species  
chromatic  passing  
tone  
b B.1  –  Solar:  
œ 2œ4:  Aœ  dbescending  
œ
j
D m7b5

&bb Ó

G 7b9

œ œ Bœ b œ œ
Species
œ

C m7

œ ‰ Œ

Ó

D m7b5
Fig.
77b9
Species B.1 from  the  
fragment  
m3  Fig.
of  7Dm7b5  to  Fig.
an  5enclosure  
rGesolving  
to  the  P5  of  G7b9  (fig.  


b 4 œ
œ
œ

& b bb 4 # œ n œ œ n œ œ n œ b œ œ œ n œ bœœ
œ
n
œœ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
b
Ó
œ
b
n
œ
&

œ œ œ #œ Ó
Fig. 7

Solar: Bar 24
Species B.3
G m7
C7
F ma7
Solar:
Bar
147
7),  descending  down  a  root  position  G  major  triad.  
5

Species B.2
D bma7 Fig. 6
Solar: Bar 71
2
Species B.4
D 7b9
Old Folks: Bar 24

nnb

œ b œœ #œœ œ œ œ b œ
G m7
j‰ Œ Ó
bbb Ó œ .
œ œ œ œ œn œ œ b œ œ
&
œ
#
œ
9
b
œ
œ
œ
œ œ ‰ Œ Ó
!
n
Fig. 7
&b
Fig. 7
Fig. 5
J
 
Species B.3
G m7
F ma7
Fig. C317 Dominant
Fig. 23
Cadence
Solar: Bar 147
# œ n œ œ n œ œ n œ b œ œ  dœescending  
Species
n œ b œ b œ œ bcœhromatic  

F #7sus
Gb7b9 B.2  –  Solar:  Bar  71:  A
Ex.  
71  B.5
–5  Species  
tone  Ó from  n b
b
Ó
n
Species B œ b œ n œ pœ assing  
Snova: Bar 40
& œb
œ
œ
œ

#
œ
n
œ
11
r
œ
#
œ
D m7b5
‰ 6of  D
! m7b5  
œ23 b œ œFig.
! ‰ Œ
Ó
Species B.1 &
RFig. 7 to  an  
Fig.
Fig.
7G 7b9
# œto  
œ Fig.
the  
mBar
3  in  
enclosure  
tœhe  P# 5  
of  G307b9  (fig.  7),  to  an  
Solar:
24anticipation  
œ
b
œ
G m7
œ
Species B.4
œ 23# œ œœ
Fig.
b bDb 7b94 œ .

œ
œ œFig.œœ7 n œ
Old Folks: Bar&24 b# œ4
b
9
b
œ
descending  
G
 
a
ltered  
d
ominant  
p
assage  
(
P5,  
m
a3,  
#
9,  
b
9)  
o
ver  
G
7b9  
A
ma7
7
Species B.6
E
œ
œ
b Fig. 7 ! œ b œ b œ
œ ‰ Œ (fig.  
Ó 23),   n
Snova: Bar 70&
œ
œ œ bœ bœ œ bœ J œ
13
Species B.2
Œ D bma7 a‰  chromatic  
!Fig.R 31 pFig.
‰ Ó
D23
m7b5 !
G 7b9
&
m7Jroot  of  G7b9  to  
continuing  
t
hrough  
assing  
t
one  
fragment  
from  ‰tChe  
Solar: Bar 71
#
œ Fig.
b œ 23œ œ œ b œ
Species B.52
b
G 7b9
œ œ œ b œ Fœ 7sus œj ‰ Œ Ó
Snova: Bar 40& œb b Ó
œ œto  # œthe  m3  of  Cm7  (fig.  7r).  
an  enclosure  
from  the  m7  o#f  œGn7b9  
œ! ‰ Œ
11
‰ Fig. !7 R
œ
b
œ
Ó
œ
Fig.
7
&
#
œ
#
œ
Fig. 5
œ
Fig. 7

D m7b5
Fig. 23

G 7b9
Fig.
7

m7
Fig.C30

23
n œ œFig.
œ n œ b œ œ œ Fig. 7
n
œ
#
œ
b
n œ b œ b œ œ b œ œ A bma7
nnb
Eb 7
bb Ó
nœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Ó
&
b
œ
œ bœ œ bœ
œ
13
œ bœ bœ œ bœ ‰ œ ‰ Ó
‰ 6 ! RFig. 7
Fig.
Fig.!23
Fig. 7

J
Fig. 30
 
G m7
Species B.4
œ 23# œ œ
D 7b9 œ .
Fig.
œ œ œ nœ
Old Folks: Bar 24 # œ
b œ œ œ featuring  
Ex.  72  –  9Species  
B.3  –  Solar:  
Bar  147:  A  diatonic  
enclosure  
b
!
œ ‰ Œ an  aÓ scending  n
&
J

Species B.3
Solar: Bar 147
Species B.65
Snova: Bar 70

G m7

C7

F ma7

Fig.t31
chromatic  passing  tone  from  
he  bFig.
13  23to  m7  in  anticipation  of  C7  (fig.  6),  to  a  
Species B.5
Snova: Bar 40

F #7sus

# œ n œ œ f#ragment  
11
descending  
cœhromatic  
œ œ b œ to  enclosure  rfrom  
‰ passing  
! tone  
! ‰ mŒ7  to  PÓ5  (fig.  7),  
&

G 7b9

R

œ #œ œ

23
Fig. 7(P5,  ma3,  #9,  b9)  over  C7  (fig.  23),  
to  a  descending  C  altered  dFig.
ominant  
passage  
Species B.6
Snova: Bar 70
13

E b7

œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ bœ bœ
! R
!
Fig. 23

A bma7

œ b œ ‰ œJ ‰ Ó

Species B
 
 

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 24

b 4 œ
&bb 4

D m7b5

œ

œ

G 7b9

œ

Fig. 7

D bma7

Species B.2
Solar: Bar 71

œ bœ œ œ

b
&bb Ó

D m7b5

G 7b9

œ

117  

œ bœ œ œ
j‰ Œ Ó
œ bœ œ
œ œ of  the  C7  
Dominant
to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  
from  the  Cadence
root  in  suspension  
2

Fig. 7

Fig. 5

C m7

Fig. 7

SpeciesF ma7
B

resolving  
a3  of  Fma7  (fig.  7),  to  a  F  major  m
otivic  interval  structure  (m3-­‐
Solar: Bar 147to  the  m
D m7b5 n œ n œ œ n œ b œ
G 7b9

œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ bœ œ
b
nœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Ó
& b bb 4Ó œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ

ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root)  
30),  ending  on  the  ma2.  
& b b 4(fig.  Fig.
œ
Fig. 7
6
Fig. 23
Fig. 7
Fig. 30
Fig. 7
G m7
Species B.4
œ #œ œ
D 7b9 œ .
œ œ œ n œG 7b9
Species
B.2
D m7b5
Old
Folks:
Bar 24 #Dœbma7
b œ œ œ œ C m7‰ Œ Ó
Solar: Bar9 71 b
œ! b œ œ œ œ b œ
2 & b
œ œ œ b œ œ J œj ‰ Œ Ó
&bb Ó
Fig. 31 Fig. 23
œ
Species B.3
Species B.1
5
Solar: Bar 24

G m7

œ

C7

nnb
n

Dominant Cadence

Fig. 7
Fig. 7
Species B.5
F #7sus
G 7b9
Fig. 5
Species
B
Snova: Bar
40
Species
B.3
G m7
C7
F ma7
Ex.  
73  
–11  147
Species  B.4  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  24:  Beginning  with  a  ma7  leap  from  the  ma3  
Solar:
Bar
D m7b5
G 7b9
Species
B.1
5
Solar: Bar 24
to  the  #9  of  D7b9,  followed  
by  
Fig.
23a  chromatic  
Fig.a7pproach  tone  from  #9  to  ma3  (fig.  
Fig.
7
Fig.
6
Fig.
23
Fig. 7
b
A bma7 Fig. 30
Species B.6
E 7
Fig.
7
Snova:
Bar
70
Species
D 7b9
31),  
to  B.4
a13  descending  
D  altered  dominant  run  (root,  b13,  P5,  G3m7,  #9,  b9,  root,  m7)  
Species
B.2
D m7b5
G 7b9
Old
Folks:
Bar 24 D bma7
C m7
Solar: Bar9 71
2
over  D7b9  resolving  on  the  
m23
3  of  the  Gm7  (fig.  23).  
Fig.
Fig. 31 Fig. 23
Fig. 7
Fig. 7
Species B.5
F #7sus
Fig. 5
G 7b9
Snova:
Bar
40
Species B.3
G m7
C7
F ma7
Solar: Bar11147

 

Fig. 7
Fig. 6
Fig. 23
Fig. 7
A bma7 Fig. 30
Species B.6
E b7
Snova:
G m7
Species
B.4
D 7b9
Ex.  
74  Bar
–13  S70pecies  
B.5  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  40:  A  chromatic  approach  
tone  from  the  
Old Folks: Bar 24

 

œ
#œ nœ
Ó
#‰œ n œ œ!n œ R œ n œ bœœ #œœ œ œn œ bbœœ b œœ # œ œ # œrn!œ ‰ Œ
& b
œ
b
œ
b
Ó
œ
b
n
œ
œ

& b 4 œ
œ
œ bœ nœ œ œ œ #œ Ó
œ
&bb 4
œ
œ.
œœR #bœœ œ œb œ
œ ! œ œ œ œn œb œ b œ œ b œ ‰ œJ ‰ Ó
Œ

!
& b #œ
bœ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Ó
œ! b œ œ œ œ b œ
& bb Ó
œ œ œ b œ œ J œj ‰ Œ Ó
& b
œ

5

œ
#œ nœ
r
Ó
& b b Ó #‰œ n œ œ!n œ R œ n œ bœœ #œœ œ œn œ bbœœ b œœ #œœb œ œœ # œ n œ! ‰ Œ
& b
bœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Ó
Fig. 23
Fig. 7

nnb
n

nnb

œœR # bœœ œ œb œ
œ œ bœ bœ œ bœ
œ
œ
œ
Œ

!
!

œ nœ bœ œ œ ‰ J ‰ Ó
9 &
!
œ ‰ Œ Ó
n
&b
J P5,  #11,  ma3,  
Fig. 23
ma7  (fig.  31),  begins  a  G  descending  
altered  dominant  run  (m7,  
œ.

Fig. 31 Fig. 23
#7sus
Species B.5
G
7b9
#9)  
over  G7b9  to  a  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fFragment  
from  the  #9  to  
Snova: Bar 40

œ

#œ nœ œ #œ
‰ ! R
œ bœ œ #œ
&
an  enclosure  resolving  to  the  root  of  F#7sus  (fig.  7).  œ
11

Species B.6
Snova: Bar 70
13

E b7

Fig. 23

Fig. 7

œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ bœ bœ
! R
!
Fig. 23

r
#œ ! ‰ Œ

Ó

A bma7

œ b œ ‰ œJ ‰ Ó

Ex.    75–  Species  B.6  –  Snova:  Bar  70:  A  descending  Eb  altered  dominant  phrase  
(b13,  ma3,  P4,  b9,  root,  m7)  over  Eb7  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  Abma7  (fig.  23).  

 

Species B.5
Snova: Bar 40

&

11

 
  Species B.6

œ

G 7b9

E b7

Snova: Bar 70
13

Fig. 23

œ

œ

Fig. 7

œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ bœ bœ
! R
!

Species B.7
C # 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 253 15

&

#œ nœ œ #œ
! R
œ bœ œ #œ
œ

F #7sus

r
#œ ! ‰ Œ

œ

œ

œ b œ ‰ œJ ‰ Ó

Fig. 5

Fig. 23

j
œ ‰

C m a7(#11)

œ

118  

A bma7

Fig. 23

Ó

Œ

Ó
 

Ex.  76  –  Species  B.7  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  253:  A  descending  C#  altered  
dominant  phrase  (#9,  b9,  root,  chromatic  passing  tone  ma7,  and  m7)  over  C#7alt  
(fig.  23),  leads  to  a  descending  enclosure  chain  from  m7  resolving  to  the  ma6  of  
Cma7#11  (fig.  5).  
 

Dominant Cadence

8.3  –  Dominant  Cadence:  Species  C  
F m7

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 7

b 4
&bb 4 ‰ œ ‰ œ œ

Species C

B b7

œ

‰ œ ‰ #œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ

Fig. 6

E bma7

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

œ

D bma7

Fig. 22

œ

œ

œ

 

œ
Ex.  77  –4  Species  
b œ m3  œ onf  œFm7,  
œ to  Óan  
b b jC.1  
‰ –Œ  Solar:  
œ B‰ar  ‰7:  A  scalar  ascent  ‰ from  œthe  

Species C.2
Solar: Bar 20

& b œ

œ

œ

œ bœ

œ

enclosure  featuring  an  ascending  chromatic  passing  tFig.
one  
6 fragment  from  the  P5  

F m7
B b7
Species C.3
Solar: Bar 30 to  the  ma3  of  Bb7  (fig.  6),  to  a  descending  altered  dominant  fragment  
resolving  
7

b
&bb Ó

Dominant Cadence

Œ

œ nœ

œ œ œ

œ n œSpecies
œ œ œC œ œ œ
B b7

E bma7

œ

Ó

b 4
œb
b
œ ‰D bma7
bœ œ œ œ œ
& b b 4 ‰ œ ‰ œ œ E m7 ‰ œ ‰ # œA 7 ‰
b
j œ.
œ œ œ ‰ Ó
nnb
bœ6 œ bœ œ œ
10
œ œFig.
Fig. 22
&bb Ó
b
œ
œ
E bma7
E b m7
A b7
D bma7
Species C.2
13
Solar: Bar 20
j ‰ Fig.
bœ œ nœ œ œ Ó
Species C.54
bAbm7b5
Œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ D 7b9

œ
b
œ
&
œ
b
œ
œ œ
Old Folks: Bar 11
b œ n œ # œ œ œj b œ
13
œ
b
Ó
Œ
!
n
œ
Œ
n  
b
œ
n
œ
&
Fig. 6
b
F
m7
B
7
Species C.3
Fig. 16
Fig. 2 Fig. 21
œ
Solar: Bar 30
A 7altBar  20:  A  tertial  Ebma7  passage  (œma3,  
D m(ma7)
bb b ÓCœ.2  –œ  Sœolar:  
Ex.  7C.6
8  –7  Species  
P
5  root)  
œ
Species
œ
œ
Œ
œ
Ó to  a  
n
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ œ # œ œn œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
&Bar 164
Son of Thirteen:
#œ #œ nœ œ #œ #œ nœ
œœ‰ Œ Ó
15
Fig.c16
scalar  ascent  
the  root  Fig.
to  P75  of  Ebm7,  
ontinues  with  aFig.
n  e1nclosure  
featuring  
& Ó from  
b
b
b
b
F m7

Species
C.1b9  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  Ebma7  
Fig. 16
from  
the  
(fig.  22),  before  Fig.
jumping  
a  m7  
Fig. 7
1
Solar: Bar 7
E bma7
Species C.4
Solar:
Bar
69
interval  to  the  ma2.  

Fig. 30
b bchromatic  
an  ascending  
passing  
the  P5  jof  œE. bm7  tœo  tœhe  ma3  
b œ œtone  
b œfrom  
10
œ
b
Ó
œ
œ
œ œ bœ
œ ‰ iÓn  
&
Species C.4
Solar: Bar 69

E ma7

Fig. 6

Fig. 13

A m7b5
Species C.5
Old Folks: Bar 11
13

&b Ó

Œ

E m7

Fig. 9

A 7

Fig. 26

œ #œ
! bœ nœ nœ œ bœ nœ

D ma7

D 7b9

Fig. 16

Fig. 2 Fig. 21

œ jbœ
œ

Œ

nnb

n

Dominant Cadence
 
 

Species C

F m7

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 7

b 4
&bb 4 ‰ œ ‰ œ œ

B b7

œ

E bma7

‰ œ ‰ #œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ

œ

œ

œ

œ

119  

Fig. 6
Fig. 22
E bma7
E b m7
A b7
D bma7
Species C.2
suspension  
o
f  
A
b7  
(
fig.  
6
),  
b
efore  
j
umping  
a
 
m
6  
i
nterval  
t
o  
t
he  
root  in  suspension  
Solar: Bar 20
4

of  Ab7.  

b j
&bb œ ‰ Œ

Species C.3
Solar: Bar 30
7

b
&bb Ó

œ ‰ ‰ œ


œ bœ ‰ œ œ

œ

Fig. 6

Dominant Cadence

Œ

œ nœ

F m7

œ
œ n œSpecies
œ œ C
œ œ œ
B b 7 Fig. 16

œ nœ œ

B b7

œ œ œ
E bma7

œ

Ó

œ

Ó

 
œ
b E b4ma7‰
œE bm7 ‰ œ ‰ # œA b7‰ œ ‰D bbma7
œ
œ
b

œ
œ
b
œ
œ
& 4
œ
œ.
bb b ÓC.3  –  Solar:  
œ
j
œ
nnb
Ex.  79  –10  Species  
B
ar  
3
0:  
A
 
d
escending  
c
hromatic  
p
assing  
t
one  
b
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ Fig. 6
œ œ bœ
œ ‰ Ó
&
Fig. 22
œ
E bma7
E b m7
A b7
D bma7
Species C.2
fragment  
to  enclosure  
from  
Fig.
13 the  P5  resolves  to  the  ma2  of  Fm7  (fig.  7),  c
Solar: Bar 20
œ ontinuing  
bb m7b5j ‰ Œ œ ‰ ‰
4
A
D 7b9
Species C.5
b
œ
‰ œ œ œ œ nœ œ
Ó
&11 b œ to  ascending  scale  
œ bb œœ(fig.  
Old Folks: Bar
œ
œ
œ
j
#
œ
with  an  
e
nclosure  
f
ragment  
1
6),  
c
ontinuing  
w
ith  
a
 tertial  

13
œ bœ
Dominant
Œ
! b œ n œ n œ œ Cadence
Œ
n
&b Ó
Fig. 6
Species C.1
Solar: Bar 7
Species C.4
Solar: Bar 69

F m7

Fig. 7

Fig. 1

b

Species C

F m7
B 7
Species C.3
ascent  
to  an  enclosure  from  the  PFig.
4  
o16
f  Bb7  
to  the  Fig.
ma3  
(fig.  
21 1),  raising  a  m6  
2 Fig.
œ
b
b

B 7
E ma7 D m(ma7)
A 7alt
b bbb Ó œ œ œŒ œ œœ œn œ œœ# œœ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ
Ó œ
&
n
œ
œ
#
œ
#
œ
n
œ
4
œ
interval  
t
o  
t
he  
r
oot.  
#
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
b
œ
œ
b


œ




œ

œœ ‰ Œœ Ó
15 &
Fig. 16
& Ób 4 œ
Fig. 7
Fig. 1

Solar:
Bar 30
F m7
Species
Species
C.67C.1
Bar 7 Bar 164
SonSolar:
of Thirteen:
Species C.4
Solar:
Bar
69
Species
C.2
10
Solar: Bar 20

E bma7

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

E bma7

E b m7

E b m7

A b7

bma722
DFig.

A b7 œ .

bb Ó
j
œ D bœma7œ ‰ Óœ
bœ œ bœ œ œ
œ
b
œ
& b j
œ bœ
4
bœ œ nœ œ
Ó
& b b œ ‰ Œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ bœ ‰ œ œ
Fig. 13
Fig. 9

Fig. 26

Fig. 30

nnb

œb

F m7
7j
œ n œm# œinor  sBcalar  
Ex.  
80  –13  Species  C.4  –  Solar:  
œ b œ to  descending  
œ b œ Eb  
œŒ
Œ Bar  6! 9:  
n
b œ An œn  naœscending  
Solar: Bar 30 b Ó

A m7b5
Species C.5
Old
Folks:
Bar
11
Species C.3

& b
&bb Ó

D 7b9

Fig. 6

 

œ œ œ
œ nœ œ
Ó
œ œ Fig.œ 2 œ Fig.œ 21œ
n
œ
Fig.
16
pentatonic  run  anticipates  Ebm7  to  an  enclosure  from  the  P4  to  the  m7  of  Ab7  
D m(ma7)
œ œ œ Aœ7altFig. 7
Fig. 16
Species C.6
Fig. 1 œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
SonSpecies
of Thirteen:
œ E bm7 # œ # œ œ #Aœb7n œ # œD bma7n œ
E bma7
C.4 Bar 164
œ œa‰  first-­‐
œ d# escending  
(fig.  13),  
œ
15 raising  a  ma7  interval  to  the  ma6  of  Ab7,  before  
Ó
Solar: Bar 69
.
&
œ
bb Ó
j
œ œ œ ‰ Ó Œ Ó nnb
bœ œ bœ œ œ
10
œ
b
œ
&
b œ P5  over  Fig.
œ 26a7,  
9
Fig. 6the  Fig.
Fig.m
inversion  Ab  major  triad  over  
giving  
ma2,  
Dbma7.  
30
7

Œ

Fig. 13

A m7b5
Species C.5
Old Folks: Bar 11
13

&b Ó

Œ

œ #œ
! bœ nœ nœ œ bœ nœ
D 7b9

œ jbœ
œ

Œ

n

 
D m(ma7)
œ œ œ Aœ7alt
œ
œ
œ œ œ #œ
œ # œ n œ sœcale  
# œ # œfragment  

œ œb‰egins  
Ex.  81  –15  Species  C.5  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  11:  #Aœn  # aœ scending  
Ó
Œ Ó from  
&
Fig. 16

Fig. 2 Fig. 21

Species C.6
Son of Thirteen: Bar 164

9
the  melodic  minor-­‐borrowed  
through  
mFig.
a2  26
of  Am7b5  tFig.
o  a  30
tertial  ascent  
Fig.m
6 a7  Fig.

through  the  m7  and  b9  of  D7b9  (fig.  16),  to  a  non-­‐diatonic  enclosure  from  the  P4  

Species C.3
Solar: Bar 30
7

 
 

b
&bb Ó

Species C.4
Solar: Bar 69
10

Œ

Fig. 7

E bma7

b
&bb Ó

œ nœ

œ œ bœ œ
Fig. 13

F m7

œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

E b m7

Fig. 16

A b7

j œ.
bœ œ œ
b
œ
œ

B b7

œ œ œ

œ

Ó

Fig. 1

D bma7

120  

œ œ œ ‰ Ó
œ jbœ
œ

nnb

Aa3  
m7b5(fig.  2),  to  a  diminished  triad  
D 7b9 (giving  chord  tones  ma3,  P5  and  
Species C.5 to  m
resolving  

&b Ó

Old Folks: Bar 11
13

b9)  (fig.  21).  

Species C.6
Son of Thirteen: Bar 164
15

œ #œ
! bœ nœ nœ œ bœ nœ

Œ

Œ

D m(ma7)
œ œ œ Aœ7alt
œ
œ œ œ #œ œ #œ
#œ œ #œ nœ œ #œ #œ nœ
œœ‰ Œ Ó

Fig. 16

Fig. 6

Fig. 9

Fig. 2 Fig. 21

Fig. 26

n

Fig. 30

Ex.  82  –  Species  C.6  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  164:  A  scalar  descent  from  the  root  of  
A7alt  (through  the  m7,  b6  and  P5),  to  a  diatonic  enclosure  featuring  an  
ascending  passing  tone  fragment  from  P4  to  ma3  (fig.  6),  to  a  major  triad  
arpeggiation  in  root  position  with  an  enclosure  around  the  root  (fig.  9),  to  a  
descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  chain  from  root  
resolving  to  the  m3  of  Dm(ma7)  (fig.  26),  to  a  motivic  interval  structure  (m3-­‐
ma9-­‐m3-­‐root)  (fig.  30).  
 
8.4  –  Dominant  Cadence:  Patterns  of  Use  
Based  on  the  evidence  compiled  in  this  chapter,  we  can  observe  patterns  for  
frequency  of  use  and  unique  features  for  each  formulaic  species  of  dominant  
cadence  vocabulary.    I  will  work  through  them  from  Species  A  to  C.  
 
Dominant  Cadence  –  Species  A:  
Species  A  breaks  down  into  component  phrases,  the  heart  of  which  is  
consistently  based  on  a  descending  diminished  triad  followed  by  a  m6  or  ma6  

 

 
 

121  

interval.  The  phrases  preceding  and  following  the  triad  are  varied  with  some  
distinct  patterns  of  use,  which  I  will  conclude  with  below.  
 
Begins  With:  
-­‐  Descending  chromatic  passing  tone  to  enclosure,  preceding  the  descending  
diminished  triad:  A.1,  A.2,  A.3,  A.4  
-­‐  Ascending  diatonic  phrase  over  IIm7  chord,  preceding  the  descending  
chromatic  passing  tone  to  enclosure:  A.1,  A.2,  A.3  
-­‐  Descending  chromatic  passing  tone  sequence  to  enclosure  to  begin,  preceding  
the  ascending  diatonic  phrase  over  IIm7:  A.3    
-­‐  Descending  chromatic  passing  tone  sequence  resolves  to  dim5  of  the  
descending  diminished  triad:  A.5,  A.6  
-­‐  Descending  chromatic  passing  tone  to  descending  enclosure  chain  resolves  to  
the  P5  preceding  the  descending  minor  triad:  A.7  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:  
-­‐  Descending  root  position  diminished  triad  from  the  b9  to  the  P5  of  the  V7  
chord,  resolves  by  step  to  the  ma3,  then  returns  to  the  b9  with  a  ma6  interval:  
A.1,  A.3,  A.5,  A.6  
-­‐  Descending  root  position  minor  triad  from  ma2  to  P5  of  V7  chord,  resolves  by  
step  to  the  ma3:  A.7  
-­‐  Descending  root  position  diminished  triad  b9  to  P5  of  V7,  then  jumps  an  octave  
to  the  #9  of  the  dom7  by  way  of  a  ma13  interval:  A.2  

 
 

122  

-­‐  Slight  variation  of  diminished  triad  with  a  descending  2nd  inversion  minor  
triad  from  dim5  to  m7  of  IIm7b5,  before  returning  through  a  m6  interval  to  the  
b9  of  V7:  A.4  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:  
-­‐  Ascending  chromatic  passing  tone  enclosure  to  descending  chromatic  passing  
tone  to  enclosure  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  Ima7:  A.1  
-­‐  Ascending  chromatic  passing  tone  enclosure  to  descending  chromatic  passing  
tone  to  enclosure  resolving  to  the  aug5  of  V7.    Then  descends  down  a  root  
position  augmented  triad  through  the  aug5,  ma3,  and  root  of  the  V7  chord  before  
resolving  to  the  root  or  the  Im7  chord:  A.3  
-­‐  Ascending  chromatic  passing  tone  enclosure  resolving  to  the  P5  of  Im7:  A.4  
-­‐  Enclosure  resolving  to  the  P5  of  Im7:  A.5  
-­‐  Resolves  by  step  to  the  P5  of  Im7:  A.6  
-­‐  A  descending  E  minor  pentatonic  run  from  the  #9  of  Edom7  including  the  b9  
and  resolving  to  the  Root:  A.2  
 
 

We  can  observe  components  to  be  favoured  or  more  practiced,  based  on  

their  frequency  of  use.    Other  less  frequent  components  are  observed  to  be  
variations  of  their  essential  form,  or  additive  phrases  that  act  to  elongate  the  
archetype.    It  is  notable  that  in  each  case  an  interval  of  a  ma6  or  m6  consistently  
follows  the  diminished  triad.    There  is  variation  through  which  Metheny  resolves  
each  formulaic  species,  and  we  may  see  this  as  a  theme  as  we  continue  our  

 
 

123  

observation  of  his  improvisational  tendencies.    Because  Metheny  is  adept  with  
enclosure  and  passing  tone  formulaic  components,  he  is  free  to  resolve  these  
Dominant  Cadence  formulas  to  a  chord  tone  of  the  tonic  triad  lucidly  and  with  
variety.  
 
Dominant  Cadence  –  Species  B:  
 

Species  B  is  the  application  of  a  descending  altered  scale  stepwise  and  

with  passing  tones,  over  a  IIm-­‐V7-­‐I,  a  V7-­‐I,  or  a  bII7-­‐I  progression.    There  are  
some  patterns  of  use  for  phrases  preceding  the  altered  scale  descent,  starting  
pitches  for  the  descent,  and  how  the  altered  scale  descent  resolves,  which  I  will  
conclude  with  below.  
 
Begins  With:  
-­‐  Descending  chromatic  passing  tone  to  enclosure  from  the  m3  of  IIm7b5  
resolving  to  the  P5  of  V7:  B.1,  B.2  
-­‐  Ascending  enclosure  with  chromatic  passing  tone  to  descending  chromatic  
passing  tone  to  enclosure  from  m3  of  IIm7  to  the  P5  of  V7:  B.3  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:  
-­‐  Descending  root  position  major  triad  from  the  P5  of  V7:  B.1  
-­‐  Descending  altered  scale  beginning  on  the  P5  of  V7  (5,  3,  #9,  b9,  R)  resolving  to  
the  m3  of  Im7  via  a  chromatic  passing  tone  to  enclosure:  B.2  
-­‐  Descending  altered  scale  beginning  on  the  P5  of  V7  (5,  3,  #9,  b9,  R)  resolving  to  

 
 

124  

the  ma3  of  Ima7  via  a  chromatic  passing  tone  to  enclosure:  B.3    
-­‐  Descending  altered  scale  beginning  on  the  root  of  V7  (R,  b13,  5,  3,  #9,  b9,  R,  b7),  
resolving  to  m3  of  Im7  by  step:  B.4  
-­‐  Descending  altered  scale  beginning  on  m7  of  bII7  (b7,  5,  #11,  3,  #9,  b9),  
resolving  through  an  enclosure  from  the  b9  of  bII7  to  the  root  of  I7sus:  B.5    
-­‐  A  typical  'cliche'  descent  from  the  ma3  of  V7  (3,  b9,  R,  b7),  resolves  by  step  to  
the  ma3  of  Ima7:  B.6  
-­‐  Descending  altered  scale  beginning  on  the  #9  of  bII7  (#9,  b9,  R,  b7),  resolving  
to  the  ma6  of  Ima7(#11)  through  a  descending  enclosure  chain  from  the  m7  of  
bII7:  B.7    
 
 

We  can  observe  that  in  three  species  (B.1,  B.2,  B.3),  a  chromatic  passing  

tone  to  enclosure  component  from  the  m3  of  the  IIm  chord  precedes  the  altered  
scale  descent.  In  two  species  (B.2,  B.3),  the  descending  altered  scale  begins  with  
a  P5  and  follows  the  identical  interval  structure.    In  Species  B.3,  the  interval  
structure  is  simply  elongated,  beginning  on  the  root  to  include  the  root  and  b13.    
Another  recurring  feature  is  the  resolution  to  a  ma3  (B.3,  B.6)  or  a  m3  (B.2,  B.4)  
of  the  Ima  or  Im  chord.    Notably,  other  starting  pitches  of  the  altered  scale  are  
used  as  well,  two  occurring  over  the  less  common  bII7-­‐I  progression,  in  which  
the  bII7  chord  is  not  simply  a  tritone  substitute.  
 
 

 
 

125  

Dominant  Cadence  –  Species  C:  
 

Species  C  is  the  application  of  an  ascending  diatonic  phrase  over  the  IIm7  

chord,  followed  by  an  enclosure  with  chromatic  passing  tone  resolving  to  the  
ma3  of  V7,  typically  followed  by  a  large  ascending  interval,  over  a  IIm7-­‐V7-­‐I  
progression.    There  are  some  patterns  of  use  and  some  unique  applications,  
which  we  can  observe  below.  
 
Begins  With:  
-­‐  Ascending  diatonic  phrase  beginning  on  the  root  of  the  IIm7  chord:  C.2,  C.3  
-­‐  Ascending  diatonic  phrase  beginning  on  the  root  of  the  IIm7b5  chord:  C.5  
-­‐  Ascending  diatonic  phrase  beginning  on  the  m3  of  the  IIm7  chord:  C.1  
-­‐  Ascending  diatonic  phrase  beginning  on  the  P5  of  the  IIm7  chord:  C.4  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:    
-­‐  Enclosure  with  ascending  chromatic  passing  tone  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  V7:  
C.1,  C.2,  C.6  
-­‐  Diatonic  enclosure  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  V7:  C.3  
-­‐  Non-­‐diatonic  enclosure  resolving  to  the  ma3  of  V7:  C.5  
-­‐  Descending  ma2  to  enclosure  resolving  to  the  m7  of  V7:  C.4  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:    
-­‐  ma6  interval:  C.2,  C.3  
-­‐  m7  interval:  C.1  
-­‐  ma7  interval:  C.4  

 
 

126  

-­‐  Arpeggiated  diminished  triad  over  V7  outlining  3-­‐5-­‐b9  scale  degrees:  C.5  
-­‐  Arpeggiated  major  triad  over  V7  outlining  3-­‐5-­‐R  scale  degrees:  C.6  
 
 

We  can  observe  that  the  diatonic  phrase  over  the  IIm7  chord  shows  

patterns  of  use,  beginning  on  the  root  in  three  species  (C.2,  C.3,  C.5),  but  making  
use  of  the  m3  and  P5  as  starting  points  as  well.    The  ma3  is  used  as  the  target  
note  of  an  enclosure  in  all  but  one  species  (C.4),  showing  a  clear  pattern  of  use.    
The  recurrence  of  a  large  interval  is  evident,  pre-­‐existent  as  a  motive  in  
Dominant  Cadence  Species  A.    Ma6  intervals  complete  the  phrase  in  Species  C.2  
and  C.3,  m7  and  ma7  intervals  complete  the  phrases  in  Species  C.1  and  C.4  
respectively.    A  new  motive  of  an  arpeggiated  triad  is  evident  in  Species  C.5  and  
C.6.  
 
8.5  –  Dominant  Cadence  –  Conclusions:  
 

Overall,  Metheny  is  shown  to  use  just  three  major  archetypes  of  

Dominant  Cadence  Species.    The  IIm7-­‐V7-­‐I  progression  is  among  the  most  
common  in  jazz,  and  so  it  is  interesting  that  Metheny  should  have  so  few  
formulaic  archetypes  for  which  to  approach  this  progression.    Through  an  
observation  of  the  transcriptions  of  Metheny’s  improvisations  in  the  appendices  
of  this  study,  it  becomes  evident  that  Metheny  often  uses  fluid  combinations  of  
shorter  fragmentary  ideas  to  improvise  through  cadence  progressions,  in  

 
 

opposition  to  the  lengthier  and  more  visibly  pre-­‐rehearsed  vocabulary  that  
we’ve  studied  in  this  chapter.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

127  

 
 

128  

Chapter  9  
Melodic  Cliché  Formulas  
 
Melodic  Cliché  formulas  are  phrases  that  are  found  to  be  popular  among  a  
wide  variety  of  jazz  improvisers.    Though  the  scope  of  this  research  does  not  
include  quantifying  their  popularity  or  origin,  most  jazz  researchers  should  find  
these  phrases  to  sound  familiar.    As  an  improviser,  it  seems  that  for  Metheny  a  
goal  is  to  “avoid  the  cliché,”  however  including  a  few  carefully  selected  cliché  
type  phrases  into  his  improvisations  injects  a  distinctive  style  familiarity  by  way  
of  recognizable  referents.    Each  formula’s  component  parts,  application,  and  
relation  to  the  harmony  are  defined  below.    To  conclude  at  the  end  of  the  
chapter,  we  will  observe  unique  features  and  patterns  of  use.  
 

Clichés
Formulas A, B, C & D

9.1  –  Cliché:  Species  A  
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 84

D m7b5

b 4
&bb 4 œ

Fig. 17

œ

œ

œ

G 7b9

œ

œ

œ

 

œ

Species A.2
G 7b9
D m7b5
Solar:
Bar–192
Ex.  
83  
 Species  A.1  –  Solar:  Bar  84:    An  Ab  melodic  minor  scale  fragment  begins  
2

b
&bb œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

nb
n

17 and  continues  as  a  tertial  arpeggio  (through  ma3,  b13,  root  
on  the  m3  of  DFig.
m7b5  

b

E 9
Species A.3
Old Folks:
and  
#9)  Bar
of  39
G7b9  (fig.  17).    
3

 

&b œ

Fig. 17

œ

œ

œœœœœœœ œ
œ
bœ #œ nœ œ œ

Species A.4
E m7b5(9)
Old Folks: Bar 49
4

&b

Fig. 13

Species A.5
Solar: Bar 210
7

F ma7

b
&bb Ó

œ

œ bœ

œ

#œ œ œ #œ

œ

A 7b9

œ

œ

!

Œ

œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ
œ
œ #œ

D m7

Œ Ó

bbb

œ
nœ œ œ bœ nœ bœ
#œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ Ó
œ
J

nb
n

Fig. 16 Fig. 17
F m7

Fig. 13

Fig. 19

‰ œœœ

Fig. 31 Fig. 17
B b7

Fig. 17

Fig. 22

Fig. 21

E bma7

Clichés
 
  Species A.1

Formulas A, B, C & D
D m7b5

Solar: Bar 84

b 4
&bb 4 œ

Fig. 17

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 192
2

b
&bb œ

D m7b5

œ

œ

œ

G 7b9

Clichés
G

œ

Formulas
œ A,n œB, C & œD

œ

œ

7b9

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

129  

nb
n

œ

m7b5
G 7b9
Species A.1
Fig.D17
 
Solar: Bar 84
b
E 9
Species A.3
Old 8
Folks:
39
Ex.  
4  –  SBar
pecies  
A.2  –  Solar:  Bar  192:  An  Ab  melodic  minor  scale  fragment  begins  
3

b 4
œ
&bb 4 œ
œ
œ
b
œ
& b œ Fig. œ17 œ œ

œœ

œ nœ œ

œ

œ

!

Œ

Species
on  
the  A.2
m3  of  Fig.
Dm7b5  
tertial  Ga7b9rpeggio  (through  ma3,  P5,  m7  
D17
m7b5 and  continues  as  a  Clichés

A 7b9 B, C & D
œ D m7œ
Formulas
b
nb
œ
œœ œ #A,

œ
n
œ
n
œ
& b b œœ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
4
œ
œ
œ
m7b5 œ œ
‰ œGœ7b9œ œ # œ
Œ Ó
bb
Species A.1 & b Fig.D17
bœ œ #œ nœ œ œ
œ
Solar: Bar 84
b
œ
b 413E 9
Species A.3
Fig.
Fig. 16 Fig.œ 17
œœ31 Fig.
œ œ œ Fig. 22
b 4 œ
œ nb17
&39bFig.
œ
Old Folks: Bar
œ
œ
F ma7
Fœm7 b œ
B 7
E bma7
3
Species A.5
b
œ
! œŒ
Fig. 17
œ
œ
&
œ
Solar: Bar 210
n
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
b
n
œ
b
œ
nb
7
# œ n œ œ œ b œG 7b9 œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ ‰ œ Ó
Species A.2
bFig.b D17m7b5
Ó
n  
&
Solar: Bar 192
œ
J
œ
A
7b9
œ
2
nb
Species A.4
b b E m7b5(9)Fig. 13œ
œ Fig. 19œœ œ # œ n œ Fig. 17 œFig.œ œ21œ n œ œ œ D m7
n
&
Old Folks: Bar
49 b œ œ
#3œ9:  A  Bb  melodic  
œ
Ex.  
85  –B.1
 4Species  
A.3  œ –œ  œOld  Folks:  Bar  
mœinor  scale  fragment  
Species
œ
A7 œ # œ
œ
œ
œ
3 œ
œ bœ œ #œ nœ œ œ
‰ œœœ
Œ Ó
bbb
E m9
17
&17b Fig.
Old Folks: Bar
œ œ œ œ #œ œ
11
E b9
J
œ œ the  
Species A.3
bFig.
Óa3  
‰through  
Œ
n
31 PFig.
Fig.
16 Fig. 17
17a6)  
begins  
o
n  
t
he  
m
aFig.
ug4,  
5,  
m
of  EœFig.
b  122
29ydian  dominant  
13 of  Eb9  (
&
œ
œ
Old Folks: Bar 39
œ
œ
œ
m7 b œ
B b7
E bma7
3
Species A.5
b œF ma7 œ n œ œœ œ œFFig.
! œŒ
15
&
Solar:
Bar
210
b
œ
and  
c
ontinues  
a
s  
a
 
t
ertial  
a
rpeggio  
(
from  
m
7,  
m
a2,  
a
ug4  
t
o  
m
a6)  
œ
nœ #œ bœ nœ
œ 1‰ 7).  
nb
Species B.2
7
œ Gœma7(fig.  
b b b133
Ó F #m9
œ
n
œ
œÓ
œ
œ
n
Fig.
17
&Bar
œ
b
œ
œ
Son of Thirteen:
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
J
#
œ
13
œ
A
7b9
# œ Fig.
Species A.4
Œ 13 ‰ J
œ #17œ #Fig.
œ 21
& Ó E m7b5(9)Fig.
n œœ n œ œœ . D m7 ‰ Ó
Fig. 19 œ # œ
Old Folks: Bar 49
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
Species B.1
A7 œ # œ œ
4
œEœm9 œ œ œ œ Fig.
œ #œ
œ Œ Ó
b
œ

œ
bbb
3 œ
15
Fig.
5
œ
œ
œ
&
b
œ
n
œ
œ
Old
Folks:
Bar
17
#
œ
Species B.3
B m(ma7)
11
œFig.œ17œ œ œFig.œ 31œ Fig.#17œ œ œFig. 22J
Son of Thirteen:
bFig.
Ó

Œ
n
œ
Fig.
16
#
œ
œ
13
&
œ
œ
œ #œ
 
Bar 96 16
œ
.
# œ n œE bma7n œ
#
œ
F ma7
F m7
B b7

Species A.5 &
Fig. 15
Solar: Bar 210
n œ  Oœld  œFbolks:  
œ n œ Bar  
œ Gœ ma7œ œ G  minor   n
b
b œ4n9:  
Species
Ex.  
86  B.2
–7  Species  
A
.4  

An  ascending  
to  
dœescending  
#
œ
#
œ
œ
F
m9
b
Ó
œ
n
‰œÓ
Fig.
15
Fig.
5
nb
&Barb 133
Son of Thirteen:
œ # œ # œ œœ œ b œ œ œ œ œ
J
13
# œ Fig.
Ó begins  
Œ o13n  t‰he  Jm7  oFig.
œ 17
Ó to  
œroot,  
œ .m6,  d‰ im5)  
Fig.
&run  
# œ #Fig.
n œ m3,  
21
pentatonic  
f  E19
m7b5(9)  (through  
Species B.1
A7
œ
3 œ
Fig. 15
Fig. 5
Old
Folks:
Bar 17 E m9
Species
B.3
œ
Bthe  
m(ma7)
an  
e
nclosure  
t
o  
P
4  
(
fig.  
1
3),  
t
o  
a
 
G
 
m
elodic  
m
inor  
s
cale  
f
ragment  
(through  
P4,  
œ
œ
œ
11
œ
œ
J

b œ Ó œ # œ ‰œ œœ œ œ
Œ
n
Son of Thirteen:
œ
&
Bar 96 16

œ #œ #œ nœ nœ.

ma2,  m3,  d&im5  and  m7)  of  Em7b5(9)  
(fig.16),  continuing  tertially  to  a  chromatic  
Fig. 15

Solar: Bar 192
2
Species A.4
E m7b5(9)
Old Folks:
Bar
and  
root)  
of  49G7b9  (fig.  17).    

F # m9

Fig. 5
œ # œ #tœo  a  œBb  melodic  
approach  
scale  fragment  from  
13 tone  (#9  to  ma3)  (fig.  31),  
J
#
œ
Œ ‰
œ # œ m#inor  
‰ Ó
œ nœ œ.

Species B.2
Fig.133
15
Son of Thirteen: Bar

G ma7

the  m7  of  A7b9  (through  rFig.
oot,  
15 b9,  #9)  to  a  tertial  
Fig. 5 ascent  (through  ma3,  P5,  m7)  

œ #œ

œ

œ

Species B.3
B m(ma7)
Son of Thirteen:
(fig.  
17),  
to  a  descending  altered  dominant  fragment  (with  b9  and  #9)  resolving  
Bar 96
16

&

œ

to  the  m3  of  Fig.
Dm7  
15 (fig.  22).  

œ

œ #œ

œ #œ #œ nœ nœ.

Fig. 5

Species A.3
Old Folks: Bar 39
3

 
  Species A.4

&b œ

Fig. 17

œœœœœœœ œ
œ #œ
&b
bœ #œ nœ œ œ

Species A.5
Solar: Bar 210

F ma7

œ

œ

œ

!

œœ
‰ œ œ œ œ #œ œ

Œ

œ nœ œ œ œ

D m7

130  

bbb

œ
nœ œ œ bœ nœ bœ
#œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ Ó
œ
J

nb
n

Fig. 31 Fig. 17

Fig. 13

Fig. 22

B b7

F m7

b
&bb Ó

7

œ œ #œ
A 7b9

Fig. 16 Fig. 17

Fig. 13

œ

Œ Ó

E m7b5(9)

Old Folks: Bar 49
4

œ

œ

œ

œ bœ

Fig. 17

Fig. 19

E bma7

Fig. 21

œ œ
œ
Ex.  87  –11  Species  
A
.5  

 
S
olar:  
B
ar  
2
10:  
A
n  
a
scending/descending  
C  Lydian-­‐based  
œ
œ
œ
œ #œ
‰ œ œ
Œ
n
œ J
Clichés
&b Ó
Species B.1
Old Folks: Bar 17

A7

E m9

 

3

B, tChe  &mD
Fig. 15
pentatonic  run  (ma6,  root,  ma6,  
aFormulas
ug4,  ma3)  A,
from  
a3  of  Fma7  gives  ma3,  P5,  
Species B.2
G ma7
F # m9
G 7b9
Species
A.1
Son
of Thirteen:
Bar 133D m7b5
ma3,  
a  n1384
on-­‐diatonic  dim2,  and  ma7  scale  tones  to  an  enclosure  from  ma7  to  the  
Solar: Bar

œ
‰ J
œ

Ób 4 Œ
&
&bb 4 œ

#œ #œ œ
# œ œ # œ # œ œn œ
œ

œ

‰ œÓ

œ .œ

m7  of  Fm7  (fig.  1Fig.
3),  17to  a  tertial  
a  r5oot  position  Ab  major  triad  
Fig. 15 descent  down  
Fig.

œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ
œ # œ # œ nœ n œ . œ
‰ nb
2 & b
œ
b
œ
n
œ
œ
n
& b œ
œ
the  P5  of  Bb7  (fig.  19),  to  an  ascending  Ab  Melodic  Minor  scale  fragment  (ma6,  
Species B.3
B m(ma7)
Son of A.2
Thirteen:
Species
G 7b9
D m7b5
Bar 96Barm
giving  
7,  P5,  m3  chord  tones  to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  from  m3  to  
Solar:
16192
Fig. Fig.
15 17
E b9

Fig. 5

ma7,  
root,  
Old Folks:
Barm
39a2,  m3)  from  the  P5  of  Bb7  giving  
œ Pœ 5,  mœa6,  m7,  root,  b9  altered  
Species A.3
3

&b œ

œ

œ

œ bœ

œ

œ

!

Œ

dominant  scale  tones  (fig.  17),  to  a  tertial  arpeggio  through  a  Bdim  triad  giving  
Fig. 17

œ œ #œ

œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ

A 7b9
Species A.4
E
m7b5(9)
b9,  
m
a3,  
P
5,  
m
a3  
a
ltered  
d
ominant  
s
cale  
t
ones  (fig.  21),  resolving  tDo  m7the  root  of  
Old Folks: Bar 49

œ

b œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ #œ nœ œ œ œ
&
Ebma7  before  ending  on  the  P5.  

Œ Ó

bbb

œ
œœ œœ
b Ó nœ œ bœ nœ #œ bœ nœ
7
œ
b
œ
n
œ
‰œÓ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ
& b
œ
J
9.2  –  Cliché:  Species  B  

nb
n

4

Fig. 16 Fig. 17

Fig. 13

  Species A.5

F ma7

Fig. 31 Fig. 17
B b7

F m7

Solar: Bar 210

Fig. 13

Species B.1
Old Folks: Bar 17
11

E m9

&b Ó

Species B.2
Son of Thirteen: Bar 133

Fig. 17

Fig. 19


F # m9

‰ œ œ œ œ #œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ

A7

œ

Fig. 21

œ

Fig. 15

Fig. 22

œ

3

E bma7

œ œ
J

Œ

n


Ex.  88  –13  Species  
C  m‰ajor  
J Bar  #1œ7:  Aœn  #aœscending/descending  
Ó B.1  –Œ  Old  ‰Folks:  
œ
Ó scale  
&

G ma7

#œ #œ nœ

œ.

Fig. 15
fragment  
(R-­‐2-­‐3-­‐4-­‐3-­‐2)  from  
the  m6  of  Em9  Fig.
(E  L5 ocrian  ma2)  (fig.  15),  to  an  
Species B.3

œ

œ #œ

B m(ma7)

œ

œ

œ

œ #œ

œ #œ #œ nœ nœ.

Son of Thirteen:
Bar 96 16
arpeggiated  
A  major  triad  over  A7  before  leaping  up  the  octave  to  the  P5.  

&

Fig. 15

Fig. 5

 

F ma7
F m7
B b7
E bma7
œ
b œ œ n œ œ œ b œœ b œ œ
&
œ œ! œ œŒ
bb Ó
nœ #œ bœ nœ
7
œ
‰œÓ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ nœ
& Fig.b 17
œ
J
A 7b9
D
m7
  Species A.4
Fig.
13
Fig.
17
Fig.
21
Fig. 19
E m7b5(9)
Folks:
Bar 49
œ
Species
B.1
# œ œ œ # œ A 7 œ # œ œ œ œ œ3n œœœ œœ œ
  Old
œ
œ
4
œ
œ
œ
E m9
œ
b
œ
œ
Œ Ó
Old Folks: Bar
& 17
bœ œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ
11
œ
œ
J

b Ó13
‰ œ
Œ
œFig. 22
& Fig.
Fig. 31 Fig. 17
Fig. 16 Fig. 17

Species A.5
3
Solar: Bar 210

B b7

nb
n

131  

bbb

E bma7

n

Fig. 15
nF #œm9 œ œ b œ n œ b œ
œ œG ma7œ œ
b
nb
7
œ
#
œ
n
œ
b b 133Ó
œ nœ
‰œÓ
Son of Thirteen:
Bar
œ
œ
n
&
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
#
œ
13
J Ó
œ #œ œ œ
J
Ó
Œ


# œ 21n œ œ .
&
# œ Fig.
Fig. 13
Fig. 17
Fig. 19
Species B.1
Fig. 15
Fig. 5A 7
 
œ
3 œ
Old
Folks:B.3
Bar 17 EBm9
Species
m(ma7)
œ
œ
œ
œ
11
J
Son of Thirteen:
œœ œ œ œ œ # œ
Œ
n
œ –  #Oœld  F‰œolks:  
& b œ Ó B.2  
Ex.  
9  –16  Species  
Bar  133:  A  #dœescending  
ajor  
Bar896
œ # œ E  œm
# œ n œscale  
n œ . fragment  

&
Fig. 15
Species A.5
Solar:
SpeciesBar
B.2210

F ma7

F m7

Species
B.2 from  
#m9
G ma7 chain  
(4-­‐3-­‐2-­‐R)  
the  Fm
3  of  F#m9  (fig.  15),  to  a  descending  
enclosure  
Fig. 15
Fig. 5
Son of Thirteen: Bar 133

œ #œ #œ œ
J
#œ œ #œ #œ nœ
Ó
Œ

resolving  &
the  ma2  of  Gma7  (fig.  5).  

œ.

13

Species B.3
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 96 16

&

œ

Fig. 15

œ

œ #œ

B m(ma7)

œ

Fig. 5

œ

œ #œ

‰ Ó

œ #œ #œ nœ nœ.

Fig. 15

Fig. 5

 

Ex.  90  –  Species  B.3  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  96:  An  ascending/descending  A  major  
scale  fragment  (R-­‐2-­‐3-­‐4-­‐3-­‐2-­‐R)  beginning  on  the  m7  of  Bm(ma7)  through  m7,  
root,  ma2,  m3  (fig.  15),  before  descending  to  the  P5  to  an  enclosure  chain  from  
2

Clichés

P5  to  m3  (fig.  5).  
Species B.4
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 111 18

G bma7(#11)

& b˙

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 105

œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ

FIg. 15

E bma7

A ma7(#11)

œ #œ #œ
œ #œ œ œ

Fig. 1

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

œ boœf  Tœhirteen:  
Ex.  91  –21  Species  
Db  
b B.4  –  Son  
œ œ bœ
b œ Bar  111:  An  œascending/descending  
&bb Ó

œ bœ œ ‰

bbb

J ‰ Œ

Ó

nnn

œ

Ó

b

3 the  P5  FIg.
major  scale  fragment  FIg.
from  
of  F29bma7#11  (fig.  15),  descending  to  the  ma3  
B bma7(#11)
Species C.2
F ma7(#11)
G ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
before  
Bar 122 a
24  diatonic  enclosure  from  ma7  to  the  P5  of  Ama7#11  (fig.  1),  before  

œ œ
J

œ
‰ J

Œ

œ œ
J

œ

Œ

ascending  an  A  major  pentatonic  
FIg. 29based  run  through  P5,  ma6,  root,  ma2,  ma3,  

œ œœ œ
&b ‰ œ œ œ J

Species D.1
Old Folks: Bar 15 G m7

3

and  aug4.  
27
 

Species D.2
 Snova: Bar 38
30

& bœ

Species D.3
Snova: Bar 61
33

E b7

œ

j
œ

œ

C7

j

FIg. 32

œ œ bœ œ œ bœ

FIg. 32

œ

3
b œ œ n œ œ œ3 b œ œ œ3
œ œ

E m9

A bma7

œ.

bœ bœ

FIg. 2

œ œ œœ œ
‰ J
Œ
G 7b9

Ó

n
Ó

A 7sus
D ma7
G 7sus
C ma7
œ #œ ! œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ ! nœ œ ! œ œ œ œ
J ‰
Œ ‰. R !
!
! œ

FIg. 32

 

 
 

2

132  

Clichés

Species B.4
G bma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 111 18


œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ
&
œ bœ
9.3  –  Cliché:  Species  C  
FIg. 15

E bma7

2 C.1
Species
Solar: Bar 105
21

b
&bb Ó

œ bœ œ

A ma7(#11)

œ #œ #œ
œ #œ œ œ

Fig. 1

E b m7

A b7
Clichés

D bma7

œ œ bœ ‰ Œ
bœ œ
bœ œ ‰ œ
J

Ó

bbb
nnn

Species B.4
G bma7(#11) FIg. 3
A ma7(#11)
FIg. 29
 
Son of Thirteen:
bma7(#11)
B
Species
C.2
Bar 111 18
F ma7(#11)
G ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
Ex.  
2  –24  Species  C.1  –  Solar:  Bar  105:  A  descending  passing  tone  fragment  from  
Bar9122
FIg. 15
Fig. 1
b
b7 triad  to  
Species
C.1
b
E m7
D ba
ma7
the  ma2  of  Ebma7  
 descending  
Gb  (AIV)  
scending  Ab  triad  (V)  
E ma7(fig.  3),  to  a
FIg.
29
Solar: Bar 105
Species D.1
C7
E m9
21
3
G m7
j
3
3
Old Folks:
Bar
15 2
3
over  
Ab7  
(
fig.  
9),  
r
esolving  
t
o  
t
he  
# œroot  of  Db.  
27
FIg. 3
FIg. 29
2
B bma7(#11)
Species
C.2
Clichés
G ma7(#11)
FIg. 32
FIg. F2 ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
b
A ma7
G 7b9
Species
Bar 122D.2
24
E b7
j
œ
Snova: Bar 38
30
Species B.4
G bma7(#11)
A ma7(#11)
FIg. 29
Son of Thirteen:
 
Species
Bar 111D.1
C7
E m9
18
3
FIg.
32
j
3
3
Old Folks: Bar 15 G m7
3

Species
Ex.  
93  D.3
–27  Species  C.2  –  Son  Ao7sus
f  Thirteen:  
Bar  1D22:  
ma7 An  arpeggiated  
G 7sus C  triad  (
CV)  
ma7 begins  
Snova: Bar 61
FIg. 15
Fig. 1
33
b
Species C.1
E bFIg.
m7 32
A b 7 extensions  
ma7
FIg. D2 ma7 ma6  and  ma2  (fig.  
on  
t
he  
a
ug4  of  BE bbma7#11  
(IV  chord)  
and  outlines  
Solar: Bar 105
A bma7
G 7b9
Species D.2
21
E b7
j
FIg. 32
œ
Snova: Bar 38

& b˙

œ b œ œ b œ œœ b œœ b œ œb œ œœ œ
œ œ œ #œ #œ
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
J
Œ
‰ J J
Œ Ó

œ bœ œ
b
b œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ œ
&bb Ó
œ b
bœ nœ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b

œ
J
&
œ œ œ
œ œ
œ
J
J
Œ œ œ ‰ b œ œ œ b œ œ .J b œ b œ

œ

& bœ
b
œ
œ bœ bœ
œ bœ œ
b œ
& b˙
œ
œ œ # œœ n œœ œ b œ œ œb nœœ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
&b ‰ œ
œ J #œ ! œ œ

R
Œ ‰. !
!

œ bœ
bbb Ó
œ œ œb œ œb œœ b œ b œ œœ. ‰ b œœb œ œ
&
29),  before  
resting  oœn  the  ma7  of  Fma7#11.  
30

& bœ
FIg. 3
FIg. 29
b
B ma7(#11)
C.2
G ma7(#11)
  Species
FIg. 32
œ œ œ
œ œ
Son of Thirteen:
œ
Species
A 7sus
D ma7
Bar 122D.3
#
œ
n
œ
24
J
J
œJ œ
Œ œ ‰# œ ! œ œ
Snova: Bar 61& Ó
œ

9.4  –  Cliché:  
Species  D   . R
33
Œ ‰
! FIg. 29
!

œ œœ œ
œ
œ
b

œ
J
&

Species D.1
Old Folks: Bar 15 G m7
27

E b7

3

j
œ

œ

C 732
FIg.
j

FIg. 32

œ œ bœ œ œ bœ

œ

œ bœ ‰ Œ Ó
œ bœ J œ œ œ œ
Ó
œ
œ œ œ œŒ œ Ó
J
Œ

œ.

bœ bœ

nnn
n

b

Ó
œ # œ # œ bbb
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ b œ œœ œ œ
n
œ œ œÓ

œ
!

J
!

œœ œb œ ‰œ Œ Ó
nnn
J
œ
œ
J
Œ Ó
F ma7(#11)

!

œ œ Œ œ œÓC ma7
n œG 7sus
œ œ b

J ‰
!

3
b œ œ n œ œ œ3 b œ œ œ3
œ œ

A bma7

bbb
b

E m9

FIg. 2

œ œ

Ó

œ

œ œ leads  to  a  
Ex.  94  –30  Species  
b œ D.1  œ–  Old  Folks:  Bar  15:  An  ascending  ‰scale  
J fragment  
Œ Ó
Species D.2
Snova: Bar 38

&

n

G 7b9

FIg.
32
descending  chromatic  
passing  
tone  fragment  on  the  ma6  of  C7  with  a  root  pedal  
A 7sus
D ma7
G 7sus
C ma7
œ #œ ! œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ ! nœ œ ! œ œ œ œ
33 32),  to  a  non-­‐diatonic  
point  (fig.  
Œ ‰ . R ! enclosure  from  the  !P4  of  C7  t!o  the  œ root  oJf  E‰ m9  

Species D.3
Snova: Bar 61

FIg. 32
(fig.  2),  to  an  ascending  ma3  to  descending  
P4  interval  motive  that  mirrors  the  

previous  pedal  point  motive  with  the  exclusion  of  a  chromatic  passing  tone.  

 

& b˙

Bar 111 18
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 122 24
C.1
  Species
Solar: Bar 105
  Species D.1
21

F ma7(#11)
œ bœ œ
œœ b œœ b œ œb œ œœ œ
œ œ œ #œ #œ
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
J
Œ
‰ J J
Œ Ó
FIg. 15
Fig. 1
G ma7(#11)

E bma7

œ bœ œ
b
3
Old Folks: Bar
&15b bG m7Ó
œœ œ
œ
27
œ
œ
& b ‰ œ FIg. 3 J
Species C.2
Son of Thirteen:
Species
Bar 122D.2
24
E b7
Snova: Bar 38
30


& bœ

b

A b7

E m7
FIg. 29

D bma7

bjœ œ œ œ ‰ œ3 œ œ œ b œE m9‰3 Œ Ó
b
b œ n œ œ œ3 b œ J œ œ
#œ œ
œ œ Ó
FIg. 29
B bma7(#11)
G ma7(#11)
FIg. F2 ma7(#11)
œ FIg.œ32 œ
œ œ
œ
b
A ma7
G 7b9
j
œ ‰ b œ J œ Jœ b œ œ .J b œ b œ œ œœ œ œ Œ œ Ó
œŒ œ
œ
‰ J
Œ Ó
FIg. 29

bbb
b

133  

C7

nnn
n

b

 
œ b œ œ3 n œ œ œ3
j
3
œ
#œ œ
œ
œ
A
7sus
D ma7
G 7susœœ œ œ œ C ma7
œ
b
œ
#
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
n
œ œ

œ Ó
œ J #œ !
& b ‰ Dœ.2  –  Snova:  
# œ ! from  !tœhe  m7  œJto  mœa6  
Ex.  95  –33  Species  
B
ar  
3
8:  
R
aising  
a
 
m
a7  
i
nterval  
R
.
Œ ‰
!
! FIg. 2 !


FIg. 32
Species D.1
Old Folks: Bar 15 G m7
Species D.3
27
Snova: Bar 61

FIg. 32

C7

E m9

3

b

A ma7
G 7b9
Species
7  descending  
E ba
œ œFIg.œ 32
j
of  
Eb7  D.2
to  begin  
with  
a  root  pedal  
œ cbhromatic  
œ œ
b œpassing  
œ . tbone  
œ fragment  
œ


œ œœ œ
b
œ
œ
J

Œ
point  (fig.  &
32),  to  a  diatonic  passage  resolving  on  the  root  on  G7b9.  
Snova: Bar 38
30

FIg. 32

Species D.3
Snova: Bar 61
33

Ó

A 7sus
D ma7
G 7sus
C ma7
œ #œ ! œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ ! nœ œ ! œ œ œ œ
J ‰
Œ ‰. R !
!
! œ

FIg. 32

Ex.  96  –  Species  D.3  –  Snova:  Bar  61:  An  ascending  scale  fragment  from  the  ma2  
of  A7sus,  to  a  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  from  the  ma6  with  
pedal  point  P4  (fig.  32),  to  a  tertial  descent  through  ma2,  ma7,  P5  and  ma3  of  
Dma7,  ending  with  a  phrase  motivically  similar  in  contour  to  fig.  32.  
 
9.5  –  Clichés:  Patterns  of  Use  
Based  on  the  evidence  compiled  in  this  chapter,  we  can  observe  patterns  
for  frequency  of  use  and  unique  features  for  each  formulaic  species  of  cliché  
vocabulary.    We  will  work  through  them  from  Species  A  to  D.  
 
Species  A  
 

This  cliché  phrase  (Fig.  17)  is  loosely  based  on  the  concept  of  the  “Cry  Me  

a  River”  melodic  pattern,  where  the  first  six  notes  of  the  aforementioned  
jazz/blues  standard’s  descending  melody  (2-­‐R-­‐5-­‐b3-­‐2-­‐R)  can  be  applied  to  

 

 
 

134  

various  harmonic  contexts  to  outline  the  harmony.    Metheny  inverts  the  cliché  to  
an  ascending  phrase  and  extends  it,  to  include  ma6  and  ma7  melodic  minor  scale  
tones,  creating  the  melodic  scale  phrase  archetype  (6-­‐7-­‐R-­‐2-­‐b3-­‐5-­‐7-­‐2).    There  
are  some  unique  applications  and  distinct  patterns  of  use,  which  we  will  observe  
below.      
 
Begins  With:  
-­‐  Ascending  melodic  minor  scale  fragment  (6-­‐7-­‐R-­‐2)  of  the  melodic  minor  scale:  
A.1,  A.2,  A.3,  A.4(2)  
-­‐  Enclosure  around  the  root  of  the  melodic  minor  scale:  A.4(1)  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:  
-­‐  Ascent  through  a  tertial  m(ma9)  structure,  from  the  m3  to  the  ma9:  A.1,  A.3,  
A.4(1)  
-­‐  Ascent  through  a  tertial  dom7  structure,  from  the  ma3  to  the  root:  A.2,  A.4(2)  
-­‐  Ascent  through  a  tertial  dom7(b9)  structure,  from  the  b9  to  the  P5:  A.5  
 
 

The  ascent  of  the  tertial  m(ma9)  structure  is  applied  to  three  unique  

harmonic  contexts,  including  Altered  Dominant,  Lydian  Dominant,  and  Locrian  
Natural  2.    The  m(ma9)  structure  outlines  Altered  Dominant  scale  tones  (3-­‐b13-­‐
R-­‐#9)  for  G7b9  in  Species  A.1,  Lydian  Dominant  scale  tones  (b7-­‐9-­‐#11-­‐13)  for  
Eb9  in  Species  A.3,    and  Locrian  Natural  2  scale  tones  (b5-­‐b7-­‐9-­‐11)  for  Em7b5(9)    

 
 

135  

in  Species  A.4(1).    The  tertial  dom7  and  dom7(b9)  structures  are  applied  to  their  
native  harmonic  contexts  in  Species  A.2,  Species  A.4(2),  and  Species  A.5.      
 
Species  B  
 

This  cliché  phrase  (Fig.  15)  is  a  melodic  scale  fragment  with  the  archetype  

(R-­‐2-­‐3-­‐4-­‐3-­‐2-­‐R)  that  is  a  simple  melodic  gesture  to  both  hear  and  perform  on  the  
guitar.    Metheny  applies  it  to  a  few  different  harmonic  contexts  and  with  some  
patterns  of  use  that  we  will  observe  below.  
 
Begins  With:  
-­‐  The  component  begins  from  the  m7  degree,  over  the  tonic  VIm7  tonality,  which  
the  IIm9-­‐V7  progression  implies:  B.1  
-­‐  The  component  begins  from  the  m7  degree,  over  a  m(ma7)  chord:  B.3  
-­‐  The  component  begins  with  a  descent  from  the  m3  of  a  IIm7  chord,  in  a  
truncated  application  of  the  component’s  second-­‐half:  B.2  
-­‐  The  component  begins  from  the  P5  degree  of  a  ma7(#11)  chord:  B.4  
-­‐-­‐>  Followed  By:  
-­‐  A  descending  enclosure  chain  from  the  P4  to  m3  of  the  m(ma7)  chord:  B.3  
-­‐  A  descending  enclosure  chain  from  the  P4  of  F#m9  resolving  to  the  ma2  of  
Gma7:  B.2  
 

 
 

 

136  

We  can  observe  that  (Fig.  15)  is  applied  by  Metheny  to  a  four  distinct  

harmonic  contexts,  namely  Aeolian,  Dorian,  Lydian  and  Melodic  Minor.    In  two  
cases,  Metheny  follows  (Fig.  15)  with  a  descending  enclosure  chain  (Fig.  5),  
showing  a  pattern  of  use  for  these  components.      
Species  C  
 

The  cliché  phrase  (Fig.  29)  is  a  common  IV  or  V  major  triad  application  

over  a  IVma7  or  V7  tonality.    There  is  one  example  of  use  for  each:      
-­‐  A  descending  IV  major  triad  to  ascending  V  major  triad  over  a  IIm7-­‐V7-­‐Ima7  
progression,  accessing  the  (11-­‐9-­‐b7-­‐R-­‐3-­‐5)  of  the  V7  chord:  C.1  
-­‐  An  ascending/descending  V  major  triad  over  a  IVma7(#11)  tonality,  accessing  
the  (9-­‐#11-­‐13)  of  the  IVma7#11  chord:  C.2  
 
Species  D  
 

This  chromatic  descending  cliché  phrase  (Fig.  32)  occurs  over  V7  

tonalities,  with  three  similar  applications,  each  slightly  unique:  
-­‐  A  chromatic  descent  from  the  ma6  to  P5  of  the  V7  of  a  IIm7-­‐V7  progression,  
featuring  the  root  as  an  escape  tone:  D.1  
-­‐  A  chromatic  descent  from  the  ma6  to  P5  of  the  IV7  chord,  featuring  the  root  as  
an  escape  tone:  D.2  
-­‐  A  chromatic  descent  from  the  ma6  to  P5  of  a  V7  chord,  featuring  the  P4  as  an  
escape  tone:  D.3  
 

 
 

137  

9.6  –  Cliché:  Conclusions  
Through  cliché  phrases,  Metheny  creates  style  familiarity  within  the  
greater  canon  of  jazz  vocabulary.    While  there  are  some  patterns  for  use,  
Metheny  largely  applies  them  to  various  harmonic  contexts  in  an  adaptive  
nature.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

138  

Chapter  10  
Pentatonic  Formulas  
 
 

Pentatonic  scales  are  some  of  the  most  widely  used  in  music.    They  can  be  

applied  to  virtually  any  style  or  genre,  not  the  least  of  which  includes  jazz  
improvisation.    Metheny  favours  pentatonic  applications  imposed  over  various  
tonalities  to  create  unique  scale  tone  combinations.  There  are  three  archetypes  
of  pentatonic  application:  
 
Species  A:  Descending  pentatonic  run  to  diatonic  enclosure  (Fig.  11).  
Species  B:  Ascending/descending  pentatonic  run  to  enclosure  (Fig.  13).  
Species  C:  Descending  pentatonic  run  (Fig.  11)  to  an  ornamentation  featuring  the  
dim5  degree,  to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  to  enclosure  (Fig.  7).  
 
Each  formula’s  component  parts,  application,  and  relation  to  the  harmony  are  
defined  below.    To  conclude  at  the  end  of  the  chapter,  we  will  observe  unique  
features  and  patterns  of  use.  
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

139  

Pentatonics

10.1  –  Pentatonic:  Species  A  
E b m7

Species A.1
Solar: Bar 58

b 4
&bb 4 Ó

Species A.2
b
Old Folks: Bar 38 B ma7

œ œ

A b7

Formulas A, B, C & D
D bma7

œ œ œ œ

œ

œ

œ

j
œ œ nœ bœ

œ

Fig. 11

E b9

nb
n

Fig. 31

œ œBar  
œ 5œ8:  œA  descending  Eb  major  rpentatonic  run  from  
Ex.  97  –  3Species  A.1  –  Solar:  
&b ‰

Pentatonics

b œ œ b œA,n œB,œ Cb œ&œD œ ! ‰ Œ
Formulas

b

Ó

bm7
A 7
Ee
D bma7 ma2,  ma7,  ma6,  aug4,  ma3  (fig.  
Fig.
11
Species
A.1of  Dbma7  
the  
ma2  
vokes  
Lydian  
scale  
œ œ Fig.
j
œ5 degrees  

b 4
& b b 4 Ó #œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

 

n

nœ bœ
œ œ œ # œ n œ œ nnb

œ #œ

œ
Solar:
SpeciesBar
A.358
A 7sus
D # 7alt
C # 7sus
Son of Thirteen:
11),  
before  
a  chromatic  approach  tone  trill  between  the  m6  and  P5  (fig.  31).  
5
Bar 148
Fig. 11
Fig. 31
b9
Species A.2
E
Fig.
11
Fig. 3
B bma7
Old
Folks:
Species
A.4Bar 38
D ma7
F 7alt
3
D # 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Formulas A, B, C & D
Bar 150 8
bm711
A b7
E
D bma7
Fig.
Species A.1
Fig. 5
j
 
œ
Solar:
BarA.3
58
#7alt
Species
A
7sus
D
C # 7sus
Fig. 11
Fig. 5
Son of Thirteen:
Ex.  
8  –A.5
 5Species  
A.2  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  38:  A  descending  F  major  pentatonic  run  
G bma7(#11)
Species
Bar9148
Fig. 11
Son of Thirteen:
Fig. 31
11
Bar
194
b9
Species
A.2
E
Fig.
11
Fig. 3
j
from  the  of  Bbma7  
through  scale  degrees  ma3,  ma2,  ma7,  
b
œ ma6,  P5  (fig.  11),  to  an  
Old
Folks:A.4
Bar 38 B ma7
Species
Fig. 11
D ma7
F 7alt
3
D # 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Species
A.6
b
Btma7(#11)
enclosure  
he  ma5  resolving  
j from  
Bar 150 8 chain  
F ma7(#11) to  the  ma3  of  Eb9  (Efig.  
m7 5).  
œ
Son of Thirteen:
Fig. 11
Fig.
5
Bar 211
14
Species A.3
A 7sus
D # 7alt
C # 7sus
Fig. 11
Fig. 5
Son of Thirteen:
b
G ma7(#11)Fig. 11
Species
Fig. 5
Bar
148 5A.5
Son
of
Thirteen:
Species A.7
b
#
E 7( 9)
A bma7(#11)
11
Barof194
Son
Thirteen: C ma7(#11)
j
Fig. 11
Fig. 3
œ
 
Bar
254
17
Species A.4
Fig.
11
D ma7
F 7alt
#
D 7alt
Son
of Thirteen:
Species
A.6
j A.3  –B  Sbma7(#11)
Ex.  
9
9  

 
S
pecies  
on  of  Thirteen:  
 descending  
D  major  pentatonic  
F ma7(#11)Bar  148:  A
E m7
Bar
150
Fig. 10
œ
Son of Thirteen:
8
Fig. 11
Fig. 17
Bar 211A.8
A ma7(#11)
Species
14
run  
from  
the  ma6  of  A7sus  Fig.
through  
ma6,  P5,  P4,  mFig.
a2,  5 ma7  scale  degrees  to  
Son of
Thirteen:
11
20
b
Bar
206
G ma7(#11) Fig. 11
Fig. 5
Species A.5
Son
of Thirteen:
Species
A.7 to  the  ma3  of  D#7alt  (fig.  
b
bma7(#11)through  degrees  
#
enclosure  
1
1),  
b
efore  
a  quartal  aAscent  
E 7( 9)
11
ma7(#11)
Bar
Fig.C11
Son 194
of Thirteen:
j
Fig. 11
œ
Bar 254 17
11 ascent  through  #9,  #11,  m7,  before  a  chromatic  passing  
ma3,  m7,  #9,  to  a  Fig.
tertial  
Species A.6
B bma7(#11)
j
F ma7(#11)
E m7
Fig. 10
Fig. 11
œ 17
Son of Thirteen:
Fig.
tone  
fragment  
esolving  to  the  b13.  
Bar
211
Arma7(#11)
Species
A.8
14
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 206 20
Fig. 11
Fig. 5
Species A.7
b
#
E 7( 9)
A bma7(#11)
Fig. 11
Fig. 11
Son of Thirteen: C ma7(#11)
Bar 254 17


J

#œ.

œ œ œ œ
J
œ

œ œ œ
œ œ œ Pentatonics
r
n
œ œ œ #bœœ #œœ b œ n œ œ b œ œ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
&b ‰
œ
J
œ
Œ ‰œ œ
œ #œ #œ œ.
‰ Ó

œ œ œ
n
œ
b
œ
œ œ œ œ
b 4
# œ n œ œn n b
& b b 4 Ó #œ
œ
.
#
œ
#
œ
œ œ œ œ
b œ‰ b œ œ #b œJœ

J
œ #œ
œ
j
bœ bœ bœ
‰ œ œ œ bœ nœ ‰ Ó

œ œ œ
bœ bœ
œ œ œ
r
n
œ œœ b#œœ œ# œb œ n œ œ b œ œ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
&b ‰ œ
œ
J
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
.
œ
Œ œ œ‰ œ
œ
œ œ ‰ Ó

œ œ # œ œ # œ œ n œ œ # œœ
œ œ
bœ Œ
&
#
œ
nœ œ
œ
.
#
œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
#
œ
œ

œ œ
b‰œ b œ œ Jb œ

J
œ œ
j
b
œ

œ œ œ b#œœ b#œœ b œ b œ ‰ œ œ œ b œ n œ ‰ Ó
œ
œ
œ œ œ œ
&œ œ œ œ
œ œ b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ
œ
œ
œ
#œ #œ œ œ
œ œ Œ œ ‰œ J
# œ œ œn œ# œ œ # œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ Ó

œ œ œ
œ
œ bœ Œ

& œ #œ #œ
#œ œ #œ œ œ #œ #œ œ
j ‰
&
#
œ
œ. nœ
#
œ
bœ bœ œ bœ
j
œ œb œ œb œ# œb œ# œ b œ b œ ‰ œ œ œ b œ n œ ‰ Ó

œ
œ
œ œ œ œ
b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ
&œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
œ œ
œ

bœ Œ
& œ #œ #œ #œ œ
œ œ #œ #œ œ
j ‰
#
œ
&
#œ #œ
œ. nœ

œ œ
œ
œ
&œ œ œ œ

Fig. 17
A ma7(#11)
Species A.8
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 206 20

&

œ #œ #œ

œ #œ #œ
œ œ œ œ
œ
Fig. 10

Fig. 11

œ #œ

œ

œ

#œ #œ

œ œ b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ

œ # œ # œj ‰

œ.

b

œ œ œ
Pentatonics E 9r
œ
œ
œ œ bœ œ nœ bœ
3
n
&b ‰
œ B,œC & œD œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
Formulasb A,
b
A 7
E b m711
Fig.
 Species A.1
140  
œ œ Fig.œ 5 œ D bma7
j
œ
n
œ
b
œ
Solar:
Bar
58
#
œ
œ œD 7altœ œ
  Species A.3
A 7sus
b C4#7sus
# œ n œ œnnb
Son of Thirteen:
& b b 4 Ó #œ
œ
.
œ œ œ œ
Bar 148 5
# œ # œ Fig. 31
‰ Fig.# œJ11 # œ

J
œ œ
Species A.2
E b9
Fig. 11
Fig. 3
B bma7 œ œ
Old
Folks:
Bar
38
œ
Species A.4
œ
œ œD ma7œ
r F 7alt
3
Son of Thirteen:
b ‰D #7alt
n
b œœ #œœb œ n œ œ b œ œ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
œ
œ
&
#
Bar 150 8
œ
J
œ
Pentatonics
#
œ
œ
.
œ
‰ Ó

& Ó Fig. 11Œ ‰
Fig. 5
Species A.2
b
Old Folks: Bar 38 B ma7

Formulas A, B, C &D #D
Species A.3
A 7sus
7alt
C # 7sus
Fig.
Fig. 5
b7 11
b
Son of Thirteen:
A
E
m7
D bma7
b
Species
A.1
G
ma7(#11)
Species
j
5
Bar
148 A.5
œ
Solar:
58
Son ofBar
Thirteen:
11 –  Species  A.4  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  150:  A  descending  E  mixolydian  
Ex.  
00  
Bar1194
j
Fig. 11
Fig. 3
œ
Species A.4
Fig.
11
Fig.
11
Fig.
D ma7
F 7alt 31
Df#rom  
7alt
pentatonic  
r
un  
m
a6  
o
f  
D
ma7  
t
hrough  
a
ug4,  
m
a3,  
m
a2,  
r
oot  
(fig.  11),  to  a  
Son of Thirteen:
b
Species
A.6
b
A.2
E 9
j B bma7 B ma7(#11)
Bar
150
F
ma7(#11)
E
m7
8 Bar 38œ
Son Folks:
of Thirteen:
Old
Bar 211 3
descending  
enclosure  chain  resolving  to  the  P5  of  F7alt  (fig.  5).  
14

œ #œ
.œ œ œ
#
œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
#
& Ób 4 b œ‰ b œ œ bJœ
Jœ œœ œjœ œ œ œ #œœ œ n œ b œ
b
Ó
b
œ
& Ób 4
bœ bœ
‰ œ œ œ bœ nœ ‰
&
bœ bœ
œ œ #œ #œ
œ œœ Œœ œ œ œ‰ œ J
œœ # œ œ œ œn œ # œœ # œ œ œœ . œ ‰
Ó
&
œ œ œ œœ
œ
r
#bœ œ b œ n œ œ b œ œ œ ! ‰ Œ œ Óœ
&b ‰
&
Fig. 11
Fig. 5

nœ œ
Ó

nb
n

Ó
bœ Œ

Fig. 11Fig. 11
Fig. 5
G bma7(#11)
Species A.5
Fig. 5
Species
A.3
Son
of Thirteen:
#
A
7sus
D # 7alt b
Species
A.7
b
C 7sus
E 7(# 9)
A ma7(#11)
11
Son
of
Thirteen:
Bar
194
C
ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
j
œ
Bar254
148 175
Bar
Fig. 11
Species A.6
Fig.
11
Fig. 3
B bma7(#11)
j
F ma7(#11)
E m7
Fig. 10
Fig. 11
Son
of Thirteen:
Fig.œ 17
Species
A.4
D ma7
Ex.  
1of01  
–  Species  
A.5  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  
Bar  194:  A  descending  FD7alt
b  major  
Bar
A ma7(#11)
Species
A.8
D # 7alt
Son211
Thirteen:
14
Son
Thirteen:
Barof150
8
Bar 206 20
pentatonic  
run  from  Fig.
the  11ma3  of  Gbma7#11  through  
ma2,  ma7,  ma6,  P5,  ma3  
Fig. 5
Species A.7
Fig. 11 E b 7(# 9)
Fig. 5 A bma7(#11)
Fig.
11
C ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
Fig.
11
b
scale  
d
egrees  
t
o  
a
n  
e
nclosure  
t
o  
t
he  
r
oot  
(
fig.  
1
1),  
t
o  a  descending  m3  interval  
G ma7(#11)
Species A.5
Bar 254 17
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 194 11
j
from  ma2  to  ma7.  
œ
Fig. 10
Fig. 11
Fig. 17
Fig. 11
A ma7(#11)
Species A.8
Species A.6
B bma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen: j
F ma7(#11)
E m7
Son of Thirteen: œ
Bar 206 20
Bar 211

bœ bœ œ bœ
j ‰
œ b#œœ .œb œ# œ bœœ
œ œ # œ b œœ n œ# œ ‰ Ón œ
œ

b
œ
#
œ
œ
b
œ
#
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ ‰
& œÓ œ œ œ‰
J
J
œ œ œ
&
J
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ
œ œ
œ œ #œ œ #œ œ nœ œ œ
œ œ
œ œ #œ #œ

& œ #œ #œ
J # œ œ œ œ# œ œ # œœ # œ # œ œj.
œ
Ó
Œ


#
œ
&
œ # œ # œ ‰ œÓ.
&
œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ œ
& œ œ œ b bœ œ bœ bœ
œ œ b œ œ œJ ‰
j
œ
bœ bœ
‰ œ œ œ bœ nœ ‰ Ó

bœ bœ

14

Œ

Œ

œ

 

n

 

Œ

œ ˙ #~~œ # œ
œ # œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ ##œœ œ# œn œ œ œ œ jœ ‰
œ œ #œ œ
&
#œ #œ œ œ œ. nœ
bœ Œ
&Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Fig. 5
 
Species A.7
E b 7(# 9)
A bma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen: C ma7(#11)
Ex.  
02  17–  Species  A.6  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  211:  An  ascending  ma3  interval  from  
Bar 1
254
Fig. 11

œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
&œ œ

œ #œ #œ
œ œ œ œ
œ

œ œ b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ

the  P5  to  ma7  of  Bbma7#11,  to  a  Fig.
descending  
F  m
ajor  
Fig.
10 pentatonic  run  from  the  
11

Fig. 17
A ma7(#11)
Species A.8
Son oftThirteen:
ma3  
hrough  
m
a2,  ma7,  ma6,  P5  to  an  enclosure  to  the  ma7  of  Fma7#11  (fig.  11),  
Bar 206 20

&

œ #œ #œ

œ #œ

œ

œ

#œ #œ

œ # œ # œj ‰

œ.

to  a  descending  
Fig. 11 enclosure  chain  from  the  non-­‐diatonic  aug5  to  the  P5  of  Em7  
Fig. 11

(fig.  5),  to  a  G  major  arpeggio  through  chord  tones  P5,  m7  and  m3.  

œ œ œ
r
n
bœ œ bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
bœ bœ œ bœ
j
b
œ
Fig. 11
Fig.b 5œ b œ b œ b œ ‰ œ œj œ
œ bœ nœ ‰ Ó
A.3
Fig. 11
A 7sus
D # 7alt
C # 7sus
  Species
# œ n œ 141  
Son of Thirteen:
œ
œ
Species
A.6
b
.
B
ma7(#11)
#
œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
j
  Son
F ma7(#11) œ œ
E m7
5
#
œ
Bar of
148Thirteen:
#
œ
œ œ
œ
Ó

œ
œ
œ
œ Jœ œ
# œ œ œ œn œ œœ œ
&
œ œ
Bar 211
œ #œ J œ
œ
14
Fig. 11
Fig. 3 b œ Œ
&
G bma7(#11)

&b ‰

Species A.5
3
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 194 11

Species A.4
D # 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Species
A.7
Bar 150 8
C ma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 254 17

œ œb # # œ # œ Fig. 5
œ œ œ # œ A b#ma7(#11)
Œ ‰ œ J œ E 7(œ 9)
‰ Ó
œ œ.

œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œFig.œ5
&œ œ œ
œ œ b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ
Fig. 11
œ
G bma7(#11)
Species A.5
Fig. 10
Fig.
17
b œ b œ œ b œ Fig. 11
Son of Thirteen:
 
j ‰
A ma7(#11)
Species
11
b
œ
Bar 194A.8
Ó
b
œ

Ó
b
œ
œ
j
& œ #œ #œ

Son of Thirteen:
œ bœ nœ
œ œ
œ of  œThirteen:  
œ Bœar  b2œ 54:  
# œ A  #m
j
Ex.  
03  20–  Species  
AFig.
.7  11
–  S#on  
ajor  
scale  fragment  
Bar 1
206
#
œ
œ
œ
. ntœhe  
&
# œ # œ ‰ œfrom  
Species A.6
b
œ B ma7(#11)

F ma7(#11)
E m7
œ 11
œ œ œma2  
Son ofoThirteen:
Fig.
œ œ œascent  
ma6  
f  Cma7#11  
to  a  tertial  
ma3,  
1œ7),  œ to  œa  descending  
n œ (fig.  
Fig.
11 P5,  m#a7,  
œ
œ
œ œ
Bar 211
œ
œ
14

bœ Œ
&
D ma7

Fig. 11

F 7alt

B  minor-­‐based  pentatonic  run  from  the  b13  of  Eb7#9  through  altered  scale  

Fig. 11
Fig. 5
Species A.7
b7(# 9)
b
tones  
P4,  #9,  Cbma7(#11)
2,  a  non-­‐diatonic  mEa7,  
and  #11  (fig.  11),  to  Aama7(#11)
n  ascending  scale  
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 254 17

œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ
&
œ
œ
fragment  featuring  a  non-­‐diatonic  dim2  over  Abma7#11.  
Species A.8
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 206 20

&

Fig. 10

Fig. 11

Fig. 17

œ #œ #œ

A ma7(#11)

œ #œ

Fig. 11

œ

œ

#œ #œ

Fig. 11

œ # œ # œj ‰

œ.


 

Ex.  104  –  Species  A.8  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  206:  An  E  major  pentatonic  run  
descends  from  the  ma2  of  Ama7#11  through  ma7,  ma6  (fig.  11),  to  an  enclosure  
chain  accessing  the  P5  (fig.  5),  to  a  descending  B  major  pentatonic  run  from  the  
aug4  of  Ama7#11  through  ma6,  ma3,  ma2  (fig.  11),  ending  on  the  ma7.  
 
2

10.2  –  Pentatonic:  Species  B  

Pentatonic

Species B.1
Son of Thirteen: B m(ma7)
Bar 99 22

#œ #œ œ œ œ
Œ ‰ œ œ œ
#œ #œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ Ó
J

Fig. 13
Species B.2
E m7
B m7
Son of Thirteen: F ma7(#11)
Ex.  
105  
–  Species  B.1  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  99:  A  B  minor  pentatonic  
Bar 124
26

&

œ œ œ œ #œ
‰ J

œ

œ

œ #œ œ œ
œ œ

œ #œ Œ

Ó

 

b

Fig. 31
ascending/descending  
run  from  
the  root  Fig.
of  B11m(ma7)  through  m3,  P4,  P5,  ma6  to  
Fig. 13
F

Species C.1
Old Folks:
Bar 31 29

&b ‰

Species C.2
Old Folks:
Bar 43 31

A7

&b Ó

j

œ
J

œ œ œ

Fig. 11

œ œ
Œ ‰. R œ
D m7

!
j
œ

œ nœ bœ bœ œ
bœ œ nœ bœ

Fig. 7

œ œ œ œ
œ œbœ œ œ
œ

j œ.
œ

Ó

œ œ bœ œ
Ó
bœ œ œ œ œ

 
 

142  
2

Pentatonic

Species B.1

#œ #œ œ œ œ
Ó
Œ ‰ œ œ œ
#œ #œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ Ó
&
between  ma2  and  ma7  bJefore  ending  on  the  P5.  

an  
enclosure  
m3  to  ma2  (fig.  13),  to  rhythmically  repeated  m3  interval  
Son
of Thirteen: fBrom  
m(ma7)
Bar 99 22

Fig. 13

œ œ œ œ #œ
‰ J

Species B.2
Son of Thirteen: F ma7(#11)
Bar 124 26

&

œ

Fig. 13
F

j

œ
J

œ

E m7

Fig. 31

œ œ œ

œ #œ œ œ
œ œ
Fig. 11

B m7

œ #œ Œ

œ nœ bœ bœ œ
bœ œ nœ bœ

Ó

j œ.
œ

b

 

Species C.1
Old1Folks:
Ex.  
06  –  Species  B.2  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  124:  An  ascending/descending  G  
Bar 31 29

&b ‰

!

7
major  pentatonic-­‐based  
run  (root,  m3,  P4,  P5,  P4)  Fig.
begins  
from  the  ma7  of  
Fig. 11

œ œ œ

Ó

œ œF  Lœ bydian  
Old Folks: giving  ma7,  ma2,  ma3,  aug4,  ma3  
œ œ œ scale  tones  (fig.  13),  to  a  
Fma7#11  
œ œœ
Species C.2

A7

Œ ‰. R

&b Ó

Bar 43 31

2

D m7

j
œ

Pentatonic

œ œ œ bœ œ
Ó
bœ œ œ œ œ

chromatic  approach  tone  from  tFig.
he  d
im2  of  Fma7#11  to  
the  m3  of  Em7  (fig.  31),  
11
Fig. 7
Species B.1

#œ #œ œ œ œ
Œ ‰ œ œ œ
#œ #œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ Ó
J the  root,  m7,  root,  m7,  P5  (fig.  11).  
the  ma2  of  Em7  through  

Sonaof
to  
 dThirteen:
escending  
D  major  pentatonic  run  (P5,  ma3,  ma2,  root,  ma6,  P5,  ma3)  from  
B m(ma7)
Bar 99 22

Fig. 13

œ œ œ œ #œ
‰ J

Species B.2
  of Thirteen: F ma7(#11)
Son
Bar 124 26

œ
&
10.3  –  Pentatonic:  Species  C  
Fig. 13

Species C.1
Old Folks:
Bar 31 29

&b ‰

F

j

œ
J

œ

E m7

Fig. 31

œ œ œ

Fig. 11

œ #œ œ œ
œ œ
Fig. 11

B m7

œ #œ Œ

œ nœ bœ bœ œ
bœ œ nœ bœ
!

Fig. 7

œ œ œ œ
œ œbœ œ œ
œ

j œ.
œ

Ó

b
Ó

D m7
Species C.2
j
A7
œ
Old Folks:
Ex.  
1
07  

 
S
pecies  
C
.1  

 
O
ld  
F
olks:  
Bar  31:  A  descending  F  minor  pentatonic  run  
Bar 43 31

&b Ó

œ œ
Œ ‰. R œ

œ œ bœ œ
Ó
bœ œ œ œ œ

from  the  root  of  Fma  through  the  
Fig. m
117,  P5,  m3  interjected  
Fig. b
7 y  a  trill  between  P4  
and  dim5  before  continuing  its  pentatonic  descent  (fig.  11),  to  a  chromatic  
passing  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  from  P5  resolving  to  ma3  (fig.  7),  then  
raising  a  m6  interval  to  the  root.  

 

œ œ œ œ #œ
‰ J

œ

œ

Son of Thirteen: F ma7(#11)
Bar 124 26

&

Fig. 13
 
  Species C.1
Old Folks:
Bar 31 29

F

&b ‰

Species C.2
Old Folks:
Bar 43 31

A7

&b Ó

j

œ
J

Fig. 31

œ œ œ

œ #œ œ œ
œ œ
Fig. 11

œ #œ Œ

œ nœ bœ bœ œ
bœ œ nœ bœ
!

Fig. 7

Fig. 11

œ œ
Œ ‰. R œ
D m7

j
œ

œ œ œ œ
œ œbœ œ œ
œ

Fig. 11

Ó

j œ.
œ

b

143  

Ó

œ œ bœ œ
Ó
bœ œ œ œ œ
Fig. 7

Ex.  108  –  Species  C.2  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  43:  A  ma7  interval  from  the  m3  of  Dm7  to  
the  ma7,  begins  a  descending  D  minor  pentatonic  run  interjected  by  a  P4  to  dim5  
trill  before  continuing  its  descent  (fig.11),  to  a  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  
to  enclosure  from  P5  resolving  to  m3  (fig.  7),  before  a  scalar  ascent  to  P5.  
 
10.4  –  Pentatonic:  Patterns  of  Use  
Based  on  the  evidence  compiled  in  this  chapter,  we  can  observe  patterns  
for  frequency  of  use  and  unique  features  for  each  formulaic  species  of  pentatonic  
vocabulary.    We  will  work  through  them  from  Species  A  to  C.      
 
Species  A  
This  pentatonic  phrase  (Fig.  11)  is  a  descending  legato  run  that  is  applied  to  
various  harmonic  contexts  and  patterns  of  use,  observed  below:  
-­‐  A  descending  V  major  pentatonic  run,  applied  over  a  bVIIma7  chord:  A.1  
-­‐  A  descending  V  major-­‐based  pentatonic  run  with  an  added  #11  scale  tone,  over  
a  IVma7#11  chord:  A.7  
-­‐  A  descending  V  major  pentatonic  run  with  a  descending  enclosure  chain  
through  a  P5  passing  tone,  over  a  IVma7#11  chord:  A.8  
-­‐  A  descending  I  major  pentatonic  run  over  a  IVma7  chord:  A.2,  A.5,  A.6  

 

 
 

144  

-­‐  A  descending  I  major  pentatonic  run  over  a  V7  chord:  A.3  
-­‐  A  descending  IV  major  pentatonic  run  over  a  IVma7  chord,  with  a  #4  alteration:  
A.4  
 
Species  B  
This  ascending/descending  pentatonic  run  to  enclosure  (Fig.  13)  is  applied  to  
two  harmonic  contexts:  
-­‐  A  native  minor  pentatonic  run  over  a  m(ma7)  chord,  including  a  ma6  scale  
tone:  B.1  
-­‐  A  V  major  pentatonic  run  over  a  IVma7#11  chord,  followed  by  a  descending  
VIm  descending  pentatonic  run  over  a  IIm7  chord:  B.2  
 
Species  C  
This  descending  pentatonic  blues-­‐based  run  is  applied  to  two  harmonic  contexts:  
-­‐  A  descending  F  minor  pentatonic  run  beginning  from  the  root  of  Fma  and  
resolving  to  the  ma3  then  root:  C.1  
-­‐  A  descending  D  minor  pentatonic  run  beginning  from  the  ma2  of  Dm7  and  
resolving  to  the  m3  then  P5:  C.2  
 
10.5  –  Pentatonic:  Conclusions  
Metheny’s  application  of  pentatonic  vocabulary  shows  some  distinguishable  
patterns  of  use  while  imposed  over  various  tonalities  to  create  unique  scale  tone  

 
 

combinations.  Because  pentatonic  vocabulary  is  so  widespread  and  
recognizable,  it  creates  both  a  sense  of  style  familiarity  and  a  strong  melodic  
hook  for  the  creation  of  memorable  events  within  an  improvisation.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

145  

 
 

146  

Chapter  11  
Motivic  Formulas  
 
Motivic  formulas  are  those  that  repeat  in  similar  and  varied  interval  
structures  throughout  series  of  chord  changes.  There  are  three  archetypes  
Metheny  uses  in  his  improvisations:  
 
Species  A:  A  descending  pentatonic  phrase  (5-­‐3-­‐2-­‐R)  (Fig.  11)  
Species  B:  An  interval  structure  derived  from  the  harmonic  shell  (3-­‐7-­‐3-­‐R)  (Fig.  
30)  
Species  C:  Diatonically  shifting  P5  intervals  (Fig.  34)  
 
Each  formula’s  component  parts,  application,  and  relation  to  the  harmony  are  
defined  below;  within  their  definitions  are  observed  unique  features  and  
patterns  of  use.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

147  

Motivic

11.1  –  Motivic:  Species  A  
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 88

F ma7

b 4
&bb 4 Ó
b œ
&bb

6

&

bbb

œ

œ nœ

œ

œ

œ

D bma7

bb n œ # œ n œ
b
&
Fig. 11

œ

B b7

Œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

8

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

F m7

E bma7

œ œ œ

nœ #œ nœ œ.
œ nœ œ
œ œ
J

C7

4

Species A, B & C

œ

œ

œ nœ

œ

E b m7

œ

œ

Fig. 11

bœ nœ bœ
œ

Fig. 11

œ bœ nœ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

‰ bœ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

œ

nœ #œ #œ nœ

A b7

œ bœ

Œ

œ

œ

Fig. 11

œ œ œ
bœ nœ nœ bœ œ

D m7b5

G 7b9

Fig. 11

&

F ma7

F m7

œ œ œ #œ

7 in  Fig.
3088  begins  diatonically  
Fig. 30over  C7,  and  
(P5,  ma3,  ma2,  Fig.
root)  
bar  
E bma7

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

 

Fig. 23
B b7

j

Ex.  109  10–  Species  
b b b œ bAœ.1  œ –  Snolar:  
Œ ‰ œ Cœ  mœ ajor  
œ œBar  88:  A  descending  
œ pœentatonic  
œ Ó motive  
œœœ

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 149

œ

D m7b5

Fig. 30

G 7b9

ascends/descends  
the  
œ chord  œ
œ structure  
œ throughout  
œ
b b œ with  abn  œ identical  œ interval  

& b œ œ œ bœ

14

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

30
changes  in  rhythmic  
roupings  
of  30
either  
three  
(fig.11).  
n  bar  89  Fig. 30
Fig. 30 gFig.
Fig.
Fig.two  
30 or  Fig.
Fig. 30
30 beats  
Fig. I30

œ ma7,  ma6  and  n
œ tones  ma3,  
over  Fma7,  a  bD  major  
œ pentatonic  
œ structure  œ gives  scale  
& b b œ œ œj n œ œ œ œj œ n œ œ # œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œJ ‰ Œ n n
18

G m7

C m7

a  non-­‐diatonic  dim2  on  Fig.
an  30
offbeat  Fig.
passing  
tone.    In  bar  90  an  E  major  pentatonic  
30
Fig. 30
Fig. 30
Species B.2
B ma7(#11)
F #7
F # m7
F #7sus
Snova: Bar 74acts  as  a  chromatic  passing  phrase  reaching  F  major  pentatonic  in  bar  
structure  

Œ œ bœ œ bœ #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ œ bœ œ
Œ Ó
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
#
œ
#
œ
n
œ
œ
91  giving  scale  tones  P5,  ma2  and  a  non-­‐diatonic  ma3  on  an  offbeat  passing  tone  
21

Fig. 7

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

over  Fm7.  In  the  second  half  of  bar  92  an  E  major  pentatonic  structure  gives  b9,  
m7,  b13,  #11  altered  dominant  scale  tones  over  Bb7.  An  Eb  minor  interval  
structure  is  adjusted  to  P5,  m3,  ma2,  root  in  over  Ebm7  in  bar  93-­‐94.  In  bar  96  a  
Db  major  pentatonic  structure  gives  altered  dominant  scale  tones  before  an  

b 4
&bb 4 Ó

 
 

b œ
&bb

F m7

4

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

œ nœ

œ

B b7

Œ

Fig. 11

b

œ œ œ

nœ #œ nœ œ.
œ nœ œ
œ œ
J

Solar: Bar 88

œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

œ

œ nœ

œ

nœ #œ #œ nœ

œ bœ nœ

148  

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

E b m7

A b7

ma7
enclosure  6 from  bEœ13  
tœo  P5  
œ a‰  descending  
œ b œ fragment  
b œ œ altered  dominant  
œ (fig.1)  before  
œ

b
&bb

œ

through  P5,  mFig.
a3,  11
#9,  b9  (fig.23).  
D bma7

bb n œ # œ n œ
b
&

 

8

11.2  –  Motivic:  Fig.
Species  
B  
11

Fig. 11

bœ nœ bœ
œ

Fig. 11

Œ

œ

Fig. 11

œ œ œ
bœ nœ nœ bœ œ

D m7b5

G 7b9

Fig. 11

Fig. 23
B b7

j œ
b

& b b œ bœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ Ó

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 149
10

œ

F ma7

F m7

Fig. 7

E bma7

Fig. 30

E b m7

A b7

Fig. 30
D bma7

œ œ œ nœ

Fig. 30

D m7b5

G 7b9

b œ

œ
œ
& b b œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

14

Fig. 30

bb

C m7

& b œ

18

Species B.2
Snova: Bar 74

F #7sus

œ

Fig. 30

œ œj n œ œ

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ
F #7

Fig. 30

œ œj œ n œ
Fig. 30

œ

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ

G m7

œ #œ œ

F # m7

Fig. 30

œ œ nœ
Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ

Fig. 30

œ œ œ ‰ Œ
J

nnn

B ma7(#11)

Ex.  110  21–  Species  

Ó B.1  
Œ –  Solar:  Bar  1# œ49:  A  descending  
b œpassing  tone  fragment  
Œ Óto  

&

œ bœ œ bœ #œ

œ œ nœ

œ #œ œ

œ nœ #œ œ œ œ #œ

Fig.
30 7),  to  
enclosure  from  the  P5  
to  7 ma3  Fig.
of  F30ma7  Fig.
(fig.  
a  m
nterval  structure  
Fig.
30 otivic  
Fig.i30

(ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root)  that  adapts  to  the  voice  leading  of  the  chord  changes  (fig.  
30).  In  bar  151  the  structure  consists  of  m3-­‐m7-­‐m3-­‐ma7,  in  bar  152  the  
structure  consists  of  ma3-­‐m7-­‐ma3-­‐root  of  Eb7  being  the  tritone-­‐substitute  of  
Bb7,  resolving  to  the  ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root  structure  of  Ebma7  in  bar  153.  A  m3-­‐
m7-­‐m3-­‐root  structure  anticipates  Ebm7  in  bar  153  before  another  D7  ma3-­‐m7-­‐
ma3-­‐root  tritone  substition  structure  resolves  to  a  ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root  structure  
anticipating  Dbma7  on  bar  154.  A  root-­‐P5-­‐root-­‐b13  structure  in  bar  156  over  
G7b9  resolves  to  an  Eb  root-­‐ma3-­‐root-­‐ma3  structure  beginning  on  the  last  
upbeat  of  bar  154  that  outlines  the  m3  and  P5  of  Cm7.  From  here  a  chromatic  

 

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

10

Fig. 23
B b7

j œ
b

& b b œ bœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ Ó

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 149

 
 

Fig. 11

F ma7

F m7

Fig. 7

Fig. 30

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

œ œ œ149  

Fig. 30

Fig. 30
D bma7

D m7b5

G 7b9

b œ

œ
œ
& b b œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
sequence  continues  wFig.
ith  30
Ema7  (root-­‐ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3),  Fma  (root-­‐ma3-­‐root-­‐ma3),  
Fig. 30
14

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

C m7
18
F#ma7  (root-­‐ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3),  
and  Gma  (root-­‐ma3-­‐root-­‐ma3),  aœscending  before  

œ
œ
b
œ
œ
& b b œ œ œj n œ œ œ œj œ n œ œ # œ œ œ œ n œ
reaching  the  P4  of  Gm7  in  bar  159.  
G m7

F #7sus

Species B.2
Snova: Bar 74
21

Fig. 30

F #7

Fig. 30

F # m7

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ œ œ ‰ Œ
J

nnn

B ma7(#11)

Œ œ bœ œ bœ #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ œ bœ œ
Œ Ó
œ
œ

nœ #œ œ œ #œ
Fig. 7

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

 

Ex.  111  –  Species  B.2  –  Snova:  Bar  74:  A  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  
fragment  to  enclosure  from  the  m3  of  F#7sus  to  the  root  (fig.  7),  beginning  a  
sequence  of  motivic  interval  structures  Dma7  (ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root),  C#ma7  
(ma3-­‐ma7-­‐ma3-­‐root),  C7  (ma3-­‐m7-­‐ma3-­‐root),  B7  (ma3-­‐m7-­‐ma3-­‐root)  in  bar  
2

Motivic

75-­‐76  (fig.  30),  before  reaching  the  ma3  of  Bma7#11  in  bar  77.  
Species B.3
A 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 177 24

&

œ #œnœœ#œ nœ

Fig. 26

œ

œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ #œ
J

D m(ma7)

B m(ma7)
#
œ
œ
œ
œ

29

#œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ
œ

#œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ œ
&

Fig. 30

œ

Fig. 30

#œ œ œ #œ
& œ œ #œ

33

œ

b

B ma7(#11)
œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ.
œ

b œœ ˙˙
J

G bma7(#11)
  Species C.1
Species  
j B.3  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  177:  A  descending  chromatic  passing  

œ.

bœ. bœ
œ.
bœ ˙
b
œ
œ œ b œ œJ b œ . b œ . b œ ˙ Ó
J

tone  fragment  
J of  A7alt  to  the  m3  of  JDm(ma7)  
& to  enclosure  chain  from  the  root  
Son of Thirteen: œ
Bar 107 38

Fig. 34

(fig.  26),  begins  a  motivic  interval  structure  (m3-­‐ma2-­‐m3-­‐root)  that  repeats  in  a  
three-­‐beat  rhythmic  pattern  through  bar  178-­‐181  (fig.30).  A  motivic  interval  

 

 
2
 

150  
Motivic

œ #œnœœ#œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

‰ ‰ #œ
#œ œ
œ #œ
œ œ
#œ œ J ‰
&

Species B.3
D m(ma7)
A 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 177 24 then  begins  with  (P5-­‐P5-­‐P5-­‐m3),  then  moves  diatonically  through  the  
structure  
Fig. 26

Fig.
30this  same  structure  step-­‐wise  or  intervallically  
B  melodic  minor  sBcale  
w
ith  
m(ma7)


œ
œ
œ



# œ3  of  Bm(ma7)  
#
œ
œ œ œ(fig.  œ #3œ0),  # bœ efore  
œ
œ
through  bar  182-­‐188  
a
 
m
elodic  
d
escent  
f
rom  
t
he  
m
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
#
œ
œœ
œ

#œ #œ œ #œ
&
29

30
in  bar  189  rFig.
eaching  
the  aug4  of  Bbma7#11  in  bar  190.  

œ

#œ œ œ #œ
œ
œ
&

33

 

11.3  –  Motivic:  Species  C  
Species C.1 G bma7(#11)
j
Son of Thirteen: œ
Bar 107 38

&

œ.

bœ ˙
J

Fig. 34

œ

b

B ma7(#11)
œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ.
œ

b œœ ˙˙
J

bœ. bœ

œ.

œ œ bœ
J

œ
bœ.
J bœ.
bœ ˙
J

Ó

Ex.  112  –  Species  C.1  –  Son  of  Thirteen:  Bar  107:  A  series  of  P5  intervals  
descending  diatonically  throughout  bar  107-­‐111  from  the  ma7  of  Gbma7#11,  
accessing  every  scale  tone  and  avoiding  the  dim5  interval  between  root  and  
aug4  (fig.  33).  
 
11.4  –  Motivic:  Conclusions  
Motivic  formulas  help  to  add  rhythmic  and  melodic  continuity  for  short  
periods  of  an  improvisation,  and  truly  create  unique  areas  of  interest  within  an  
improvisation.    Metheny  uses  them  to  great  effect,  lucidly  adapting  these  interval  
structures  through  a  piece’s  chord  changes,  allowing  for  great  continuity  in  the  
flow  of  the  melodic  line.  
 
 

 

 
 

151  

Chapter  12  
Reharmonization  Formulas  
 
Reharmonization  formulas  are  those  that  temporarily  infer  harmonic  
information  beyond  what  the  piece’s  basic  harmonic  structure  suggests.    Each  
formula’s  component  parts,  application,  and  relation  to  the  harmony  are  defined  
below;  within  their  definitions  are  observed  unique  features  and  patterns  of  use.  
 

Outside

12.1  –  Reharmonization:  Species  A   Species A, B & C

b 4 œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ
b
œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
& b 4

C m7

Species A.1
Solar: Bar 37

G m7

Fig. 31 Fig. 7

Fig. 31

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 61

C m7

Fig. 33

C7

Fig. 6

G m7

Fig. 26

C7

Ex.  113  5–  Species  
b n œAb.1  
œ –œ  Solar:  Bar  37:  Chromatic  
œ b œ œ approach  tones  embellish  the  

&bb

nœ nœ #œ

œœ
œ œ

nœ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
#œ Œ Ó
œ œ #œ

Fig. 27
root  and  P4  of  Fig.
a  C33
 minor  scale  run  over  Fig.
Cm7  
fig.  
a  descending  
25 (Fig.
2631),  before  

E b m7
A b7
D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
Species A.3
Solar:
Bar
190
chromatic  approach  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  from  the  dim5  to  m3  in  bar  38  
9

b bœ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ nœ nœ nœ
&bb ‰
#œ œ

j
œ ‰ Œ

Ó

(fig.  7),  to  a  descending  
run  (ma6,  m6,  P5,  ma3,  ma2,  
FIg. 15 Gb  major  pentatonic-­‐based  
Fig. 33

FIg. 2 FIg. 8
C m7
G m7
Species B.1
root,  
P5)  
which  as  the  tritone  substitute  (bV)  of  C7  gives  altered  dominant-­‐based  
Solar: Bar
133

b bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ Œ
&bb
œ
scale  tones  #9,  ma2,  b9,  m7,  b13,  #11  (fig.  33)  in  bar  38-­‐39,  before  a  diatonic  
12

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

Species C.1

Fig. 13

Fig. 13

Fig. 11

F ma7

b
nb
œ
‰ œ #œ
#
œ
#
œ
& b b #œ nœ
œ
#
œ
#
œ
n
œ
œ root  (fig.  6)  in  bar  39-­‐40,  continuing  on  with  an  
œ to  the  
ma3  and  b9  of  C7  resolving  
enclosure  
Solar: Bar 41 featuring  an  ascending  chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  between  the  
15

Fig. 28
Species C.2
G7
D 7b9
descending  
root.  
Old Folks: Bar 12chromatic  passing  tone  fragment  to  enclosure  chain  from  the  
3
17

&b Ó

3
Œ œ b œ œ b œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ b œ n œ œ # œ # œ œ Œ œ œœ n œœ
b b œœ b œ œ

Fig. 7

Fig. 27

Fig. 10

Fig. 9

Fig. 27

 

Outside
 
  Species A.1

Species A, B & C

152  

b 4 œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ
b
œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
& b 4

C m7

G m7

C7

Solar: Bar 37

Fig. 31 Fig. 7

Fig. 31

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 61

Fig. 33

C m7

Fig. 6

Fig. 26

G m7

C7

b nœ bœ œ nœ
nœ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
#œ Œ Ó
&bb
œ
œ œ #œ

5

Fig. 33
E b m7

A b7

Fig. 27

Fig. 25 Fig. 26

D bma7

œ An  dœ escending  
Ex.  114  9–  Species  
b Ab œ.2  –œ  Sœolar:  
b œ Bar  œ 61:  
b œ b œ n œ D  major  (II)  pentatonic-­‐based  
j
Species A.3
Solar: Bar 190

&bb ‰

nœ nœ #œ
œ

D m7b5

 

G 7b9

œ ‰ Œ

Ó

15 ma6,  P5,  ma3,  root)  
run  (ma2,  dim2,  rFIg.
oot,  
Fig. 33gives  C  minor  scale  degrees  ma3,  m3,  
FIg. 2 FIg. 8

Solar: Bar
133 ma6,  bdœim5  (œfig.  33)  in  bar  61,  to  an  ascending  C  Aeolian  run  that  leads  
ma2,  
m12a7,  
b
œ œ
œ
Species B.1

C m7

G m7

œ œ œ nœ
œ nœ œ œ Œ
Species A,
B & C passing  tone  fragment  
to  an  enclosure  from  a  dim2  to  a  descending  
chromatic  
&bb

bœ œ œ
œ bœ
Outside
nœ œ nœ œ

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

Fig. 13

Fig. 11

Fig. 13

Species A.1
from  
the  41root  to  a  descending  enclosure  
Solar: Bar
œ b œ chain  from  m7  to  aug5  (fig.  25  +  fig.  26)  
Solar: Bar 37

Species C.1

F ma7
C m7

bb 4
15
œ œ œ n œ œ# œ #œœ b œ b‰œ œ œœ b œ# œœ œ
œ #œœn œ œœœ b œœ n œ n n b
&
#
œ
& bb bb #4œ œ nn œœ œ œ
b
œ
bœ œ
nœ bœ
œ
in  bar  62-­‐63,  to  a  C  whole  tone  scale-­‐derived  descending  Cb  œaugmented  triad  to  
G m7

C7

Fig. 28
Fig. 31 Fig. 7
Fig. 33
Fig. 6 Fig. 26
Fig. 31
Species C.2
G
7
C
m7
G
m7
C7
D
7b9
Species A.2
Old Folks: Bar D
12  augmented  triad  giving  root,  ma2,  ma3,  aug4,  aug5,  m7  scale  
ascending  
3
3
Solar: Bar 61

b Ó n œ b œŒ œ nœœb œ œ b œ n œ b œ œb œœ œb œœn œœ œn œœ œ œ œ b œ n œ œ # œ œ Œ œŒ œ Ón œœ
b
b
&
nœ #œ œ œ
& b
b œ n œ œ # œ n œ # œ œ # œ #b œb œœ b œœ œ
œ in  bar  63-­‐64.  
œ
degrees  anticipating  C7  (fig.  27)  
175

Fig. 33
E b m7

A b7

Fig. 27

Fig.
Fig.1025 Fig. 26Fig. 9

D bma7

Fig. 27

b bœ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ nœ nœ nœ
&bb ‰
#œ œ

Species A.3
Solar: Bar 190
9

Fig. 7

Fig. 15

Fig. 2 Fig. 8

Fig. 27

D m7b5

G 7b9

j
œ ‰ Œ

Fig. 33

Ó

 


œ b œ Bœar  190:  An  expanded  
Ex.  115  12–  Species  
œ
œ b œ aœscending  
œ enclosure  from  
b b A.3  œ –  œSolar:  
Œ
C m7

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 133

G m7

& b

œ nœ œ nœ

œ

œ

nœ œ nœ œ
œ

2 Fig. 11
Fig. 13 D  m
Fig. 11
Fig.
13 (II)  pentatonic-­‐based  
the  ma3  to  P5  oFig.
f  Ab7  
(fig.  8),  to  a  descending  
ajor  
run  
Species C.1
Solar: Bar 41

F ma7

(dim2,  r15oot,  m
œ substitute  (bV)  oœf  a  
b b a6,  P5,  ma3,  root)  which  as  the  
‰ tritone  

& b #œ nœ

œ

œ #œ #œ

#œ nœ

#œ #œ

œ

nb
n

28 P5,  #11,  #9,  b9,  b7,  #11  altered  dominant  scale  tones  (fig.  
suspended  Ab7  Fig.
gives  
Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 12

œ oœf  œDnm7b5  
33)  in  b17ar  191,  before  resolving  
œ 3  
œ b œ œ to  tbhe  
œ3 b m
œ œ œin  bar  œ192.  
 
 
 
 

D 7b9

&b Ó

G7

Œ

bœ nœ

Fig. 7

Fig. 27

Fig. 10

b œ n œ # œ # œ œ Œ œ œœ n œœ
b b œœ b œ œ

Fig. 9

3

Fig. 27

Fig. 31 Fig. 7

Fig. 31

 
 

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 61

Fig. 33

C m7

Fig. 6

G m7

Fig. 26
C7

b nœ bœ œ nœ
nœ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
# œ Œ Ó 153  
&bb
#
œ
œ
œ
œ

5

Fig. 33
E b m7

Fig. 27

Fig. 25 Fig. 26

A b7

D bma7

b bœ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ nœ nœ nœ
9
&bb ‰
#œ œ
12.2  –  Reharmonization:  Species  B  
Species A.3
Solar: Bar 190

Fig. 15

D m7b5

Fig. 33

Fig. 2 Fig. 8

G 7b9

j
œ ‰ Œ

Ó

b bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ Œ
&bb
œ
C m7

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 133
12

G m7

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 41

Fig. 13

Fig. 11

Fig. 13

F ma7

nb
œ
Ex.  116  15–  Species  
from  
b b b B.1  –  Solar:  Bar  133:  #Aœ  descending  
‰ œ non-­‐diatonic  # eœ nclosure  
n
&

#œ nœ

œ

œ #œ

#œ nœ

 

œ

Fig.to  
28the  P4  (fig.  2),  begins  a  descending  Db  major  pentatonic  run  
the  dim5  of  Cm7  
Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 12

Outside

Bœ7,  
&mC6  C  mœinor  scale  tones  to  an  
œ A,
(ma3,  m17a2,  rboot,  
mb œ3,  œdim2,  
œ b œgiving  
b œSpecies
œ b œ nPœ 4,  
œ n œm
œ bœ nœ
Ó ma6,  
Œ P5)  
Œ
œ nœ

&

G7

D 7b9

#œ #œ œ

3

b b œœœ b œœ œœ
3

b 4 œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ
b
œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
& b 4

C m7
G m7
C7
Species A.1
Fig. 10 an  ascending/descending  
enclosure  
5  
(
fig.  
1
1),  
b
eginning  
C  m
Fig.
27
Fig.
9
Fig.
27 ajor  
Solar: Bar 37 from  m6  to  P
Fig. 7

pentatonic  run  (P5,  ma6,  root,  
ma6)  giving  Fig.
P5,  33ma6,  root,  ma6  
C  minor  scale  
Fig. 31 Fig. 7
Fig. 6

Fig. 31
Fig. 26
C m7
G m7
C7
Species A.2
tones  
(fig.13)  
in  bar  134,  back  to  a  Db  major  ascending/descending  pentatonic  
Solar: Bar
61

b nœ bœ œ nœ
nœ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
&bb
#œ #œ Œ Ó
œ
œ
œ
run  (root,  ma2,  
root,  ma6)  giving  dim2,  m3,  dim2,  m7  C  m
inor  scale  degrees  (fig.  
Fig. 33
Fig. 27
5

Fig. 25 Fig. 26
E b m7
A b7
D bma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
Species A.3
13),  
efore  
Solar: b
Bar
190 returning  to  a  descending  C  major  pentatonic  run  over  C7  in  bar  135  

b bœ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ nœ nœ nœ
&bb ‰
#œ œ
(fig.  11).  
9

Fig. 15

Fig. 2 Fig. 8

Fig. 33

j
œ ‰ Œ

Ó

b bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
12
œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ Œ
&bb
œ
12.3  –  Reharmonization:  Species  C  
C m7

B.1
 Species
Solar: Bar 133

Fig. 2

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 41
15

G m7

Fig. 11

F ma7

b
& b b #œ nœ
Fig. 28

Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 12

Fig. 13

œ

œ #œ #œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 13

œ #œ

œ
œ
#œ #œ

nb
n

3
œ œ œ nœ œ œ
Ex.  117  17–  Species  C.1  –  Sœolar:  
b œ œ Bar  41:  
b œ3 Db œescending/ascending  
œ augmented  triads  

D 7b9

&b Ó

Œ

G7

bœ nœ

b œ n œ # œ # œ œ Œ œ œœ n œœ
b b œœ b œ œ

give  (m3,  ma7,  P5)  (ma6,  
dim2,  Fig.
P4)  
(dim2,  
P4,  ma6)  scale  
tones  
Fig.m
103,  ma7)  
27 (P5,  
Fig.
9
Fig. 27
Fig. 7
derived  from  the  whole  tone  scale.  

 

b bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ Œ
&bb
œ
C m7

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 133
12

 
  Species C.1

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

b
& b b #œ nœ
Fig. 28

Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 12
17

Fig. 13

F ma7

Solar: Bar 41
15

G m7

D 7b9

&b Ó

œ

œ #œ #œ

Fig. 13

œ #œ

154  

Fig. 11

œ
œ
#œ #œ

nb
n

3
3
Œ œ b œ œ b œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ b œ n œ œ # œ # œ œ Œ œ œœ n œœ
b b œœ b œ œ

G7

Fig. 7

Fig. 27

Fig. 10

Fig. 9

Fig. 27

 

Ex.  118  –  Species  C.2  –  Old  Folks:  Bar  12:  A  descending  chromatic  passing  tone  
from  the  root  of  D7b9  to  the  ma3  of  G7  (fig.  7),  to  a  G  whole  tone  scale  fragment  
(ma3,  aug4  aug5,  m7)  over  G7  (fig.  27),  to  a  descending  ma2  interval  to  
enclosure  from  the  m7  to  P5  (fig.  10),  to  a  G  major  root  position  triad  
arpeggiation  featuring  non-­‐diatonic  enclosures  beginning  on  the  P4  though  the  
ma3,  P5,  R  (fig.9),  to  ascending  augmented  triads  (ma3,  aug5,  root)  (aug4,  m7,  
ma2)  (aug5,  root,  ma3)  (fig.  27).  
 
12.4  –  Reharmonization:  Conclusions  
Reharmonization  formulas  act  to  create  melodic  interest  beyond  diatonic,  
typical  altered  dominant  or  simple  reharmonization  vocabulary.    These  
Reharmonization  phrases  stand  out  in  an  improvisation  as  they  break  away  from  
the  piece’s  basic  harmonic  structure,  and  create  unique  events  that  break  up  a  
sense  of  predictability  in  the  melodic  line.  
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

155  

Chapter  13  
Analysis:  Metheny’s  “Son  of  Thirteen”  Improvisation  
 
Having  concluded  our  comprehensive  examination  of  Metheny’s  
formulaic  system,  we  will  observe  how  this  formulaic  system  functions  within  
the  larger  context  of  an  improvisation,  on  Metheny’s  original  composition  “Son  
of  Thirteen.”    For  this  analysis  of  Metheny’s  improvisation  on  “Son  of  Thirteen,”  
we  will  refer  to  page  175  of  Appendix  A.    Referring  to  formulaic,  melodic,  
structural,  and  motivic  categorizations,  I  will  demonstrate  the  extent  to  which  
Metheny’s  use  of  these  concepts  establishes  overall  coherence.    Beginning  with  
Section  A1  of  the  improvisation,  “Son  of  Thirteen”  begins  with  a  B  melodic  minor  
phrase  over  Dm(ma7)  through  bar  88-­‐92,  in  anticipation  of  the  Bm(ma7)  
harmony  in  bar  93.    A  blues  phrase  with  a  dim5  grace  note  typical  of  the  blues  
vernacular,  bridges  the  first  phrase  to  a  descending  P5  interval  between  
Bm(ma7)’s  P5  and  root.    The  Melodic  Cliché  Species  B.3  formula  follows  in  bar  
94-­‐95,  to  the  Pentatonic  Species  B.1  formula  in  bar  95-­‐96,  establishing  the  first  
motivic  connection,  as  these  two  phrases  are  identical  in  ascending/descending  
contour.    The  next  phrase  in  bar  97-­‐98  contains  a  repeating  dotted-­‐quarter  note  
figure,  which  is  an  elaboration  on  the  two-­‐beat  figure  phrase  from  bar  88-­‐89,  
establishing  a  second  motivic  connection.    This  phrase  ends  with  a  descending  
P5  interval  between  ma2  and  P5,  recalling  the  descending  P5  interval  in  bar  93,  
for  a  third  motivic  connection.    The  Enclosure  Species  A  &  C  formula  in  bar  99-­‐

 
 

156  

100  resolves  to  the  Enclosure  Species  G.1  formula  over  Bbma7#11  in  bar  101  
which,  like  the  phrase  on  bar  99-­‐100,  ends  with  a  descending  phrase  using  a  
fig.10  enclosure  component,  for  a  fourth  motivic  connection.    A  descending  
tertial  phrase  of  an  F  major  root  position  triad  in  bar  102  over  Fma7#11  leads  to  
an  ascending  tertial  phrase  of  a  C  minor  root  position  triad  over  Abma7#11,  for  a  
fifth  motivic  connection.    Another  descending  P5  interval  between  the  aug4  and  
ma7  of  Ebma7#11  in  bar  104  continues  the  P5  motivic  theme,  for  a  sixth  motivic  
connection.    An  ascending  ma7#11  tertial  phrase  begins  from  root  position  in  
bar  105-­‐106,  continuing  the  tertial  motive  from  bar  103  with  the  same  off-­‐beat  
rhythmic  placement.  The  Motivic  Species  C.1  formula  in  bar  107-­‐11  completes  
the  P5  interval  motive  with  descending  P5’s  in  three-­‐beat  figures,  for  a  seventh  
motivic  connection.    The  Cliché  Species  B.4  formula  in  bar  111-­‐112  leads  to  an  
ascending  pentatonic-­‐based  phrase  in  bar  113-­‐114  over  Ama7#11,  which  leads  
to  melodic  phrasing  through  bar  114-­‐119.    The  descending  Enclosure  Species  G  
&  D  formula  in  bar    120  resolves  to  a  melodic  phrase  with  a  
ascending/descending  contour  in  bar  121-­‐122  over  Cma7#11  and  Gma7#11,  
becoming  a  motive.  The  Cliché  Species  C.2  formula  in  bar  122-­‐124  over  
Bbma7#11  has  an  identical  contour  to  the  motivic  phrase  in  bar  121-­‐122,  as  
does  the  Pentatonic  Species  B.2  formula  in  bar  124,  and  the  following  pentatonic  
phrase  in  bar  125-­‐126,  to  complete  the  motivic  ascending/descending  contour  
sequence  for  an  eighth  motivic  connection.    A  tertial  ascent  outlining  F#m9  in  
bar  127-­‐130  with  off-­‐beat  rhythmic  placements,  leads  to  a  step-­‐wise  melodic  

 
 

157  

phrase  in  bar  130-­‐133.  The  descending  Cliché  Species  B.3  formula  in  bar  134  
resolves  to  the  beginning  of  section  B.  
An  extended  period  of  motivic  phrasing  in  D  major  through  bar  135-­‐145  
begins  Section  B.  Three  phrases  throughout  bar  135-­‐142  end  with  motivic  
descending  intervals  (a  ma3  in  mm135-­‐136,  ma2  in  bar  137-­‐138,  and  P5  in  bar  
138-­‐142)  and  each  phrase  is  followed  by  a  brief  rhythmic  pause,  drawing  a  ninth  
motivic  connection.    A  four-­‐note  step-­‐wise  descending  phrase  in  bar  143-­‐144  is  
followed  by  another  four-­‐note  step-­‐wise  descending  phrase  at  a  lower  pitch  level  
in  bar  145-­‐146,  for  a  tenth  motivic  connection.    In  bar  148-­‐149,  the  Enclosure  
Species  G.2  formula  begins  with  a  sustained  note  to  a  descending  run  to  
enclosure,  and  this  continues  as  a  motive  within  the  Pentatonic  Species  A.3  
formula  in  bar  149  and  the  Pentatonic  Species  A.4  formula  in  bar  150-­‐151,  for  an  
eleventh  motivic  connection.    It  is  also  noteworthy  that  a  tertial  descent  follows  
the  motivic  phrase  in  bar  149,  whereas  a  quartal  ascent  follows  the  motivic  
phrase  in  bar  150.    The  Chromatic  Passing  Tone  Species  B.2  formula  in  bar  152  
leads  to  the  Enclosure  Species  E  &  D.2  formula  in  bar  153-­‐156,  ending  with  a  
cadential  chord  structure.  
Section  A2  begins  with  melodic  notes  followed  by  Dm(ma7)  chord  
structures  in  both  bar    157  and  bar  159,  and  a  step-­‐wise  quarter-­‐note  triplet  
melodic  phrases  in  both  bar  158  and  bar  160  for  a  twelfth  motivic  sequence.    
Continuous  descending/ascending  phrases  in  bar  160  and  bar  161  follow  the  
same  contour  at  different  pitch  levels  for  a  thirteenth  motivic  event.  A  blues  

 
 

158  

phrase  in  bar  163-­‐164  leads  to  a  melodic  phrase  that  ascends  step-­‐wise  through  
a  sequence  of  chord  changes  in  bar  165-­‐167.  A  four-­‐note  step-­‐wise  descending  
phrase  in  bar  168  begins  a  new  motive,  as  the  contour  of  this  phrase  is  mirrored  
in  bar  169-­‐170,  in  the  first  five  notes  of  Chromatic  Passing  Tone  Species  B.3  
formula  in  bar  171,  in  the  melodic  phrase  in  bar  173-­‐174,  and  in  the  first  five  
notes  of  the  Cadence  Species  C.6  formula  in  bar  174-­‐175  for  a  fourteenth  set  of  
motivic  connections,  and  completes  the  first  chorus  of  the  improvisation.  
The  Motivic  Species  B.3  formula  begins  Section  A1  as  a  three-­‐beat  figure  
through  bar  176-­‐180  over  Dm(ma7),  then  moves  step-­‐wise  and  intervallically  
through  Bm(ma7)  in  bar  181-­‐187  for  a  fifteenth  motivic  event.    Two  pairs  of  
arpeggiated  chord  structures  and  rhythmic  figures  occur  through  a  series  of  
chord  changes  in  bar  189-­‐192  for  a  sixteenth  motivic  event.  The  Pentatonic  
Species  A.5  formula  in  bar  194-­‐196  leads  to  the  Chromatic  Passing  Tone  B.4  
formula  in  bar  196-­‐198  followed  by  a  descending  melodic  phrase.    An  ascending  
phrase  in  bar  200-­‐201  leads  to  a  motivic  three-­‐note  three-­‐beat  figure  in  bar  202-­‐
204,  for  a  seventeenth  motivic  event.    The  Pentatonic  Species  A.8  formula  then  
descends  in  bar  205-­‐207,  followed  by  the  ascending  Chromatic  Passing  Tone  
Species  B.5  in  bar  208-­‐210.    In  bar  211-­‐212,  the  Pentatonic  Species  A.6  formula  
holds  a  descending  run  to  enclosure  that  acts  as  a  repeated  motive  in  bar  213,  
and  again  in  the  descending  Chromatic  Passing  Tone  Species  C.3  formula  in  bar  
214-­‐215  (with  a  passing  tone  in  place  of  the  enclosure),  for  an  eighteenth  
motivic  connection.    A  pentatonic-­‐based  ascending  phrase  follows  with  a  dotted-­‐

 
 

159  

quarter  note  rhythmic  motive  in  bar  215-­‐218,  and  a  melodic  and  blues-­‐based  
phrase  in  bar  219-­‐221  completes  Section  A.    
Section  B  begins  with  a  period  of  motivic  phrasing  through  bar  223-­‐234,  
where  a  sustained  note  followed  by  a  descending  m3  interval  in  bar  224  informs  
the  sustained  note  and  descending  m3  interval  in  bar  125-­‐126,  and  a  dotted  
quarter  note  rhythmic  motive  in  bar  227  informs  ascending  chord  structures  in  
bar  228  and  bar  229  for  a  nineteenth  motivic  passage.    In  bar  231-­‐234  phrases  of  
identical  contour  occur,  for  a  twentieth  motivic  event.    A  gradually  ascending  
melody  with  accompanying  chord  structures  occur  with  repeated  rhythmic  
figures  in  bar  235-­‐240,  to  an  ascending/descending  step-­‐wise  phrase  ascending  
in  bar  241-­‐242,  for  a  twenty-­‐first  motivic  event.      
Section  A2  begins  with  a  blues  phrase  in  bar  244-­‐245,  leading  to  a  
motivically  rhythmic  phrase  through  bar  246-­‐249  where  the  rhythmic  
placement  of  notes  plays  off  an  alternating  mix  of  on-­‐beats  and  off-­‐beats,  for  a  
twenty-­‐second  motivic  event.    The  Enclosure  Species  F  &  D  formula  follows  in  
bar  250-­‐252,  leading  to  a  pair  of  motivic  eighth-­‐note  phrases  through  a  series  of  
chord  changes  in  bar  253-­‐256.    The  Cadence  Species  B.7  formula  over  C#7alt  in  
bar  253  descends  to  an  enclosure  in  the  same  manner  as  the  Pentatonic  Species  
A.7  formula  over  Eb7#9  in  bar  255,  and  the  ascending  step-­‐wise  phrase  over  
Cma7#11  in  bar  254  holds  an  identical  interval  structure  to  the  first  five  notes  of  
the  phrase  in  in  bar  256,  for  a  twenty-­‐third  motivic  event.    In  bar  257-­‐262,  a  
rhythmic  motive  is  used  as  chord  tones  are  selected  over  a  series  of  chord  

 
 

160  

changes,  for  a  twenty-­‐fourth  motivic  event.    Cadential  chord  structures  through  
bar  263-­‐264  signal  the  end  of  the  improvisation,  leading  to  the  chordal  comping  
that  supports  the  drum  solo.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

161  

Chapter  14  
Summary  and  Conclusions  
 

 
Pat  Metheny’s  formulaic  system,  with  its  unique  three-­‐tier  approach  

dividing  formulaic  information  into  a  connected  system  of  categories,  species,  
and  components,  has  revealed  insight  into  his  improvisational  forming  process,  
while  demonstrating  the  practical  application  of  formulaic  concepts.    Having  
documented  Metheny’s  elements  of  style,  formulaic  components,  categories  and  
species,  and  an  analysis  of  Metheny’s  improvisation  on  “Son  of  Thirteen,”  it  is  
clear  that  Metheny’s  improvisational  style  establishes  coherence  through  
formulaic,  melodic,  structural,  and  motivic  concepts,  possessing  the  proficiency  
to  exhibit  sound  development  through  continuity  of  thought  and  spontaneous  
variation.    In  an  even  more  global  sense,  sound  development  through  the  
formulaic,  melodic,  structural,  and  motivic  concepts  observed  within  Metheny’s  
improvisation  on  “Son  of  Thirteen”,  can  be  attributed  to  four  key  areas:  style  
familiarity,  balance,  structure  and  connectivity.  
 

Metheny’s  highly  idiosyncratic  formulaic  system  establishes  both  the  

framework  for  his  improvisational  style,  as  well  as  a  system  of  identifiable  
components  that  represent  a  nuanced  style  familiarity.    Each  of  Metheny’s  
formulaic  components  adds  a  layer  of  complexity  through  the  application  of  
idiosyncratic  interval  structures,  beyond  that  which  can  be  considered  typical  or  
derivative  of  mainstream  jazz  vernacular.    While  genre  style  familiarity  is  

 
 

162  

established  insofar  as  this  formulaic  system  stems  from  mainstream  jazz  
concepts,  Metheny’s  use  of  a  highly  stylized  system  of  components  establishes  
an  artistic  style  familiarity  that  is  uniquely  particular  to  him  as  an  improviser.    
Style  familiarity  also  is  tied  to  what  a  listener  subconsciously  expects  to  hear  
and  how  the  artist  reinforces  or  defies  this,  through  both  risk  and  repetition.    
With  an  overly  formulaic  approach  there  is  the  danger  of  predictability,  of  not  
fulfilling  the  listener’s  desire  for  spontaneous  or  connected  ideas,  while  
spontaneous  creation  accompanies  the  risk  of  loss  of  control.    As  creativity  in  
jazz  improvisation  is  a  balance  of  both  spontaneous  invention  and  reference  to  
the  familiar,  Metheny’s  creative  process  can  be  valued  for  its  nuanced  approach  
to  style  familiarity  through  a  contrast  of  both  formulaic  depth  and  inventive  
spontaneity.  
 

This  leads  us  to  Metheny’s  next  area  of  improvisational  strength:  balance.    

Metheny  has  appropriated  a  diverse  collection  of  stylistic  elements  to  comprise  
his  approach  to  improvisation.    With  regard  to  Metheny’s  formulaic  system,  his  
formulaic  categories  are  well  rounded,  with  no  more  than  a  handful  of  distinct  
formulaic  species.    While  the  number  of  formulaic  species  within  these  
categories  is  not  exhaustive,  there  is  often  a  more  comprehensive  collection  of  
variants  for  each  species.    It  is  clear  that  Metheny  prefers  to  focus  on  a  tangible  
number  of  formulaic  species  that  he  has  great  facility  and  control  with,  so  that  
they  may  be  used  in  an  adaptive  and  generative  manner,  allowing  greater  
opportunity  for  continuity  of  thought  through  spontaneous  invention.    Beyond  a  

 
 

163  

practical  consideration  for  balance  in  Metheny’s  formulaic  system,  is  the  balance  
between  Metheny’s  formulaic,  motivic,  melodic,  and  structural  elements  of  style,  
as  these  devices  are  also  offered  with  a  consistent  regard  for  balance.  
 

Within  this  balance  of  stylistic  elements  there  is  an  observable  structure  

to  the  prolongation  and  segmentation  of  concise  musical  phrases  and  devices.    
Metheny’s  improvised  phrase  lengths  often  mirror  the  piece’s  harmonic  phrase  
lengths,  or  subdivide  them  into  logical  segments.    Within  Metheny’s  
improvisation  on  “Son  of  Thirteen,”  harmonic  phrase  lengths  typically  follow  
structural  patterns  of  eight,  four,  and  two-­‐bar  phrase  lengths.    Connecting  
melodic  phrases  typically  follow  a  structural  pattern,  beginning  around  the  
fourth  or  eighth  bar  in  a  harmonic  phrase  length,  to  initiate  a  new  idea  on  the  
first  or  second  bar  of  the  following  harmonic  phrase.    As  such,  Metheny’s  
improvised  melodic  phrases  are  observed  to  be  cohesive  to  harmonic  phrase  
lengths,  acting  to  mark  the  structure  and  character  of  the  piece  upon  which  they  
are  performed.    The  segmentation  of  melodic  devices  is  also  evident  within  the  
content  of  these  harmonic  phrases.    A  combination  of  formulaic  and  motivic  
melodic  content  may  mark  one  harmonic  phrase  length,  while  a  mixture  of  
melodic  and  structural  melodic  content  may  mark  another  harmonic  phrase  
length.    For  example,  in  each  chorus  of  “Son  of  Thirteen”,  Metheny  clearly  
performs  the  first  twelve  bars  of  the  ‘B  Section’  in  a  distinctly  melodic  fashion  
over  the  diatonic  harmonic  phrase  length,  marking  the  harmonic  rhythm’s  break  

 
 

164  

from  shifting  modal  key  centers  to  a  temporarily  functional  harmonic  sequence  
in  D  Major,  in  a  clear  demonstration  of  structured  diatonic  melodicism.    
 

Overall,  none  of  these  attributes  of  Metheny’s  improvisational  style  

would  truly  communicate  to  such  a  degree  without  their  connectivity.    Through  
formulaic,  motivic,  structural,  melodic  devices  and  a  regard  for  style  familiarity,  
balance  and  structure,  Metheny’s  improvisational  style  demonstrates  its  
connectivity  through  melodic  ideas  that  are  sound  in  their  development  and  
inventive  their  spontaneity.    The  appropriation  of  these  elements  into  a  manner  
that  is  effectively  familiar,  balanced,  structured,  and  connected  can  not  be  
attributed  to  simply  one  principal;  however  a  life-­‐long  respect  and  appreciation  
for  music,  a  level  of  prudence,  open-­‐mindedness,  and  self-­‐governance  are  
certainly  characteristics  that  have  become  clear  through  research  of  Metheny’s  
process  of  forming  and  the  investigation  of  his  music.    From  the  smallest  
components  to  the  broadest  overview  of  Metheny’s  three-­‐tier  formulaic  system  
and  improvisational  elements  of  style,  there  is  a  high  order  of  detail,  
thoughtfulness  and  resonant  individuality  that  enables  within  the  music  a  great  
capacity  for  communication  between  performer  and  listener.  
   
 
 
 

 
 

165  

References  
 
 
Books:  
Berliner,  Paul.    1994.    Thinking  in  Jazz:  The  Infinite  Art  of  Improvisation.    Chicago:  
University  of  Chicago  Press.    
 
Hodier,  Andre.    1956.    Jazz:  Its  Evolution  and  Essence.    New  York:  Grove  Press.  
Kernfeld,  Barry.    1995.    What  to  Listen  for  in  Jazz.    New  Haven:  Yale  University  
Press.  
Lerdahl,  Fred  &  Jackendoff,  Ray.    1983.    A  Generative  Theory  of  Tonal  Music.  
Boston:  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology.  
 
Martin,  Henry.    1996.    Charlie  Parker  and  Thematic  Improvisation.    Lanham,  
Maryland:    The  Scarecrow  Press.    
 
Meyer,  Leonard  B.    1956.    Emotion  and  Meaning  in  Music.    Chicago:  University  of  
Chicago  Press.  
Russell,  George.    2001.    Lydian  Chromatic  Concept  of  Tonal  Organization,  Volume  
One:  The  Art  and  Science  of  Tonal  Gravity:  Fourth  Edition.    Brookline,  
Massachusetts:  Concept  Publishing  Company.
Articles:  
Brownell,  John.    1994.    “Analytical  Models  of  Jazz  Improvisation,”  Jazzforschung,  
xxvi:  9-­‐29.    Graz,  Austria:  Akademische  Druck-­‐  u.    Verlagsanstalt.    
 
Cook,  Nicholas.    1989.    “Schenker’s  Theory  of  Music  as  Ethics,”  Journal  of  
Musicology  vii,  no.4:  415-­‐39.    Berkeley:  University  of  California  Press.  
 
Gushee,  Lawrence.    1977.    “Lester  Young’s  ‘Shoeshine  Boy’,”  In  A  Lester  Young  
Reader,  ed.  Porter,  Lewis.    224-­‐254.    Washingon:  Smithsonian  Institution  Press.  
1991.    
 
Larson,  Steve.    1995.    “Integrated  Music  Learning  and  Improvisation:  Teaching  
Musicianship  and  Theory  Through  Menus,  Maps,  and  Models.”  College  Music  
Symposium,  xxxv:  76-­‐90.  
 
Martin,  Henry.    1996.    “Jazz  Theory:  An  Overview,”  Annual  Review  of  Jazz  Studies  
viii:  1-­‐14.    Lanham,  Maryland:  Scarecrow  Press.    
 

 
 

166  

Nettl,  Bruno.    1976.    “Thoughts  on  Improvisation:  A  Comparative  Approach,”  The  
Musical  Quarterly  LX,  no.1:  1-­‐19.  
 
Owens,  Thomas.    1999.    “Bird’s  Children  and  Grandchildren:  The  Spread  of  
Charlie  Parker’s  Musical  Language,”  Jazzforschung  xxxi:  75-­‐88.    Graz,  Austria:  
Akademische  Druck-­‐  u.    Verlagsanstalt.    
 
Perlman,  Alan  M  &  Greenblatt,  Daniel.    “Miles  Davis  Meets  Noam  Chomsky:  Some  
Observasions  on  Jazz  Improvisation  and  Language  Structure,”  The  Sign  in  Music  
and  Literature,  ed.  Steiner,  Wendy.    Austin:  University  of  Texas  Press.    1981.    
169-­‐183.  
 
Schuller,  Gunther.    1958.    “Sonny  Rollins  and  the  Challenge  of  Thematic  
Improvisation,”  The  Jazz  Review  1  (1):  6-­‐21.    
http://jazzstudiesonline.org/?q=node/695  
 
Encyclopedia  Entries:  
Oxford  Music  Online,  2007-­‐11.    s.  v.    “Jazz  Improvisation.”    
http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.yorku.ca/subscriber/article
/grove/music/J215000?q=improvisation&search=quick&pos=1&_start=1  
 
Oxford  Music  Online,  2007-­‐11.    s.  v.    “Jazz  Writing.”    
http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.yorku.ca/subscriber/article
/epm/49373?q=barry+kernfeld&search=quick&pos=3&_start=1#firsthit  
 
Oxford  Music  Online.    2007-­‐11.    s.  v.    “Metheny,  Pat.”    
http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.yorku.ca/subscriber/article
/epm/18839?q=pat+metheny&search=quick&pos=2&_start=1  
 
Oxford  Music  Online,  2007-­‐11.    s.  v.    “Montgomery,  Wes  –  The  Incredible  Jazz  
Guitar  of  Wes  Montgomery.”    
http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.yorku.ca/subscriber/article
/epm/83379?q=jazz+guitar&search=quick&pos=1&_start=1#firsthit  
 
Transcriptions:  
 
Metheny,  Pat.    2000.    The  Songbook.    Milwaukee:  Hal  Leonard.    
 
Dissertations:  
 
Owens,  Thomas.    1974.    “Charlie  Parker:  Techniques  of  Improvisation,  Vol.    I  &  
II.”    Ph.  D.    dissertation,  University  of  California,  Los  Angeles.    
 

 
 

Smith,  Gregory.    1983.    “Homer,  Gregory,  and  Bill  Evans?  The  Theory  of  
Formulaic  Composition  in  the  Context  of  Jazz  Piano  Improvisation.”    Ph.  D.    
dissertation,  Harvard  University.    
 
Interviews:  
Niles,  Richard.    2009.    The  Pat  Metheny  Interviews.    Milwaukee:  Hal  Leonard.    
 
Pat  Metheny  Interact:  Question  and  Answer.    Accessed,  Sept.    262011,  
http://interact.patmetheny.com/qa/?selection=doc.  2  
 
Discography  
Metheny,  Pat.    2008.    Day  Trip.    Nonesuch:  376828.    
 
Metheny,  Pat.    1989.    Question  and  Answer.    Geffen:  24293.    
 
Rollins,  Sonny.    2008.    Saxophone  Collossus.    Universal:  UCC09161.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

167  

 
 

168  

Appendix  A  –  Transcriptions  
Pat Metheny: Guitar Performance on

From the recording:
Metheny, Pat. Question and Answer (Nonesuch 511494)
Track 1

Solar
(M. Davis)

Swung 8ths
(Quarter Note = c. 250)

D bma7

b 4 œ
&bb 4

Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ

b
j
œ
&bb œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ J Ó
F ma7

b
& b b nœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
E bma7

œ
b
&bb œ œ œ œ

9

C m7

b œ ‰ œ ‰ œ Œ
&bb
J J

13

F ma7

b
& b b nœ

17

E bma7

œ œ nœ ‰ œ

œ bœ

œ

C m7

5

D m7b5

œ œ

œ
˙

G m7

j

‰ bœ

œ
j
œ

œ. bœ
J Ó

nœ œ Œ ‰bœ ‰nœ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ

E b m7

A b7

œ

C7

F m7

œ

œ bœ œ bœ

B b7

‰ œ ‰#œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ

D bma7


‰ b œ ‰ œ b œ ‰ J ‰ œJ œ ‰ b œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ
œ œ œj œ œ .
J

D m7b5

œ œ œ
œ œ œ

G m7

j
œ

Œ ‰ n œj b œj ‰ œ

C7

Ó

B b7

F m7

3

œ nœ œ

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

3

œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ

b j
& b b œ ‰ Œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ bœ ‰ œ œ bœ œ nœ œ

21

G 7b9

œ

b
œ œ œ œ ‰ œJ Œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó
&bb œ
C m7

G m7

25

 

Ó

œ

G 7b9

‰ œ ‰ œ
Œ œ œ #œ

œ bœ œ œ œ
nœ œ

D m7b5

G 7b9

C7

Œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ

Transcription by Noel Thomson
 
*Metheny’s  management  team,  The  Kurland  Associates,  has  authorized  all  included  transcriptions.

 

 
 

166  

Solar

2
F ma7

B b7

F m7

b
œ œ
& b b œ ‰ n œj œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ n œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

29

E bma7

b
&bb

33

!

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

œ œ œ bœ
nœ bœ bœ

œ Œ Œ

b œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ
b
& b
C m7

œ

Ó

œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
nœ œ
D m7b5

G m7

G 7b9

C7

œ bœ œ œ
œ
bœ bœ bœ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ

37

B b7

b
œ œ nœ œ ‰ œ bœ œ œ #œ nœ nœ bœ

& b b #œ nœ œ œ #œ #œ ‰ œ #œ nœ #œ #œ œ
œœœ
F ma7

F m7

41

E bma7

E b m7

b
j œ.
& b b ‰ nœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ

45

C m7

b
œ
&bb œ œ œ

49

F ma7

b
& b b nœ Œ Œ

53

E bma7

D bma7

Ó

œ œ

œ
Œ
œ œ

œ œ

D m7b5

G m7

‰ œ ‰ nœ œ œ

œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ
œ nœ
‰ bœ bœ
J

b b b œ œ œ œ ‰ œJ œ
b
&

57

A b7

F m7

E b m7

j
œ

Œ

A b7

b

œ œ œ b œ D ma7
œœ

œœœ

 
 
Transcription by Noel Thomson

j
œ

nœ bœ

G 7b9

‰ œ ‰ œ nœ œ
œ nœ
#œ #œ

C7

B b7

Ó

nœ bœ œ ‰
J

#œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ

D m7b5

G 7b9

 

 
 

167  

Solar
C m7

3
G m7

C7

b nœ bœ œ nœ
nœ #œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ œ #œ #œ Œ Ó
&bb
œ

61

F ma7

b
& b b Œ ‰ œJ ‰ œJ Œ

65

E bma7

j
œ

nœ ‰ œ œ œ
J

E b m7

A b7

b œ ‰ Œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
jœ.
b
b
œ
&
J
œ bœ

F m7

B b7

D bma7

D m7b5

œœ‰œ‰œ‰œ ‰œ‰œ‰œœ
J
J

œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
œ œ bœ œ
œ
C7
G m7
C m7
j
j
œ ˙
#œ œ. nœ œ œ œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ
73
œ
bb
œ
œ
& b œ œ ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ œ
69

G 7b9

B b7

œ
œ bœ œ œ œ œ
bb œ b œ œ b œ n œ n œ b œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ n œ œ
œœœ
& b
F ma7

F m7

77

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

bb b œ n œ œ b œ ‰ œ b œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ Œ
b
&

81

nœ ‰ bœ nœ bœ

C m7

b
&bb ‰

85

bb œ œ # œ n œ œ .
b
&
J
F ma7

89

nœ bœ œ
œ

D bma7

œœ
œ bœ œ œ
œ
œ
n
œ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ
œ œ œ œ

G m7

œ nœ œ
œ œ œ nœ #œ #œ
n
œ
œ

Œ
F m7

 
 
Transcription by Noel Thomson

D m7b5

C7

Ó

G 7b9

œ nœ œ
œ

B b7

œ œ œ nœ œ bœ

œ
 

 
 

168  

4

b
&bb

93

E bma7

œœœ

œ‰œ‰

E b m7

bœ œ œ

Œ

A b7

œ bœ œ

Solar

D bma7

œ nœ #œ nœ œ bœ nœ bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ
œ

C m7

D m7b5

G m7

G 7b9

C7

b
jj
jj
j j
jj
j
& b b œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰nœ

97

F ma7

b
& b b ‰ nœ ‰ bœ nœ bœ

101

E bma7

E b m7

B b7

j
j
nœ ‰ Œ ‰ bœ œ
œ œ‰ Ó
œ
œ
œ
F m7

A b7

D bma7

‰ bœ œ œ

œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ nœ bœ œ
b
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
bb
œ
œ
œ
n
œ
bœ œ œ ‰ œ œ bœ
& b œ Œ

105

D m7b5

G 7b9

œ
bb b œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& b
œ œ œ nœ bœ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ bœ nœ
œœ
C m7

G m7

C7

109

b
&bb

F ma7

113

bb

& b

117

nœ.
œ nœ

E bma7

j
œ œ œ

j
œ œ.

E b m7

œ.

A b7

œ
œ œ œ œJ .
J

œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ
Œ
‰J‰J

F m7

D bma7

Ó

G m7
œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ
œ
n
œ
œ
œ
b œ
Œ J‰
Ó
&bb
C m7

121

B b7

j

œ.

œ n œj œ
J Œ

nœ bœ nœ bœ œ œ
œ œ #œ
‰ œJ ‰
D m7b5

œ œ nœ
J ‰

 
 
Transcription
  by Noel Thomson

G 7b9

œ œ nœ

C7

j
œ

Œ

 

 
 

169  

Solar

œ nœ
œ œ
b ‰ nœ ‰ bœ ‰ nœ ‰
b
‰ ‰ œ
& b

F m7

125

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

B b7

œ œj œ ˙

F ma7

D bma7

nœ #œ œ œ œ œ

Œ

5

129
œ œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ nœ bœ œ
bb b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ œ
&

D m7b5

b bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
Œ
œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ
&bb
œœ
C m7

G m7

133

b bœ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ ‰
b
Ó
j
& b
œ œœœ
F ma7

F m7

137

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

G 7b9

C7

Œ

B b7

œ bœ œ
œ nœ œ

œ
Œ ‰ œJ n œ œ œ

b œ œ œ n œ œJ b œ œ n œ œ n œ b œ
œ
bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ
œ
œ
n
œ
b
œ

& b

bœ œ œ œ

141

D m7b5

G 7b9


œ
bb b œ œ n œ n œ n œ b œ b œ b œ œ n œ b œ n œ b œJ ‰ Œ œ b œ œ ‰ # œ œ n œ n œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ b œ
&
C m7

G m7

C7

145

B b7

j œ
b

& b b œ bœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Œ ‰ œ ‰ œ nœ œ œ œ Ó
F ma7

F m7

149

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

D bma7

D m7b5

œ œ œ nœ
G 7b9

b œ

œ
œ
& b b œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

153

 
 
Transcription  by Noel Thomson

 

 
 

170  

Solar

6

œ

œ #œ œ œ
Œ œœ

œ
œ
b œ
œ
& b b œ œ œj n œ œ œ œj œ n œ œ # œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œJ ‰ Œ
C m7

G m7

157

œ
bb b œ b œ n œ n œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ ‰
&
F ma7

F m7

161

b
&bb

165

E bma7

œœ

Œ

œ

E b m7

Œ

Œ

A b7

D bma7

bœ œ bœ

œ

j
œ

b #œ œ œ nœ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ œ
&bb ‰
C m7

G m7

j
b
.
& b b ‰ n œ ‰ œ œ n œ œ n œ œ . n œJ œ

b œ Œ
&bb
C m7

181

b
&bb

185

A b7
œ bœ. œ œ.
J
J

F ma7

j

E b m7

œ œ

Œ

œ

œ bœ nœ

œ œ œ bœ

B b7

‰ Ó

G 7b9

C7

j
œ œ œ œœ œ
œ œ nœ œ ‰ œ

F ma7

œ.
œ
bb b œJ . œJ
&

œ

D m7b5

F m7

œ œ.
J

173

E bma7

j

œ bœ œ bœ œ
nœ bœ œ œ
œ
œ nœ
Œ

169

177

œ‰œ

C7

œ œ.
J

B b7

œ œ œ œ.
J

G 7b9
b œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ D m7b5
œ nœ bœ œ
œ
J
J
œ œ nœ

D bma7

œ
Œ ‰ J Œ
Œ ‰ œ nœ œ
J

G m7

œ

œ œ œ
‰ J
œœ œ
Œ ‰J

F m7

 
 
 
Transcription
by Noel Thomson

œ

C7

B b7

Œ Œ

œ œ

œ œ
3

œ
Œ ‰J

 

 
 

171  

E bma7

b
&bb ‰

189

E b m7

bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
b
&
C m7

b
&bb

Solar

D bma7

œ ‰ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ nœ

nœ nœ #œ

œ nœ œ nœ œ bœ

F ma7

E bma7

œ œœ

Ó

193

197

A b7

œ nœ

b

G m7

œœ

D m7b5

œ nœ œ
œ œœœ

œ nœ

œ nœ bœ

C7

Ó

7

B b7

œ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ

F m7

œ œ œ œ nœ #œ nœ
œ
œ œ nœ œ
b

œœ

G 7b9

b

A 7
D ma7
D m7b5
G 7b9
œ œ E œm7
œ
bœ œ œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ
b œœœœœ
j
œ nœ œ

œ œ bœ ‰ œ œ œ œ nœ œ
&bb

201

3

œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ nœ nœ bœ nœ
bb b œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ ‰ œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ ‰ œ n œ œ
J‰
& b
C m7

G m7

C7

205

B b7

nœ œ nœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ œ œ
œ
bb b œ œ œ œ n œ b œ
nœ #œ bœ nœ œ
&
œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ
F ma7

F m7

209

E bma7

b œ
&bb

213

217

&

bbb

œ

‰œÓ
J

E b m7

˙

D bma7

bœ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
‰ J ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰bœ nœ bœ œ nœ œ œ

C m7

A b7

˙

˙˙
˙

G m7

˙˙
˙

D m7b5

œ
n œœ

 
 
  by Noel Thomson
Transcription

Œ

b ˙˙˙

C7

G 7b9

b œœœ ...

œ
n œœ
J

 

 
 

172  

Pat Metheny: Guitar Performance on

From the recording:
Metheny, Pat. Question and Answer (Nonesuch 511494)
Track 8

(Metheny)

Ballad
(Quarter Note = c. 120)

ÿ

œ ‰ #œ
&b c ‰

3

&b

D m7

œ

B

5

7

bMaj7

&b

œ
&b

A m7( 5)

&b

11

œ
J

œ.

jA

œ

b

j
œ

œ

7

œ
œ3

3

œ
j
œ

œ œ œ
œ

b
œ

œ

œ
J
œ

œœ
J

‰ b œœ
J

D 7 ( b 9)

b9

C7

D 7 ( 9)

3

œ œ œ
J

œ

œ

 
 
Transcription By Noel Thomson
 
 
 

œ œ
œœ
œ
3
‰ nœ œ

œ œ3 œ œ

œ

œ

œ

œ œ œ œ

œ j bœ
œ

œ bœ nœ œ #œ #œ œ
j

b œœ

j
‰ # œœ œœ b œ

œ #œ
! bœ nœ nœ œ bœ nœ

13

œ

‰ b œœ ..

œœ

‰ œ œ œ
3

3 bœ
œ œ œ nœ œ
& b nœ bœ

15

E

F7

œ

j
œ

œ

m7

b

œ
&b ‰ œ œ œ

A7

œ

œ

jC
œ

œ

G7

C7

Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ œ œ œj œ

E m9

j 7
œD

œ

œ

œ

& b œœ

G m7

9

œ

Old Folks

œ bœ œ bœ
Œ

œ nœ
b b œœœ b œœ œœ
3

b œ œ3 n œ œ œ3 b œ
 

 
 

173  

Old Folks

2

{A2}

E m9

œ œ3 œ œ
b
&

17

œ

jD m7
œ

&b

19

B

j
œ

A7

œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ

œ

bMaj7

D

j
œ

œ œ œ œ
&b

b7

œ b œ œ œ œ œ3 œ
b

œ œ

œ œ3 œ
!

œ œ
œ œ
b
œ
œ
b
&
&b œ

25

A m7( b 5)

&b œ

27

&b

29

j

F

&b ‰

31

œ

œ
œ

G m7

n œœ

j

œ
J

œ

3

œ œ œ œ

œ bœ œ

3

œ

J

Œ

œ œ œ #œ
!

23

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ

D 7 ( b 9)

œ

œ3 œ œ

!

j
œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ #œ œ

œ bœ œ œ

œ
œ

œ nœ bœ œ œ
bœ bœ
œ

3

œ

C7

œœ b œj n œœ
J

œ n œb œb œ œ
bœ œ nœ bœ

 
 
  By Noel Thomson
Transcription
 

!

F7

œ #œ

!

C7

œ

œ b œœ ..
J

D 7 ( b 9) œ .

A7

œ œ
J

3

C m7

E 9 j bœ
.
œ

21

G m7

œ

œ œ œ
œ nœ bœ œ œ
3
œ œj œ
J

œ


œ
J

œ
j œ.
œ

œ
Œ

œ bœ
œ3 œ
œ
œ bœ œ œ

 

 
 

174  

Old Folks

Ÿ F Maj7

b œ3 œ œ œ3 œ
œ
b
œ

#œ œ
œ œ

C 7#5

œ œ œ3 œ ! b œ œ ! œ n œ
&b œ œ
3

33

C m7

œ b œœ ..
& b J œ.

35

Œ

37

3

F7

bMaj7
œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
b œ

œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ

bœ bœ nœ œ bœ œ

b9

œ œ œ œ œ
œ
b
œ
œ œ œ bœ œ
Œ
&b œ œ œ œ
œ œ
E

39

F

& b œ n œ œJ

41

D m7

œ œ
&b

43

G 7( 11)
#

& b nœ

45

C7

&b Œ

47

j
œ

3

œ

3

œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ œ nœ œ œ bœ
œ œ

B

&

3

œ œ

A7

œ œ œ

3

œ

œ œ3 # œ œ
J

!
j3
œ

3

bœ œ nœ
œ bœ œ

œ œ œ œ œ bœ
œ œœœ œ
œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

œ #œ #œ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ bœ œ

œ.

Œ

œ
‰ œœ

bœ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ
œ bœ bœ œ
œ nœ œ œ

œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
r
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
 
 
Transcription By Noel Thomson

 

 
 

175  

Old Folks

4
{A2}

A
œ #œ
œ
œœœ
œ œ œ nœ œ œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ bœ œ #œ nœ œ œ
‰ œ œ œ œ #œ
&b
E m9

7

b7
C m7
œ œ
œ
œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
!

49

&b

D m7

œ

bMaj7
"
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
&b

51

œ œ bœ 3 œ
&b J
J

55

A7

57

&b

59

&b

61

G m7
b
A m7
b œ( 5)

Gœm7
F

&b Œ

63

&b

E m7

œ

œ3œ
J

3

&b œ

65

b9
œ

B

53

œ bœ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

D

œ

! œ œ
œ

"
œ

j

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ bœ œ œ

! bœ œ bœ œ bœ
œ

œ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ œ

C7

œ œ3 b œ
œ

œ

b œ œ3 œ œ b œ3

œ

! œ œ

œ n œ3
œ
œ

œ

œ

D 7 ( b 9)

œ.

œ

œ

E

F7

D 7 ( b 9)

œ

œ n œ3 b œ

C7

œ

œ œ3
œ nœ

œ
œ œ

œ

œ bœ

œ

œ

œ

j
œ

œ bœ

œ
J

3
œ œ3 œ œ œj b œ œ b œ œ3 b œ œ œ3 œ œ n œ3 b œ

œ

œ

œ

A7


J

 
 
Transcription By Noel Thomson
 
 

œ.

˙
 

 
 

176  

Pat Metheny: Guitar Performance on
From the recording:
Metheny, Pat. Day Trip (Nonesuch 2-376828)
Track 1

Son Of Thirteen
(Metheny)

Even 8ths, Two-Feel
(Quarter Note = c. 270)

Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ #œ œ œ #œ. œ ˙
J
&c
{A1} D m(Maj7)

B m(Maj7)

5

& #œ.

j
#œ ˙

w
& Œ Œ #œ
9
b
B Maj7(#11)
˙
œœ
Œ

b
œ
&
J
13
b
G Maj7(#11)
œ. j
œ

17

Œ
˙
b
& ˙

21

let ring

j
F Maj7(#11)
œœ œ œj ˙
œ
œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œœœ
J
J

˙
Œ bœ

œ. #œ ˙
J
&

25

Œ #œ #œ

#w
Œ

œ

j
œ # # œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ

‰ b œj ˙
œœ

A Maj7(#11)

œ
Œ ‰ œJ œJ œ J w

œ

‰ # œJ œ

j j
j
œœœ œœœ # # œœœ œœœ œœœ
b
A Maj7(#11) j
j
œ œ
œ œ œj ˙
œœ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ b b œœœ œœœ ‰
œ
J J
J

w
œ . b œJ œ b œ

bœ.

b wœ . œ œ b œ b œœ
J

œ

w
b ww

let ring

Transcription by Noel Thomson

w
œ #œ ˙


œ #œ œ
#
œ
œ
Œ
œ
œœ
b
E Maj7(#11)
j
j
bœ ˙
œ œ œj
Œ Œ ‰ b b œœœ œœœ ‰ Œ
J J
b œœ .. b œœ œœ b œœ
J

œ œ bœ
J

# œ . # œJ œ # œ # # # œœœœ .... œœœ œœœ œœœ
J
 
 
 
 

‰ #œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ

˙˙
˙

œ nœ bœ #œ

œœœ# # œœœ ... # # œœœ
J

let E sustain

œœœ
 

 
 

177  

2

# œœ ..
&# œ .

29

C maj7(#11)

˙
œœ
& Œ ‰ œJ

33

&

37

E 7sus

#
F m9

Son of Thirteen

œœœ œœœ œœœ
# w˙ .
œ wœ . # œ
J
J
b
j
G Maj7(#11)
B Maj7(#11)
j
j
œ œ œ #˙
œ œ œj ˙
œœ
# œœ œœ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ b œœœ
œ ‰Œ
Œ

œ œ
J
J
J J
#
F 7sus
B 7sus
œ œ
J

œ #˙
J

˙

F Maj7(#11)
j
œ œ œj ˙
œœ
œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œœœ
J
J

j
œ #˙

œ œ
J

#œ œ #œ #œ

# ˙˙

œ

œ

œ.

let ring

j
œœ œ œj
œœ ‰ Œ
J

œ ˙
J

œ # œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ # œj œ œ
. J
.J
& œ . œJ œ
J
J

41

let ring

Ÿ G Maj7

47

3
œ #œ œ

G Maj7

#w
& Ó

F

F

Œ

œœ
œ

# m7
˙

# m7
w
œœ .
.

œ # œ3 œ

˙

E m7

œ.
# œœ ..

#œ ˙
J

let ring

# m7
œ œ3 # œ ˙

E m7

F

j
œœ ˙˙
œ ˙

F

# m7

# ˙˙
˙

œ

œ

œ

œ

# m7
#
3
E m7
F m7
3
œ
Œ
œ3 œ
#œ ˙
˙ # œœ Œ # œ œ ˙
œ
#
œ
˙
Œ
Œ
& Œ ‰ œœ ˙˙
Œ œ Ó
55
J
#
#
C 7sus
C 7sus
A 7sus
D 7alt
3
j
3
bw
˙
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
Œ #œ #œ w
œ
# œ # # ww
œ
#
w
.
b
œ
w
Œ
‰ œ .. # w
‰ œ œ
& Ó
w
J
59
51

G Maj7

3

F

let ring

 
 

Transcription by Noel Thomson

 

 
 

178  

Son of Thirteen

j
# ˙ œ œ # ˙˙ # œ œ œ œ˙ . # œ œ œ w
#œ ˙

b ˙˙ Ó
Ó
& Œ œœ ˙˙
D Maj7

F 7alt

3

G Maj7

# œœ ..
œœ ..

63

{A2} D m(Maj7)

&

69

#œ.

œ ˙
J

j
#œ ˙

Œ #œ

#7alt
C Maj7#11
j
˙
œ œ œj ˙
œœ œœ
Œ

œ œ ‰ Œ
Œ ‰ œ
&
J
J J

77

C

E Maj7#11

& #œ.

j
#œ ˙

& œœœ ...
bœ.
85

œ œ
J

81

b
B Maj7#11

let ring

let ring

#œ.
œ

œ.

œ

b
E 7#9
j
œ œ œj b ˙
œ ‰ Œ
J

j
#œ œ
œ ˙
J

œ

G add9

œ.
œ.

œ

let ring

let ring

#œ œ œ œ nœ
#œ œ œ œ
J

‰ ‰ Œ ‰ J
&

{A1} D m(Maj7)

89

&

93

B m(Maj7)
j
œ

#œ œ ˙

œœ ..
œ.

j
œ

#œ.
A

œ œ
J

#˙~

œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ
#œ #œ nœ nœ.
 
 
 
Transcription  by Noel Thomson
 

œ #œ
#œ œ #œ
J

bMaj7#11

œ œ bœ ˙
J
J Œ ‰ bœ
J

œ œ
J

Cliche Species B.3

3
#7alt
œ
#œ œ
œœ œœ Ó œ
œœ # # œœ

F

œœœ ‰ # œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ
J

# œœœ ..
.

# ¥¥

B m(Maj7)

& #œ.

73

œ w
J Ó

‰ œJ œJ œ

Œ

j
œœ
œœ

œ.

œ
œœ
œ
Ó

˙˙
˙
Ó

j
œœ œ œj
J ‰ Œ
œ ˙
J

#œ œ œ #œ
œ œ3 œ œ
œ

Pentatonic Species B.1


œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ
J
Re: mm.94

 

 
 

179  

Son of Thirteen

4

Enclosure Species A & C

Œ ‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ œ # œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ

Re: mm.93

& #œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ Ó

97

b
B Maj7#11 Enclosure Species G.1 F Maj7#11
œ œ œ œ œ
b
œ
J
nœ œ œ œ œ Œ
& J
Re: mm.88-89

101

G

bMaj7#11

105

&

œ.

109

Re: mm.100


œ œ
J

‰ b œj œj b œ

j
œ

œ bœ bœ.
J .
bœ ˙
J

113

&

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ
#œ.

121

E m7

&

125

3 œ
#œ œ
œ œ œ
J
J

G Maj7#11

C Maj7#11

œ

œ #œ

œ.

Re: mm.103-104

j
œ

#œ œ #œ œ #œ.
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
& œ #œ

117

j
œ

Motivic Species C.1

œ œ bœ
J

bMaj7#11

œ
‰ œ b œJ œJ

œ bœ

A Maj7#11

&

A

œ

Re: mm.121-122

œ

j
œ

œ œ œ
J J

Re: mm.93

bœ ˙
J

bœ. bœ

Re: mm.93

bœ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ

#œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ.
J J
J J œ J J

œ #œ #œ œ ˙
J J
J

#œ.

œ

Re: mm.102

bMaj7#11
œ œ. œ ˙
J
J
E

Œ œ #œ

Enclosure Species G & D

#œ œ œ #œ nœ
œ œ
‰ J

bMaj7#11
F Maj7#11
œ œ œ Cliche
œ œSpecies C.2 Pentatonicœ Species
œ œ # B.2
œ
œ
œ
œ
J J
J
‰ J

B

Re: mm.121-122

B m7

œ

œ

 
 
Transcription by Noel Thomson

Œ

Re: mm.121-122

œ

j

 

 
 

180  

F

# m9

Son of Thirteen

#œ œ
j j
œ œ # œ œJ œJ
J

j j
& œj œ # œ œ # œ
127
& #œ

131

. œœ œ
J

Maj7
Ÿ G

F

# m7

œ œ œ # œJ œJ œ .
J J
#
F m7

& œ.

135

# œ œ3 œ # œ œ3 œ

G Maj7

œ3 œ
œ
#
œ
œ
Œ
&

j
œ

3

#œ œ
J

˙

œ #œ #œ œ
j
œ

œ

‰ # œ œJ

5

œ #œ #œ œ
#œ œ #œ #œ nœ
‰J
Cliche Species B.3

E m7

F

# m7

j
œ ˙

3
j
‰ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ

œ œ œ3 œ
J

j
œ

‰ # œj œ œ

# m7

Re: mm.135-136

E m7

F

œ # œ3 œ œ œ3 œ

#œ j #˙
œ
Œ

#
#
F m7
E m7
F m7
j # œ œ n œj
j
œ
œ œ # ˙ œ œ œ # œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ
J
Œ
&Œ ‰
Re: mm.143-144
143
#
#
A 7sus
C 7sus
C 7sus
D 7alt
G.2
Pentatonic Species A.3
˙ Enclosure
œ b œSpecies
œ œ #œ œ
œ #œ nœ œ
.
#
œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
#œ œ
&
J œ œ œ œ #œ
J
J
139

147

Re: mm.147

D Maj7

&

151

œ

G Maj7

&

153

Re: mm.135-136

G Maj7

œ

Pentatonic Species A.4

Re: mm.147

œ #œ œ nœ œ

œ

œ

œ

F 7alt

œ.

Enclosure Species E & D


J

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œ
# œ œ œ œ # œœ

Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ #œ

Chromatic Passing Tone Species B.2

œ

œ

F

#7alt

œœ Œ œ œ
œ

 

 
 

181  

6
{A2}

&

157

Son of Thirteen

D m(Maj7)

j
# œœœ œœœ

œ.

œœœ

B m(Maj7)

˙

œ œ3 œ

Ó

œ

# œœœ

j
œ . # œ œ œ œj œ œ . œ # œ œ œj # œ ˙ n œ œ œ œ
J J
J
J J
J
&
Re: mm.161
161
b
#
C 7alt
C Maj7
E 7#9
œ

j
œ
#œ œ.
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ #œ œ
J J
&J
J
165

E Maj7#11

&

j
œ

j

# œ

# # ˙˙

G Maj7#11

# # œœ .. # œœ œœ # œœ ..
J J

# œ œ3 # œ

Ó

Re: mm.157-158

œ œ œ œ œ œ
J
J
bMaj7#11
œ œ bœ œ

A

œ
J

œ
œ œ œœœ
œ œ #œ œ œ #œ
#
œ
J

Chromatic Passing Tone Species B.3

b
C.6
B Maj7#11
œ œ œ Aœ7alt Cadence Species
˙~ œ . œ œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
#œ #œ œ #œ nœ œ #œ #œ nœ œ
J Jœ œ
&
J
Re: mm.168

173

{A1} D m(ma7)

B m(ma7)

&

181

185

œ

œ

Re: mm.168

Motivic Species B.3

œ œ œ
& #œ œ

177

Re: mm.168

Re: mm.168

169

œ œ œ #œ œ

œ

œœœœ œ

œ

œ #œ œ œ œ ‰
J

œ

œ‰ œ‰

œ

œ #œ

œ
œ
œ


œ œ œ œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ
#
œ
œœ
œ

#œ #œ œ #œ

œ #œ #œ

œœ

œ #œ #œ

œ œ #œ

 

Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ
œ
œ œ œ œ ‰ #œ œ #œ œ

 

 
 

182  

B

bma7(#11)

&

œ.

b
G ma7(#11)

189

193

Son of Thirteen

b œœ ˙˙
J
.
‰ b b œœœ ..

F ma7(#11)

œ.

A

œœ ˙˙
J

Re: mm.189

bma7(#11)
œ

œ œ ˙

E

bma7(#11)

7

bœ ˙

Œ b œœ

Re: mm.191

bœ bœ œ bœ
b œ b œ b œ b œj ‰ œ j
‰ ‰

œ œ œ bœ nœ
bœ bœ œ
Pentatonic Species A.5

˙˙
˙

Chromatic Passing Tone Species B.4

j

bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ ‰
& bœ bœ bœ œ bœ
J

197

œ œœ
‰ b œJ b œJ ‰ Œ ‰ b œj b œ œ

A ma7(#11)

#œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ ‰ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
j
œ
# œ œ ‰ # œJ ‰ œ # œJ ‰ ‰ œ
#
œ
‰ J
‰JJ‰
&
Three-Beat Figure

201

j
œ

j

œ #œ #œ

Pentatonic Species A.8

#œ œ #œ œ œ #œ #œ œ #œ j ‰ œ. nœ Ó ‰
œ
&

œ #œ
205
C ma7(#11)
b
G ma7(#11)
F ma7(#11) Pentatonic Species A.6
B ma7(#11)
j
Chromatic Passing Tone Species B.5
œ ˙~ œ œ
œ #œ œ nœ œ
œ
œ
œ‰
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ

‰JJ‰
& #œ œ œ
209

E m7

&

œ

213

F

# m7

& #œ.

215

œ

œ

œ

Re: mm.211-212

j
œ œ #œ

œ bœ #œ
j
œ œ.

B m7

œ

œ . # œJ œ

Chromatic Passing Tone Species C.6

œ #œ
œ

 
Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ #œ.
J

œ bœ

œ bœ

Re: mm.211-212

œ.

j
œ

#œ œ
J

œ

œ

 

 
 

183  

8

&

j

#œ.

j
œ

219

Ÿ

G ma7(#11)

&

223

&

œ

œ

#œ.

227

# m7
#œ œ #˙
F

G ma7(#11)
j
œ

œ œ nœ
J
J ‰ Ó

F

œ ˙
J

œ.

G ma7(#11)

œ œ #œ
& œ #œ ‰

231

&

235

&

239

&

241

{A2}

C 7sus

bœ.

D ma7

#œ.

G ma7

&

œ
# œœ
œ
J

œ. #œ œ œ
#œ. J

D m(ma7)

245

j
œ
b œœ œœœ

œ

œ
Œ œœ Œ

# m7

F

Son of Thirteen

j
œ

j
œ œ œ œ #˙

œ œ #œ

œ #œ
#œ œ
J

E m7

j
œ

œ.

j
œ

œ œ
J

œ

Ó

F

Œ

# m7

œ œ3 œ œ œ

Re: mm.224

E m7

# œœ ..
œ.

œ #œ
‰ J J ‰

# m7
# www

œ ˙
J

œ

F

#
F m7
# m7
E m7
j
3 œ
œ ‰ œJ œ . # œ ‰ œ ‰ œ # œ œ œ ˙
Œ #œ
J
Re: mm.231-232
#
#
C 7sus
D 7alt
A 7sus
bœ ˙
œ. #œ œ œ
œ œ œ
b œœ ... J
b b b œœœ ... J
œ œ
œ
J Re: mm.235-236

œœ
œ
œ.

œ

œ œ œ
J

Re: mm.227

F 7alt

œ
J

# # œœœ ...

!
j #œ.

œ œ
J

j
œ

!
œ
œ
œ œ
Œ œ œ œ œ ‰
‰ ‰ œ
off-beat

 
 
  by Noel Thomson
Transcription

œ

˙

F

#7alt
Ó

œ
on-beat

# œ n 3œ œ œ

œ œ ‰ œ ‰ #œ

off-beat

 

 
 

184  

Son of Thirteen

Enclosure Species F & D
#œ œ #œ
œ
b
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
#
œ
œ #œ #œ. #œ œ
œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

J
J

&‰
249
b
b
#
A ma7(#11)
C 7alt
C ma7(#11)
E 7#9
Pentatonic Species A.7
Cadence Species B.7
œ œ
œ
œ
#
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œœœœ
œ œ œ œ #œ
b
œ
œ
& œ bœ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ

B m(ma7)

253

E ma7(#11)

#œ.

j
#œ œ

&
b
B ma7(#11)
œ.
œ œ
&
J

257

œ

œ œ œ œ

œ

œ

261

D m(ma7)

{A1}

&

265

# # wwww

B m(ma7)

œ

œ

G ma7(#11)

Re: mm.253-254

#œ.

œ

A 7alt

œœ ..
#œ.

ww
ww
w

ww
ww
w

ww
ww
w

ww
ww
w

273

œœ
œ Œ
J

œ

œ

Re: mm.257-258

œœ
œ

 
 

Transcription by Noel Thomson

œ
j
œ
œœ

Ó

!
ww
ww
w

&

œ œ
J

ww
ww

# # www
#
& # ww

269

9

œ

œ bœ

˙
b b ˙˙˙
!

ww
ww
w
!
 

 
 

185  

Pat Metheny: Guitar Performance on

Snova

From the recording:
Metheny, Pat. Day Trip (Nonesuch 2-376828)
Track 4

(Metheny)

Even 8ths, Two-Feel
(Quarter Note = c. 134)
A madd9

˙
& c ˙˙˙

j
œœ ˙˙
œ ˙

œœœœ ....

A m7(b13)

A1

œ
& ‰ œœ

A m7

&

j

nœ.

&

j
œ

œœ
œ

œ.

Ó
b b œœ ..

F #7

E b7

F # m7 3

˙

F Maj7(#11)
13

&

A2

3

œ œ
œ
J œ œ

A add9(#11)

œ.
& # ˙˙˙

17

G 7sus 4

œ.
& ‰ œœœ ...

21

E bMaj7(#11)

j

œ œ œ œ bœ
J
J

3

B ma7(#11)

œ œ œ œ

D m7

œ

j

#œ œ
3

œ˙ .
˙

G/F

œ œ Œ b œ Œœ Œ œ
œ œ œ
J

Œ

G 7(b913)

G 7(b9b13)

3

j
#œ œ #œ
œ
#
œ
œ

A Maj7(#11)

B bMaj9(#11) A b13 sus

j
œ b œ˙ .

 
Transcribed by Noel Thomson
 
 

j
œ

nœ œ
3

b

B /E
j j bœ
œ œ . œj
œ ˙œ˙ œ
b ˙˙
G 7sus 4

A bMaj7(#11)

3
3
j
j 3
Œ

œ
œ
œ
œ œ˙œœ # œœ # ˙œœ # œœ
œ œ œ œ ˙ b œ œœ
œ œ ˙
˙
J
Ó
Ó

B m7 (b 5)
G m7
C9
F Maj7#5
F Maj6
3
j
j
j
.
Ó
‰ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œœ œ œ
œ ˙œ œ
œ
œ
œ
#œ œ
œœ œœ ...
b œœ ... œ
œ

Ó
Œ
J
J Ó

F/A

j
œ

Œ ‰ j
œ œ œ

J

G sus4

A b Maj7

œ Œ œ bœ
œ
J Ó
j

Ó
Œ #œ

˙
˙
#
œ
œ
# ˙ n œœ # œ # ˙˙
&
Œ ‰JŒ ‰J
Œ

9

œ.
œœ ..

Œ 3œ
œœ œœ
œ ˙ œœ .
.
J J ‰ Œ ‰

F/A

3

E b7sus

A m(b6)

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ˙˙˙

Ó
Œ
œ œ ˙ œ
œœ œœ
Ó
‰ œ

œ ˙
J

F # 7sus 4

A m9

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ˙˙
œ ˙
j œ œœ œœ
œœ œœ
J
œ
J J
J J

œœ
œ

œ ˙
J

E b Maj7

5

j
œ œ œœœ œœœ ˙˙˙
A m(b6)

Transcription by Noel Thomson

A b dim7

Œ ‰
œœ b œ œj
J

E9

# œœœ .

Œ

œœ
 

 
 

186  

2

Snova
E b7sus13

j
˙
œ œ.
25
b œœ œœ ˙˙
& ‰ b œ œJ ˙
j
œœ
# œœ

A 7sus

œ.
& œœ ..

29

A1

A m7

33

&

œ

F/A

&‰

35

A bma7

&

œ.

œœ . b œ b œ œ
œ
b
b œœ
Œ
Ó

œ .
J œœœ .
.
G 7sus

! œ œ bœ

j
œœ
œœ

6

F #7sus

F #7

C9

œœ ..
œœ ..

œ
J

j
b œœ ... œœ
b œ b œœ

! œ

œ

! œ
G 7sus

G 7b9

œ #œ
œ œ ! #œ #œ œ
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

B m7 b 5

6

œœ ..
œœ ..

œ ! #œ œ

œ

j
œ

j

œ

E Maj7

œ

œ œ nœ œ
œ
J
E 7alt

œ œ œ
œ

G 7/F

œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ
‰ J

()
œ œ œœœ œ
J

Bb 9

F 7sus

œ œ
œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ
J ‰
bœ bœ

B Maj7/F #

j
œ
# ˙ œ # œ œœ . œ . œ œœ . œ # œ# # œœœ
œ Œ
‰ œ œJ œ . # œ œ Œ
J

E b7

& #œ #œ ‰ #œ

41

F #7sus

F m7

œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰
J
3
3
3

& œj b œ

39

œœ ..
œœ ..

! œ œ

E bma7

37

6

D9

A bma7/E b

j
œ œ ‰

! œ œ

œ bœ

œ œ bœ

#œ nœ œ #œ
! R
œ bœ œ #œ
œ


F #7

œ.

œ

F # m7

œ #œ nœ œ bœ
3

3

 

 
 

187  

Snova

B ma7(#11)

œ #œ
#œ œ #œ œ #œ
#
œ
œ
œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ

3

A ma7(#11)


& ! ! bœ ! bœ ! bœ œ œ bœ

!

43

3

E bma7(#11)

œ œ ‰ œ œ !œ
œ œ œ bœ œ ! œ ! œ ! œ ! #œ ! #œ ! œ ! œ
&
œ
F ma7(#11)

45

B bma7(#11)

A b 13

œ œ
! bœ œ œ ‰
&! œ ! œ œ œ

47

A2

A add9

49

&

œ

œ

œ

3

œ œ
œ œ ‰
&
F/A

51

& œ.

55

&

œ œ.

œœ

œœ

œ œ

œ œœœ œ

Fj ma7
œ

j
œ

G 7sus

œ bœ
œ
3


œ

œœ

œ

Œ

j
œ

œ.
œ.

œœ
! œ œ

j

œ

! œ
œ œ œ

G m7

j

œ

A b dim7

œ œœ ..
œ
J

œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

œ
B m7b5

 
 
 
 
 
 

œ.
œ.

E 7b9

j
œ

œ œ
bœ œ

œ œ
œ

œ #œ
‰ œ œ

Œ

3

G 7sus
53

œœ

œœ

D ma7

3

œœ œ œ œ

œ œ œ
3

3

C7

‰ bœ nœ œ œ
3

œ E 7b9 œ
!

œ

œ

! œ œ nœ œ bœ
 

 
 

188  

4

Snova

57

E b7sus

&

œ

F #7sus

59

bœ. bœ
" J

#œ œ
" œ #œ
‰. R "

#œ " œ #œ œ nœ

œ

A 7sus

&"

61

!
F m7
b
œ
œ
œ bœ
bœ œ bœ bœ œ " œ

ss.
œ G~~li~~~
J ‰

A bma7/E b

D ma7

B ma7/F #

!
#œ.

œ
œ œ

#œ " nœ

"

"

#œ " œ
œ

G 7sus

"

#œ.
" J

E ma7

œ
R

‰.

œ œ C ma7
œ

J ‰ œ

b

B m7b5
E 7alt
œ b œ œ œ b œ œ b œ B ma7n œ œ œ œ b œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œœœ
œ bœ nœ bœ œ
œ #œ œ #œ
&
œœ"
F 7sus

63

A1

A m7

67

&

E bma7

&"

69

œ

j F/A
œ

bœ œ

j
œ

"

œ

œ

"
" œ

œ

" œ

j

œ

j
#œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ "

j

œ

G 7sus

E b7

œ œ nœ " œ œ œ bœ

" "
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

œ

œ œ
œ œ
‰ œJ œJ ‰ œ
"
~~~~~~

œ
&œ " œ " œ "

65

Œ

œ œ œ.

œ œ " œ

G 7/F

œ bœ œ bœ

"

"

"

œ

œ œ bœ bœ

 

 
 

189  

Snova

œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ
71
b
œ
n
œ
œ
œ œ
bœ œ
œ œ #œ
& œ ‰ J ‰ ! bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ
A bma7

73

&

F #7sus

#œ #œ

F #7

B ma7(#11)


œ #œ #œ #œ nœ œ #œ !

œ

F ma7(#11)

&

B bma7(#11)

j
œ
b b b œœœ
J

j
œœ . œ
œœ .
& .

œ
81

& J

A add9

œ
& œœœ

F/A

83

œœ

œœ œœ

79

A2

œ œ # œœ œœ

A ma7(#11)

& #œ
œœ ..

F # m7

œ. #œ œ
œ œ #œ œ bœ œ



bœ #œ œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ nœ #œ œ œ œ

œ!

75

77

5

G 7b9

‰ # œœœœ
œœ
œ

A b 13

œœ

œ
œœ
œ

œ
œœ
œ

œ
J

œ
œ. #œ

œ

œœœœ
œœ
œ

œ

œ

œ œ

E bma7(#11)

œ
œ
b
b œœ

G 7sus

œœ
b
b œœ ...
!

#œ œ

A b dim7

œ

3

 
 
 
 
 
 

œ

œ

œ b œœ
œ
‰ J

œ

œ bœ
œœ
J
!
!

j
œ


œ œ

œ

œ

j
œ œ
œ
œ
œ

j
œœ
œœ

D m7

E 7b9

œ bœ.
œœ
R
! ‰
œ bœ
œ

œ
Œ

œ

œ

œœ
œœ
J


œ

œ

!

 

 
 

190  

6

Snova

85

~~~~ ~

&

!G 7sus
j
#œ œ
#œ œ

œœ
87
œœ
&

E b7sus

&

œ
b bb œœœ

F #7sus

œ
œ
& œœ
J

91

œ

œ

œœ
95
b
œ
& b œJ

œ

93

&

F 7sus

A m7

œ.
& œœœ ...
œ.

97

œ

œ

œ

b b œœœ
œ

œœ
œœ
J

œ

œ
œœ
œœ
J

œœ
b œœ

# # œœ
# œ
J

œ

œ
œœ
œ
J

œ
# # œœœ
‰ J

œœ
œ

œ
œœ
œ

œœ
œœ

œœ
œ
J

A bma7/E b

œœ
œœ
J

œ

b b œœœ
J

B ma7/F #

œ #œ
# # # œœœ
J

œœ
œ
J

œ
œœ
œ


# œœœ
‰ J

G 7sus

Œ
n n œœ

œœ
œ

B m7b5

œ
# # œœ

Ó
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

œœ
œ

œ
J

œœ
œ

œ

C7

œ
œœ
J

œ

B m7b5

j

D ma7

B bma7

œœ
b œœ
J

œ
J

b œœœ

G m7

3


# œœ
œ
J

œ

œ
œœ
œ

A 7sus

nœ œ
œ

œ

F ma7

89

œ

œœ
œ

œœ
œœ
J
œ.

œ
œœ
J

E 7b9

# # œœœ

J

F m7

œœ ..
œ.

E ma7

œœ
œ

Œ

œœ ..
œœ ..

C ma7

E 7alt

œ
J


œ

j
n œœ
œ

 

 
 

191  

 
Appendix  B  –  Formulaic  Components  
 

Formulaic Components
C


&4 œ œ ‰ Ó

Figure 1

1

C

Figure 2

7

Figure 4

C

1

b œ 2œ œ ‰ Ó

C

& œ #œ
9

œ #œ

œ

1

Figure 5

11

Figure 6

Figure 7

1

C

2

12

Figure 8

Œ

3

C

Œ


œ

œ

œ

œ bœ

j
œ

1

2

œ

œ bœ

3

4

3

1

2

Œ

Ó

j
œ

Œ

Ó

2

1

1

2

 
 

j
œ


Œ

Œ

œ

œ

4

j ‰
œ

j

C

œ

j ‰
œ

œ bœ

C

16

Œ

œ

1

14

1

œ b œ œJ ‰ Ó

C

j
œ ‰

1

C

C

1

j
œ ‰

œ #œ

œ œ œ ‰ Ó
J

1

1

3

Figure 3

3

C

& b œ œ œJ ‰ Ó

4

C

œ œ œ ‰ Ó

4

Œ
 

 
 

192  

 
Formulaic Components

2
Figure 9

C

17

Figure 10

Figure 11

C

19

C ma7
1

&

21

Figure 12

œ

œ

23 1

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ bœ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

4

3

œ

4

2

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

25

Figure 14

1

j ‰
œ

œ

œ

1

3

œ

2

C

Figure 13

2

1

œ

œ

j
œ

27

œ

1

C

29

Œ

C

32

1

2

œ

œ
œ œ
1
œ

œ
2

Œ

Ó
Ó

Œ

Ó

j
œ

Œ

Ó

j
œ

Œ

Ó

j
œ

Œ

Ó

1

1

Œ

j
œ

C

Figure 16

C

Figure 15

3

œ

1

œ œ œ œ œj ‰ Œ
1
œ

œ
 
 
 

œ

!
Œ
 

 
 

193  

3

Formulaic Components

C m(ma7)

Figure 17

&

œ

œ

Œ

33

Figure 18

1

C

34

Figure 19

Figure 20

1

œ

œ

Figure 22

1

œ

œ

7 (b 9)

œ

1

1

2

G


1

œ

2

C ma7

œ

& bœ nœ bœ nœ

45

2

1


œ
J

Œ

Ó

Œ

œ

j
œ

Œ

Œ

Ó

1

C

œ

œ
C


Ó

œ

2

j
œ

2

j
œ

œ

7 alt

43

Figure 24

œ

1

G

41

Figure 23

œ

œ

& bœ

40

œ

œ

œ ‰ Œ
J

œ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ

G 7Ñ9

Figure 21

1

3

G7

39

2

œ

1

C

37

œ

œ

œ

1

œ

œ

Œ

Ó

C

Œ

3

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

œ bœ

4

œ

j ‰
œ

Œ

 

 
 

194  

Formulaic Components

4
Figure 25

C

47

Figure 26

3

Figure 27

3

œ

51

52

G7

Figure 30

C

œ

54

1

3

& bœ

57

Figure 32

1

2

j
œ ‰

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

1

2

j
œ

1

2

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

2

C

Ó

œ œ
1

2

& # œj œ
1

3

œ
œ

1

2

œ

œ œ
1

4

2

œ

œ

œ
1

Ó

C

œ

œ

4

œ 1 œ2 Ó

2

Œ

œ

C7

58

œ

œ

1

œ

œ

C

Figure 31

œ

œ

œ

1

53

œ

C m(Ñ9)

& bœ

Figure 29

G 7#5(#11)

Figure 28

C

49

Ó

œ

1

4

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

œ

3

1

œ

 

 
 

195  

 
 
5

Formulaic Components
Figure 33

G 7 alt

&

59

Figure 34


2

œ

C ma7(#11)

&

61

3

œ

œ

1

4

œ

œ


œ

C

œ

4

œ #œ

1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2

œ

œ

Œ

œ
œ

œ

Ó

œ

Ó

 

 
 

196  

Appendix  C  –  Formulaic  Categories  and  Species  
 

Enclosure Chromaticism
Species A, B, C, D, E, F & G

Species A
Solar: Bar 29

F ma7

b 4
&bb 4 Œ

Species B
Solar: Bar 4
3

5

Fig. 16

C7

b
&bb Ó

Species C
Solar: Bar 5

j
nœ œ

œ

Fig. 7

F ma7

b
& b b nœ

œ

j

F ma7

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

œ

œ

Œ
Ó

œ

œ

Fig. 8

Species B, A, G & C
Solar: Bar 200
B b7
6

b
&bb Ó

b

Fig. 7

b

Fig. 8

G m7

b

& b b œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ
œ œ

Species F
Solar: Bar 53

F ma7

b
&bb Ó

Species A, E & D
b
Solar: Bar 106 E m7
16

Fig. 10

Fig. 16

Fig. 25

13

b

E ma7
E m7
A 7
D ma7
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
œ
b œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ œ b œj ‰

Species E & D.1
C m7
Solar: Bar 62
10

b

Ó

Œ
A b7

Fig. 5

Fig. 27

œ

œ bœ œ œ nœ bœ bœ
Fig. 26
D bma7

Fig. 30

Fig. 19

C7

#œ #œ Œ

Ó

F m7

œ œ œ nœ bœ nœ ‰ bœ
J bœ

Fig. 1

Fig. 31 Fig. 28

œ bœnœ œ œbœnœbœ œ bœ œ
bb Ó ‰ œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ
œœ œœnœbœ œ ‰ Œ Ó
& b
J
Fig. 16

D m7b5

Fig. 25

 
 
 
 
 

G 7b9

Fig. 24

C m7

Fig. 2 Fig. 30 Fig. 5

nb
n
 

 
 

197  

 
 
2

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D, E, F & G

C m7
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
!
D b7

Species A & G
Old Folks: Bar 51 D m7
21

œ

&b

Fig. 16

Fig. 10

Species A & C
Son of Thirteen: Bar 99 B m(ma7)

‰ # œj # œ œ œ œ

23

œ bœ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

F7

Species B & C
Old Folks: Bar 36

F7

&b Ó

Œ

26

Fig. 16

œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
œ

Fig. 8

Fig. 16

B bma7(#11)

bœ ‰ Œ
J

Fig. 11

Ó

œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ
nœ œ
Fig. 8

Fig. 1

b

œ œ œ

B bma7

Fig. 7

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

Species C, D & E
Old Folks: Bar 45 G 7( #11)

& b nœ

28

Fig. 8

œ #œ #œ nœ œ
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
#œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ
Fig. 11 Fig. 5

Species F & D
Son of Thirteen: Bar 251

œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ

B m(ma7)
30

&

Fig. 26

33

&

Fig. 25

bœ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ

C # 7alt

œ œ #œ œ nœ œ

#œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œ
# œ œ œ œ # œœ

G ma7

Species A, C & D
Old Folks: Bar 47 C 7

&b Œ

Fig. 5

Fig. 2 Fig. 11

B b7

n

Fig. 9

Fig. 31

Fig. 25

37

Fig. 27

Fig. 5

Species E & D.2
Son of Thirteen: Bar 153

n

œ ‰ Œ
J
F # 7alt

Ó

œœ Œ Ó
œ

b

r
œ œ bœ nœ nœ bœ œ œ nœ #œ bœ nœ
‰. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ
n
Fig. 16

Fig. 8

Fig. 1

 
 
 
 
 

(Em9)

Fig. 14

Fig. 5

 

 
 

198  

 
 

& b œJ

Species G & D
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 120
41

&‰
˙

Species G.2
C 7sus
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 147
43

&

œ

œ
J

œ

œ

œ

F ma7(#11)

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 10


J

A ma7(#11)

3

Enclosures - Species A, B, C, D, E, F & G

B b maj7( # 11)

Species G.1
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 101 39

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 10 Fig. 5

œ bœ

œ

œ
C # 7sus

œ

Fig. 10

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#œ.

C ma7(#11)

œ

Œ

œ

œ
J

Ó

Œ
 

 
 

199  

Passing Tone Chromaticism
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 60

b 4 #œ
&bb 4

œ

œ

œ

D m7b5

Species A, B, C & D

œ

G 7b9

œ nœ

C m7

œ

Fig. 31

Fig. 12

b b œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ ‰ œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ œJ ‰
b
& b

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 205
3

C m7

Fig. 3

œ #œ œ œ nœ nœ bœ nœ
bb b
&
C7

Fig. 4

9

&b Ó

E b9

!

Species B.2
Son of Thirteen: Bar 152
11

& œ.

Fig. 4
Species B.3
Son of Thirteen: Bar 171
13

&

G bma7(#11)

Species B.5
Son of Thirteen: Bar 208
18

œ

Fig. 25

œ

Fig. 18

œ

œ œ

œ
œ

œ

B bma7(#11)

˙

Fig. 3

œ œ #œ œ œ
œ
œ

C ma7(#11)

œ
œ #œ

3

Fig. 31

Fig. 3

Fig. 5

œ nœ œ
J

bœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
b
œ
b
œ
œ
bœ bœ

œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ
J ‰

G m7

F

œ

œ #œ

Fig. 3

Species B.4
Son of Thirteen: Bar 196
15

Fig. 2

G ma7

Fig. 4

œ

# œG ma7 œ

Fig. 2 Fig. 3

bœ œ nœ
œ b œ œ Fig. 3
œ

Ó

œ œ œ œ nœ nœ bœ œ nœ œ bœ bœ nœ
J ‰ Œ
3

œ


J

F 7alt

F ma7

6

Species B.1
Old Folks: Bar 40


J

 
 
 
 
 
 

nnb

Œ

n

œ
Ó

bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
J ‰

Fig. 25

#œ œ ‰ œ

G ma7(#11)

Fig. 31

œ œ
‰ J J ‰

 

 
 

200  

2
Passing Tones - Species A, B, C & D
Species B.6
Son of Thirteen: Bar 250
21

&

Species B.7
Snova: Bar 44
23

#
œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ F 7sus
b
œ
n
œ
œ #œ œ
œ #œ œ #œ #œ
! œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ
œ!Œ Ó

A bma7

G 7b9

Fig 4

Fig. 18

Fig. 14

Species C.3
Son of Thirteen: Bar 214

&‰

B m7

œ

œ

Species C.4
Son of Thirteen: Bar 252

Species C.5
Snova: Bar 42

&

C # 7alt

œ

œ bœ

F #7

Fig. 4

œ.
Fig. 1

œ
F # m7

œ


œ

œ œ œ
œ bœ œ

A7

Fig. 5

bœ œ œ œ bœ
Fig. 7

œ

Fig. 3

œ bœ bœ

œ œ œ Œ

Ó

Ó

F # m7

œ

#œ.

C maj7( # 11)

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ #œ nœ œ bœ bœ
! ! bœ ! bœ ! bœ œ
Fig. 3

3

 
 
 
 

n

œ

œ

Fig. 17

B ma7(#11)

3

Œ

Fig. 31 Fig. 21

œ œ œ
R

‰.

b

Fig. 31 Fig. 7 Fig. 2 Fig. 11 Fig. 5

œ nœ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ
œ

&b Œ

36

œ œ ‰ œ œ
J ‰ Œ

Fig. 24

Fig. 18

&b Ó

&

Ó

F ma7(#11)

Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 39 E b 9
30

34

Fig. 3

Species C.1
Old Folks: Bar 22 E b 9

32

œ

œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ
#
œ
#
œ
!
œ
&

œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ

Species B.8
Snova: Bar 71

28

œ bœ

A ma7(#11) 3

Fig. 31

25

œ

œ


J

#œ.

B m(ma7)

œ bœ

bbb

 

 
 

201  

Passing Tones - Species A, B, C & D
Species D.1
Solar: Bar 83
38

D bma7

b œ
&bb

3

œ

Fig. 3

Species D.2
Snova: Bar 73 F #7sus
39

#œ #œ
&

œ

œ

Fig. 19

œ

!

œ.

œ

Fig. 11

œ
œ

œ #œ
Fig. 19

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


œ bœ

nnn

œ
œ bœ

 

 
 

202  

Dominant Cadence
Species A
Species A.1
Old Folks: Bar 35

F7

4
&b 4 Ó

Species A.2
F ma7
Snova: Bar 55
4

Fig. 12

Œ

!œœ

œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ

&

Fig. 24

Species A.4
Solar: Bar 119
10

b
&bb Ó

Species A.5
Solar: Bar 167
13

D bma7

b
&bb Œ

Species A.7
Solar: Bar 43
19

D bma7

b
&bb Ó

Species A.6
Solar: Bar 179
16

D bma7

F m7

b
&bb Ó

Fig. 7

Fig. 21

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ

Fig. 7

Fig. 6

œ E 7b9œ

B m7b5

Fig. 12

Species A.3
F 7sus
Snova: Bar 63
7

B bma7

œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ
œ
œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ nœ œ ! ‰ Œ Ó
Œ
R

C m7

!

n

b

E 7sus
! œ œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ. bœ bœ
! J

Fig. 21 Fig. 11

B bma7

œ œnœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ
j
œ œ#œ œ#œ œbœnœ bœ œ œ ! œ ‰ Œ Ó
œ
B m7b5

Fig. 12

E 7alt

Fig. 21

nœ bœ nœ bœ

œ œ

D m7b5

Fig. 7

Fig. 6 Fig. 7
G 7b9

‰ œ ‰
J

Fig. 21

A m7

Fig. 28

œ œ #œ

bœ œ œ œ nœ
‰ J

Fig. 21

œ

œ
‰ #œ
‰ Ó

Fig. 2

Fig. 26

Fig. 20

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

C m7

Œ

Fig. 21

#œ nœ nœ bœ

œ

œ

G 7b9

B b7

Ó

C m7

œ nœ bœ œ
œ
œ œ nœ

D m7b5

Fig. 24

nœ bœ

œ
J ‰ Œ

C m7

Fig. 6

œ b œ œ b œD m7b5œ n œ b œ G 7b9
œ œ œ nœ œ
Fig. 7

bbb

œ

œ

Ó
œ


 

 
 

203  

Dominant Cadence
Species B
Species B.1
Solar: Bar 24

b 4 œ
&bb 4

D m7b5

œ

G 7b9

œ

œ

Fig. 7

D bma7

Species B.2
Solar: Bar 71
2

b
&bb Ó

Fig. 7

Species B.4
D 7b9
Old Folks: Bar 24

&b

Species B.5
Snova: Bar 40
11

C m7

j
œ ‰ Œ

Fig. 7

C7

œ.

œ

G 7b9

&

Species B.6
Snova: Bar 70
13

œ bœ œ œ
œ bœ œ
œ

Fig. 5

G m7

Ó

E b7

Species B.7
C # 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 253 15

&

œ

Fig. 23

œ

F ma7

Fig. 7

Fig. 6

9

G 7b9


œ
bb Ó # œ œ n œ n œ b œ œ œ n œ b œ b œ œ b œ œ n œ n œ œ
b
&

œ œ œ #œ Ó

Species B.3
Solar: Bar 147
5

œ bœ œ œ

D m7b5

œ

!

Fig. 23

œ #œ

Fig. 31

Fig. 7

œ œ œ
œ nœ bœ œ œ

Fig. 23

#œ nœ œ #œ
! R
œ bœ œ #œ
œ

œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ bœ bœ
! R
!

Fig. 23

Fig. 7

Fig. 23

œ

œ
Fig. 5

œ
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fig. 30
G m7

F #7sus

œ ‰ Œ
J

Ó

r
#œ ! ‰ Œ

n

Ó

A bma7

œ b œ ‰ œJ ‰ Ó

j
œ ‰

C m a7(#11)

nnb

Œ

Ó
 

 
 

204  

Dominant Cadence
Species C

F m7

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 7

b 4
&bb 4 ‰ œ ‰ œ œ

Species C.2
Solar: Bar 20
4

7

b j
&bb œ ‰ Œ
b
&bb Ó

Species C.4
Solar: Bar 69
10

b
&bb Ó

A m7b5
Species C.5
Old Folks: Bar 11
13

&b Ó

Species C.6
Son of Thirteen: Bar 164
15

œ nœ

Fig. 7

œ œ bœ œ
Fig. 13

E b m7

œ

A b7


œ bœ ‰ œ œ
Fig. 6

F m7

œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

E b m7

Fig. 16

œ

D bma7

Fig. 22

A b7

j œ.
bœ œ œ
b
œ
œ

œ #œ
! bœ nœ nœ œ bœ nœ

œ

œ nœ œ

B b7

œ œ œ

œ

œ
œ

Ó

œ

Ó

Fig. 1

D bma7

D 7b9

Œ

E bma7

‰ œ ‰ #œ ‰ œ ‰ bœ

œ ‰ ‰ œ
Œ

E bma7

œ

Fig. 6

E bma7

Species C.3
Solar: Bar 30

B b7

œ œ œ ‰ Ó
œ jbœ
œ

nnb
Œ

D m(ma7)
œ œ œ Aœ7alt
œ
œ œ œ #œ œ #œ
#œ œ #œ nœ œ #œ #œ nœ
œœ‰ Œ Ó

Fig. 16

Fig. 6

Fig. 2 Fig. 21

Fig. 9

Fig. 26

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fig. 30

n

 

 
 

205  

Clichés
Species A, B, C & D
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 84

D m7b5

b 4
&bb 4 œ

Fig. 17

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 192
2

b
&bb œ

D m7b5

Fig. 17

Species A.3
Old Folks: Bar 39
3

&b œ

E b9

Fig. 17

œ

œœœœœœ

Species A.4
E m7b5(9)
Old Folks: Bar 49
4

&b

Fig. 13

Species A.5
Solar: Bar 210
7

F ma7

b
&bb Ó

Species B.1
Old Folks: Bar 17
11

13

Species B.3
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 96 16

&

œ

œ

œ bœ

œ bœ œ #œ nœ œ œ

œ #œ

B m(ma7)

Œ Ó

bbb

œœ œœ‰œÓ
œ
œ
n
œ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
J

nnb

œ

œ

œ #œ
œ #œ œ

Fig. 19


Œ

nnb

œ

Fig. 31 Fig. 17

œ

Fig. 22

Fig. 21

œ

œ

#œ #œ œ #œ
œ #œ #œ nœ
œ

œ

Fig. 5

œ #œ

Fig. 15

3

E bma7

œ œ
J
G ma7

œ.

œ #œ #œ nœ nœ.
Fig. 5

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Œ
D m7

Fig. 17

Fig. 15

!

œ œ nœ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ #œ

B b7

œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ

Fig. 15

œ

‰ œœœ

A7

œ
‰ J

œ

œ

A 7b9

Fig. 13

F # m9

œ

G 7b9

œ

F m7
nœ œ œ bœ nœ bœ
#œ nœ

&b Ó

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Fig. 16 Fig. 17

E m9

Species B.2
Son of Thirteen: Bar 133

œ

œ

œ

G 7b9

Œ

n

‰ Ó

 

 
 

206  

2

Clichés

Species B.4
G bma7(#11)
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 111 18

& b˙

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 105
21

FIg. 15

E bma7

œ bœ œ

b
&bb Ó

Species C.2
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 122 24

œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ

FIg. 3
G ma7(#11)

Œ

Species D.2
Snova: Bar 38
30

& bœ

Species D.3
Snova: Bar 61
33

E b7

3

œ

j
œ

œ #œ #œ
œ #œ œ œ

Fig. 1

E b m7

A b7

œ œ
bœ œ
bœ œ ‰ œ

D bma7

bœ ‰ Œ
J

FIg. 29

B bma7(#11)
œ œ
œ œ
J
J

FIg. 29

œ œœ œ
&b ‰ œ œ œ J

Species D.1
Old Folks: Bar 15 G m7
27

œ
‰ J

A ma7(#11)

œ

œ

C7

j

FIg. 32

œ œ bœ œ œ bœ

F ma7(#11)

œ

Œ

Ó

nnn

Ó

b

3
b œ œ n œ œ œ3 b œ œ œ3
œ œ

E m9

A bma7

œ.

FIg. 32

œ

bœ bœ

FIg. 2

œ œ œœ œ
‰ J
Œ
G 7b9

bbb

Ó

n
Ó

A 7sus
D ma7
G 7sus
C ma7
œ #œ ! œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ ! nœ œ ! œ œ œ œ
J ‰
Œ ‰. R !
!
! œ

FIg. 32

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

207  

Pentatonics
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 58

3

&b ‰

Species A.6
j
Son of Thirteen: œ
Bar 211
14

&

Fig. 5

‰ #œ


J

Œ

œ
‰ J

#œ.

A 7sus

˙ ~~

B bma7(#11)

Fig. 11

œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
&œ œ
&

œ #œ #œ

A ma7(#11)

Fig. 11

œ

nnb

Fig. 31

Ó

D # 7alt


#œ œ
#
œ
œ

n
nœ œ

Fig. 3

œ #œ #œ œ
œ œ #œ #œ

F 7alt

œ.

‰ Ó

Fig. 5

j
bœ bœ bœ
b œ b œ ‰ œ œj œ

œ
œ œ œ F ma7(#11)
œ œ #œ œ #œ œ nœ œ

Species A.7
Son of Thirteen: C ma7(#11)
Bar 254 17

Species A.8
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 206 20

j
œ œ nœ bœ

D ma7

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

Fig. 17

œ œ œ œ
J
œ

Fig. 11

bœ bœ œ

œ

E b9

Fig. 11

G bma7(#11)

Species A.5
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 194 11

œ

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
r
bœ œ bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ ! ‰ Œ

D # 7alt

Species A.4
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 150 8

œ

Fig. 11

C # 7sus

Species A.3
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 148 5

D bma7

œ œ œ œ

b 4
&bb 4 Ó

Species A.2
b
Old Folks: Bar 38 B ma7

Species A, B, C & D

A b7

E b m7

Fig. 5

E b 7(# 9)

Fig. 10

œ #œ

œ

œ

Fig. 11

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#œ #œ

œ œ œ œ
œ bœ Œ

E m7

A bma7(#11)

œ #œ #œ
œ œ œ œ
œ

Fig. 11

œ bœ nœ ‰ Ó

œ œ b œ œ œJ ‰ Œ

œ # œ # œj ‰

œ.

 

 
 

208  

2

Pentatonic

Species B.1
Son of Thirteen: B m(ma7)
Bar 99 22

#œ #œ œ œ œ
Œ ‰ œ œ œ
#œ #œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ Ó
J

Fig. 13

œ œ œ œ #œ
‰ J

Species B.2
Son of Thirteen: F ma7(#11)
Bar 124 26

&

œ

Fig. 13
F

Species C.1
Old Folks:
Bar 31 29

&b ‰

Species C.2
Old Folks:
Bar 43 31

A7

&b Ó

j

œ
J

œ

E m7

Fig. 31

œ œ œ

Fig. 11

œ œ
Œ ‰. R œ
D m7

!
j
œ

œ #œ œ œ
œ œ
Fig. 11

B m7

œ #œ Œ

œ nœ bœ bœ œ
bœ œ nœ bœ

Fig. 7

œ œ œ œ
œ œbœ œ œ
œ

Fig. 11

b
Ó

œ œ bœ œ
Ó
bœ œ œ œ œ
Fig. 7

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

j œ.
œ

Ó

 

 
 

209  

Motivic
Species A, B & C
Species A.1
Solar: Bar 88

F ma7

b 4
&bb 4 Ó
F m7

b
&bb

6

E bma7

œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

œ nœ

b œ
&bb

4

œ

œ

œ

œ

D bma7

bb n œ # œ n œ
b
&
Fig. 11

œ

œ

œ nœ

œ

E b m7

œ

œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

œ bœ nœ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

bœ nœ bœ
œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

œ

‰ bœ

nœ #œ #œ nœ

A b7

œ bœ

Œ

G 7b9

Fig. 11

Fig. 23
B b7

F m7

Fig. 30

E bma7

E b m7

A b7

œ

œ œ œ
bœ nœ nœ bœ œ

F ma7

Fig. 7

œ

Fig. 11

D m7b5

j œ
b

& b b œ bœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ Ó

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 149
10

B b7

Œ

Fig. 11

Fig. 11

8

œ œ œ

nœ #œ nœ œ.
œ nœ œ
œ œ
J

C7

Fig. 30
D bma7

œ œ œ nœ

Fig. 30

D m7b5

G 7b9

b œ

œ
œ
& b b œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

14

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ

b
œ
œ
& b b œ œ œj n œ œ œ œj œ n œ
C m7

18

Species B.2
Snova: Bar 74
21

F #7sus

Fig. 30

F #7

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ

G m7

œ #œ œ

F # m7

Fig. 30

œ œ nœ
Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ

œ œ œ ‰ Œ
J

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fig. 30

nnn

B ma7(#11)

Œ œ bœ œ bœ #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ œ bœ œ
Œ Ó
œ
œ

nœ #œ œ œ #œ
Fig. 7

Fig. 30

Fig. 30

 

 
 

210  

2

Motivic

œ #œnœœ#œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

‰ ‰ #œ
#œ œ
œ #œ
œ œ
#œ œ J ‰
&

Species B.3
A 7alt
Son of Thirteen:
Bar 177 24

D m(ma7)

Fig. 26

# œ B m(ma7) œ
œ
œ

29

#œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ
#
œ
œœ
œ

#œ #œ œ #œ
&
Fig. 30

Fig. 30

œ #œ œ #œ
œ
œ
& œ #œ

33

Species C.1 G bma7(#11)
j
Son of Thirteen: œ
Bar 107 38

&

œ.

Fig. 34

bœ ˙
J

œ

b

B ma7(#11)
œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ.
œ

b œœ ˙˙
J

bœ. bœ

œ.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

œ œ bœ
J

œ
bœ.
J bœ.
bœ ˙
J

Ó
 

 
 

211  

Reharmonization
Species A, B & C

b 4
œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ
œ
& b b 4 œ nœ œ
bœ bœ bœ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
C m7

Species A.1
Solar: Bar 37

G m7

Fig. 31

Fig. 31

Species A.2
Solar: Bar 61
5

E b m7

D bma7

Fig. 27

Fig. 2 Fig. 8

D m7b5

Fig. 33

j
œ ‰ Œ

G 7b9

Ó

b bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ
œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ Œ
&bb
œ
C m7

Fig. 2

Species C.1
Solar: Bar 41

G m7

Fig. 11

b
& b b #œ nœ

Species C.2
Old Folks: Bar 12

Fig. 13

F ma7

Fig. 28

D 7b9

&b Ó

œ

Fig. 13


œ #œ

œ #œ

Fig. 11

œ œ
#œ #œ

3
3
œ
Œ œ b œ œ b œ n œ b œ b œ œ œ n œ œ œ b œ n œ œ # œ # œ œ Œ b œœ œœ n œœœ
b œ bœ

nnb

G7

Fig. 7

 

Fig. 26

C7

bb ‰ b œ œ œ b œ n œ œ œ n œ b œ b œ n œ n œ n œ
b
&
#œ œ

Species B.1
Solar: Bar 133

17

Fig. 25 Fig. 26

A b7

Fig. 15

15

Fig. 6

G m7

b nœ bœ œ nœ nœ

&bb
#œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ #œ nœ œ œ #œ #œ Œ Ó

Species A.3
Solar: Bar 190

12

Fig. 33

C m7

Fig. 33

9

Fig. 7

C7

Fig. 27

Fig. 10

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fig. 9

Fig. 27