You are on page 1of 12

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN

Comprehensive Instructional Design Plan
Manieka Palmer
University of West Georgia

1

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
Introduction
The comprehensive instructional design packet will be one that I will design for a 7th
grade reading class. In the packet, the focus will be comprehension and identifying key evidence
from within the story of “The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle”. This is a novel that the
students are reading as a class and as a tool to develop various targeted skills needed in their
reading class. One of the things that I have noticed about the novel that the students are reading
is that it lacks pictures. Many students in reading classes are struggling with reading and their
Lexiles are below grade level.
With that being said, many students are lacking comprehension skills due to their struggle
with reading. Students who are struggling will benefit from some sort of visual image and text to
help support and develop their skills where needed. The instructional design plan that will be
used for the project will be a poster of graphic and words to help guide students through their
thinking process by posing various questions that will help them with reading comprehension so
they would be able to identify key evidence with ease. Students will also have to create a poster
based on the evidence/events that took place in book. That way they are taking an active part in
their leaning and being creative at the same time.
Another instructional design that will be the used in this process is comics. Due to the
fact that “The Adventure of Charlotte Doyle” lacks visual images, a comic script will be
designed to reiterate key events from the book/chapter as a model. The students will be asked to
create their own comic design of the key events they have identified within the story. This will be
a great activity and instructional activity for the students because they will get the opportunity to
share what they think the characters and scenes look like. The students will become more

2

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
engaged in wanting to find those key events so that they can design their comics and create
posters based on those events.
Description of Client and Instructional Problem
At Jane Macon Middle School, a 7th grade Reading teacher by the name of Brittany
Caracciolo, would like a lesson to be designed based on a book called Charlotte Doyle. The book
of Charlotte Doyle is about a thirteen-year-old girl who was from Barrington Better Schools for
Girls, wanting to travel to America on a ship. Before boarding the ship, the young girl imagined
her adventure being limited to learning how to reinvent herself with fancy clothes, proper hats,
and fabulous hair. Once she arrives on the ship, the Seahawk, Charlotte learns that she can have
more of an adventure without wearing the fancy attire, but she gets caught up in “Murder!
Mutiny! Mayhem!” This book is an adventure story that appeals to many students.
Currently, Mrs. Caracciolo’s students are working through the book of Charlotte Doyle,
chapter 9-11. The 7th grade reading teacher shared that the students are struggling with
distinguishing between what events and evidence are significant in the story. She wants me to
design an instructional plan based on distinguishing between evidence, so the students can
develop the skills of identifying how to identify the important information based on the key
events that are taking place in the story.
One of the challenges for Mrs. Caracciolo is having enough time to work with students’
throughout the lessons because there are only sixty minutes in a class period for teacher. Usually,
five minutes out of sixty minutes are used to help the students to settled down and get focused.
Also, behavior issues with students tend to play a role on how effective her instructional time is
in the classroom. But for the most part, she is finding herself having to conduct a lot of one-on-

3

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
one conferences with the students in order to get them going in the right direction. She said that
her one-on-one conferences seem to be the most effective so far within her lessons.
Description of the Instructional Design Model
The ADDIE model was the focus of me developing a comprehensive plan for my
client. The steps represented in the ADDIE model is a great guideline for the students to follow
when determining the key evidence provided within the story of Charlotte Doyle. It is also a
great model for me to follow as I develop the plan that will assist with Mrs. Caracciolo’s
instructional need for her students.
The first step will be analysis stage. This process allowed me to analysis what the
teacher have already started implementing into her lessons to assist the students with identifying
key evidence/events. Mrs. Caracciolo is teaching a total of 160 students per day and her
classroom size is 30-32 students per class. With a large class, Mrs. Caracciolo is very limited to
the amount of help she can provided to each students, taking into consideration the frequent
behavior issues with a few students. The resource that is used by the teacher is having them to
fold a piece of paper in 4 squares, then labeling the characters, listing their traits, identifying
what is taking place in the chapter, and sketching a picture of how the scene look from their
perspective. The teacher will have a class set of the Charlotte Doyle book for the students to
read.
Next, we will focus on the design stage. The teacher will read the chapter with the
students as a class. After reading the story, Mrs. Caracciolo will conduct an open discussion with
the students about what is taking place in the story and what appears the be the focus in that
particular chapter. The teacher will demonstrate how to create a story map that reflects the key

4

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
events within chapters 9-11. Students will use the book to help the teacher brainstorm ideas for
the story map by reflecting back on specific scenes, comparing and contrasting information, and
taking a closer look at the characters’ feelings.
The next stage is development. This will give the students the opportunity to
brainstorm some ideas and facts that can be pulled from the story to complete the story map.
Students will take part in developing their own story maps and graphs using
www.piktograph.com. Mrs. Caracciolo will demonstrate how to create a graph along with
possible answers that will lead to them picking out key events/evidence within the story. The
learners will look back into the chapters and make notes based on their findings that could be a
possible lead to the evidence/events.
The implementation stage is require the teacher to teach the lesson for 2 weeks due to
the 45 minutes each class period will have to read and discuss the chapters. Mrs. Caracciolo will
have examples of what are facts and events for the students to refer too. The teacher will also
have a story map as a model for students to reflect upon, but the model will be based on a
previous chapter.
The final stage is to evaluate. Students will turn in their story maps to their teacher
for evaluation and a rubric will be used to score their work using artifact 1. This will give Mrs.
Caracciolo the opportunity to gauge what her students understand and if they can produce a story
map, with answers, to support the Chapter they are reading as a class.
Standards Addressed
The Georgia Common Core Standards that will be addressed throughout this instructional plan
consists of the following below:
5

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
ELAGSE7RI1: Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well
as inferences drawn from the text.
ELASE7RL2: Determine a theme and/or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of
the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
ELASE7RI3: Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence
individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events.)
ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

Standard One
2. The visually literate student identifies a variety of image sources, materials, and types.
Learning Outcomes:
c. Identifies different image and visual media types and materials (e.g., paintings,
prints, photographs, born-digital images, data models)
d. Articulates ways images can be used to communicate data and information (e.g.,
charts, graphs, maps, diagrams, models, renderings, elevations).

Standard Five
The visually literate student uses images and visual media effectively.
Performance indicators:
1.

The visually literate student uses images effectively for different purposes.

Learning Outcomes:
a. Plans for strategic use of images and visual media within a project
b. Selects appropriate images and visual media aligned with a project’s purpose
c. Integrates images into projects purposefully, considering meaning, aesthetic criteria, visual
impact, and audience

6

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
d. Uses images for a variety of purposes (e.g., as illustrations, evidence, visual models, primary
sources, focus of analysis)
e. Uses images for subject-specific and interdisciplinary research, communication, and learning
Explanation of Artifacts
In artifacts one and two, I used the Dual Coding Theory because many of her students
are visual learners but we wanted to keep provide images that students can use to connect to
reading while searching for evidence within their story. Mrs. Caracciolo will give her students a
story map to create as she is reviewing over her original copy during class. That way the students
will have their own copy and something to refer to as they are working to seek key evidence
within the story. The goal is to provide students with an alternative visual that will assist them in
finding the answers in the story that will support their skills of identifying key events within a
story or text.
Reflection
This project was very helpful with allowing me to understand how to create an
instructional design lesson for Mrs. Caracciolo’s class. In the beginning, I faced the challenge of
having to catch up on what the students were reading in order to understand how to design a
lesson that can be used within the classroom to help her students. Then I was faced with coming
up with a different approach because the original approach that I was seeking to use was already
in place with Mrs. Caracciolo. So, I was left with having to brainstorm a totally new approach
that could build onto what she was already doing but take it to another level where the students
would become more engaged. Overall, Mrs. Caracciolo was very helpful and provided me with
enough information to begin my project for her class.
7

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
Artifact 1

8

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
Artifact 2

9

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
Grading Rubric 1
GRAPHIC ORGANIZER RUBRIC
Criteria
Organizati
on

4

3

Exceeding

meeting

Extremely
well
organized.
Order
& structure of
information is
compelling
and flows
smoothly

2

1

Organized.
Structure
allows reader
to move
through
content
without
confusion.
Flows
smoothly

Somewhat
organized
structure
allows
reader to
move
through
some of the
content
without
confusion.
Flow is
sometimes
interrupted.

Poorly
organized. A
clear sense of
direction is not
evident. Flow is
frequently
interrupted.

Content

Thorough
and insightful
understandin
g of content

Complete
understandin
g of content

Shows
some
understandi
ng of
content

Shows
incomplete
understanding
of material

Creativity

Enthusiastica
lly uses
materials and
ideas for
enhancemen
t

Use of
materials and
ideas for
enhancement

Shows
some use of
materials
and ideas

Shows minimal
effort for
enhancement of
materials and
ideas

Ideas

Insightful and
well
considered
ideas making
multiple
connections

Ideas are
considered;
more than
one
thoughtful
connection is
made

Ideas are
somewhat
on topic;
makes
some
connections

Ideas are
unclear

10

few connections

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
Grading Rubric2
Category

4

Main Idea
(weight x2)

The topic and
messages of the
infographic are
clear and easily
understood
Details (including
labels) support the
main idea without
distracting with
clutter.
At least 4 accurate
facts/concepts are
displayed in the
infographic
Color, shape, size,
and arrangement
of graphics
contribute
meaning to the
overall message.
The design/layout
is neat, clear, and
visually appealing.
Capitalization and
punctuation are
correct
throughout.

Details

Content Accuracy
(weight x2)
Graphics Visual

Design/layout
Mechanics

3

2

1

Topic and main
ideas are clear.

Topic is given but main
ideas are unclear or
lacking.

Topic and/or main ideas
are absent or very
unclear.

Detail is added to
support each main
idea with minimal
clutter.

More is needed for
understanding. Some
are distracting.

Very little detail is
provided for the main
ideas and understanding
is limited.

3 accurate facts are
displayed.

2 accurate facts are
displayed.

Fewer than 2 accurate
facts are displayed.

Color, shape, size,
and arrangement
are eye catching
and contribute some
mearning.

Color, shape, size, and
arrangement are
present but do not add
to the information.

Color, shape, size, and
arrangement are
distracting or misleading.

Is attractive in terms
of design, layout and
neatness.
There is 1 error in
capitalization or
punctuation.

Is acceptably attractive
though it may be a bit
messy.
There are 2 errors in
capitalization or
punctuation.

Is distractingly messy,
unattractive, or very
poorly designed.
More than 2 errors in
capitalization or
punctuation.

Your
score

Total

/24

11

COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PLAN
Reference Page
ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. (2011, October). Retrieved
December 1, 2016 from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/visualliteracy
Create Easy Infographics, Reports, Presentations | Piktochart. (2015). Retrieved December 01,
2016, from https://piktochart.com/

12