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Corey Bell

Geometry, Grade 9-10


Chap 2: Geometric Reasoning
Time: 12 Days
27 Students
Consists of 9 Total Lesson Plans
Geometry, Holt McDougal

1. Learning Goals:
Use inductive reasoning to identify patterns and make conjectures.
Find counterexamples to disprove conjectures.
Identify, write, and analyze the truth value of conditional statements.
Write the inverse, converse, and contrapositive of a conditional statement.
Apply the Law of Detachment and the Law of Syllogism in logical reasoning.
Write and analyze biconditional statements.
Review properties of equality and use them to write algebraic proofs.
Identify properties of equality and congruence.
Write two-column proofs.
Prove geometric theorems by using deductive reasoning.
Write flowchart and paragraph proofs.
2. Rationale:
Biologists use inductive reasoning to develop theories about migration patterns.
To identify species of butterfly, you must know what characteristics one butterfly
species has that another does not.
You can use inductive and deductive reasoning to decide whether a common myth is
accurate.
A gardener can plan the color of hydrangeas she plants by checking the pH of the soil.
3. Learning Objectives:
Use inductive reasoning to identify patterns and make conjectures.
Find counterexamples to disprove conjectures.
Identify, write, and analyze the truth value of conditional statements.
Write the inverse, converse, and contrapositive of a conditional statement.
Apply the Law of Detachment and the Law of Syllogism in logical reasoning.
Write and analyze biconditional statements.
Use properties of equality to write algebraic proofs.
Identify properties of equality and congruence.
Write two-column proofs.
Prove geometric theorems by using deductive reasoning.
Write flowchart and paragraph proofs.
4. Content Standards:
CC.9-12.G.CO.9- Prove theorems about lines and angles.
CC.9-12.G.CO.10- Prove theorems about triangles.
CC.9-12.G.CO.11- Prove theorems about parallelograms.
CC.9-12.G.SRT.4- Prove theorems about triangles.
5. Lesson Plan: Attached

6. Schedule of Lessons:
2-1 Lesson

Using Inductive Reasoning to

1.5 Days

2-2 Lesson
2-3 Lesson

Make Conjectures
Conditional Statements
Using Deductive Reasoning to

1 Day
1 Day

2-4 Lesson

Verify Conjectures
Biconditional Statements &

1 Day

Mid-Chapter Review & Quiz


2-5 Lesson
2-6 Lesson
2-7 Lesson
End of Chapter Review &

Definitions
Covers Section 2-1 thru 2-4
Algebraic Proof
Geometric Proof
Flowchart & Paragraph Proofs
Covers all of Chapter 2

1.5 Days
1 Day
2 Days
1 Day
2 Days

Chapter Test
7. Preparation/ Materials:
Projector for notes
Have bookwork pages and numbers ready to be assigned
Have worksheet for each section prepared
Have activity worksheets prepared
Be prepared to answer any and all questions assigned to students
8. Assessment of Prior Knowledge: Each day, we will do some sort of review over the
material covered the previous day. Some days this will consist of doing a few warmup
problems on white boards, other times it will be going over any questions from the
homework as a class, and sometimes it will be providing an example or two for the
students to do in their notes before we start. Each day, during notes, I will ask a lot of
guiding questions to ensure that the students are leading the discussion, and that they
understand the material. I will also ask a lot of questions about the material that they
have seen before. I will ask questions like this should look familiar from last year, what
can you tell me about it? If I notice that one part of the section is more difficult than the
others, I will provide multiple examples for students to test their understanding.
9. Differentiating Instruction: One of the ways I will use differentiation in my lessons is
by providing videos in my notes. The videos are usually only a few minutes long, and
give a quick introduction about the topic. This provides the students with another voice
that teaches them about the topic. They also get to see different visuals, other than me
simply writing the notes out. Another way I use differentiation is by splitting my students
into appropriate groups. This allows them to discuss the topic and procedures with

students at their ability level (but they dont know that they are split up by ability). I also
walk around a lot during individual work time. This allows students who need one-onone instruction to receive extra help. Differentiation helps all of my students learn.
10. Culminating Activity: Since chapter two is about proofs and geometric reasoning, a
good culminating activity could be a packet of different proofs (attached). The book
takes us through how to prove conjectures one step at a time (or section at a time), so a
culminating packet could be a good way to test students understanding. The packet
would start with problems that the students could solve after section one was covered,
then cover more problems as we advance further through the chapter. By the end of the
chapter, students should be able to complete the entire packet.
11. Types of Assessment:
Formative Assessment
o Asking guiding questions throughout the notes to check students
understanding.
Ex: If we were to write a biconditional statement, what form will I
need that to be in?
o Providing warmup problems at the beginning of class, and checking the
students work to check their procedures and answers.
Ex: Write a conditional statement, then write its converse, inverse and
contrapositive.
o Providing problems in the book, along with worksheets, that will be reviewed
and answered as a class at the beginning of the hour.
Summative Assessment
o Mid-way through the chapter, the students will receive a quiz covering section
2-1 through 2-4.
o At the end of the chapter, the students will take a chapter test, covering all of
the material taught from chapter 2.
12. Reflection: I believe that this is an appropriate unit plan, including a realistic pacing
guide, quality differentiation, and proper assessment of prior knowledge. However, one
thing that needs to be planned for is change within the pacing guide. If there is a missed
day due to weather we can simply continue with the chapter as planned, but a review at
the beginning of class should be planned. If a lot of students are struggling with a
specific section and it would not be a good idea to move on, I believe it is worth it to
have a day of reteaching. I would rather spend a day reteaching a section than move on
and move too fast. It should also be noted that preparation is key. It is important to look
at the section prior to teaching it, and I need to be able to do examples for each part of the
notes. I should also be able to do all of the problems that I expect my students to do. I
should also be prepared to answer questions about any and all of the questions I assign. It
is also important to have all videos and handouts prepared to use before class starts, that
way we will have fast transitions in the classroom. I believe that if I follow this unit plan,
I will be successful.

Corey Bell
Geometry Sec 2-1: Using Inductive Reasoning to Make Conjectures
Subject: Geometry
Topic: Section 2-1: Using Inductive Reasoning to Make Conjectures
Grades: 9-10
Number of Students: 27
Grouping: Individual work, class discussion
Time: 53 minutes
Content Standards:
CC.9-12.G.CO.9- Prove theorems about lines and angles.
CC.9-12.G.CO.10- Prove theorems about triangles.
CC.9-12.G.CO.11- Prove theorems about parallelograms.
CC.9-12.G.SRT.4- Prove theorems about triangles.
Goals: Use inductive reasoning to identify patterns and make conjectures. Find
counterexamples to disprove conjectures.
Rationale: Biologists use inductive reasoning to develop theories about migration patterns.
Objectives: After lecture, students will be able to use inductive reasoning to make a conjecture,
and either prove it or prove that it is false.
Materials: Notes, projector, sec 2-1 worksheet
Teacher Preparation: Have notes ready to go. Know what bookwork will be assigned, and
have the worksheet ready. Be prepared to answer questions and explain procedures about how to
make a conjecture, and show a counterexample.
Assessment of Prior Knowledge: During notes, I will ask a lot of guiding questions that will
assess the students prior knowledge. There are parts of this lesson that should look familiar to
students (especially the definitions) so I will ask questions to get the students thinking about
these things.
Procedures:
We will start with notes from the next section (2-1) since we just took a test.

During notes I will ask a lot of guiding questions to help the students understand the
material.
I will provide multiple examples for each part of the notes.
o Identifying a pattern
o Making a conjecture
o Applications
o Finding a counterexample
After notes, I will see if there is any confusion that I can clear up.
Students will work quietly on bookwork and their worksheet after notes.
During this time, I will be walking around the room to help struggling students.

Plans to Reteach and Extend: There are some difficult examples in the bookwork for this
section. These problems will act as both an opportunity for struggling students and for advanced
students. Struggling students will be able to ask questions to clarify things that are confusing to
them. Advanced students will be able to attempt difficult problems, to see if they can do them on
their own.
Reflection: I thought that this lesson went well. We were able to have a good class discussion
rather than having me simply lecture. The students were confused at times, which was actually
beneficial for our discussion. They were able to argue why we would or would not do certain
things, which helped deepen their understanding, and give them that ah ha moment. They
were able to guide me through the notes, rather than having me tell them every little step.
They also worked well on their assignment, and asked questions when necessary.

Name:
Date:
Hour:
Chapter 2 Review Packet
Section 1:
1. Explain Inductive Reasoning in your own words.
2. Write your own TRUE conjecture, then list examples to find a pattern to show that it is
true.
3. Make your own data table, make a conjecture about your table.
4. Write your own FALSE conjecture, and give at least one counterexample to show that it
is false.
Section 2:
1. Draw a Venn diagram, then write a conditional statement from it.
2. Write a conditional statement, then write its converse, inverse, and contrapositive.
3. Find the truth value of each statement you wrote in problem #2, then tell which
statements are logically equivalent.
Section 3:
1. Explain deductive reasoning in your own words.
2. Write a statement and a conjecture that is valid by the law of detachment
Hint: Need to write: p to q, p, and a conjecture.
3. Write a statement and a conjecture that is invalid by the law of detachment, and explain
why it is invalid.
4. Write two statements (p to q and q to p), and a conjecture that is valid by the law of
syllogism.
5. Write two statement and a conjecture that is invalid by the law of syllogism. Explain
why it is invalid.
Section 4:
1. Write a conditional statement, then write its converse and a biconditional statement.
2. Find the truth value of the biconditional statement and explain why it is or is not true.
3. Write a definition, then write a biconditional statement from that definition.
Section 5:
1. Solve the equation, give justification for each step.

a. -5 = 3n + 1
b. What is the temperature in degrees Celsius C when it is 86 degrees Fahrenheit?
5
Solve the equatin C= ( F32 ) for C, and justify each step.
9
Section 6:
1. Write a two-column proof for theorem 2-6-1. (Hint: see book).
2. Complete the Check It Out! (Problem #3) on page 112.
Section 7:
1. Complete the Check It Out! (Problem #2) on page 119.
2. Complete the Check It Out! (Problem #3 on page 120.
COMPLETE THIS PACKET BEFORE THE TEST ON WEDNESDAY, BRING TO
CLASS WITH YOU THE DAY OF THE TEST!!