‘JACKIE’ A FABLE

OF THE KENNEDYS
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18

HOW DOES IT WORK?

M-A FALL IN
STATE FINALS

A TIP SHEET FOR WORKERS AND WORKPLACES WHERE POT IS
LEGAL
NATION PAGE 5

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016 • XVII, Edition 93

Facebook gives $20M for affordable housing
East Palo Alto, Menlo Park, nonprofit advocacy groups partner with tech giant
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

One of the world’s most prominent tech
giants is partnering with Menlo Park and
East Palo Alto community groups to address
one of Silicon Valley’s most pressing challenges — affordable housing.
Facebook is pitching in $20 million and
agreeing to work collaboratively with neigh-

boring cities and advocacy nonprofits to
help curb gentrification prompted in part by
an astronomical growth of high-paying jobs.
As the multi-billion-dollar social media
firm embarks on a major expansion at its
Menlo Park headquarters slated to host nearly 6, 500 new employees, some of the
region’s lowest income residents in adjacent neighborhoods are undoubtedly feeling
the heat. To help alleviate the pressure, an

unprecedented corporate-public-nonprofit
partnership called Envision Transform
Build-East Palo Alto was formed to preserve
as well as build affordable housing, and
tackle tough policy issues.
Cities and communities throughout the
region continue to struggle in finding ways
to engage employers and the hope is
Facebook’s efforts will inspire others, said
Tameeka Bennett, executive director of

Youth United for Community Action.
“Silicon Valley is huge and anybody who
has ideas of being the next huge tech
tycoon or CEO, they move here. This is the
place to do that. But what people forget
about Silicon Valley, is there are smaller
engines that make this place run,” Bennett
said.

See HOUSING, Page 8

Jobs report
shows solid
U.S. hiring
Trump to inherit two-track economy
with 4.6 percent unemployment, but
many people giving up on looking
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANNA SCHUESSLER/DAILY JOURNAL

Artist Kari Zinser of Belmont showcases her wall paintings. Below: Artist Rebecca Bangs of San Carlos holds one of her
pointillism paintings.

An open door to art

WASHINGTON — The U.S. jobs report
on Friday made one thing clear:
President-elect Donald Trump will inherit the same two-track U.S. economy that
bedeviled his predecessor.
Hiring is solid and the unemployment
rate low. But longer-term problems per- Donald Trump
sist — especially a stubbornly high
number of men who are out of work and have given up looking. Many are likely frustrated former manufacturing workers who voted for Trump over Hillary Clinton.
Employers added 178,000 jobs in November, the government said, extending the longest streak of hiring since
World War II. And the unemployment rate sank from 4.9 per-

Open studios this weekend gives chance for the public to interact with artists
By Anna Schuessler

County talks new pot rules

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Anyone with an interest in art and how it is made can
explore open studios of 80 artists this weekend while contributing to a larger effort to sharpen the focus on Redwood
City as a creative leader.
On Dec. 3-4, the Artists’ Holiday Open Studios will invite
the public to tour the artist studio spaces in seven locations
in Redwood City and San Carlos. The sites, which include
the Art Shack, the Main Gallery and University Art in
Redwood City, will showcase the work of 80 artists, and
will be open between noon and 5 p.m., with the exception
of the Art Center of Redwood City and San Carlos, which
will only be open on Sunday.
Though the concept of open studios is nothing new to
Peninsula artists, this event marks the first time that artists

See ART, Page 24

YOUR SAN MATEO DENTIST
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See JOBS, Page 8

Board of Supervisors considers the
next steps for legalized marijuana
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

In the face of landmark changes to who can grow and
smoke marijuana, San Mateo County officials are slated to
discuss how to adapt to Proposition 64.
The Board of Supervisors is hosting a study session
Tuesday to consider whether to enact restrictions in
response to Californians voting to legalize adult recreational marijuana last month.
Like many cities throughout the area, supervisors may

See POT, Page 8

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“What the world really needs
is more love and less paper work.”
— Pearl Bailey, American entertainer

This Day in History
A real-life mystery began as English
novelist Agatha Christie, 36, drove
away from her home in Sunningdale,
Berkshire, and disappeared. (Christie
turned up 11 days later at a hotel in
Harrogate, Yorkshire, under an assumed name, for reasons
never quite explained.)

1926

In 1 8 1 8 , Illinois was admitted as the 21st state.
In 1 8 2 8 , Andrew Jackson was elected president of the
United States by the Electoral College.
In 1 8 3 3 , Oberlin College in Ohio — the first truly coeducational school of higher learning in the United States
— began holding classes.
In 1 9 2 5 , George Gershwin’s Concerto in F had its world
premiere at New York’s Carnegie Hall, with Gershwin at
the piano.
In 1 9 4 7 , the Tennessee Williams play “A Streetcar
Named Desire” opened on Broadway.
In 1 9 5 3 , the musical “Kismet, ” featuring the song
“Stranger in Paradise, ” opened on Broadway.
In 1 9 6 0 , the Lerner and Loewe musical “Camelot” San Mateo High School students conducted their annual holiday food drive and broke their world record by collecting
opened on Broadway.
105,000 pounds of food and continuing their tradition of being one of the largest food drives in the country. All donations
In 1 9 6 5 , The Beatles’ sixth studio album, “Rubber went to the Samaritan House in San Mateo and Second Harvest Food Bank.
Soul, ” was released in the United Kingdom by Parlophone
the source of the sister’s super powers.
Mae Questel (1908-1998) did the origi(it was released in the U. S. by Capitol Records three days
nal voice of Betty Boop. Questel was
***
later).
More than 40 million Care Bear stuffed also the voice of Popeye’s girlfriend
In 1 9 6 7 , surgeons in Cape Town, South Africa led by Dr.
toys were sold between 1983 and 1987. Olive Oyl.
Christiaan Barnard performed the first human heart trans***
***
plant on Louis Washkansky, who lived 18 days with the
Marion Ross (born 1928), of “Happy Shaggy’s full name is Norville Rogers.
donor heart, which came from Denise Darvall, a 25-yearDays” fame, was the voice of Grandma Scooby-Doo is Shaggy’s pet Great
old bank clerk who’d died in a traffic accident.
Squarepants in a 2001 episode of Dane.
***
“Spongebob Squarepants.”
Strawberry Shortcake was created as a
***
Do you know what the first cartoon greeting card character in 1978.
***
series on prime time television was?
“Pinky and the Brain,” (1995-1998) a
The year? See answer at end.
peedy Gonzalez had a cousin
cartoon series about genetically
***
named Slowpoke Rodriguez. He Underdog’s
alter-identity
was enhanced lab mice that want to take over
was the slowest mouse in all of Shoeshine Boy. Whenever television the world, won an Emmy in 1996 for
Mexico.
Achievement
in
reporter Sweet Polly Purebred was in dis- Outstanding
***
tress, she called for Underdog’s help. Animation.
Voice actor Joe Dougherty originally “Underdog” aired from 1964 to 1973.
***
did the voice of Porky Pig. Dougherty
In 1955, Mighty Mouse was the first
***
really had a stutter, however, he couldn’t The Pink Panther cartoons began as cartoon character ever to appear on
Actress Daryl
Rock singer Ozzy
Actress Julianne
control it and it made production costs opening segments for the Pink Panther Saturday morning television.
Hannah is 56.
Osbourne is 68.
Moore is 56.
too high. Mel Blanc (1908-1989) series of movies, starring the bumbling
***
Movie director Jean-Luc Godard is 86. Singer Jaye P. began doing Porky Pig’s voice in 1937. Inspector Clouseau, played by Peter Hong Kong Phooey’s alter-identity was
***
Penrod Pooch, a janitor at a police staSellers (1925-1980.)
Morgan is 85. Actor Nicolas Coster is 83. Actress Mary Alice
tion. When Penrod turned into kung fu
***
is 75. Actress Heather Menzies Urich is 67. Rock singer Daffy Duck had a wife named Daphne. In
Mickey Thomas is 67. Country musician Paul Gregg (Restless the 1955 cartoon short “Stork Naked,” a Foghorn Leghorn, the obnoxious roos- crime-fighting Hong Kong Phooey, his
stork tries to deliver a duckling to Mr.
sidekick Spot the cat usually got him
Heart) is 62. Actor Steven Culp is 61. Olympic gold medal fig- and Mrs. Daffy Duck, but Daffy tries to ter with a southern accent, was based on
Senator Claghorn, a character from the out of trouble.
ure skater Katarina Witt is 51. Actor Brendan Fraser is 48. stop him.
***
Fred Allen (1894-1956) radio show
Singer Montell Jordan is 48. Actor Royale Watkins is 47.
***
Ans wer: The modern Stone Age family
“Allen’s Alley” in the 1940s.
Actor Bruno Campos is 43. Actress Holly Marie Combs is 43. George Jetson worked for Spacely
“The Flintstones” premiered on ABC in
***
Actress Liza Lapira is 41. Actress Lauren Roman is 41. Pop- Sprockets, owned by Cosmo G. “Pac-Man” was a Saturday morning car- 1960. The Flintstones was loosely
rock singer Daniel Bedingfield is 37. Actress Anna Chlumsky Spacely. Spacely’s competitor was W.C. toon based on the popular video game. based on “The Honeymooners” (1955Cogswell, owner of the rival company In the cartoon, which aired from 1982 to 1956) starring Jackie Gleason (1916is 36. Actor Brian Bonsall is 35.
Cogswell Cogs.
1984, Packy and his family were 1987).
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
***
pestered by ghosts who were the minby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Bubbles, Blossom and Buttercup are the ions of Mezmaron, a villain who wanted
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
trio that makes up the Powerpuff Girls. to rule the world.
one letter to each square,
weekend edition of the Daily Journal.
***
The girls were created in a laboratory by
to form four ordinary words.
Questions?
Comments?
Email
a concoction of sugar, spice, everything Betty Boop made her first appearance in knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 344nice and Chemical X. The chemical is the 1930 animated film “Dizzy Dishes.” 5200 ext. 128.
NARDK

Birthdays

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

OODTU

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Now arrange the circled letters
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Yesterday’s

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Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

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Daily Four
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The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Big Ben, No. 4, in second
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race time was clocked at 1:46.85.

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: SINGE
DOUSE
TRUDGE
LETTER
Answer: It was time to close her bakery for the day
after the customers had — “DESSERTED” IT

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Parking permit program made permanent
By Anna Schuessler
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

After hearing from residents tired of cars
and other vehicles from visitors in the
Greater East San Carlos neighborhood, city
officials tried a parking permit program for a
year and decided to make it permanent this
week.
Officials are now contemplating exploring other areas where the pilot program may
be tested, though residents caution it may
not be necessary.
Since January 2016, the city has enforced
a two-hour parking limit between 7 a.m. and
7 p.m. Monday through Friday in the area
south of Holly Street in the neighborhood.
Vehicles displaying an East San Carlos residential parking permit have been exempt
from these weekday two-hour parking
restrictions. The one-year pilot program was
deemed necessary in part because commuters
and Giants’ fans were using the neighborhood to park to take the train from the nearby station.
The program was made permanent
Monday, Nov. 28, with an unanimous council vote. At Monday’s meeting, the City
Council reviewed a report prepared by city

Madelyn (Dolly) Marie Bianconi
Madelyn (Dolly) Marie Bianconi, 89, of
Millbrae, died Nov. 27, 2016. She was born
Aug. 24, 1927, in Chicago, Illinois, to Sam
and Florence Nicosia.
Dolly grew up in Coloma, Michigan, with
her two brothers Sam and Vincent where she
was active in the marching band and drama
at Coloma High, graduating in 1945. She
moved to San Francisco and married
Raymond Bianconi in 1953, settling in
Millbrae in 1957. They were married for 59
years.
Dolly was very active in the Full Gospel
Church, serving as a bible study pastor, dea-

officials deeming the pilot program to be an
overall success. The report included results
from a survey of residents and businesses in
the Greater East San Carlos neighborhood.
Of the 155 residents who responded, 64 percent strongly agreed that the program
improved the ease of parking near their
homes and 89 percent would recommend that
the program be made permanent. Between
Jan. 1 and Nov. 7, approximately 460 citations were issued in the program area.
Councilman Mark Olbert sees the pilot’s
success as an opportunity to review other
similarly affected areas. He noted anecdotal
comments about the north side of Holly
Street and south side of Laurel Street at the
edge of downtown as areas that have experienced limited parking availability due to
increased traffic. The council may add these
areas to those eligible for a pilot in the
future, should the council detect sufficient
interest from residents and businesses.
“An area has to be identified as potentially benefiting from such a program. Once it’s
in that classification, if enough people in
the neighborhood ask for it, we can look
into it,” he said.
But the council will proceed with caution.
San Carlos Mayor Cameron Johnson noted

some of the disadvantages of piloting the
program, such as hassles for residents who
need to obtain permits for visitors.
“If there are solutions where a permit is
not necessary, we’d look into other alternatives,” he said.
Scott Marsters, a former planning commissioner who lives in Greater East San
Carlos, was not convinced that a consensus
has been reached as to whether residents
north of Holly Street are interested in this
pilot.
“There are individuals north of Holly who
might be interested in it,” he said. “But is it
a unanimous thing?”
Resident Ben Fuller is not interested in the
pilot’s expansion to the northern end.
“The north side has not asked for it,” he
said. “Please don’t give us what we’re currently not asking for.”
Regardless of where the pilot may be used
again, Public Works Director Jay Walter said
he feels as though the city made the good
assumptions about the hours of operation
and days of the week when they designed the
pilot.
“We at least have a process in place where
we can evaluate it and have a consistent
approach,” he said.

Obituary

Highlands in Millbrae. The family asks for
you to pay your respects at her viewing 3
p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 7. A private
funeral service will follow.

con and board member.
Her passion was the word
of God and her family.
Dolly joins her husband Ray in heaven and
is survived by her children,
Michele
and
Steven, five grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. She also
leaves behind many caring relatives and
friends.
Arrangements are with Chapel of the

As a public serv ice, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approx imately 200
words or less with a photo one time on a
space av ailable basis.

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

3

Police reports
Sounds like a nuisance
A man was heard talking to his neighbor through a wall to try and keep him
awake on East Bellevue Avenue in San
Mateo before 11:15 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 30.

SAN MATEO
Theft. Someone stole $300 worth of items
from Sephora at the Hillsdale Shopping
Center before 7:46 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1.
Di s t urb an c e . A man began yelling at
someone because they were swearing at the
Main Library on West Third Avenue before
6:12 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1.
Sus pi ci o us v ehi cl e. A car was seen with
its back window smashed and hazard lights
on near West Third Avenue and Crystal
Springs Road before 8:36 a.m. Thursday,
Dec. 1.
Di s turbance. Two men were seen yelling
and cursing at each other on North Bayshore
Boulevard before 11:09 a.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 30.

MILLBRAE
S us p e n de d l i c e n s e . A 25-year-old
Stockton resident was found to be driving
with a suspended license on the 200 block of
Adrian Road before 7:05 a.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 30.
Burg l ary . Someone broke into a home and
stole items on the 100 block of Ashton
Avenue before 8 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29.
Po s s es s i o n. A 32-year-old Concord resident was found in possession of drug paraphernalia and methamphetamine near El
Camino Real and Taylor Boulevard before
3:28 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29.

4

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

California state-worker union cancels Monday strike
By Jonathan J. Cooper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California’s largest
public-employee union on Friday canceled a
planned one-day strike, averting a potentially disruptive protest that would have
kept up to 95,000 state employees off the
job.
The Service Employees International
Union Local 1000 said negotiators from the
union and the state “both feel we have found
a pathway forward.”
“Our goal has never been to go on strike.
It has always been to get a contract we can

all be proud of,” Local 1000 President
Yvonne Walker said in a note posted on the
union’s website. “We will provide constant
updates throughout the day and into the
night, if necessary. Stay tuned.”
Walker did not offer details about the
breakthrough that led to the cancellation.
“We are pleased that the public will not
have to face disruptions to state services on
Monday,” said Joe DeAnda, a spokesman for
the California Department of Human
Resources. “We will continue to work with
union leaders to finalize a formal agreement.”
The decision came shortly after a judge

earlier Friday declined to intervene in the
labor dispute, postponing until Dec. 13 a
decision on whether to block some union
members from taking part in strike action as
the state had requested.
Sacramento County Superior Court Judge
Raymond Cadei did not issue an injunction
Friday in response to requests by the Public
Employment Relations Board and Gov.
Jerry Brown’s administration, which last
month asked the board to seek an order
blocking a strike by all 95,000 state workers who are members of the Service
Employees International Union.
Instead, he continued a hearing on the

matter. The board had sought to block about
6,000 members of the local who are deemed
essential to public health or safety.
Those include nurses, cooks and janitors
who work at state mental hospitals, prisons, veterans homes, care centers for the
disabled and schools for the deaf and
blind.
The state sought to block a strike by all
workers or, failing that, to add more
employees to the list of essential personnel.
Attorneys for both sides declined to speak
to reporters as they left the court proceeding, which was held behind closed doors.

890 Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

5

State treasurer asks Trump
for guidance on pot, banking
By Michael R. Blood
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

Mary Becker, 21, exhales after taking a hit of hash oil.

A tip sheet for workers and
workplaces where pot is legal
By Bob Salsberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Changing marijuana
laws aren’t necessarily making weed
more welcome in the workplace.
For now, many employers seem to be
sticking with their drug testing and
personal conduct policies, even in
states where recreational marijuana use
is now permitted. Others are keeping a
close eye on the still evolving legal,
regulatory and political environment.
Voters in California, Massachusetts,
Maine and Nevada voted Nov. 8 to
approve the use of recreational marijuana, joining Colorado, Washington,
Oregon and Alaska, where it had previously been legalized. (A recount of
Maine’s close result is scheduled.)
More than two dozen states have medical marijuana programs.
But the drug is still against federal
law.
A closer look at what it all means for
workers and businesses:

CAN MY EMPLOYER
STILL TEST ME FOR POT?
Bottom line: You can’t come to work
high. You can still be drug tested. And
you can still be fired — or not hired —
for failing a drug test even if you’re not
the least bit impaired at work.

All the states with legalized recreational pot have exemptions for workplace drug policies.
In Massachusetts, for example, the
law includes language stating that “the
authority of employers to enact and
enforce workplace policies restricting
the consumption of marijuana by
employees” is not changed.
“Yes, you may be able to have (marijuana) at home, but that doesn’t mean
it’s OK in the workplace,” said Edward
Yost, an HR specialist with the Society
for Human Resources Management.

WHAT ABOUT
WORKPLACE SAFETY?
Advocates for marijuana legalization
said it was never their intention to
compromise safety, a central reason
offered by employers for drug testing.
“We don’t want anyone to come to
work impaired on any drugs,” said
David Boyer, campaign manager for
the ballot initiative in Maine.
A 2013 survey by the employee
screening firm HireRight found 78 percent of employers conducted drug tests
either randomly, as a condition of
employment, after accidents or for
some combination of those reasons.
The federal government requires
drug t es t i n g fo r s o me wo rk ers ,
including truck drivers and others in

transportation.
Quest Diagnostics, which performed
nearly 11 million laboratory-based
drug tests for employers in 2015, said
the percentage of tests coming back
positive has shown a modest increase
in recent years. Nearly half of all positive tests showed evidence of marijuana
use.

CAN I GET FIRED
EVEN IF I’M NOT HIGH?
THC, the psychoactive chemical in
cannabis, can stay in a person’s system for days or even weeks, experts say
— long after the buzz has subsided.
“It’s the equivalent of firing somebody who drank a glass of wine on
Friday evening and then came to work
on Monday,” said Tamar Todd, legal
director for the Drug Policy Alliance,
who believes employers should reconsider zero-tolerance policies in light of
changing laws and attitudes.
A number of efforts are underway to
develop an accurate method, akin to the
Breathalyzer for alcohol, to measure
actual marijuana impairment. Such a
test might be useful not only for
employers, but also for police and
prosecutors trying to determine what
constitutes driving under the influence
of marijuana in states where recreational pot is legal.

LOS ANGELES — California Treasurer John Chiang on
Friday appealed to President-elect Donald Trump for guidance on how the state’s projected $7 billion marijuana industry can participate
in the nation’s banking system while
pot remains illegal under U.S. law.
California voters last month approved
Proposition 64, which legalized the
recreational use of marijuana, beginning
in 2018. Largely at issue is how the state
will collect an estimated $1 billion in
John Chiang annual taxes from legal pot sales and cultivation, when cannabis businesses can
face obstacles opening bank accounts, getting loans or
obtaining insurance.
The “conflict between federal and state rules creates a
number of difficulties for states that have legalized
cannabis use, including collecting taxes, increased risk of
serious crime and the inability of a legal industry under
state law to engage in banking and commerce,” Chiang
wrote to Trump.
“We have a year to develop a system that works in
California and which addresses the many issues that exist as
a result of the federal-state legal conflict,” he added.
“Uncertainty about the position of your administration creates even more of a challenge.”
The California vote on Nov. 8 represented the national
legalization movement’s biggest victory to date. The new
law will attempt, at least in theory, to tame a market that
now ranges from legal, medicinal production and sales to
vast illegal grows operated by drug cartels.
With pot illegal on the federal level, it’s unclear what
stance the incoming Trump administration will take with
the new California pot economy and other weed-friendly
states. Trump’s pick for attorney general, Alabama Sen. Jeff
Sessions, has called marijuana a danger that should not be
legalized.
Twenty-eight states and Washington, D.C., allow marijuana for medical or recreational purposes.
In other states, the business of legal marijuana has created a patchwork of banking and tax practices.
In Oregon, officials have built a fortified office, with bulletproof glass, security cameras and armed guards, for collecting huge cash payments for pot taxes. In Washington,
most businesses are paying taxes electronically, a sign of
better access to bank accounts.
And the number of U.S. banks and credit unions willing to
handle pot money under Treasury Department guidelines
issued two years ago is growing, though they are often
smaller institutions.

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6

LOCAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

Legislators, San Bruno mayor
urge action on corruption probe
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo,
Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South San
Francisco, and San
Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane
sent a letter Friday to
U. S.
Rep.
Xavier
Becerra, named by Gov.
Jerry
Brown
as
California’s next attorney general, to urge that
the office of the state’s
top prosecutor press
Jerry Hill
forcefully ahead with the
corruption probe of the
California
Public
Utilities Commission.
Attorney
General
Kamala Harris opened a
public corruption probe
of the CPUC in 2014
and, with her election to
U. S.
Senate,
the
Kevin Mullin Peninsula legislators
and San Bruno’s mayor
want to ensure that the
investigation continues,
according to Hill’s
office.
“It’s essential that a
thorough investigation
move forward and that all
possible
criminal
charges are vigorously
prosecuted, ” said Hill.
Jim Ruane
“A misstep or a delay
could impair — or eliminate — the chance
to pursue a case.”

Commercial crab season opens
along Sonoma and Marin coast
The commercial Dungeness crab season

Local briefs
will open Saturday between Point Reyes in
Marin County and Salt Point in Sonoma
County, the California Department of Fish
and Wildlife announced Thursday.
The 50-mile area had been closed because
of elevated levels of domoic acid, a naturally occurring toxin, and the fishery north of
Salt Point to the Humboldt Bay entrance
will remain closed until further testing of
acid levels show it is safe.
Low levels of domoic acid can cause nausea, diarrhea and dizziness in humans and at
higher levels can cause persistent shortterm memory loss, seizures and in some
cases can be lethal.
Last fall and winter, domoic acid along
the coast from Santa Barbara and the
Oregon state line closed the Dungeness and
rock crab fisheries.
State and federal law prohibit the commercial distribution of seafood products
that contain domoic acid levels above the
federal level of 30 parts per million in the
viscera, or guts. That caused a delay or closure on Nov. 8 of the Dungeness crab season north of Point Reyes and the rock crab
fishery north of Pigeon Point 50 miles
south of San Francisco.
The crab fishery between the north jetty
of Humboldt Bay and the Oregon state line
opened on Thursday, and the recreational
Dungeness crab season opened Nov. 5 with
a warning to avoid consuming the internal
organs of Dungeness crab caught between
Salt Point and the north jetty at Humboldt
Bay.

Medical issue may have caused
multi-car collision that injured two
A San Carlos man may have been suffering from a medical issue when he drove into

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A San Carlos man was driving a 1989 Honda Accord north on the 1500 block of El Camino when
he crossed into the southbound lanes at the Harbor Boulevard intersection causing a
multi-car collision.
oncoming traffic and his Honda collided
with two other cars in Belmont on
Thursday, police said.
Police and firefighters responded at
12:25 p.m. to the collision on the 1400
block of southbound El Camino where the
man and another person were injured.
Police learned that the San Carlos man
was driving a 1989 Honda Accord north on
the 1500 block of El Camino when he
crossed into the southbound lanes at the
Harbor Boulevard intersection.
The Honda collided with a 2006 Lexus,
which struck a 2016 Mazda, and then collided with a 2008 Subaru, which hit a 2015
Toyota.
The Honda then spun out and came to

rest, police said.
The driver of the Honda and the driver of
the Lexus were taken to hospitals with
injuries not considered life-threatening.
No one else was injured, according to
police. The driver of the Honda had to be
cut out of his car.
The cause of the collision is under investigation but it does not appear drugs or
alcohol played a part, according to police.
Traffic on southbound El Camino was
diverted for about two hours after the collision.
Anyone who saw the Accord just before it
crossed into the southbound lanes is asked
to call Belmont police at (650) 595-7430
or email them at police@belmont.gov.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

7

Trump, backers ask courts to halt
or block recounts in three state
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LANSING, Mich.
— President-elect
Donald Trump and his supporters went to
court Friday to prevent or halt election
recounts in Michigan, Pennsylvania and
Wisconsin, less than two weeks before the
states would have to complete the tasks to
meet a federal deadline to certify their election results.
The legal actions seeking to block or halt
the recounts in three states Trump narrowly
won could cause delays that would make
them extremely difficult or impossible to
complete on time. Even if the recounts happen, though, none would be expected to
give Democrat Hillary Clinton enough
REUTERS votes to emerge as the winner.
The recounts were requested by Green
Donald Trump, left, and Mike Pence, right, greet retired Marine Gen. James Mattis in
Party candidate Jill Stein, who says they’re
Bedminster, N.J.
necessary to ensure that voting machines
weren’t hacked, even though there’s no evidence that they were. Critics say Stein is
simply trying to raise money and her political profile while building a donor database.
“In an election already tainted by suspi-

Trump to nominate
retired Gen. Mattis
to lead the Pentagon
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Breaking once more
from presidential custom, Donald Trump is
turning to a military man to steer the U.S.
military, choosing retired Gen. James
Mattis, who will be the first career officer to
lead the Pentagon since just after World War
II.
Mattis, 66, is a Marine Corps general who
retired in 2013 after serving as commander
of the U.S. Central Command, responsible
for directing America’s wars in both Iraq and
Afghanistan.
The president-elect, who has referred to
Mattis by his nickname “Mad Dog,” made
the announcement of his choice for defense
secretary at a postelection victory rally
Thursday night in Cincinnati.
The selection raises questions about
increased military influence in a job
designed to ensure civilian control of the
armed forces. Those traditional concerns
revolve around whether a recently retired
service member would rely more on military
solutions to international problems rather
than take a broader, more diplomatic
approach.
For Mattis to be confirmed, Congress
would first have to approve legislation
bypassing a law that bars retired military
officers from becoming defense secretary

within seven years of leaving active duty.
Mattis has a reputation as a battle-hardened, tough-talking Marine who was
entrusted with some of the most challenging commands in the U.S. military. In a
tweet last month, Trump described him as “A
true General’s General!”
Mattis also has talked tough on Middle
East policy, and was blunt in his assessment
in 2013 that the Obama administration’s
program of sanctions and diplomatic efforts
to stop Iran from gaining nuclear weapons
were not working. Tehran, he said, “has a
history of denial and deceit.”
He also warned of risks in setting up the
no-fly zone over Libya in 2011. And he was
vocal in his assessment that the U.S. needed
to keep two Navy aircraft carriers in the
Middle East to provide additional security
and support for American military interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan that dragged
on in recent years.
Mattis would be only the second retired
general to serve as defense secretary, the
first being George C. Marshall in 1950-51
during the Korean War. Marshall was a much
different figure, having previously served as
U.S. secretary of state and playing a key
role in creating closer ties with Western
Europe after World War II.
The only previous exception to the law
requiring a gap after military service was for
Marshall.

Job deals like Carrier’s often
fall short of political hype
By David A. Lieb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — When
President-elect Donald Trump announced a
deal to save hundreds of jobs at a Carrier
plant in Indiana, it came with a cost to
state taxpayers of about $7 million in tax
breaks and grants.
Similar jobs-for-subsidies deals are
struck nearly every day around the country
by governors, mayors and other officials.
But it’s debatable whether the economic
impact ultimately lives up to the political
hype.
Some projects fall short of their promises. Economists say other business deals
likely would have occurred even without
the incentives. And in some places, it’s
hard for the public to track the exact
amount of state and local subsidies that get
provided.
In any given year, federal, state and local
governments promise companies tens of
billions of dollars in public subsidies in

exchange for creating or saving thousands
of jobs.
States offer more than 1,800 incentive
programs for businesses, a figure that has
declined slightly over the past five years as
programs have been consolidated and
revamped, according to the Arlington,
Virginia-based Council for Community and
Economic Research.
While some governments provide direct
grants, the arrangements often allow companies to forgo paying property, income or
sales taxes under the premise that the
money the company saves will help it
expand, hire workers and create an economic ripple effect in the community.
The announcement marked an extraordinary accomplishment for Trump, who had
railed against Carrier’s plans to shift jobs
to Mexico while campaigning. The deal
was unique because the president-elect
became personally involved in it, and Vice
President-elect Mike Pence was in a position as Indiana governor to help facilitate
the incentives.

Trump speaks with Taiwan’s
president, risking China tensions
TAIPEI, Taiwan — President-elect Donald
Trump spoke Friday with the president of
Taiwan, a move that will be sure to anger
China.
It is highly unusual, probably unprecedented, for a U.S. president or presidentelect to speak directly with a leader of
Taiwan, a self-governing island the U.S.
broke diplomatic ties with in 1979.
Washington has pursued a so-called “one
China” policy since 1979, when it shifted
diplomatic recognition of China from the
government in Taiwan to the communist

cion, previously expressed by Donald
Trump himself, verifying the vote is a common-sense procedure that would address
concerns around voter disenfranchisement,
“Stein said in a statement. “Trump’s desperate attempts to silence voter demands raise a
simple question: why is Donald Trump afraid
of these recounts?”
Wisconsin is the only state where a
recount is underway. It began Thursday, and
one of the state’s 72 counties had already
completed its task by Friday, with Clinton
gaining a single a vote on Trump. Clinton
lost to Trump in Wisconsin by about 22,000
votes, or less than 1 percentage point.
Two pro-Trump groups, the Great America
PAC and the Stop Hillary PAC, along with
Wisconsin voter Ronald R. Johnson went to
federal court late Thursday to try and stop
the recount. U. S. District Judge James
Peterson on Friday rejected their request for
a temporary restraining order to immediately halt the recount, saying there was no
harm in allowing it to continue while the
court considers their lawsuit. A hearing on
the lawsuit is scheduled for Dec. 9.

Around the nation
government on the mainland. Under that
policy, the U.S. recognizes Beijing as representing China but retains unofficial ties
with Taiwan.
A statement from Trump’s transition team
said he spoke with Taiwanese President Tsai
Ing-wen, who offered her congratulations.
“During the discussion, they noted the
close economic, political, and security ties
... between Taiwan and the United States.
President-elect Trump also congratulated
President Tsai on becoming President of
Taiwan earlier this year,” the statement
said.

8

LOCAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

HOUSING
Continued from page 1
Even with new developments and Silicon
Valley blossoming around it, the average
East Palo Alto households makes about
$52,700 a year, according to 2014 U.S.
Census data. But over the last year alone,
average home prices in East Palo Alto — a
city once known as having the highest murder rate per capita — have increased nearly
18 percent to $744, 000, according to
Zillow. Eviction rates have also ratcheted
up in the communities as an overheated
housing market squeezes low-income
renters, according to the county’s Legal Aid
Society.
“You have a responsibility to the place
you’re moving into and to the families that
are there, especially if their presence is
going to harm the livelihood of those families. But this isn’t a blame game and I think
that’s why some of these companies are

JOBS
Continued from page 1
cent to a nine-year low of 4.6 percent. Yet
the jobless rate dropped mainly because
many of those out of work gave up on their
job hunts and were no longer counted as
unemployed.
A key challenge for the Trump administration is to extend the benefits of job growth
to include many of those who feel left out.
The job market’s durability will help to some
extent. Eventually, low unemployment
should compel employers to offer higher pay
to attract more workers. That, in turn, could
persuade more Americans to resume their job
hunts and find work.
“With the unemployment rate this low and
wages rising, now is the real test of whether
a stronger economy can bring people back
into job market,” said Jed Kolko, chief economist at job hunting website Indeed.
Aside from the longer-term challenges,

POT
Continued from page 1
adopt moratoriums to prohibit commercial
operations in unincorporated areas of the
county or craft provisions other jurisdictions could use as a model.
Per the new statewide laws, adults 21
years and older can smoke marijuana in
their homes or a licensed facility like a pot

THE DAILY JOURNAL

afraid to come to the table. We understand
your goal wasn’t to displace our families,
but indirectly that’s what’s happening. So
we’d like to work with you and not against
you in rectifying that,” Bennett said.
The partnership was announced Friday and
is comprised of Facebook, Youth United for
Community Action, Faith in Action Bay
Area, Community Legal Services in East
Palo Alto and Comité de Vecinos del Lado
Oeste. Bennett said the 4-month-old initiative was prompted as her group considered
whether to file a lawsuit concerning the
effects Facebook’s expansion would have
on East Palo Alto and Menlo Park’s lowincome areas. Instead, they approached the
company hoping to collaborate and were
thrilled by Facebook’s enthusiasm and commitment to do more than simply write a
check, she said.
“Our goal is to connect people everywhere, and that starts with being good
neighbors in our local community, ”
Facebook founder and Palo Alto resident
Mark Zuckerberg wrote on his website
announcing the partnership. “For all the

opportunity and jobs the technology industry has created, it has also made the Bay
Area a less affordable place to live. We recognize our growth contributes to these challenges, and we’re committed to helping
solve them so people can afford to live and
work here.”
About $18.5 million of Facebook’s contribution will go toward the Catalyst
Housing Fund to build or preserve units;
$500,000 to a tenant assistance fund to
help low-income residents threatened with
displacement, $250, 000 to Rebuilding
Together Peninsula, and $625,000 for job
training in science, technology, engineering and math fields. Facebook is also hiring
a liaison dedicated to connecting community members with open positions at the company, according to Facebook.
Representatives from each community
agency, the cities and Facebook will form a
committee to oversee the expenditures and
Bennett said they plan to work more collaboratively with Facebook as it undertakes its
expansion.
The funds will roll in annually over the

next few years and ideally, they’ll be able to
leverage the money to garner more support
from others, Bennett said. As for policy
advocacy, they will also seek to promote
tenant protection measures in local communities, including just-cause eviction rules
and maybe even rent control. But perhaps
just as valuable as the sizable financial contribution, is the partnership and example
this sets for other employers, she said.
“Since shortly after Facebook was created, we’ve been part of Silicon Valley and the
Bay Area,” Elliot Schrage, Facebook’s vice
president for public policy and communications, said in a press release. “The region —
this community — is our home. We want the
region to remain strong and vibrant and
continue a long tradition of helping to build
technologies that transform the future and
improve the lives of people around the
world, and also in our extended neighborhood. We all need to work together to create
new opportunities for housing, transportation and employment across the region.
We’re committed to join with the community to help.”

recent data suggest that the economy is in
decent shape. Americans bought homes in
October at the fastest pace in nearly a decade.
They’re also more confident in the economy
than at any other point in the past nine years
and are spending more.
Those trends are keeping the Federal
Reserve on track to raise short-term interest
rates at its next meeting in less than two
weeks.
“For the Fed, barring a very adverse ...
development, a hike at the Dec. 14 meeting
appears to be a done deal,” said Michael
Feroli, an economist at JPMorgan Chase.
Two measures illustrate the mixed nature of
the economic recovery:
The unemployment rate is now back to
where it was in August 2007 — four months
before the Great Recession began. That suggests that the economy has fully recovered.
Yet the percentage of all adults with jobs is
still 3 percentage points below where it was
in August 2007. Some of that decline has
been driven by retirements among the aging
baby boom generation. But for men age 25

through 54 years old — prime working years
— the proportion who have jobs remains
substantially below its pre-recession level.
That translates into millions of men who are
neither working nor looking for work.
Why have so many men dropped out?
Kolko says that is “probably the biggest
question facing the labor market today.”
Many men who aren’t working blame mental or physical health problems. Alan
Krueger, an economist at Princeton and a former top adviser to President Barack Obama,
has found that nearly half of men ages 25
through 54 who are outside the workforce
take pain medication.
The nation has lost nearly a third of its
manufacturing jobs since 2000, and many
who once held those positions have struggled to find work that pays as well.
But Nicholas Eberstadt, an economist at
the right-leaning American Enterprise
Institute, notes that most European countries
also lost manufacturing jobs, yet haven’t
seen a similar decline in male employment.
Instead, Eberstadt points to high levels of

incarceration over the past three decades.
That’s left millions of men with criminal
records that can make it hard for them to find
work even years after they’ve completed
their sentences.
Randy Shacka, president of Lansing,
Michigan-based moving firm Two Men and a
Truck, says job applicants have had a harder
time passing drug tests in recent years, particularly in states that have eased marijuana
laws.
The company hopes to add 3,000 to its
8,000-person staff by June, when moving
season heats up. But with unemployment
down and the economy growing consistently, the company has had to try harder to find
qualified applicants. It recently introduced a
401(k) plan and has ramped up training,
Shacka said.
Sluggish pay gains have been a chronic
problem for the economy and have provided
less incentive for those who have dropped
out to resume job hunts. Average hourly pay
slipped in November and has risen just 2.5
percent in the past year.

cafe, and can grow up to six plants for personal use. The state is now tasked with creating a licensing system for commercial
operations, which is expected to be rolled
out by 2018.
The new law did, however, provide some
autonomy for local jurisdictions to enact
further restrictions. Cities or counties can
prohibit outdoor marijuana growing and
can ban commercial operations. Attorneys
have theorized that cities looking to ban
marijuana-related businesses or large-scale
cultivation must do so before the state

begins issuing licenses.
Locally, San Mateo, Foster City, San
Bruno and Burlingame adopted stricter
emergency provisions. Half Moon Bay has
considered whether to permit marijuana cultivation in greenhouses or agricultural
lands as a way to help offset the declining
floral industry. The Board of Supervisors is
responsible for regulating unincorporated
areas including the coast, which has prominent agricultural lands in areas such as
Pescadero.
The county’s current regulations stem

from a 2009 ordinance that regulates the
licensing of medical marijuana dispensaries and currently there are none operating within the county’s jurisdiction.
During its study session next week,
supervisors may instruct staff to craft new
restrictions or opt for more research to be
conducted before considering whether to
create new regulations.
The Board of Superv isors meeting begins
9 a.m. at 400 County Center, Redwood
City.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION/WORLD

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

9

Panel urges better cybersecurity
to President-elect Donald Trump
By Tami Abdollah
and Darlene Superville
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A national commission
on Friday delivered urgent recommendations
to improve the nation’s cybersecurity,
weeks before President-elect Donald Trump
takes office. The report follows the worst
hacking of U.S. government systems in
history and accusations by the Obama
administration that Russia meddled in the
U. S. presidential election by hacking
Democrats.
The Presidential Commission on
Enhancing National Cybersecurity, which
REUTERS was expected to spell out actions the U.S.
Barack Obama delivers remarks to reporters as he welcomes U.N. Secretary General-designate can take over the next 10 years, instead
Antonio Guterres in the Oval Office.
urged more immediate actions within two to
five years. It suggested the Trump administration consider some items “deserving
action” within the first 100 days.
It recommended that Trump create an
assistant to the president for cybersecurity,
who would report through the national secu-

House passes $611B defense
policy bill by a wide margin
By Richard Lardner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Republican-led
House on Friday overwhelmingly backed a
$611 billion defense policy bill that rejects
a number of President Barack Obama’s key
proposals for managing the nation’s vast
military enterprise.
Lawmakers passed the legislative package, 375-34. The bill now goes to the
Senate where a vote is expected early next
week.
The bill, crafted after weeks of talks
between House and Senate negotiators, prohibits Obama from following through on
his longstanding campaign pledge to close
the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The
bill also bars the Pentagon from reducing
the number of military bases even though
senior U.S. defense officials said there is
excess capacity, and it awards U.S. troops
their largest pay raise in six years. Obama
had recommended a smaller pay increase.
The bill would prevent the Pentagon from
forcing thousands of California National
Guard troops to repay enlistment bonuses
and benefits they received a decade after they
signed up to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Soldiers would have to return a bonus only if
a “preponderance of the evidence” shows
they knew they weren’t eligible to receive

the money.
Even at $611 billion, the Republican
chairman of the House Armed Services
Committee lamented that more money is
needed in the defense budget to restock the
U.S. arsenal worn down by 15 years of conflict. Rep. Mac Thornberry of Texas said he
is hopeful President-elect Donald Trump,
who pledged during the campaign to spend
more on the military, will ask Congress
early next year to boost fiscal year 2017
military spending even further.
During his 2008 bid for president, Obama
pledged to close the detention facility at
Guantanamo, which he called a recruiting
tool for extremist groups. But Republicans
and a number of Democrats repeatedly
thwarted his goal over the ensuing years,
arguing the prison was badly needed for
housing suspected terrorists. The ban on
closing the prison also includes a prohibition on moving Guantanamo detainees to
secure facilities in the U.S.
Trump has not only pledged to keep
Guantanamo open, he said during the campaign that he wants to “load it up with some
bad dudes.”
The defense legislation also authorizes a
2.1 percent pay raise for the troops — a
half-percentage point higher than the
Pentagon requested in its budget presentation.

Philanthropist to fund Washington
Monument elevator repair
WASHINGTON — A project to modernize
the Washington Monument’s elevator, estimated to cost $2 million to $3 million, will
be paid for by businessman and philanthropist David Rubenstein, officials announced
Friday.
In a statement, the National Park Service
said the project will correct ongoing
mechanical, electrical and computer issues
that have closed the monument’ since Aug.
17. The elevator takes visitors to an observation deck near the top of the 555-foot
monument.
“The monument has become a symbol of

rity adviser, and establish an ambassador for
cybersecurity, who would lead efforts to create international rules. It urged steps to end
the threat of identity theft by 2021 and said
Trump’s administration should train
100, 000 new cybersecurity workers by
2020.
Other ideas included helping consumers to
judge products using an independent “nutritional label” for technology products and
services.
The White House requested the report in
February and intended it to serve as a transition memo for the next president. The commission included 12 of what the White
House described as the brightest minds in
business, academia, technology and security. It was led by Tom Donilon, Obama’s former national security adviser.
The panel studied sharing information
with private companies about cyber threats,
the lack of talented American security engineers and distrust of the U.S. government by
private businesses, especially in Silicon
Valley.

Around the nation
our country, and reminds everyone of the
towering strengths of our first president. I
am honored to help make this symbol safely accessible again to all Americans as soon
as practicable,” Rubenstein said in a statement.
The monument is expected to reopen to
visitors in 2019.
Among other things, Rubenstein’s gift
will let officials replace the computer system that controls the elevator and add a
remote diagnostic system that will allow
technicians to quickly determine the cause
of problems when they occur, officials
said.

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Rally ebbs as investors seek
safety after weak wage data
By Marley Jay

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Investors made a
small move back to safer assets
Friday afternoon after the government’s November jobs report
showed continued hiring, but
weak wages.
Indexes finished little changed
as real estate and household goods
companies rose, but banks, which
have soared since the presidential
election, took losses.
Most stocks finished higher,
and the biggest gains went to
companies that pay big dividends,
similar to bonds. Investors also
bought bonds, and prices rose and
yields fell.
The dollar also weakened as
investors expected less inflation.
Thanks to a loss from Goldman
Sachs, which closed at a nine-year
high on Thursday, the Dow Jones
industrial average dipped after
closing at a record high a day ago.
The jobs report called into question some of investors’ hopes
about the state of the economy,
and they reversed some of the
moves they’ve made since the
presidential election three weeks
ago.
“It suggests that inflationary
pressures maybe aren’t building as
quickly, at least on the wage side,
as some had supposed,” said Russ
Koesterich, head of asset allocation for BlackRock’s Global
Allocation
Fund.
He said
investors want to see a combination of strong wage growth and

High:
Low:
Close:
Change:

19,196.14
19,141.18
19,170.42
-21.51

OTHER INDEXES

stimulus spending to boost the
economy in 2017. The weak wage
figures throw that into doubt.
“You’re less likely to see inflation build if people aren’t getting
paid more because they can’t
afford to spend more, ” said
Koesterich.
The Dow lost 21.51 points, or
0.1 percent, to 19,170.42. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
0. 87 points to 2, 191. 95. The
Nasdaq composite added 4. 55
points, or 0. 1 percent, to
5,255.65.
The weak finish appeared to
mark an end, at least for now, of
the post-election rally for U.S.
stocks. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq
fell this week after a three-week
rally took them to record highs.
The Dow finished little changed.
The Labor Department said U.S.
employers added 178,000 jobs in

November as hiring remained
steady. Investors have long
expected that the Federal Reserve
will raise interest rates later this
month, and the jobs report did
nothing to dispel that notion. But
fewer people looked for work and
hourly wages slipped.
Bond prices, which have been
falling sharply since the presidential election, rose. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note fell to
2.30 percent from 2.45 percent.
Lower bond yields pushed
investors to buy utility and real
estate companies and consumer
goods makers, which are often
compared to bonds because of
their big dividend payments.
When bond yields fall, those
stocks become more appealing to
investors
seeking
income.
General Growth Properties rose 62
cents, or 2.5 percent, to $25.46

S&P 500:
NYSE Index:
Nasdaq:
NYSE MKT:
Russell 2000:
Wilshire 5000:

2191.95
10,838.58
5255.65
2249.37
1314.25
22,928.72

+0.87
+9.59
+4.54
+19.41
+0.45
+14.17

10-Yr Bond:
Oil (per barrel):
Gold :

2.39
51.64
1,179.10

+0.05
+0.58
+9.70

and Exelon rose 84 cents, or 2.6
percent, to $33. 01. PepsiCo
climbed $1.57, or 1.6 percent, to
$100.60.
The drop in bond yields also
affected banks because yields are
linked to long-term interest rates.
Lower interest rates mean banks
can’t make as much money from
lending. Goldman Sachs fell
$3.27, or 1.4 percent, to $223.36
and Citigroup gave up $1.25, or
2.2 percent, to $56.02.
The financial sector of the S&P
500 is the highest it’s been since
2008, up 13 percent since the
presidential election.
Benchmark U.S. crude added 62
cents, or 1.2 percent, to $51.68 a
barrel in New York. Brent crude,
the standard for pricing international oils, picked up 52 cents, or
1 percent, to $54.46 a barrel in
London. The price of oil surged 12

percent this week after OPEC
countries agreed to trim the production of oil next year. That was
the biggest weekly rise in oil
prices since February 2011.
The dollar fell to 113.67 yen.
The euro rose to $1.0660 from
$1.0645.
Starbucks shares slid $1.30, or
2.2 percent, to $57.21 after the
coffee chain said Howard Schultz
will step down as CEO in April. He
will remain chairman, and
Starbucks said he will focus on
new ideas like high-end shops.
President and Chief Operating
Officer Kevin Johnson will
become CEO. Schultz gave up the
CEO title in 2000, and investors
feel Starbucks struggled until he
became CEO again in 2008.
Human resources software company Workday gave a weak forecast. CEO Aneel Bhusri said some
customers have recently delayed
completing large deals, partly
because of “global uncertainties
such as Brexit, the U.S. presidential election, and pending elections in other G8 countries. ”
Workday’s stock tumbled $10.20,
or 12.5 percent, to $71.40.
Gold rose $8.40 to $1,177.80
an ounce. Silver jumped 33 cents,
or 2 percent, to $16.83 an ounce.
Copper lost 2 cents to $2.63 a
pound.
In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline picked up 1 cent to
$1.56 a gallon. Heating oil added
1 cent to $1.66 a gallon. Natural
gas lost 7 cents, or 2 percent, to
$3.44 per 1,000 cubic feet.

Health care tab hits $3.2T; fastest growth in eight years
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The nation’s
health care tab grew at the fastest
rate in eight years in 2015, driven
by the coverage expansion in
President Barack Obama’s law and
by costly prescription drugs, the
government said Friday.
The growth of 5.8 percent in
2015 boosted total health care
spending to $3.2 trillion. That’s
an average of $9,990 per person,
although the vast share of that
money is spent caring for the
sickest patients.
Health spending grew about 2
percentage points faster than the

overall economy in 2015, said
the report from nonpartisan economic experts at the Department
of Health and Human Services.
That’s a problem because it makes
it harder for government programs, employers, and individuals to afford the level of health
care that Americans are used to
having.
The report was disappointing
news for the outgoing Obama
administration,
which
had
enjoyed a long stretch of historically low increases in health care
spending, and had sought to credit
its 2010 health care overhaul for
taming costs. It’s a reality check
for President-elect Donald Trump,

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who did not focus much on health
care during his campaign and
implied that problems could be
easily fixed.
America has struggled for
decades to balance health care
cost, access, and quality. Obama’s
law made significant strides to
expand access, and the report
found nearly 91 percent of U.S.
residents now have coverage. But
the problem of costs has reemerged. That’s partly because
people with health insurance use
more medical care than the uninsured, who tend to postpone going
to the doctor. Some of the newly
insured turned out to be sicker than
those who were already covered.

The report “casts further doubt
on the extent of a permanent slowdown in health cost growth,” said
economist Eugene Steuerle of the
nonpartisan Urban Institute.
In a milestone for data-watchers,
the report found that the federal
government became the largest
payer for health care in 2015.
Washington accounted for 29 percent of overall spending. That was
followed by households (28 percent), businesses (20 percent),
and state and local governments
(17 percent). In doing the analysis, the HHS experts count the
employee share of premiums for
job-based insurance as spending
by households.

Spending by private health
insurance plans increased by 7.2
percent in 2015, and Medicaid
spending grew by 9.7 percent. In
both cases, the health care law was
a driver. Nine million people had
private insurance through the
health care law’s subsidized markets, and nearly 10 million had
Medicaid coverage as a result of
the law. Increases in Medicaid
spending will be a problem for
states. Starting next year, states
that expanded the program under
the health law must gradually pick
up a share of the costs.
Spending on prescription drugs
dispensed through pharmacies
increased by 9 percent in 2015.

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PAL ANNOUNCES ALL-LEAGUE FOOTBALL TEAMS: A SURPRISE FOR OCEAN DIVISION OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 13, Tiger Woods shows he
still has some magic after shooting a 65
Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

M-A falls in state finals Spotlight

on girls at
Bear Bash

By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

ORANGE — It’s become quite apparent
Fletcher Anderson is an outstanding volleyball coach. In two years as head coach at
Menlo-Atherton, Anderson has led the Bears
to two CIF Northern California titles.
Following M-A’s second CIF Division I
state championship game loss in as many
years, however, Anderson was wearing the
loss even harder than the 2015 defeat. Perhaps
it was the recognition that Friday’s three-set
loss to Edison-Huntington Beach could mark
the end of an era with the coming graduation
of the team’s core four starting seniors.
But it was also a disheartening loss in that
M-A (30-6 overall) never got going against
the No. 2 seed from the Southern California
Division I bracket. Edison (36-8) featured a
balanced assault of attackers, with three players totaling double-digit kills to dominate the
Bears in a 25-20, 25-21, 25-18 sweep
“It didn’t turn out the way we wanted,”
Anderson said. “You always want to end with a
win. But they should be super proud of what
they did (this season).”
The Bears’ core four seniors generated
enough offense to keep the opening two sets
close for a time. Peninsula Athletic League
Co-Most Valuable Player senior Jacqueline
DiSanto shared the match-high with 13 kills;
senior outside hitter Kiana Sales produced
eight kills and a team-best 11 digs; PAL CoMVP senior Eliza Grover notched six kills and
was solid in the back row with six digs; and
All-PAL first team setter, senior Kirby Knapp,
totaled 26 assists and six digs.
But Edison’s three-tiered attack of Hannah
Phair, Cassidy Dennison and Taylor Gray kept
the notoriously sharp M-A defense out of
rhythm from the outset. Phair shared the
match-high 13 kills while Gray and Cassidy
Dennison racked up 10 apiece. And adding
another iron to the fire with middle blocker
Kristen Austin checking in in Game 2, the junior went on to total seven kills.
“They’ve got a lot of weapons and a lot of
ball control,” Anderson said.
Game 1 proved discouraging in that M-A

See BEARS, Page 14

By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

the importance of getting a new ballpark built
in Oakland. A new ballpark will allow for the
most competitive level of play on the field.
We are laser-focused on making that happen as
quickly as we can.”
Kaval, named to his new A’s leadership
position last month while also currently serving as president of Major League Soccer’s San
Jose Earthquakes, brings a business savvy and
the experience from just pulling off the building of the Quakes’ second-year, state-of-the
art Avaya Stadium, which boasts the largest

With all eyes on the Menlo-Atherton girls’
wrestling team, the pressure is now on for the
first time in program history.
With an all-time high 23 wrestlers on the
girls’ roster, M-A enters the 2016-17 season
ranked No. 1 in the Central Coast Section.
That’s a far cry from two years ago when the
Bears just had one girl in the wrestling program.
With the CCS’ top ranking comes the pressure of pioneering the girls’ program. Last year,
head coach Phil Hoang saw “an explosion,” as
he puts it, in terms of turnout. Twenty-two girls
spent the season putting into a sport that, until
recent years, has been nearly a boys’ sport
exclusively.
“I think they’re a little nervous,” Hoang said.
“We have experience but for the first time, this
team is being recognized for this. … They feel
like we’re trying to be positive for everyone.
And we’re trying to set an example and be a
good example for everyone.”
Hoang is seizing the opportunity the explosion of numbers has allowed him as, Saturday,
Menlo-Atherton will kick off the season hosting its first annual M-A Girls’ Bear Bash, a
girls-only wrestling tournament featuring 16
teams from Northern California. San Mateo
County-based
teams
include M-A, Sequoia,
Carlmont and Aragon.
At the outset of last year,
M-A sophomore Lauren
McDonald never dreamed
she’d be one of the anchors
of the wrestling team. Not
only were the Bears coming off a 2014-15 season
Lauren
with just one girls’ wrestler
McDonald
on roster, McDonald didn’t
even know such a sport existed.
Having grown up playing recreational soccer, McDonald’s introduction to wrestling came
in freshman P.E. class when the M-Aboys’ team
held a demonstration for fellow students. Before
the boys’ team hit the mat, McDonald was reluctant to even give the demo any serious attention.  
“When some people think of wrestling, they
think of like Sumo wrestling,” McDonald said.
“So, I didn’t know what it was.”
Six weeks later, McDonald was attending her
first day of wrestling practice. The then-freshman went on to embrace the sports and excel in
the postseason. In the 121-pound division, she
took fourth place at the Peninsula Athletic
League championships and advanced to the
Central Coast Section finals, where she recorded a 2-2 record to finish her season in seventh
place.

See ATHLETICS, Page 14

See WRESTLING, Page 16

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

M-A’s Jacqueline DiSanto, left, tries an attack through the Edison block during the Division I
state volleyball championship match.The Bears were swept in the final for the second straight
season, losing 25-20, 25-21, 25-18.

A’s being phased out of revenue sharing,
urgency now in building new ballpark
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The Oakland Athletics will be
phased out of revenue sharing in the coming
years as part of baseball’s new labor deal, and
that puts even more urgency on the smallbudget franchise’s plan to find the right spot
soon to build a new, privately funded ballpark.
The A’s revenue-sharing funds will be cut to
75 percent next year, 50 percent in 2018, 25
percent in 2019 and then phased out as part of
the five-year agreement reached Wednesday
and formally announced Friday.

“We are very excited
that there is an agreement
on a new CBA. We are
committed right now to
investing every dollar of
revenue that we generate
back into the on-field
product and the fan experience,” new A’s team
President Dave Kaval
Dave Kaval
said. “We will also work
hard to increase our revenue in the near term so
that we can allocate more resources to both of
these areas. The new CBA again highlights

12

SPORTS

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

One surprise in PAL football all-league awards
By Nathan Mollat

Bay Division

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It’s not unusual to see best player awards
handed out to those who compete for the team
that won a division or league championship.
And the Peninsula Athletic League, for the
most part, is no different. The PAL AllDivision teams were released publicly Friday,
with Menlo-Atherton dominating the Bay
Division’s best and Lake Division champ San
Mateo filling most of the player of the year categories in that division.
But there was a surprising choice for Ocean
Division Offensive Player of the Year. Half
Moon Bay’s Chase Hofmann and Menlo
School’s Charlie Ferguson, two teams that finished tied for the division title and two of the
top running backs in all of the PAL, were
expected to vie for the division’s top offensive
award.
In the end, Ferguson was given the nod.
“I put [Hofmann] up (for the MVP award).
Some other coaches put some other players up
(for consideration). There are only six who
vote (the six division coaches). Four vote for
their own kid. That left two votes. [Hofmann]
got neither of them,” said Half Moon Bay
coach Keith Holden.
Holden said he did not complain because ultimately it would do no good and did not want to
make it about himself or his team.
“Would complaining change anything? No.
there were other (coaches of other) people who
didn’t win it who were upset,” Holden said.
Ferguson rushed for 621 yards in Ocean
Division play, compared to 620 for Hofmann,
who appeared in one less game. For the season,
however, Hofmann finished with 2,070 yards
rushing and 29 touchdowns, while Ferguson
finished with 1,613 and 25 scores.
Menlo took the top honors on both sides of

Local sports roundup
Boys’ basketball

Offensive Player of the Year: Aajon Johnson (sr., M-A)
Defensive Player of the Year: Christian Wiseman (Sr., M-A)
Utility Player of the Year: Nate Rosas (sr., Hills)
Special Teams Player of the year: Marquis Reid (sr., M-A)
First-team offense
Aajon Johnson (sr., QB, M-A); Jordan Mims (sr., RB, M-A); Sean
Saunders (sr., RB, Bgame); Nate Rosas (sr., RB/QB, Hills); Ian
Tapueluelu (jr., OL, Aragon); Kyle Stalder (sr., OL, SHP); Michael
Mata’u (sr., OL, TN); Leo Cucinell (sr., OL, M-A); Matt Roloff (sr., OL,
Hills); David Peterson (sr., TE, SHP); Mekhi Blackmon (sr., WR, MA); Isaiah Cozzolino (sr.,WR, Hills); Davion Cox (jr.,WR, Aragon); Rich
Walls (jr., WR, TN); Dakota Severson (sr., K, Aragon)
First-team defense
Jack Baker (sr., DL, Bgame); Noa Ngalu (so., DL, M-A); Hati Unga
(sr., DL, Aragon); Arman Dizadji (sr., DL, Bgame); Brendan Semien
(sr., LB, SHP); Angelo Pera (sr., LB, TN); Christian Wiseman (sr., LB,
M-A); Stavro Papadakis (sr., LB, M-A); Cole Friedlander (sr., DB,
Bgame); Anthony Sandoval (sr., DB, Aragon);Tate Tussing (sr., DB,
M-A); Siua Tongamoa (sr., DB, Aragon); Isaiah Cozzolino (sr., P,
Hills)

Offensive Player of the Year: Charlie Ferguson (sr., Menlo)
Defensive Player of the Year: JH Tevis (jr., Menlo)
Utility Player of the Year: Marcelous Chester-Riley (Sr., Woodside)

Offensive Player of the Year: Anderson Perdomo (sr., SM)
Offensive Lineman of the Year: George Oobti (sr., SM)
Receiver of the Year: Joe Baker (sr., SM)
Defensive Player of the Year: Tristan Helin (sr., SM)
Linebacker of the Year: Isaiah Archilla (jr., Cap)
Defensive Back of the Year: Raynaz Halim (sr., Cap)
Special Team Player of the Year: Daniel Benjamin (jr., Jeff)
Utility Player of the Year: Trey Zahursky (jr., Cap)

First-team offense
Hayden Pegley (sr., QB, Menlo); Marcelous Chester-Riley (sr., RB,
Wood); Charlie Ferguson (sr., RB, Menlo); Chase Hofmann (jr., RB,
HMB); Jose Ramirez (sr., OL, HMB); Adalberto Villalobos (sr., OL,
Seq); Urian Barraza (jr., OL, SSF); Ricky Camacho (jr., OL, HMB);
Christian Ochoa (so., OL, Wood); Jack McNally (sr., TE, Menlo);
Tyler Franham (jr., WR, TKA); Evan King (sr., WR, Menlo); Hayden
Von Almen (jr., WR, HMB); Duncan Stewart (jr., WR, Seq); Dylan
Williams (jr., K, Menlo)

First-team offense
Austin Salvail (sr., QB, SM); Anderson Perdomo (sr., RB, SM); Boris
Mazin (sr., RB, SM); David Tavilanga (sr., RB, Mills); George Oobti
(sr., OL, SM); Lomio Fasisila (sr., OL, Cap); Ako Tamasese (sr., OL,
Jeff); Jackson Velschow (jr., OL, Cmont); Nathan Julian (sr., OL,
EC); Joe Baker (sr.,WR, SM); Raynaz Halim (sr.,WR, Cap); Roshawn
Livingston (sr., WR, Jeff); CJ Bautista (sr., WR, EC); Jake Jefferies
(sr., TE, SM); Jake Jeffries (sr., K, SM)

First-team defense
JH Tevis (jr., DE, Menlo); Jack Cartwright (sr., DL, HMB); Nate Talakai
(sr., DL, Seq); Luke Cruz (sr., DL, SSF); Kilifi Leaatoa (jr., LB, TKA);
Chris Brugger (jr., LB,Wood); Sean Baird (sr., LB, HMB); Gavin Beene
(sr., LB, Seq); Aidan Israelski (jr., DB, Menlo); Landon Smith (jr., DB,
Menlo); Jake Quosig (sr., DB, HMB); Jacob Yamboa (Sr., DB, Seq);
Gavin Tomberlin (jr. P, HMB).

First-team defense
Tristan Helim (sr., DL, SM); Ariel Blemur (jr., DL, SM); Moses Olive
(jr., DL, Cap); Sione Langi (jr., DL, Mills); Isaiah Archilla (jr., LB, Cap);
John Torno (sr., LB, Jeff); Saumane Stanley (sr., LB, Mills); Damien
Lum (sr., LB, EC); Abnan Grejada (jr. DB, Cap); DeArris Simpson
(sr., DB, Jeff); D’Harerra Allen (jr., DB, SM); Raynaz Halim (sr., DB, Cap);
Henry Reich (jr., P, Cmont).

Marquis Reid garnering Special Teams Player
of the Year honors. M-A coach Adhir Ravipati
was named Coach of the Year after leading the
Bears to an undefeated Bay Division record and
the CCS Open Division I title.
Hillsdale’s Nate Rosas broke up the potential M-A sweep as he earned Utility Player of
the Year honors.
The Lake Division featured a number of division bests, with San Mateo taking home nearly all the hardware. Bearcats’ running back
Anderson Perdomo was Offensive Player of the
Year, while Tristan Helin was named Defensive
Player of the Year. George Oobti was named
Offensive Lineman of the Year, while Joe Baker
was Wide Receiver of the Year. Not surprisingly, San Mateo coach Jeff Scheller was named
Coach of the Year after winning the Lake title
with an undefeated run.
There were a few other players from other
teams who slipped in and garnered some recog-

nition. Capuchino’s Isaiah Archilla and
Raynaz Halim were named Linebacker and
Defensive Back of the Year, respectively, while
teammate Trey Zahursky got the Utility Player
of the Year nod. Jefferson’s Daniel Benjamin
won the Special Teams Player of the Year award.
Of all the players to be named to first-team,
all-division teams, there were two who were
named to both the first-team offense and
defense: Hillsdale’s Isaiah Cozzolino and
Capuchino’s Halim. Cozzolino was a Bay
Division, first-team wide receiver and also was
honored as punter of the first-team defense as
well. Halim was first-team, all-league at both
wide receiver and defensive back for Capuchino
in the Lake Division.
San Mateo’s Jake Jefferies was the only
player in the PAL to be named all-league at two
different positions on one side of the ball. Not
only was Jefferies named the Lake Division’s
top tight end, but its best place kicker as well.

Palo Alto, 6:30 p.m.; Irvington-Fremont
vs. Burlingame, 8 p.m.The championship
game is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Friday.

outscoring the Rams 20-10 to trail just 4741 going into the final period. But St.
Mary’s pulled away over the final eight minutes, outscoring the Bears 22-12 to take the
win.
M-A was led by Greer Hoyem, who scored
a game-high 21 points. St. Mary’s was
paced by Neenah Young, who finished with
20. Aquira DeCosta, one of the best players
in the country, finished with 19 points for
the Rams.

Cal (3-0) kept its 11-point lead for most of
the second half.
Alexa Bayangos led Carlmont with 11
points. Victoria Mataele added seven for the
Scots. Cal’s Audrey Moulton led all scorers
with a game-high 19 points.

THURSDAY

Burlingame High School, in cooperation
with the Burlingame Lions Club, will host
the 40th annual Burlingame Lions Club
tournament beginning next Tuesday in the
Burlingame gym.
This preseason tournament, started in
1977, is the longest-running tournament on
the Peninsula.
The varsity tournament features eight
team vying for the title, with first-round
matchups tipping off Tuesday: Half Moon
Bay vs. Los Altos, 3:30 p.m.; Aragon vs.
Stuart Hall-SF, 5 p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep vs.

Girls’ basketball
St. Mary’s-Stockton 69,
Menlo-Atherton 53
The Bears hung with the nationallyranked Rams at the third-annual Cardinal
Newman Classic tournament in Marin
County.
M-A (0-1) trailed just 18-14 after the first
quarter, but St. Mary’s (1-0) outscored M-A
19-7 in the second to take a 37-21 lead at
halftime.
The Bears got back into the game in third,

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with either a territory or vertical category.

Ocean Division

Lake Division

the ball in the Ocean Division as defensive end
JH Tevis was named Defensive Player of the
Year. Woodside’s Marcelous Chester-Riley was
awarded Utility Player of the Year. Holden, who
led the Cougars to a second straight Central
Coast Section title by beating Menlo 41-24
last Saturday, was honored as Coach of the
Year.
In the Bay Division, Menlo-Atherton’s
Aajon Johnson beat out teammate Jordan
Mims for Offensive Player of the Year honors.
Johnson, the Bears’ senior starting quarterback, accounted for 2,862 yards of offense
from the line of scrimmage. He threw for 1,901
yards, with 18 touchdowns against just five
interceptions. His 961 rushing yards were second on the team, behind Mims, and Johnson
added 14 more touchdowns on the ground.
Two other M-A players were also awarded
MVP honors, with Christian Wiseman earning
the Defensive Player of the Year tag and

40th annual Burlingame Lions Club
tournament tips off next week

The leading local daily news resource for the
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Cal-San Ramon 49, Carlmont 38
A slow start doomed the Scots in the
championship game of the FremontSunnyvale High tournament against the
Grizzlies of the East Bay.
Carlmont (2-1) was held to just four firstquarter points and trailed 24-15 at halftime.

Girls’ soccer
Half Moon Bay 3,
Harker School-San Jose 3
The Cougars’ rallied from a three-goal
halftime deficit to salvage a tie with the
Eagles in a non-league game.
Senior captain Savannah Freitas scored
twice for Half Moon Bay (0-1-1). Rachel
Rodriguez, a freshman, notched her firstever high school goal for the Cougars as
well.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

13

Tigers Woods posts a 65 in second round back
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASSAU, Bahamas — Tiger Woods saved
par from the dunes with a shot so good that
two spectators ran over and scooped up sand
for a souvenir.
It also served as motivation Friday at the
Hero World Challenge. The tee shot on the
par-3 eighth that landed next to a bush was
so bad that Woods said he told caddie Joe
LaCava after his par putt, “I’m not dropping
a shot.”
And he didn’t.
Woods capped a bogey-free round with an
even more unlikely par save on the 16th
hole. What stood out on a balmy day at
Albany was a seven-hole stretch in the middle of the round in which he never really
missed a shot. It led to enough birdies for a
7-under 65, leaving him six shots behind
and in a tie for ninth in the 17-man field.
His golf was as good as it was Thursday,
his first competition in 15 months, only
this time he eliminated the mistakes.
“I wanted to keep that card clean,” Woods

Baseball briefs
A’s sign 1B Yonder Alonso
to $4M contract for 2017
OAKLAND — The Oakland Athletics have
agreed to a $4 million, one-year contract
with first baseman Yonder
Alonso to avoid salary
arbitration.
The A’s also announced
Friday they have tendered
contracts to all remaining
players on their roster.
Alonso batted . 253
with 34 doubles, seven
homers and 56 RBIs in
Yonder Alonso 156 games in his first
season with Oakland last
year.
Oakland also outrighted infielder Rangel
Ravelo to Triple-A Nashville and will bring
him to spring training as a non-roster invitee.
The A’s have four remaining arbitrationeligible players on their roster: outfielder
Khris Davis, catcher Stephen Vogt, and
pitchers Sonny Gray and Liam Hendriks.

Nationals reacquire catcher
Derek Norris from Padres
WASHINGTON — The Washington
Nationals have reacquired catcher Derek
Norris from the San Diego Padres for minor

said. “I don’t know what
it is about playing and
competing, but keeping
cards clean, there’s
something really special. And it feels pretty
good about doing that.”
And he did it quickly,
in just under three hours.
Justin Rose, who
Tiger Woods
opened with a 74, withdrew with back problems. That left Woods
as a single, and when he realized there would
not be much wind, he felt he could play just
as well without a marker (typically the club
pro) to get a feel for how various shots
might be affected.
He was on his own and moving in the
right direction.
The par save on No. 8 and a wedge to tapin range on the No. 9 allowed him to make
the turn in 33, just like Thursday. The difference was how he finished.
After pounding a drive down with the wind
at his back on the par-5 11th — he had to
carry a bunker 290 yards away — he switch
league right-hander Pedro Avila.
Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo
announced the trade Friday.
Norris, a 2007 first-round pick of the
Nationals, hit .186 with 14 home runs and
42 RBIs last season for San Diego. The 27year-old is a career .233 hitter in five major
league seasons with the Oakland Athletics
and Padres.
Washington sent Norris to Oakland for
left-hander Gio Gonzalez in 2011. He
returns to the Nationals, who avoided arbitration with catcher Jose Lobaton on
Thursday.
All-Star catcher Wilson Ramos is a free
agent who will miss the start of the season
after knee surgery.
Avila, 19, went 7-7 with a 3.48 ERA in 20
starts for Single-A Hagerstown last season.

Giants agree to one-year
deals with Adrianza, Gearrin
SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco
Giants have agreed to one-year contracts with
infielder Ehire Adrianza and right-hander Cory
Gearrin to avoid salary arbitration.
The team announced the moves on Friday.
Adrianza batted .254 with two homers and
seven RBIs in 40 games last season.
Gearrin went 3-2 with a 4.28 ERA in 56
relief appearances.
The other Giants eligible for arbitration are
pitchers George Kontos and Will Smith, and
infielders Eduardo Nunez and Conor Gillaspie.

to a 5-iron to play away from a bunker to the
right of the green, making sure he would
have the right angle to the pin. It was right
where he was aiming, a yard off the green,
setting up an easy two-putt birdie. He followed that with a 6-iron to a foot for birdie
on the 12th, a 10-foot birdie putt on the
14th and a two-putt birdie on the par-5 15th.
He made seven birdies, but nothing
brought out the emotion like a par.
His tee shot on the 16th, where he made
double bogey Thursday, took a wild hop
into a bush in the sandy area. Enough of the
ball was showing that Woods tried to hit 6iron to the front bunker, but it came out
heavy into more of the waste area. The next
shot was well beyond the hole.
The par putt dropped on its final turn, and
Woods thrust his fist toward the cup and
slapped the face of his putter.
Two more pars, and he was done and feeling much better about the next two days.
“I really had it dialed in both ways,” he
said. “I was shaping it both ways and I really had nice control of my (trajectory). That
was the key. I was able to keep the ball down

when I needed to and send it at times.”
Woods stayed out of golf following two
back surgeries over the last three months of
2015, and he had not competed since a tie
for 10th at the Wyndham Championship on
Aug. 23, 2015. There have been no issues
with his back, and Woods said he has made a
few changes with his swing and how much
he works away from golf.
If he looks slimmer, he says he picked up
an illness from his children over
Thanksgiving. More relevant is that he said
he no longer lifts as much weight or runs as
he once did. Woods said he used to run 30
miles a week in his early days on tour.
“I’ve had four knee surgeries, three backs.
My body’s been through it,” he said.
As for the weights?
“I don’t load the spine like I used to,” he
said. “I’m trying to do other things to gain
strength. I don’t have any problem with
suppleness and flexibility, but I also need to
have stability.”
As for his swing, Woods said he has made
subtle changes to alleviate the strain on his
back.

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SPORTS

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NASCAR hopes new ATHLETICS
sponsor will attract
younger fans to sport
LAS VEGAS — NASCAR’s top circuit has been called the
Winston Cup, Nextel Cup and Sprint Cup.
Starting in 2017, the sport could have a Cup-less name, one of
many changes expected as Monster Energy takes over as title
sponsor with a desire to attract younger fans to a sagging sport.
“Young people set trends in fashion and then older people
adapt,” said Mark Hall, Monster’s chief marketing officer.
“Fashion is set by a small group of influencers. The challenge is
to make your product relevant to that group and then have them
influence the others. If we’ve been successful in the past, we’ve
followed that model.”
A decade ago, NASCAR was the cool sport, drawing record television ratings and numerous sponsors as it branched out from
its Southeastern roots. The recession hit the sport hard, then the
fans started to scatter and TV ratings dwindled. Sprint, which
inherited the sponsorship of the sport’s top series when it
merged with Nextel, announced in December 2014 it wouldn’t
renew.
It took nearly two years to find a replacement, and it’s believed
Monster is paying much less. But NASCAR hopes the relationship with the California-based maker of caffeine-filled energy
drinks will reinvigorate an aging fan base.
NASCAR Chairman Brian France kept saying “fun” and
“edgy” in describing Monster at Thursday’s news conference
announcing the agreement.
“They get at a millennial audience in a different way than we’ve
ever been associated with,” France said. “They know what
they’re doing.”
France declined to say what the name of the circuit will be in
2017. NASCAR’s press release of the multiyear agreement
referred to NASCAR’s “premier series,” hinting the Cup name
will go away. An official announcement of the name and logo is
expected within a couple weeks.

Continued from page 11

Continued from page 11

outdoor bar in North America. He envisions an intimate baseball venue surrounded by the bustle of businesses, restaurants
and housing.

bounced back from three early deficits of 8-5, 10-8 and 12-10
to tie it each time, but could never get over the top to take the
lead. Phair, Gray and Cassidy Dennison worked in rotation off
the left side to give the Bears fits. Of Edison’s 11 kills in the
set, eight came from the outside hitter position.
Then after M-A tied it 12-12 to force a side out, DiSanto
committed one of the Bears’ four service faults in the opening
set. Edison, in turn, got back-to-back aces from senior libero
Dani Dennison amid a 5-0 run, and M-A never got closer than
four points for the remainder of the set.
“We missed too many serves and our passing was never really there,” DiSanto said. “We were never able to run our middles
and I think that’s what really hurt us.”
Indeed, sophomore middle Alicia Letvin and freshman middle Marit Hoyem managed just 12 attacking attempts in the
match, and totaled just one kill between them. Dani Dennison
— the twin sister of Cassidy Dennison — said that was precisely Edison’s strategy.
“They’re a really good team and they block well, but we
picked up on that really quickly,” Dani Dennison said.
Game 2 was more of the same. M-A overcame and early 8-4
deficit with a four-point run to tie it. But again the Bears never
managed a lead. The set crawled to ties of 9-9, 10-10, 11-11
and 12-12, but M-A committed one of its 28 unforced errors to
give Edison a 13-12 edge and the Chargers never again trailed.
Down 21-16, M-A went on a mini-run capped by a Letvin
block to close it to 21-19. But a Cassidy Dennison kill and a
block by Phair put the set on ice to give Edison a commanding
2-sets-to-0 lead.
In Game 3, M-A earned its first lead since early in the opening set. The Bears overcame a 4-1 deficit to take its first multipoint lead at 16-12 on a block by Sales. But as quickly as the
little wind in M-A’s sails came, Edison responded with an 110 run — winning several extended brawling rallies — to all but
put the championship on ice.
“They like to extend rallied just like we do but they were the
better team today,” Anderson said.
M-A’s players weren’t nearly as stunned following the match
as they were following their elimination from the Central
Coast Section Open Division bracket. Knapp said it was the
feeling the Bears were playing with house money.
“I think we were lucky in CIF, and getting another chance to
play in CIF after getting knocked out in CCS,” Knapp said. “It
was a great second chance. And we’ve played well. We just didn’t show it tonight.”
M-A finishes the season having won 29 of its last 31 matches. In regular-season play, the Bears earned their third consecutive PAL Bay Division championship; through the past three
season, M-A has lost just one match in league play. And the
Bears became the first team in program history to win back-toback Nor Cal titles.
“They should be so proud of themselves,” Anderson said.
“Getting here two years in a row, how well they’ve played all
season — they should not be defined by what they did today.”

Commissioner Rob Manfred said during the Cubs-Giants
series in October he would like to see the club stay put and find
a viable solution in Oakland, and Mayor Libby Schaaf has
pledged her commitment.
The A’s have a current payroll of $87 million, pending award
bonuses and adjustments, and that is above only Tampa Bay
and Milwaukee’s. They added outfielder Matt Joyce with an $11
million, two-year contract Wednesday and avoided a potential
arbitration case when first baseman Yonder Alonso agreed
Friday to a $4 million, one-year contract.
Pushing forward for a new ballpark is a top priority, along
with improving the fan experience at the Coliseum in the
meantime to keep a frustrated fan base happy until ground
breaks to show this really will happen — prompting him to
say last month, “I know it’s maybe lipstick on a pig.”
The run-down Coliseum, shared with the Raiders and the last
venue with both Major League Baseball and football, had multiple sewage problems in 2013 that caused damage during
games among other issues.
Kaval is committed to making quick progress but also doing
this right. That means strong communication with city and
civic leaders as well as the community and fan base. On
Tuesday afternoon, Kaval will host his first office hours at the
Coliseum open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis
— then each Tuesday after that by appointment. He has held a
similar practice as with the Earthquakes.
“I do hope our new president has a better understanding of
what the fans want in order to get a new stadium done,” catcher
Stephen Vogt said in a text message Friday. “I think it’s great
that he is having office hours that fans can come in and give
him their opinion on what they would like to see. The new stadium is for these fans. These fans deserve a new stadium. They
waited long and they still supported us through thick and thin
the last few years.”

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

15

Who has it better than Raiders’ Hayden
the 49ers? Everybody! headed to IR with
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco
49ers have fallen to a new level of failure and
futility, a laughingstock of the league.
Among the worst they’ve ever been when all
that winning from just a few years back is still
so fresh. Oh, and the Oakland Raiders are running through the AFC.
After an impressive shutout of the Rams in
the season opener lifted spirits for a turnaround
following two straight seasons out of the
playoffs, San Francisco
has lost a franchise-worst
10 in a row.
So, who’s got it better
than us? (Almost) everybody!
“I just feel like every
team circles us on their calendar,” Eli Harold said
recently. “We can’t be the
Jed York
target. We can’t be a laughingstock.”
Fans have taken to
social media begging for
emotional,
hard-nosed
Michigan coach Jim
Harbaugh to come back.
Hey, even one-and-done
Jim Tomsula sounds like a
better alternative to some
Trent Baalke — he won five games last
year, after all.
CEO Jed York never saw
this kind of losing and
embarrassment coming for
his once-proud franchise.
He had high hopes of
immediately contending
again when he hired a big
name in Chip Kelly nearly
11 months ago.
“He’s going to be able
Chip Kelly
to take us to where we want
to go,” York promised at the time.
Instead, there is little to cheer for in Kelly’s
first year; the embarrassment of a half-empty
home stadium many Sundays; and infuriated
fans who have simply had enough and are
choosing to spend their hard-earned money
anywhere but $1.3 billion, third-year Levi’s
Stadium.
San Francisco is worst in the NFC, and only
ahead of winless Cleveland in the entire NFL.
Quite a valley for an organization that reached
three straight NFC title games from 2011-13.
Only adding to the pain is the other team in
their market, AFC West-leading Oakland, is
one of the NFL’s best stories.
Next up for the Niners (1-10) is a game at
Chicago (2-9) this Sunday after a week spent
practicing in Orlando rather than returning to

the West Coast following a loss at Miami.
Kelly expects his players to keep fighting
to finish this season as well as could be imagined given the historic struggles.
“They’re professionals and I think they’re
all competitors, so I don’t know what they’d
gain from packing it in. Is that going to make
them feel better?” Kelly said. “They want to
straighten this thing out, so they’re going to
go out and compete and we’ve got a bunch of
competitors in there that want to go win. I
don’t want anybody to pat them on the back
and tell them that: ‘Hey, you did a good job.
You were close.’ They’re grown men, they
want to win and they’ll continue to work that
way.”
Oh what they would do for the Candlestick
Park glory days of Joe Montana to Dwight
Clark or Steve Young beautifully finding Jerry
Rice, and Ronnie Lott landing a crushing,
game-changing hit. Five Super Bowl titles
under newly enshrined Hall of Famer Edward
DeBartolo Jr.
“I feel very bad for what they’re going
through,” DeBartolo said, “but they’ll definitely come out of it.”
The lost season could lead to the dismissal of
Kelly or general manager Trent Baalke —
maybe even both, though that would be a lot of
money for York to commit to paying out given
Tomsula still had his salary on the books when
he was dismissed. Then, the daunting idea of
both a GM and coaching search — again.
Or, they both could stay. York’s plans are
anybody’s guess.
Four months ago, Baalke acknowledged the
need to win for his own job security.
“If you’re in the National Football League,
you’re on the hot seat. Sometimes it’s a little
hotter than others,” he said. “This is a performance-based business. You’re here to win. I
always look at it like that. I don’t ever look at
it any other way.”
It’s worth noting that mobile quarterback
Colin Kaepernick is making just enough
strides and big plays in his comeback from
three surgeries to land himself a solid opportunity elsewhere. That could mean the Niners
would get none of the long-term benefits of
his development. Or he might opt to stay put
where he’s comfortable and accepted .
Then there’s the draft, on which Baalke
noted, “We certainly have had some misses.”
San Francisco had 12 arrests or charges filed
involving seven players from January 2012 to
Aldon Smith’s August 2015 release. York
vowed his franchise would “win with class,”
and now the Niners are being ultra-cautious and
trying to select only who they believe to be
high-character guys.
Baalke’s choices since being put in charge
of the draft have been questioned , along with
why he wasn’t more proactive in free agency
this year.

hamstring injury
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — The Raiders plan to place
cornerback DJ Hayden on injured reserve
because of a hamstring injury, potentially
ending the former first-round pick’s stay in
Oakland.
Although the team had yet to make an
official announcement, coach Jack Del Rio
told reporters on Friday that Hayden’s season was finished.
“He’s got a substantial
hamstring (injury) so
he’s not going to be
returning this year to
us,” Del Rio said. “That
was a big blow. That’ll
happen either tonight or
tomorrow. It’s unfortunate. He was playing
DJ Hayden
well for us but that’s the
case.”
Hayden was injured on the second play in
the fourth quarter of last week’s win against
the Carolina Panthers and did not return.
That ended an up-and-down season for the
fifth-year player who had been playing
mostly in nickel situations.
“It’s always a blow when we lose any type
of player because every piece that we have
is critical for our success on the field,” said
TJ Carrie, who is likely to replace Hayden
as Oakland’s nickel back. “A lot of other
guys are going to have to step up. A lot of
the younger guys are going to have to step
up and be on notice for whatever happens
with us in the back end.”
It is also a potentially cruel ending to
Hayden’s tenure in Oakland.
The Raiders went 14-34 during Hayden’s
first three seasons but are 9-2 and leading
the AFC West heading into Sunday’s home
game against the Buffalo Bills. General

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manager Reggie McKenzie declined to pick
up the option year on Hayden’s contract
this past offseason, however, making him a
free agent at the end of this season.
Hayden did not come into the locker room
during the media access period Friday.
Carrie, a close friend, said his teammate is
trying to remain upbeat.
“DJ’s a big part of our success defensively, what we’ve been able to do,” Carrie said.
“As a professional, your hopes are going to
be down for a little bit but at the end of the
day I think he’s still very positive in the
sense he can be around us and definitely
teach us some of the things that he knows
and allow us to see some of the things he’s
seen on the field. That will be critical for all
of us.”
The 12th overall pick in 2013, Hayden
has played only one full season due to a history of injuries after suffering a near-fatal
heart injury prior to his senior year in college. Hayden missed eight games as a rookie because of a groin injury and sat out the
first six games in 2014 with a foot injury.
“He has all the tools to go as high as he
wants to go,” Raiders cornerback David
Amerson said. “I just always knew when he
gets there mentally he could do all these
things, that he could play with the best of
them. That he was going to be an important
piece, of any team, of our team. It sucks,
man.”
Notes: Quarterback Derek Carr (finger)
was removed from the injury list. .
Defensive tackles Stacy McGee (ankle),
Darius Latham (ankle) and linebacker
Shalique Calhoun (knee) did not practice and
are out. Wide receiver Michael Crabtree
(ankle), center Rodney Hudson (knee), running back Latavius Murray (ankle), left
guard Kelechi Osemele (knee) and linebackers Malcolm Smith (hamstring) and Perry
Riley Jr. (hamstring) were all limited and
questionable.

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Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

WRESTLING
Continued from page 11
“Which does not sound like much, but last
year was my first year,” McDonald said. “Other
girls had a ton more experience. … So just getting to finish seventh was a huge accomplishment for me.”
This season, McDonald enters the season
ranked seventh in the 126-pound division.
Two M-A girls earned No. 1 preseason rankings: senior Chelsea Wilson — the reigning
CCS champion and state bronze medalist in
106s — now in 111s; and sophomore Fola
Akinola — the reigning CCS champ — in
160s.
“It took seven years … it took some time to
get here, but we are here,” Hoang said of the

SPORTS
team’s No. 1 preseason
ranking. “We just have to
earn it now.”
As far as M-A has come
in terms of earning
medals, the team has come
just as far in earning
respect, Hoang said. This
year’s Girls’ Bear Bash is
Chelsea Wilson emblematic of just how far
the sport has come. Last
year, the team had trouble even finding tournaments. Hoang recounted a co-ed tourney at a
CCS school that was so overbooked —
approximately 200 wrestlers showed up for an
event meant to accommodate 150, he said —
during which some wrestlers had to wait
upwards of five hours between matches.
At least M-A had the numbers to help create
such a logjam though. The first five years of
the seventh-year coach’s M-A career, Hoang’s

THE DAILY JOURNAL

mission was merely establishing a girls’ program that other county schools such as Terra
Nova and South City had establish in previous
years.
With one wrestler on roster through those
first five seasons — including the first-ever
girls’ wrestler in program history, 2012 graduate Kendra Wiley — it was slow goings. And
Hoang found M-A wasn’t the only school
fighting an uphill battle in establishing a
girls’ program.
“Not anymore,” Hoang said. “I think in the
last two years, not really. But four or five years
ago it was pretty common for (other schools’)
coaches to tell me it wasn’t worth their time.
… A lot of times, it was like it was a detriment
to their boys’ program.”
Huang said challenging the local culture
took work as well. The nature of wrestling as a
contact sport was a deterrent for many girls,
individually and culturally. 

“You’ve got to find the right kids,” Hoang
said. “This is not what their parents envisioned for them when they came in … but I
think the dynamic is changing here. I think
the kids like the challenge in it. They like finding the discipline level on their own.”
Many like McDonald have embraced the
independence the sport demands. The sophomore called her first season competing on the
mat “rewarding,” and is now intent on improving enough to advance to the state finals this
year.
Terra Nova also fared well in the CCS preseason rankings, landing No. 3 in the girls’ team
poll. Terra Nova junior Victoria Borrego —
reigning CCS champ and state bronze medalist
— earned the No. 1 ranking in 106s; junior
Marlene Salinas — reigning CCS champ —
earned the No. 1 ranking in 150s; and senior
Minnah Adams—a CCS silver medalist last
season — earned the No. 1 ranking in 170s.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NHL GLANCE

NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
New England 9 2 0 .818
Miami
7 4 0 .636
Buffalo
6 5 0 .545
N.Y. Jets
3 8 0 .273

PF
293
249
281
196

PA
197
240
236
266

South
Houston
Tennessee
Indianapolis
Jacksonville

6
6
5
2

5
6
6
9

0
0
0
0

.545
.500
.455
.182

194
308
270
214

236
296
301
293

North
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

6
6
3
0

5 0
5 0
7 1
12 0

.545
.545
.318
.000

218
266
213
197

201
222
245
352

West
Raiders
Kansas City
Denver
San Diego

9
8
7
5

2
3
4
6

.818
.727
.636
.455

307
252
266
313

275
214
219
291

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
Dallas
11 1 0 .917
N.Y. Giants
8 3 0 .727
Washington
6 4 1 .591
Philadelphia 5 6 0 .455

333
231
280
254

228
213
264
213

0
0
0
0

South
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

7
6
5
4

4
5
6
7

0
0
0
0

.636
.545
.455
.364

358
249
334
276

302
264
307
281

North
Detroit
Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago

7
6
5
2

4
6
6
9

0
0
0
0

.636
.500
.455
.182

247
233
274
178

238
209
289
264

West
Seattle
Arizona
Los Angeles
49ers

7
4
4
1

3 1
6 1
7 0
10 0

.682
.409
.364
.091

224
245
170
228

187
228
236
344

Sunday’s Games
Kansas City at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Los Angeles at New England, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Miami at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Denver at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 10 a.m.

NBA GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Montreal
23 16
Ottawa
24 14
Boston
24 13
Tampa Bay
25 13
Florida
24 12
Detroit
24 11
Toronto
23 10
Buffalo
23 9

L
5
8
10
11
10
10
9
9

OT
2
2
1
1
2
3
4
5

Pts
34
30
27
27
26
25
24
23

GF
68
57
57
75
60
58
70
48

GA
50
59
54
70
61
61
74
60

Metropolitan Division
N.Y. Rangers 25 16
Pittsburgh
24 14
Columbus
22 13
Washington 22 13
Philadelphia 25 12
New Jersey
23 10
Carolina
23 9
N.Y. Islanders 23 9

8
7
5
7
10
7
9
10

1
3
4
2
3
6
5
4

33
31
30
28
27
26
23
22

91
75
70
57
80
58
55
59

63
72
50
51
82
62
61
67

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Chicago
25 16 6
St. Louis
24 14 7
Minnesota
23 11 8
Nashville
22 11 8
Dallas
25 9 10
Winnipeg
26 11 13
Colorado
22 9 12

3
3
4
3
6
2
1

35
31
26
25
24
24
19

72
67
64
65
63
69
49

63
67
50
57
85
78
66

29
28
28
27
26
22
19

58
62
76
62
63
55
54

50
56
66
61
79
73
69

Pacific Division
San Jose
24 14 9 1
Anaheim
24 12 8 4
Edmonton
25 13 10 2
Los Angeles 24 13 10 1
Calgary
27 12 13 2
Vancouver
24 10 12 2
Arizona
22 8 11 3
Saturday’s Games
Chicago at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Boston at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 10 a.m.
New Jersey at Nashville, 11 a.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at St. Louis, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Arizona, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m.

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
13
6
.684
Boston
11
8
.579
New York
10
9
.526
Brooklyn
5
13 .278
Philadelphia
4
15 .211
Southeast Division
Charlotte
11
8
.579
Atlanta
10
10 .500
Orlando
8
12 .400
Miami
7
12 .368
Washington
6
12 .333
Central Division
Cleveland
13
5
.722
Chicago
11
7
.611
Milwaukee
9
8
.529
Detroit
11
10 .524
Indiana
9
10 .474
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
San Antonio
16
4
.800
Houston
12
7
.632
Memphis
12
8
.600
New Orleans
7
13 .350
Dallas
3
15 .167
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City
12
8
.600
Utah
11
9
.550
Portland
10
10 .500
Denver
7
11 .389
Minnesota
5
14 .263
Pacific Division
Golden State
16
3
.842
L.A. Clippers
16
5
.762
L.A. Lakers
10
11 .476
Sacramento
7
12 .368
Phoenix
6
13 .316
Saturday’s Games
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 2 p.m.
Minnesota at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 6 p.m.
Miami at Portland, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Orlando at Detroit, 3 p.m.

GB

2
3
7 1/2
9

1 1/2
3 1/2
4
4 1/2

2
3 1/2
3 1/2
4 1/2

3 1/2
4
9
12

1
2
4
6 1/2

1
7
9
10

17

LA 2024 releases $5.3
billion Olympic budget;
no new stadiums needed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Los Angeles bid committee
for the 2024 Olympics released
details of a nearly unheard-of budget plan Friday, insisting $5.3 billion will be enough to cover both
operational and infrastructure costs
for an Olympics that won’t need
any new, permanent stadiums.
The cost would be less than half
that of the recently completed Rio
Games and about a quarter of
Tokyo’s ballooning budget for the
2020 Olympics.
It also defies convention in the
Olympic bidding business, in
which cities traditionally deal with
two figures — one for operational
costs and one for “non-Olympics”
costs that cover capital and infrastructure.
Bid officials say they can do this
because more than 30 venues
already exist in the L.A. area and
those that don’t will be built as
temporary structures. The bid folded in $1.2 billion for infrastructure,
which would primarily be used for

temporary venues and to bring
existing ones up to Olympic standards.
“If LA is chosen to host the 2024
Games, the IOC does not have to
worry about changing or evolving
budgets, shifting competition venues or uncertainty about the delivery of the Games,” bid chairman
Casey Wasserman said.
Los Angeles is going against
Paris and Budapest, Hungary.
Preliminary figures for Paris called
for an infrastructure budget of $4.5
billion and operational costs of
$4.8 billion, with 95 percent of the
city’s proposed venues either temporary or already in existence. The
next deadline for cities to submit
candidate files, which will include
updated budget figures, is Feb. 3.
The games will be awarded next
September.
Gone from Los Angeles’ budget
was a one-time projected surplus of
$161 million. In its place is a $491
million contingency fund that
would cover cost overruns.

San Francisco at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Houston at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m.
Carolina at Seattle, 5:30 p.m.

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‘La La Land’
Movie named best
film by New York critics
SEE PAGE 23

Thankful for
Thanksgiving
By Karan Nevatia

T

hanksgiving has never been a big
thing in my family. My parents are
both immigrants, so they never
grew up celebrating the American holiday
and, as vegetarians, the traditional meal
revolving around a turkey was never
appealing.
So, Thanksgiving became more of a
preparation for Black Friday than a celebration to give thanks. My
dad and my brother would
venture out at 8 p.m. on
Thanksgiving, waiting
in line for Best Buy’s
midnight opening, to
buy the latest tech products at the cheapest
prices.
My mom would go to
the Hillsdale Shopping Center on the
morning of Black Friday, shopping for
holiday gifts and fashionable clothing
from Express. My younger sister and I
would usually tag along, playing around in
the LEGO store or begging to buy plastic
toys that we knew we would play with for a
few days before leaving them forgotten in a
closet.
Every year, we’d discuss not going out to
shop on Black Friday. Our house is already
filled with the latest gadgets, my mom’s
closet is overflowing with clothing and
Amazon is all we need for holiday gifts.
But there was some underlying fear of
missing out in all of us. We got pages and
pages of Black Friday deals in the mail, and
60 percent off of those latest Bluetooth
headphones seemed too good to pass up,
even though we have six different pairs of
headphones lying around the house that no
one uses.
And each year after we came home, our
Black Friday shopping was never quite satisfying. We started the day with giddy cravings for plastic that looked good on paper,

See STUDENT, Page 20

Natalie Portman plays Jacqueline Kennedy in ‘Jackie.’

‘Jackie’ is a fractured
fable of the Kennedys
Natalie Portman explores the
mysteries of Jackie Kennedy
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Jacqueline Kennedy did
not have a conventional speaking voice.
It’s part New York, part prep school MidAtlantic, and it’s jarring to most modern
ears. Natalie Portman remembers her first
few days on the set of “Jackie,” going all in
on that very specific accent and looking up
to see her director Pablo Larrain’s wide-eyed
bafflement.
“Pablo’s face was like ‘uhhhhh. . . ’, ”
Portman said laughing.

By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

They were filming a recreation of the television special “A Tour of the White House
with Mrs. John F. Kennedy,” where CBS
News correspondent Charles Collingwood
followed the first lady around with cameras
as they spoke about each room and her
pricey restoration. Larraín stopped during
one take and played footage of the actual
tour just to check. He was amazed at how
spot-on Portman’s interpretation actually
was.

History, lately run amok, is ordered with
such tidy, forceful finesse by Natalie
Portman’s Jacqueline Kennedy in the piercing “Jackie.” Summoning a journalist to
Hyannis Port in 1963, not long after the
assassination of John F. Kennedy, she coolly sets the record for her late husband’s legacy, coining “Camelot” and shaping the
mythology. Some details that don’t fit the
narrative she simply crosses out. “I don’t
smoke,” she tells the Life magazine reporter
(Billy Crudup), with a cigarette dangling
between her fingers.
Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie,” a work of probing intimacy and shattered stereotype, is an
electrifyingly fractured portrait of the for-

See PORTMAN, Page 22

See JACKIE, Page 22

‘Miss Bennet: Christmas at
Pemberley’ a holiday treat
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

KEVIN BERNE

Arthur de Bourgh (Adam Magill) and Mary Bennet (Martha Brigham).

Lauren Gunderson and Margot Melcon
have created a delicious holiday confection
with “Miss Bennet: Christmas at
Pemberley,” presented by Marin Theatre
Company.
It imagines what Jane Austen might have
written as a sequel to “Pride and Prejudice.”
Occurring in 1815, two years after the end
of that play, this one takes place at
Pemberley, the estate of Elizabeth Darcy
(Cindy Im) and Fitzwilliam Darcy (Joseph
Patrick O’Malley), who are hosting her
family for Christmas.
First to join them is Mary (Martha
Brigham), the unmarried middle sister. Next

comes another sister, the very pregnant
Jane Bingley (Lauren Spencer), and her husband, Charles (Thomas Gorrebeeck).
The youngest sister, Lydia Wickham
(Erika Rankin), arrives later, sans husband.
Despite her claims to the contrary, she’s not
happily married.
The story focuses on the bookish, bright
but socially awkward Mary. She says she’s
content with her solitary state, but some of
her behavior says otherwise.
Then there’s another guest, Arthur de
Bourgh (Adam Magill), invited by Mr.
Darcy, much to his wife’s surprise. Arthur
has recently come into an inheritance that
grants him the title of lord, a fortune and an
estate.

See BENNET, Page 20

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

19

‘Man Down’ waits
too long to deliver
a worthy message
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“Man Down” carries a poignant message about American
veterans’ mental health needs, but you may give up on the
movie before it gets there. Nothing is
clear until the film’s final moments, which
hit with a gut punch just before the credits
roll.
Until then, the story is told through disjointed flashbacks that make it hard to
know what’s going on and who to root for.
Director Dito Montiel bounces between
boot camp, active duty in Afghanistan and
life in post-apocalyptic America, with star
Shia LaBeouf Shia LaBeouf’s haircut and beard scruff the
only real indicator of where we are in time.
LaBeouf’s performance is powerful, maybe his best to date,
but it’s unduly burdened by an erratic story structure that doesn’t engender empathy for his character.
He plays Gabe, a Marine who enlisted with his lifelong best
friend, Devin (Jai Courtney). When we first see the two men,
they’re dirty and bearded, not in uniform, brandishing guns in
a bombed-out city as they desperately look for Gabe’s son.
Gabe carries a worn picture in his pocket of his wife, Natalie
(Kate Mara), and their towheaded little boy, Jonathan (Charlie
Shotwell, heartbreaking in the final scenes).
Suddenly, uniformed, clean-shaven Gabe is in an office
being questioned by a military counselor (Gary Oldman, disappointingly flat). The counselor is asking about “the incident,” and Gabe is stoic.
Then it’s basic training at Camp Lejeune, where Gabe and
Devin are new recruits being toughened up by an unrelenting
drill sergeant. Natalie sweetly shaves Gabe’s head as he prepares to ship out to Afghanistan.
Now, Gabe and Devin are back from the war, bearded and
dirty, wandering dystopian streets and threatening a homeless
man as they look for Gabe’s family.
Now clean-shaven Gabe is driving his son to school as they
playfully decide to use the military term “man down” as secret
code for “I love you.” He promises to send letters from
Afghanistan.
Now stoic Gabe drops a reluctant tear while talking to the
military counselor.
The meandering structure creates a little too much mystery
for the audience to know where to place its allegiances. Did
the Marines have something to do with the disappearance of
Gabe’s son, so Gabe and Devin have gone rogue? Or did Gabe
harm his son, and that’s why he’s being questioned by a military counselor? That distinction is key if we want to root for
the good guy.
Screenwriter Adam G. Simon’s nonlinear story parses out
details in such a way that we doesn’t know enough about
Gabe’s situation to experience his emotional arc until the
very end, which feels like a lost opportunity given its heartwrenching heft. Without that context, it’s hard to fully appreciate LaBeouf’s nuanced performance. We don’t understand
what we’re looking at until it’s over.
“Man Down” ultimately has a lot to say about the debilitating effects of war and the dismal reality for many veterans
who suffer from post-traumatic stress. It just waits too long to
say it.
“Man Down,” a Lionsgate release, is rated R by the Motion
Picture Association of America for “some disturbing violence,
and language throughout.” Running time: 92 minutes. Two
stars out of four.

Sunday news shows
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Vice President-elect Mike Pence; Gen. David Petraeus,
former CIA director.

NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
To be announced.

CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince
Priebus; former House Speaker Newt Gingrich; House
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi; former Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta.

CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Kellyanne Conway, former campaign manager for
Donald Trump; Robby Mook, former campaign manager
for Hillary Clinton.

‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Conway; Karen Finney, former spokeswoman for Clinton
campaign; Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein.

DAVE LEPORI

From left, Jonathan Rhys Williams (Kenneth), Randall King (Tommy) and Allison F. Rich (Aimee) star in San Jose Stage Company’s
regional premiere of Conor McPherson’s ‘The Night Alive.’

Violence nixes holiday
cheer in ‘Night Alive’
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

San Jose Stage Company calls contemporary Irish playwright Conor
McPherson’s “The Night Alive” a kind
of nativity story, but it’s hard to find
many parallels with the Bible story.
Nevertheless, as the cast talked with
audience members after the reviewed
performance, one actor said the play is
about hope, which is part of the nativity story.
The play is set in an extremely cluttered downstairs apartment in Dublin
occupied by down-on-his-luck Tommy
(Randall King), courtesy of his cranky

uncle, Maurice (Julian LópezMorillas), who lives upstairs.
Tommy is often joined by his amiable but not-too-bright friend Doc
(Lawrence Radecker), who helps him
in the odd jobs they manage to find.
One night Tommy returns home
assisting Aimee (Allison F. Rich), a
stranger who he found badly beaten by
her boyfriend. She winds up staying
and becoming friends with Tommy and
Doc.
Things change when Aimee’s
boyfriend, the menacing Kenneth
(Jonathan Rhys Williams), unexpectedly barges in when Doc is there alone.
Bloody violence erupts.
As time passes, Aimee has left for

parts unknown, but she returns and is
welcomed in the wake of other changes
that offer the hope cited by the actor.
Despite the darkness that pervades
much of the play, there are moments of
humor, expertly delivered by the outstanding cast and director Tony Kelly.
Running about an hour and 45 minutes with no intermission, this isn’t
what one might consider holiday fare,
but it’s absorbing and well acted, making it worthwhile, but only for adults.
“The Night Alive” will continue
through Dec. 11 at San Jose Stage
Company, 420 S. First St., San Jose.
For tickets and information call (408)
283-7142 or visit thestage.org.

20

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

BENNET
Continued from page 18
He’s uncomfortable with all three.
Similarly, he’s uncomfortable with most
people because, like Mary, he’s bookish and
socially awkward. It’s only natural that they
would be attracted to each other, but their
shyness gets in the way.
There are other complications, too, such
as Lydia’s flirting with Arthur and a mixup of
letters written by her, Mary and Arthur.
Another complication is the arrival of
Arthur’s cousin, the catty Anne de Bourgh
(Laura Odeh), who claims they are engaged,
much to his surprise and Mary’s chagrin.
Of course all works out well in the end,
thanks in large part to interventions by the
two married couples.
Although it’s a love story, it’s also a celebration of the importance of family and
kindness to one another.
The playwrights write in the style of Jane
Austen, which can seem formal at first but
which soon seems natural. There’s much
humor to leaven all that formality, producing many laughs.
Besides the script itself, much of the

WEEKEND JOURNAL
play’s success stems from Meredith
McDonough’s sure-handed direction of the
ensemble cast. All of the actors seem well
suited to their roles.
It’s great fun to watch their characters’
reactions as situations unfold. Even if the
conversation is between just two people,
there’s much to be gained from watching the
others.
The handsome drawing room set, complete with an elevated library area, is by
Erik Flatmo. The ceiling-high Christmas
tree that graces one corner seems strange to
most of the characters, but Elizabeth says it
was inspired by a German custom. As the
play progresses, lights and ornaments are
added.
Running about two hours with one intermission, this production is the third of a
rolling world premiere. The other two
opened in Chicago and Bethesda, Maryland,
within the two weeks before this opening.
It was scheduled to run through Dec. 18,
but artistic director Jasson Minadakis said
he hoped audience demand will extend it
through Dec. 23, and it was shortly later.
It’s likely that the play will become a holiday treat all around the country.
Marin Theatre is at 397 Miller Ave., Mill
Valley. For tickets and information call
(415) 388-5208 or visit marintheatre.org.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Katt Williams pleads no
contest to assault, battery charges
GAINESVILLE, Ga. — Katt Williams has
pleaded no contest to assault and battery
charges stemming from
an incident with a bodyguard in north Georgia.
The comedian, whose
real name is Micah Sierra
Williams, was charged in
March after authorities
said he threatened the
man while an acquaintance beat him with a
Katt Williams baseball bat. Defense
attorney Drew Findling
said Williams on Thursday agreed to a plea
deal.
Williams was ordered to serve five years
on probation. Findling said a related marijuana charge will be dismissed once
Williams completes probation.

STUDENT
Continued from page 18
but ended the day with bags full of junk that
no longer seemed so great.
This year, we did something different. It
was the first year my older brother was
away for college, so Thanksgiving was the
first time he was back in a while. We wanted to do something more special than wasting our time with him out shopping.
So on Thanksgiving Day, instead of
waiting in Best Buy lines or searching
through advertisements for the best deals,
we prepared a Thanksgiving meal (minus
the turkey), and sat down and ate together
as a family. We shared what we were thankful for, and none of us felt like we were
missing something.
In the evening, we went to the theaters to
watch “Moana” together — a fun movie all
of us enjoyed and, despite being at The
Shops of Tanforan, we didn’t care to visit

Entertainment briefs
TV’s ’Full House’ home
is staying in the Tanner family
SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco
home featured in television’s “Full House”
has sold to the producer who created the show.
KGO-TV reports veteran TV producer Jeff
Franklin bought the 3-bedroom Victorian in
August.
It was on the market for more than $4 million.
The real estate agent had declined to say
who bought the home in San Francisco’s
lower Pacific Heights neighborhood.
The home’s exterior was used as the Tanner
family’s residence in the original show.
Inside scenes were filmed on a set in
Burbank, California.
The shots were used again in the recent
“Fuller House” reboot of the show on
Netflix.
any of the stores that called us with lures of
“Buy one get one free” or “10 percent off
every purchase!” (with hidden fine print
that says you have to spend $200 for either
deal to be valid).
On Black Friday, instead of heading to
the mall, we stayed inside during most of
the day. I worked on my college applications, we played board games as a family
and avoided the shopping fray. In the
evening, we went to Ghirardelli Square in
San Francisco to watch a Christmas tree
lighting. There was a concert with
Christmas music, free chocolate being
thrown into the crowd and even fake snow
falling from the sky.
It brought us right into the holiday spirit, and all of us felt much more satisfied
than Black Friday shopping had ever made
us feel.

Karan Nevatia is a senior at Aragon High School in
San Mateo. Student News appears in the weekend
edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.

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WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

21

By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

THE MOS T FAMOUS ( S MALL)
WHITE HOUSE IN AMERICA: GRANT
WOOD’ S
AMERICAN
GOTHIC
DRAWS VISITORS TO ELDON, IOWA.
A dour farmer, wearing overalls and a jacket
and clutching a pitchfork, poses rigidly
next to a pinch-faced, apron-clad woman
who gazes into the distance. Behind them is
a modest white farmhouse whose second
floor window has a pointed arch. Unlikely
subjects for one of the most recognized
paintings in the world, but this is what
Grant Wood’s American Gothic has become
since he painted it in 1930 for a competition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The
painting entered the Institute’s permanent
collection. The little farmhouse still stands
in its original location in Eldon, Iowa,
where Wood saw it (only once) during a brief
stay. With its listing on the National
Register of Historic Places in 1974 and its
donation in 1991 to the State Historical
Society of Iowa by its last private owner,
the house is secure. Now, visitors come
from all over the world to spend time in
Eldon, to see the place that inspired Wood’s
masterpiece, and to make themselves a little
part of its story.
GET IN THE S PIRIT AND PUT
YOURSELF INTO THE PICTURE. Steps
from the farmhouse is the American Gothic
House Center, which contains displays
about Grant Wood and the creation of the
painting as well as a collection of the painting’s parodies. The Center generously lends
various sizes of the apron, overalls, suit
jacket and pitchfork to encourage visitors
to pose in front of the house and create their
own American Gothic portrait. To help personalize the portrait, visitors can substitute
an implement of their own trade (in place of
the pitchfork held by the man) or a piece of
their own jewelry (in place of the broach
worn by the woman).
American
Gothic
House
Center
Administrator Holly Berg said: “Most visitors are very excited at the opportunity to
put themselves in the picture. Sometimes it
takes a little coaxing to get a reluctant
spouse or teenager involved, but once they
don the costume they get in the spirit. It
does amaze me the number of visitors that
come prepared for their photos. One group
of sisters came dressed in their father’s
iconic overalls as a tribute to him. Another

couple came as Batman and Robin and wrote
in the guest book that they were from
Gothic City (instead of Gotham). The stories, both touching and goofy, are endless!
And though the parody photos are a fun
experience, it is always interesting to see
how many people notice something about
the painting they didn’t realize until they
put themselves in it — such as the daughter’s shoulder slightly behind the fathers, or
her off to the side glance. It always ends up
being a fun, but educational experience at
the same time.”
AMERICAN GOTHIC HOUSE PARTICULARS. The American Gothic House is
located at 300 American Gothic St. in
Eldon, Iowa. Tours of the downstairs portion of the house are given the second
Saturday of the month, April through
October from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Due to the
historic features of the house and grounds,
accessibility for visitors with limited
mobility can be challenging. The adjacent
American Gothic House Center, “photo-op”
area, and parking lot are all accessible. For
more information call (641) 652-3352 or
e
m
a
i
l
Th eAmeri can Go t h i cHo us e@g mai l . co m.
Admission to the Center is free. American
Gothic by Thomas Hoving is an entertaining biography of the painting.
GRANT WOOD AROUND IOWA.
Grant Wood (Feb. 13, 1891 – Feb. 12,
1942) is Iowa’s most famous artist. He was
born on a farm near Anamosa but moved to
Cedar Rapids when he was 10 years old after
the death of his father. From then on, Wood
lived most of his life in Cedar Rapids or
Iowa City, dying of cancer the day before
his 51st birthday. In addition to the
American Gothic House in Eldon, sites in
Iowa connected with his life and works
include the Grant Wood Gallery and Visitor
Center in Anamosa; the Grant Wood Studio
and Home in Cedar Rapids; Grant Wood’s
House in Iowa City; and his gravesite in
Riverside Cemetery in Anamosa. Grant

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

Visitors pose in front of the American Gothic House in Eldon, Iowa. The nearby American
Gothic House Center lends aprons, overalls and pitchforks to the thousands who come each
year to pose as the figures in Grant Wood’s iconic painting.
Wood’s Iowa by Wende Elliott and William
Balthazar Rose is a useful guide for those
laying out a tour.
AND REMEMBER: “I had to go to
France to appreciate Iowa.” — Grant Wood.

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susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her stories
may be found at http://ifwtwa.org/author/susancohn.

22

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

PORTMAN
Continued from page 18
Still, “at the beginning it was shocking,”
Larrain said.
It was also, he notes, different from how
Jackie Kennedy sounded in other circumstances. She had a public voice and a private
voice, which Portman was able to study
through Kennedy’s recorded interviews with
Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.
The film “Jackie,” out in limited release
Friday, explores the nuances of these public
and private sides of the enigmatic figure in
the immediate aftermath of the assassination
of her husband in 1963 as she plans the
funeral, exits her home, comforts her children and tends to her husband’s legacy.
It’s what compelled screenwriter Noah
Oppenheim to make her the subject of his
first script.
“Most often she is perceived through the
lens of being this style icon, this beautiful
woman at her husband’s side. People are fas-

JACKIE
Continued from page 18
mer First Lady. Gone is the image of the wan,
serene Jackie. Here, instead, is a savvy public-relations operator, a steely widow in grief
and a woman redefining herself amid tragedy.
“I’m his wi--” she begins saying after Dallas.
“Whatever I am now.”
The more complicated view of the mysterious Kennedy is inspired partly by the revelatory private interviews conducted by Arthur
M. Schlesinger Jr. and released in 2011. She
was not purely her pillbox-wearing public
image, not merely a totem of grace, the candid tapes revealed.
Throughout “Jackie,” we feel her discomfort at playing a starring role in an American
fairy tale turned nightmare. The disharmony,
sounded by Mica Levi’s knotted, gloomy

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

cinated by their marriage and his infidelities.
But I didn’t feel like she had ever gotten
enough credit for understanding intuitively
the power of television, the power of
imagery and iconography and her role in
defining how we remember her husband’s
presidency,” Oppenheim said.
It was she, a week after the assassination,
in an interview with Theodore H. White for
LIFE magazine, who first uttered the word
Camelot in reference to their time in power.
“I always assumed that the Kennedy administration had been referred to as Camelot
from the beginning, that they were this
young, handsome couple and American royalty,” Oppenheim said. “The fact that she
came up with Camelot is incredible. That one
reference accomplishes more than any list of
policy accomplishments ever could have in
terms of cementing in people’s minds who
Jack Kennedy was.”
The film, however, isn’t out to provide
answers. It relishes in Jackie being this
inscrutable figure, showing the subtle differences in her interactions with the people
around her, including a priest (John Hurt), the
journalist (Billy Crudup), her longtime friend

Nancy Tuckerman (Greta Gerwig) and Bobby
Kennedy (Peter Sarsgaard).
“(Oppenheim) told her story through these
different relationships and the different roles
she played around the people in her life at different times. I think that’s really powerful ...
Consistency or arc is really a narrative fiction. Human beings are not like that,” said
Portman, who is earning some of the best
reviews of her career for her performance.
Larrain wouldn’t do the film without
Portman. The script had been around since
2010 before getting the attention of Darren
Aronofsky, who was set to direct his thenfiancé Rachel Weisz in the role. After exiting, Aronofsky stayed on to produce and was
the one who made the somewhat unconventional ask of Larrain, a Chilean filmmaker,
to consider it.
When Portman met with Larrain, she said it
was akin to “being dared” to do the film.
“He was like, ‘we’re going to do this
together or we’ll both walk away,’” she said.
“I was like ‘all right, this is good. Let’s take
each other’s hands and jump.’”
The tone, thanks to studied editing of
Sebastian Sepulveda and a striking score by

Mica Levi, can sometimes seem more like a
psychological thriller than a conventional
character study. Larrain delights in the beauty of bringing an audience to “that indeterminate place.”
Portman, on the other hand, knows she’s at
the disposal of her directors and often isn’t
aware of the exact tone until she sees the finished product.
“When we were making ‘Black Swan,’ I
thought I was making a completely different
movie from the one I saw. I thought we were
making something almost like a documentary and then I saw it and I was like ‘What?
What is this!?’ I literally had no idea,” she
said. “I thought it was like a realistic portrait
of a psychological breakdown of a person
and it was not at all. You can totally misunderstand tone, but still it can work.”
The film, heavy with historical and emotional significance, did allow for some levity, though, compliments of that White
House Tour.
“We enjoyed that so much,” Larrain said.
“It was just talking about furniture and
chairs. And she would even make the same
mistakes Jackie did.”

score, is always there between persona and
person. “We’re the beautiful people, right?”
she sarcastically quips. Exiting Air Force
One, she deadpans to her husband (Caspar
Phillipson), “I love crowds.” In Larrain’s
hands, Kennedy’s pained public performance
is a kind of sacrifice. “Jackie” is at once a
deconstruction of the Jackie Kennedy fable
and a dramatization of its making.

White House, her pink suit bloodied from the
shooting, is an unshakable image that feels
straight out of Kubrick.
And then there’s Kennedy stomping
through rainy Arlington, her heels digging
into the wet ground. Seeking a spot for what
will be the Eternal Flame, she is, through
force of will, staking a plot in history for her
husband. “Have you read what they’ve been
writing?” she first greets the reporter. “It’s
no way to be remembered.”
Portman’s Kennedy is, from the start,
probably thornier and more uneasy than the
woman ever was. Portman and Larrain have
sharpened her and superimposed her story on
a rigorously crafted but resolutely cold surface. “Jackie,” though endlessly fascinating,
can feel like a character study conducted on a
surgical table.
Larrain, the talented Chilean filmmaker of
the Oscar-nominated “No” whose equally
complex “Neruda” is also out soon, is inter-

ested in dissecting Kennedy but not solving
her. “I’ll settle for a story that’s believable,”
says Crudup’s reporter. The truth, Kennedy
says, is out of reach.

Penned by Noah Oppenheim (“The Maze
Runner”), “Jackie” evades the traditional
biopic format like a disease. It’s organized
around the Hyannis Port interview with
flashbacks to events large and small before
the assassination, during it and after. Many
of the scenes, quiet and empty, are shot less
like flashbacks than like Kennedy’s own
splintered, haunted memories.
Some, like her televised White House tour
(recreated with black-and-white precision),
are familiar. Others are strikingly surreal.
Kennedy silently marching through a vacant

What is within the grasp of “Jackie” —
aside from a compelling, intricate performance from a fully committed Portman — is a
sense of how difficult it may have been for
Kennedy to make things look so easy. With
preternatural poise, she served as a bulwark
of decorum and order against the chaos of the
times. It’s chilling now to hear the advice of
Kennedy family friend William Walton (the
great Richard E. Grant) after Lee Harvey
Oswald is gunned down. He tells Kennedy to
take the kids to Boston and “build a fortress.”
‘’The world’s gone mad, Mrs. Kennedy.”
“Jackie,” a Fox Searchlight release, is
rated R by the Motion Picture Association of
America for “brief strong violence and some
language.” Running time: 100 minutes.
Three stars out of four.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

23

‘La La Land’ named best film by New York critics
Gosling and Stone on
‘La La Land’ and their
on-screen romances
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Bogart and Bacall. Tracy and Hepburn. Stone
and Gosling.
The hugely charming Los Angeles musical “La La Land”
seals it: Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling have entered the ranks
of great cinematic couples. Their easy rapport together was
first hinted at with “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” and carried through
the crime drama “Gangster Squad.”
Those, though, were only appetizers to Damien Chazelle’s
“La La Land,” in which they star as two flailing aspirants trying to make it in LA. Stone plays an actress, Gosling a jazz
pianist. They sing. They dance. They patter like Cary Grant
and Katharine Hepburn.
“La La Land,” a resurrection of joyful 1930s studio musicals
on contemporary LA streets, is an impassioned argument for
the movies, in all their widescreen glory. And part of that vintage Hollywood experience includes big ol’ movie stars.
In an era that has struggled to produce them, Stone and
Gosling stand apart as two of our best answers. In “La La
Land,” they’re our version of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers,
maybe not quite as light on their feet (who is?), but more natural and funnier.
How far will they push their on-screen chemistry? “Do you
think people would let us do anything together again?” Stone
asked her co-star during an interview earlier this fall. “I don’t
think we’d be allowed.”
After greeting warmly (Gosling had been shooting “Blade
Runner 2049”), the actors sat down to reflect on why they go
so well together, their own tortured paths to Hollywood success and just how deep their movie love runs.
AP: Di d ei ther o f y o u hes i tate abo ut wo rki ng
to g ether ag ai n?
STONE: That was an exciting aspect that it was our third
thing together. The characters also have by the end five years
between them and I think we’d probably known each other
that long by that point. It’s kind of nice to not have to find
that when the story depends so much on the connection
between the two of them.
AP: Di d y o u feel a co nnecti o n ri g ht away o n y o ur
fi rs t fi l m to g ether?
GOSLING: We’ve been asked to improvise a lot in the
films that we’ve done together. I think even in our first audition we were asked to improvise. That just kind of connects
actors in a way that just saying dialogue doesn’t do.
AP: The fi l m po rtray s s o me s o ul -crus hi ng audi ti o ns . Were they fami l i ar?
STONE: The first audition was inspired by Ryan’s story.
GOSLING: Yeah, where I had to cry and this lady took a
call in the middle of it. And then just told me to go on, “Pick
up where I left off.” That was part of what was great about making this film was Damien encouraged us to bring our experiences to these characters.
AP: Ho w do y o u feel abo ut bei ng a part o f pro udl y bi g -s creen fi l m l i ke “La La Land” at a ti me when
tel ev i s i o n i s s een as ecl i ps i ng the mo v i es ?
STONE: I don’t think films are less than TV now, but there
are some amazing characters on TV, so I understand why people want to do TV. When movies are at their full glory, I think
it’s pretty mind-blowing. What do you think, Ry?
GOSLING: When I first met with Damien, it wasn’t about
this. It was just kind of a general meeting. He has a very infectious love of movies but also of the experience of going to
the movies. He talked a lot about wanting to make movies
that you couldn’t watch on your iPhone, that you really wanted to see in a theater with an audience.
AP: Yo ur l o v e o f mo v i es s eems cl ear, s i nce y o u’v e
prev i o us l y ackno wl edg ed s tuffi ng DVDs do wn y o ur
pants .
STONE: You put DVDs down your pants?!
GOSLING: (laughing) VHS. Look, in these kinds of situations, you’re encouraged to say anything. And it’s celebrated.
And then you pay the price for that later.
STONE: Was it to be closer to your favorite movie?
GOSLING: No. It was one story a long time ago where I
had to hide an R-rated movie from my parents. It was very
intimate. This is the danger of this kind of thing that you do
because it haunts us.
AP: Wel l , i t’s a v ery v i v i d ex ampl e o f mo v i e
l o v e.
GOSLING: I do love movies but I love making them more.
I’ve never found something professionally that engages me
as much as that. You work with such a large group of people
and it’s this constant problem solving process that gets you
to this end, whatever that is. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. It’s always a crapshoot.
STONE: For me, watching movies is what makes me want
to make movies. I’m so inspired by watching movies. The
process of making it is engaging but I get so reinvigorated
every time I see a great movie. Then I feel like I’m the character in the movie for the rest of the day. Then I realize I can’t
play that same character I just watched.

By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Damien Chazelle’s
Los Angeles musical “La La Land” was
named best film of the year by the
New York Film Critics Circle.
The group announced their picks
Thursday on Twitter, spreading around
their awards to a variety of Oscar contenders. The top award came as something of a twist after the critics’ early
choices leaned toward Barry Jenkins’
coming-of-age portrait “Moonlight”
and Kenneth Lonergan’s grief-filled
drama “Manchester by the Sea.”
“Moonlight” won awards for best
director (Jenkins), best cinematography (James Laxton) and best supporting
actor
(Mahershala
Ali).
“Manchester by the Sea” took best
actor for Casey Affleck, best screenplay for Lonergan and best supporting actress for Michelle Williams.
Williams was honored jointly for her
performances in “Manchester by the
Sea” and Kelly Reichardt’s “Certain
Women.”
Best film was the sole award for “La
La Land,” which opens next week.
Chazelle’s film, starring Emma Stone
and Ryan Gosling, also led the
Critics’ Choice Awards nominations
on Thursday with 12 nods.
Those three films — “La La Land,”
“Moonlight” and “Manchester by the
Sea” — have been the favored critics’
choices in the early going of
Hollywood’s
awards
season.
“Moonlight” led the Gotham Film

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling star in the hugely charming Los Angeles musical
‘La La Land.’
Independent Awards on Monday.
“Manchester by the Sea” topped the
National Board of Review Awards on
Tuesday.
Each group, however, has its own
quirks and other favorites - Denzel
Washington’s “Fences” and Martin
Scorsese’s late-arriving “Silence, ”
among others — are also in the mix.
On Sunday, the Los Angeles Film
Critics Association will make their
picks.
The NYFCC, a body of several
dozen New York-area critics, named

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Isabelle Huppert best actress for her
lead
performances
in
Paul
Verhoeven’s “Elle” and Mia HansenLove’s “The Things to Come.” Best
first-film was a tie between Kelly
Fremon Craig’s teen comedy “The
Edge of Seventeen” and Trey Edward
Shults’ micro-budget family drama
“Krisha.”
Special awards were also singled out
for Thelma Schoonmaker, Scorsese’s
longtime editor, and the 25th
anniversary restoration of Julie
Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust.”

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24

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

ART
Continued from page 1
have coordinated their schedules in the
month of December.
Cindy Stokes, a Redwood City photographer, said the holidays have typically been
a popular time for artists to hold open studios, but efforts in previous years were disorganized. Just following the last year’s
holiday season, she and other artists wondered if they could coordinate their efforts to
increase attendance across the community.
“We said, ‘Why don’t we coordinate our
open studios?’ That way, we can cross-promote our work,” she said.
Stokes is part of a community of artists
organized by ARTS RWC, that has an aim to
advance Redwood City as a destination for
the arts.
Chaired by Beth Mostovoy, a Redwood
City photographer, ARTS RWC has partnered with Redwood City’s Parks,
Recreation and Community Services
Department, the Civic Cultural Commission
and the Public Arts Task Force on this event.
The group has been successful with collaborations in the past, working with these
groups to coordinate Redwood City’s Art on
the Square program, which brought artists
to Courthouse Square four times during the
summer and once in November this year.
Mostovoy is working toward making
Redwood City the arts and entertainment
capital of the Peninsula, and sees power in
numbers as essential to this goal.
“The art reads like a tapestry throughout
the community. We are co-creating this
beauty together,” she said.
Along with four other artists, Mostovoy
will showcase her print photography at her
home, one of the Open Studios sites.
Chris Beth, Parks, Recreation and
Community Services Department director,
shares this enthusiasm for creating what he
calls a cultural renaissance in Redwood City.
“We have a culture of collaboration in
Redwood City, groups that work really well
together. We do lots of events to activate
the downtown and gather artists into a community,” he said.
Beth cites a utility box mural program, an
increased number of approved murals on
buildings, sculptures in public areas and the
development of a public art master vision as
strides the city has made under the leadership of ARTS RWC.
Elevating the arts profile is also a priority for Rebecca Bangs, president of the Art
Center of Redwood City and San Carlos,
another Open Studio site. A San Carlos resident, Bangs has been working in contemporary pointillism for the last three years, and
will be showcasing her paintings along
with 26 other artists at the Art Center.
“A lot of people see art as a luxury, and we
think it would be great to shift the culture so
that it is more mainstream,” she said.
Standing in the natural light streaming
into her shared studio at the Arts Center and
surrounded by the bold color of her paint-

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www.smdailyjournal.com
ings, Bangs discussed the importance of an
arts community in her path toward dedicating time to her passion for painting.
“I always wanted to be an artist. I trained
to be an artist, went to school to be one. But
I got knocked down too many times,” she
said.

Shared spaces
For Bangs, one of the joys of participating in an open studio is meeting people who
have felt similarly stifled in pursuing their
artistic interests.
“You see many people who feel they’re
not creative when they are. Or they are
working in their garages, on the side,” she
said.
The Open Studios offers individuals a
chance to ask artists about their process and
get a glimpse of the spaces where they
work. Kari Zinser, who also has a studio
space at the Arts Center, looks forward to
open studios as a way of gaining visibility
in the community.
“You don’t often have people come and
buy your art right away,” she said. “But they
might come back and ask for a commission
later.”
Zinser is a Belmont-based artist who uses
acrylic ink and paint to create wall paintings with what she calls abstract fractal
creatures. She once received a call from an
interior designer asking her to create pieces
for a client. The designer had seen her work
at a previous open studios event, took a
photo and showed it to a client, who requested a commission of her work.
“You never know what’s going to happen
at one of these,” she said.

Opening a dialogue
For other artists, the Open Studios event
opens a dialogue with their work that
unlocks meaning that cannot be conveyed
through online stores. Shirley Bunger, a
Redwood City-based artist, repurposes older
materials to create new stories through her
art. She collects postcards, photos and
mementos to create different types of collages, all of which tell stories. One of
Bunger’s more recently completed projects
is a quilt of recipe cards she purchased at an
estate sale.
“Because of the intricacy of this work, it’s
important for people to see it and understand
the story behind it. It’s only then that they
can see themselves in it,” she said.
It seems for many of the artists presenting
their work this weekend, the chance to have
conversations about art is why they invite
others into their studios.
“Even though I’m an introvert, I feel
charged when I’m talking about art,” said
Bangs.
Visit redwoodcity.org/residents/redwoodcity -ev ents/art for more information.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, DEC. 3
Breakfast With Santa. 8 a.m. to 9
a.m. or 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 60 E.
31st Ave., San Mateo. Guests can
enjoy kid-friendly pizzas, fresh fruit
and morning-time beverages prepared by California Pizza Kitchen. Kids
will enjoy a special appearance by
Santa, balloon figures made to order,
a holiday puppet show, crafts and festive gifts to take home. Immediately
following the event, Santa will be
available to hear wish lists and take
photos. Tickets are $10.99 per person,
general admission. For more information visit hillsdale.com.
Millbrae Friends Book Sale. 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Free
admission. For more information contact 697-7607.
Author Signings. 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 11
W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Local
authors will sign books all day
Saturday at the Barnes and Noble
Book Fair. For more information visit
bn.com.
Make your own snow globe. 9 a.m.
to noon. 1010 Metro Center Blvd.,
Foster City. Kids ages 3 to 12 are invited to create a holiday snow globe. For
more information email mrodrigues@shiftcomm.com.
Holiday Traditions from Around
the World. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Will feature
children’s craft activities such as such
as making an Italian La Befana (doll)
and a Mexican rattle (New Year’s
noise maker). For more information
visit historysmc.org.
Friend’s Annual Holiday Book Sale.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
All books, CDs, DVDs and tapes are 20
percent to 50 percent off. For more
information call 593-5650.
Winter Open Studio. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. 16 Coalmine View, Portola Valley.
Featuring new Asian-inspired works.
For more information visit leemiddleman.com.
PENPEX 2016 Stamp Show. 10 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Community Activities
Building, 1400 Roosevelt Ave.,
Redwood City. For more information
visit www.penpex.org.
Holiday Marketplace. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. 1140 Cooper St., Palo Alto.
Includes homemade food items, gifts,
crafts and wreaths. For more information visit gardenclubofpaloalto.org.
Holiday Traditions from Around
the World. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. The event
will include children’s craft activities
such as making an Italian La Befana
doll and a Mexican New Year’s rattle.
Children can meet Santa Claus and
receive free photographs. For more
information visit historysmc.org.

and Code.org to introduce millions of
students to one hour of computer science and computer programming.
Children under 11 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information call 522-7818.
Holiday
Concert:
Gabriel’s
Trumpets. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas. For more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
City of Millbrae 25th Annual
Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony. 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Millbrae City Hall, 621
Magnolia Ave., Millbrae.
Christmas Crèche Exhibit. Noon to 9
p.m. 3885 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto.
Celebrate the birth of the Christ child
with more than 350 nativities from
around the world in artistic settings,
hands-on activities and live holiday
music. For more information call 8003865.
San Francisco Banjo Band. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Molloy’s Tavern, 1655 Mission
Road, South San Francisco, Colma.
Come for a live concert and singalong. The band plays music of all
eras and genres. Admission is free. For
more information call 544-3623.
Christmas Village to Fight Cancer. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. 1317 South Norfolk St.,
San Mateo. The Christmas Village this
year is to help find a Cure for Breast
Cancer and All Cancers. Open every
Friday, Saturday and Sunday until Jan.
1. For more information contact
charleswright54@gmail.com.
Capuchino High School presents
‘Drop Dead!’ 8 p.m. 1501 Magnolia
Ave., San Bruno. A comedic murder
mystery set within a dramatic murder
mystery play. $10 general admission;
$8 for students and seniors. For more
information call 558-2799.
SUNDAY, DEC. 4
Christmas Bazaar. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1515 Dolan Ave., San Mateo. The
event will include a pancake breakfast, photos with Santa and a silent
auction, among other activities.
Admission is $7. For more information email nyoro58@yahoo.com.
Gingerbread House Decorating
Par ty. 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. or 10:30
a.m. to noon. Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 E. 31st Ave., San Mateo. Tickets
are $25 per house to include all confections and refreshments for holiday
cheer. To purchase tickets/house visit
brownpapertickets.com/event/25981
16. For more information visit
www.hillsdale.com.
Wreath Making Workshop. 9:15 a.m.
and 11 a.m. San Mateo Arboretum Society, 101 Ninth Ave., San Mateo. Two
workshops, each is one hour long. $30
for nonmembers for each wreath and
$20 for members for each wreath. For
more information, call 579-0536 ext. 3.

Holiday Open House and Book
Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas.
For more information email belmont@smcl.org.

PENPEX 2016 Stamp Show. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Community Activities Building, 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood
City. For more information visit
www.penpex.org.

Hometown Holidays in Downtown
Redwood City. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free event for all ages.
For more information email courtney@oliverprsolutions.com.

Winter Open Studio. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
16 Coalmine View, Portola Valley. Featuring new Asian-inspired works. For
more information visit leemiddleman.com.

Holiday Open House. 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. Antiques and More, 1148 El
Camino Real, San Carlos. Come for
food and drinks including apple
cider, a drawing for gift certificates
and special sales during the open
house. For more information call 5931152.
F45 Training Grand Opening. Noon
to 2 p.m. F45 Training, 24 42nd Ave.,
San Mateo. Owners, Ami Jampolis
and Kristen Morcos, will be co-hosting the grand opening party and
encourage locals of all fitness levels
to experience first-hand the training
network. There will be some training
exercises videos, a raffle and food. For
more information visit www.f45sanmateo.com.
First Annual Giving Tree Art Show
and Sale. Noon to 6 p.m. 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Enjoy
refreshments, live music and local artwork. 20 percent of proceeds go to
local recovery programs. For more
information
visit
newleaf.com/events.

First Annual Giving Tree Art Show
and Sale. Noon to 6 p.m. 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Enjoy refreshments, live music and local
artwork. 20 percent of proceeds go to
local recovery programs. For more information visit newleaf.com/events.
Millbrae Friends Book Sale. 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. $5
admission. For more information contact 697-7607.
Capuchino High School presents
‘Drop Dead!’ 1 p.m. 1501 Magnolia
Ave., San Bruno. A comedic murder
mystery set within a dramatic murder
mystery play. $10 general admission;
$8 for students and seniors. For more
information call 558-2799.
Holiday Tea. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Share some
holiday memories and make some
new ones. Pre-registration is required.
$12 per person and children 12 years
and under are $8. For more information call 522-7490.

Free Handbell Holiday Concert. 1
p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
The San Mateo County Historical
Museum will host the S.F. State
University Handbell Choir for a performance with holiday tunes and
interactive singing experience.
Admission is free. For more information email sarah@historysmc.org.

‘Twas the Night Before Christmas.
1 p.m. and 4 p.m. 199 Churchill Ave.,
Woodside. This creative and colorful
show includes Santa and his magical
sleigh, prancing reindeer, dancing
mice and twirling toys, brought to life
by a cast of over 80 children and
adults. Ticket prices are $15 child/senior and $25 for adults. For more
information visit twasthenight.org.

Model Railroad Show. 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. 1090 Merrill St., Menlo Park.
Admission is free. For more information call 322-0685.

Model Railroad Show. 1 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. 1090 Merrill St., Menlo Park. Admission is free. For more information
call 322-0685.

Hour of Code. 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. ‘The Hour of
Code’ is a nationwide initiative by
Computer Science Education Week

Meet the authors. 2 p.m. Peninsula
Jewish Community Center, 800 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. Rudi Raab and
Julie Freestone will be telling the real

story behind the compelling historical
novel ‘Stumbling Stone.’ For more information email rudi1julie@aol.com.
Magicflutes Flute Orchestra Winter
Concert. 2:30 p.m. St. Matthew’s
Catholic Church, 1 Notre Dame Ave.,
San Mateo. Tickets are $12. $10 for
seniors and students with ID. For more
information
visit
www.magicflutes.org.
Rockaway Beach Tree Lighting Festival. 3:30 p.m. Dondee Way, Pacifica.
The annual Christmas tree lighting
features activities such as Santa Claus
fire truck rides, live music and food
trucks. For more information contact
355-4122.
Walk ing the Path of the Jewish
Mystic. 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. 800 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. Explore how to
use seminal teachings to deepen selfknowledge and live life with greater
awareness. Admission is $13. For more
information email emitchell@pjcc.org.
Viva la Musica Holiday Concert. 4
p.m. 225 Tilton Ave., San Mateo. Advance tickets: $30 preferred, $27
general, $25 senior and $16 student.
Door tickets: $35 preferred, $30 general, $30 senior and $20 student. For
more
information
visit
vivalamusic.org.
Hristo Vitchev Quartet Concert. 4:30
p.m. 311 Mirada Road, Half Moon Bay.
Join the Bach Dancing and Dynamite
Society for a concert that displays innovative and sophisticated jazz
compositions. Admission is $35. For
more information call 726-4143.
Local women peace activists video
and discussion. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Los
Altos Library, 13 S. San Antonio Road,
Los Altos. In association with the
Women’s Power to Stop War exhibit
that runs through Aug. 30. For more
information
email
wilpf.peninsula.paloalto@gmail.com.
Staged Reading: Waiting for Next
by Jeffrey Lo. 7:30 p.m. Dragon Productions Theatre Company, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Several
Mondays a month Dragon will open
its doors to local artists to use the
space for anything, including staged
readings of new plays, local film
screenings, poetry slams, stand up
comedy, improv demos, books readings, movie nights curated by the
Dragon staff and anything else that
the Bay Area artistic community
comes up with.
MONDAY, DEC. 5
Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula Meeting. 1 p.m. 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Free. For
more information contact 345-4551.
Christmas Luau. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 2145
Bunker Hill Drive, San Mateo. $25 per
person. Kids ages 4 to 12 are $10. Kids
under 3 are free. For more information call 345-2381.
Jewish Superstition and Symbolism
through Ar ts. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. 800
Foster City Blvd., Foster City. Trace the
history, meaning and emboitement
of Jewish superstitions. Admission is
$4. For more information go to
pjcc.org.
A Wolf at the Gate — Story Time. 4
p.m. 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Mark
Van Steenwyk, author of ‘A Wolf at the
Gate,’ will perform a dramatic reading
of his book. Refreshments will be provided. For more information email
craig@reachandteach.com.
Groovy Judy Shares Holiday Love. 6
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Off The Grid Belmont,
1325 El Camino Real. Free.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

25

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLs BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 RSVP word
4 — Beta Kappa
7 Knee neighbor
11 Queen beater
12 Apply caulking
13 Hello, matey!
14 Fit exactly
16 “I came,” to Caesar
17 More friendly
18 Rounded roof
19 Family mem.
20 1914 headline
21 Cancel
24 Squandered
27 Service charge
28 Reach across
30 Unhurried
32 Seldom seen
34 Wedding, e.g.
36 Freud, to himself
37 Trouser feature
39 Like piecrust
41 Bottle edge
42 ET vehicle

GET FUZZY®

43 Comparable
45 Southpaw
48 Roof problem
49 On the dot
52 Bright colors
53 The E in QED
54 Good buddy
55 Courtesy encl.
56 TLC providers
57 Diligent insect
DOWN
1 Gloomy
2 Desktop picture
3 Name in blue jeans
4 Porous gem
5 Yes, in Yokohama
6 — -advised
7 Romps
8 Beg pardon!
9 “The — Ranger”
10 Memo abbr.
12 Iron alloys
15 Neutral shade
18 Trial VIPs

20 Hunger for
21 It’s south of Eur.
22 Tide type
23 Orchid-loving Wolfe
24 Hang around
25 Essay byline
26 Wharf
29 Get ready
31 How come?
33 Lunar event
35 Result
38 Kissing —
40 Artist’s workplace
42 Radius neighbors
43 Length x width
44 Pokes fun at
46 Brass band instrument
47 Kitten’s plaything
48 Rx givers
49 Part of mpg
50 Coffee dispenser
51 House site

12-3-16

Previous
Sudoku
answers



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2016
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Look at every
option carefully. Sticking to a guideline will help you
avoid overreaching and overspending. Balance will be
required to offset temptation. Enforce change for the
right reasons.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Build on an old idea
that fits current trends. You have the opportunity to
increase your earning potential if you live within your
means and work toward a long-term goal.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Avoid being pushed
in one direction or another. Having too many options
can be confusing, but if you keep your goal in sight and

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

friday PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

your strategy in mind, success will follow.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — If you step up and take
charge, you will make a difference. Follow your heart
and don’t let the actions of others alter your path.
Romance is highlighted.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Do your best to help
those in need, but not at the expense of falling short
where your responsibilities are concerned. Learn from
past mistakes and do what’s best for you first.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Studying, researching
and exploring different ways to approach something
you want to do will be informative. Don’t let time
constraints stress you out. Uncertainty is a warning
that you need to be careful.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Jump into action and

12-3-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

do all you can before someone faults you for not
contributing enough or falling short on a promise
you made. Take care of your responsibilities first
and foremost.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Spend some time
taking care of the responsibilities you signed up for, or
you will end up in a dispute with a loved one. Strive for
equality in your relationships.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — If you put passion behind
your actions, you will get a positive response. Get
involved in activities that will allow you to show off
your skills and endurance.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t let anyone put
unrealistic demands on you. Get your responsibilities
out of the way and pursue the projects and people that

make you feel good. A unusual offer can be expected.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — A change at home or
within a relationship is likely to cause uncertainty.
Don’t make assumptions, overreact or let someone
take advantage of you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — The past can be a
wonderful teacher when it comes to how to handle
a certain challenge. Draw on the information you’ve
gathered and the friends you feel can contribute, and
pursue a creative outlet.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

PIAZZA’S FINE FOODS
LOOKING FOR ENERGETIC PEOPLE WITH
A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE
DELI CLERKS – CHECKERS – MEAT CLERKS

ATTENTION CAREGIVERS!
Immediate need for Full Time/Part Time
Home Care Providers
$250 Sign on Bonus*
Paid Training & Benefits
Must have valid DL and reliable transportation
Call or stop by TODAY!

FAX RESUME TO:
(650) 367-7341 OR EMAIL:
JOBS@PIAZZASFINEFOODS.COM
San Mateo / Palo Alto Store Locations
Part Time / Full Time

Don’t wait, call or stop by TODAY! – Ask for Carol

(650) 458-2200

We offer union benefits and union-scale wage
progression. We have advancement opportunities.

www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #115 in San Mateo

GOT JOBS?

NEWSPAPER
DELIVERY
ROUTE

The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.

IMMEDIATE OPENING
San Mateo
Burlingame

For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...

Seeking Delivery drivers to manage newspaper routes on the
Peninsula.

Contact us for a free consultation

Requires early morning work six days per week Mon-Sat.
Papers are picked up early morning between 3am and 4:30am

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Call 650-344-5200

We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

DISHWASHER
NEEDED
Tues, Sat, Sun 8am-4pm

105 Education/Instruction
GROUP BASKETBALL
LESSONS
Come learn from
an experienced coach.
Grades 1 - 8
Trial lessons available.

Call David
(415)527-7023

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

Apply in Person or call
Chef 1 541 848 0038
Sean 1 650 592 7258
1696 Laurel Street,
San Carlos
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required. Starting at $15 per hour.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSEKEEPER/JANITOR For a skilled nursing facility. Experience
preferred, but we will provide training!
$12.00 an hour with health, vacation/sick
leave, and additional benefits. References and work eligibility documentation required. Carlmont Gardens is located at
2140 Carlmont Drive. Drop by between
9:00 and 4:00 M-F to complete an application.

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NOW HIRING
3 Shifts Available!
Assisted Living Community
for Seniors in Burlingame
(Close to Broadway).
Near Public Transportation.

Call Ana
650-771-1127
HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED

Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
90 Glenn Way #2, SAN CARLOS

Exciting Opportunities at

Candy Maker Training Program
Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence
welcome to apply.
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t2VJDLTBMBSZQSPHSFTTJPO
t2VBMJmDBUJPOTJODMVEF CVUBSFOPUMJNJUFEUP'PMMPXJOHGPSNVMBT 
TUBOEJOH XBMLJOH CFOEJOH UXJTUJOHBOEMJGUJOHMCTGSFRVFOUMZ
t"QQMJDBOUTNVTUCFBWBJMBCMFUPXPSLEBZBOEOJHIU
TIJGUBOEPWFSUJNF
t.VTUCFBCMFUPSFBE TQFBLBOEXSJUF&OHMJTI
t1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFJONBOVGBDUVSJOHQSFGFSSFE
t&NQMPZFFTBSFNFNCFSTPG-PDBM
t1PTJUJPOTMPDBUFEBU&M$BNJOP3FBM
4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDP

If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

RESTAURANT - Need Cook/Kitchen
help. Fletch’s catering business is taking
off. We need help! Call (650)685-8301
SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales
Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, please call
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

127 Elderly Care

FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271077
The following person is doing business
as: Glow Limo, 600 2nd Avenue, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owners:
1) George Franklin Campelo Vieira, 600
2nd Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 2)
Mario Queiroz Dasilva Neto, 920 Easton
Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The business is conducted by Co-Partners. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/George Franklin Campelo Vieira/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/11/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/16, 11/19/16, 11/26/16, 12/3/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271421
The following person is doing business
as: Germaine Design, 2723 Burlingview
Dr, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered Owner: Melissa Germaine, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 1/1/15
/s/Melissa Germaine/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/10/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/16, 11/19/16, 11/26/16, 12/3/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271328
The following person is doing business
as:
MILESTONE ACADEMY PRESCHOOL ONE, 164 School Street, DALY CITY, CA 94015. Registered Owner:
1) Phyu Nwe Win, 212 Saint Francis
Blvd, DALY CITY, CA 94015 2) Kay
Khine Win, same address. The business
is conducted by a General Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Phyu Nwe Win/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/2/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/16, 11/19/16, 11/26/16, 12/3/16).

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

CITY OF SAN BRUNO
NOTICE OF RESOLUTION ADOPTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City
of San Bruno, California (the “City”) at its regular meeting on,
Tuesday, December 13, 2016, at the Senior Center starting at
7:00 p.m., 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, will consider a resolution adopting affordable housing impact fees for
residential developments and commercial linkage fees for nonresidential developments. The fees initiated by this resolution
are reasonably related to the need for affordable housing associated with development projects in the City of San Bruno.
The proposed resolution will implement an ordinance adopted
by the City Council on November 22, 2016 amending and replacing Chapter 12.230 of Title 12 (Land Use) of the San Bruno Municipal Code to establish an affordable housing program
and affordable housing impact fees for new residential and
nonresidential development projects in San Bruno.
The adoption of the resolution is not a project under the California Environmental Quality Act because the resolution creates a governmental funding mechanism which does not involve any commitment to a specific project that may result in a
potentially significant effect on the environment. (CEQA
Guidelines Section 15378(b)(4).)
A copy of the proposed fees and data regarding the need for
affordable housing associated with development in San Bruno,
including the cost of affordable housing and funds available to
provide affordable housing, is available for review at the office
of the City Clerk, 567 El Camino Real, San Bruno, California
94066. Written comments may be sent to the City Clerk at the
same address. Further information may be obtained from Mark
Sullivan,
phone
(650)
616-7053,
e-mail
msullivan@sanbruno.ca.gov.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that if you challenge the adoption of
the resolution in court, you may be limited to raising only those
issues you or someone else raised at public hearings before
the City of San Bruno or in written correspondence delivered
to the City of San Bruno at, or prior to, the public hearing.
The public is invited to attend the hearing and comment. Disabled persons requiring accommodation in order to participate
in the public hearing may contact the City Clerk’s Office at
(650) 616-7058. TDD users may contact the California Relay
Service at: 1 (800) 735-2929.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
December 2, 2016
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, December 3 and 8,
2016.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271102
The following person is doing business
as: MAIA MASTER CLEANING, 209
PINE AVE, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: Zulmira A.
Maia, 812 Antoinette Lane #L, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Zulmira A. Maia/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/12/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/16, 11/19/16, 11/26/16, 12/3/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271145
The following person is doing business
as: Nellie’s Toffee, 2105 Pullman Ave.,
BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered Owner: Jonathan Nightingale, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Jonathan Nightingale/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/16, 11/19/16, 11/26/16, 12/3/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271297
The following person is doing business
as: A Miracle Plumbing, 430 N. Canal
St. Unit 12A, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: Lonnie
Daniels Jr., 1119 Gaven St., San Francisco, CA 94134. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/Lonnie Daniels /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/28/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/16,11/26/16,12/3/16,12/10/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271318
The following person is doing business
as: Cecy’s Beauty Salon, 808 Maple
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063.
Registered Owner: Cecilia Aguilar Cazares, 1855 Woodside Rd, Apt 104,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Cecilia Aguilar Cazares/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/1/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/16,11/26/16,12/3/16,12/10/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271408
The following person is doing business
as: The Children’s Place, 1336 Arroyo
Avenue, SAN CARLOS, CA94070. Registered Owner: Community United
Church of Christ in San Carlos, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/9/16
(NA).
/s/Siv Nickerson/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/9/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/16,11/26/16,12/3/16,12/10/16).

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

27

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271509
The following person is doing business
as: Evart, Young & Hobbs Investment
Management, 3 Lagoon Drive #155,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065. Registered Owner: Leo H. Evart, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2006.
/s/Rosalee Young/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/18/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/16,11/26/16,12/3/16,12/10/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271590
The following person is doing business
as: Yuzu, 54 W. 37th Ave, SAN MATEO,
CA 94403. Registered Owner: Arima
Enterprise Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on12/01/2016
/s/Yukiko Ayima/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/29/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/3/16, 12/10/16, 12/17/16, 12/24/16).

LOST CAT. Black and White. Black
patch on right eye. REWARD.
Call (323) 439-7713.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271576
The following person is doing business
as: Beauty By the Ocean Production,
1277 Rosita Rd, PACIFICA, CA 94044.
Registered Owner: Liliia Radchenko,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on05/01/2016
/s/Liliia Radchenko/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/29/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/3/16, 12/10/16, 12/17/16, 12/24/16).

BASSINET $25 (Musical, Rocks, vibrates, has 4 wheels, includes sheets &
mattress) (650)348-2306

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271452
The following person is doing business
as: Se Come Asi Taqueria, 1302 Bayshore Hwy, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Rosa Maria Vasquez,
28240 Armour St., Hayward, CA 94545.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 1/1/17
/s/Rosa Maria Vasquez /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/16,11/26/16,12/3/16,12/10/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271610
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Bay Area Living, 2) Luis Ocon, 3)
LOBay Area Living, 4) Ocon Group, 1976
San Carlos Ave, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070. Registered Owner: Bay Area Living, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/Luis Ocon/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/1/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/3/16, 12/10/16, 12/17/16, 12/24/16).

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS at Westwood Park in
Redwood City, off of Fernside. Call to
claim (650)714-8893
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634

LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502

294 Baby Stuff

FISHER-PRICE HEALTHY Care booster
seat - $5 (650)592-5864.
HIGH CHAIR (wooden) excellent condition $35.00 (650)348-2306

296 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898
AIR CONDITIONER, Portable, 14,000
BTU,
Commercial
Cool
model
CPN14XC9, almost like new! All accessories plus remote included.
20” x 16-5/8” x 33-1/2” $345.
(650)345-1835
CHARCOAL GRILL with cover, 24”, almost new $25. (650)368-0748

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

COLEMAN LXE Roadtrip Grill Red Brand New! (still in box) $100
(650)918-9847

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD. Please email us at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

JACK LALANE'S power juicer. $40.
Call 650 364-1243. Leave message.

SAN MATEO COUNTY PUBLIC GUARDIAN’S OFFICE
CASE # 126482 PRO (San Mateo County Superior Court)
1049 Almanor Avenue - Menlo Park

CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487

REFRIGERATOR WHITE Full sized 2
door Whirlpool Perfect condition .$98.
650 583-9901 650 678-0221
TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500
UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco
WHIRLPOOL WASHER DRYER, GE
Refrigerator all working and in good condition all for $99.00 650-315-3240.

297 Bicycles
ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

298 Collectibles

OPEN HOUSE SAT DECEMBER 3, 2016 Noon – 2 PM

ASKING PRICE: $1,120,500
Sealed Bid due December 19, 2016 – 5pm.
Court confirmation NOT required.

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
BILLY DEE Williams autographed Star
Wars action figure: Lando Calrissian,
space smuggler. $35 Steve 650-5186614
LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.
MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good
$59 call 650-218-6528
POSTERS TRAVEL, airline, art from
1970’s and 1980’s; about 50+; $30 for all
(650)595-2494
RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

299 Computers
KOGI 15 inch computer monitor. Model
L5QX. $25. PH(650)592-5864.
RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Major clothing
chain
7 Free speech
inhibitor?
15 Morsel
16 Tufted tweeter
17 Unspecific threat
18 “Right you are!”
19 “Women and
Love” author
Shere
20 Tach readings
22 Norwegian king
during the Cold
War
23 Serial sequence
24 Attributes
26 Door opener?
27 Where Martin
Scorsese taught
Oliver Stone:
Abbr.
28 Rhein tributary
29 16th-century
rulers
32 Archaeologist, at
times
34 Capital of
Kazakhstan
36 Disdained, with
“at”
38 Mickey Rooney
septet
42 Blue on screen
44 Last Supper query
45 Completely
overhauled
48 Revival figs.
50 Texter’s
appreciation
51 I, perhaps
52 Harsh
54 U.N. ambassador
appointed by JFK
55 2008 Best New
Artist Grammy
winner
58 Sweet sign-off
59 King Ahab’s
father
60 Different
exercises
performed
consecutively
62 Boxer Rebellion
setting
64 Cherish
65 Shady Records
co-founder
66 Snakes
67 Event associated
with warm
climates and big
midday meals

DOWN
1 Driving instructor’s
reminder
2 “Star Trek:
Voyager” actress
3 Initial encounter
in a romcom
4 Fit
5 Frat letters
6 Former Nissan
SUV
7 Hinders
8 “Bullets Over
Broadway” Oscar
winner
9 Sci-fi staples
10 Recess rejoinder
11 Stir up
12 Katy of “High Noon”
13 Sincere sign-off
14 Player of Kent
21 Flaunt
24 Fiction’s Lord
Greystoke
25 Pringles
alternative
30 Ill-conceived
31 Stand for 45-Down
33 First name in
architecture
35 Hybrid cuisine
37 “Nos __”: 2000s
French-Canadian
drama set in a
summer home

39 Total assets?
40 One way to
connect
nowadays
41 Quality
control
process with an
alphanumeric
symbol
43 Allots
45 They involve
insult comedy
46 Stomach

300 Toys

303 Electronics

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

LARGE STUFFED ANIMALS - $3 each
Great for Kids (650) 952-3500

47 Superior,
vis-à-vis
Michigan
49 Metaphors, e.g.
53 Wield
56 Vault
57 Language that
gave us “plaid”
59 Tom Joad, e.g.
61 Flare producer
63 “Big four”
record
company

PUZZLES, 20 available, 1000 pcs.
$3.00 each,. (650)596-0513
STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg
THOMAS THE TRAIN; trains, crossing
gate, bridge, track; good condition;
$25/OBO. 650-345-1347.
THOMAS TRAINS; Cranky the Crane
$15/OBO; Tidmouth Shed w/turntable
$50/OBO. 650-345-1347.

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE BUFFET Cabinet, with 2 large
drawers w/skeleton key, needs refinishing. $700/obo.. ANTIQUE CHINA cabinet, with doors and legs, dark wood..
$500/obo. (650)952-5049
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
2 TWIN MAPLE bed frames, Cannon
Ball construction **SOLD **
5 FOOT resin folding table, still in the
box $25.00 (650)368-0748
ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529
ANTIQUE TIGER Oak Curio, curved
glass and four glass shelves, $700 or
best offer. Solid wood Gothic coffee table, $300 or best offer. Antique sideboard, $300 orbest offer. Faux leather
recliner, couch & loveseat, $400 or
best offer. Brown glass dining table with
four chairs, $300 or best offer.
Call (650)781-2773
BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319

COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your
mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)5207045

BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking
$100. (650)593-4490
BULOVA WINDUP Travel clocks.Vintage. Set of eight. $99. gene (650)4215469
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

12/03/16

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469

303 Electronics

BAZOOKA SPEAKER 20, +10W, never
used $95. (650)992-4544

By John Lieb
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

60 GIG Ipod, Does not work.
Battery/hard drive not working. $25.
(650)208-5758

12/03/16

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469

STORE FRONT display cabinet, From
1930, marble base. 72” long x 40” tallx
21” deep. Asking $500. (650)341-1306

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

xwordeditor@aol.com

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

IPHONE 5 Morphie Juice Pack with
charger, Originally $100, now $85.
(650)766-2679

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
COMPUTER TABLE, adjustable height,
chrome legs, 29”x48” like new $30 (650)
697-8481
COUCH, CREAM IKEA, great condition,
$89, light-weight, compact, sturdy loveseat (415)775-0141
CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINETTE TABLE, 3 adjustable leaf.$30.
(650) 756-9516.Daly City.
DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER for $50.
Good shape, blonde, about 5' high.
(650)726-4102

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

ENTERTEITMENT CENTER 5'x4' glass
door / shell / drawers / roller ex $25/BO
(650)992-4544

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

FREE: TWO full-size featherbeds. Excellent
condition.
Redwood City
location. 650-503-4170.

ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

KITCHEN TABLE with 4 chairs, Blonde
wood, Farm Style. Apartment sized.
Good condition. $25. (650)359-0213

SAMSUNG FLAT TV 20" ex.co.incl.
VCR ,set up $70. (650)992-4544

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

304 Furniture

308 Tools

316 Clothes

318 Sports Equipment

LEATHER SOFA, black, excellent condition. $100 obo. (650)878-5533

SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi
color
in
excellent
condition
3/4
length $50 650-692-8012

Golf Clubs, used set with Cart for $50.
(650)593-4490

SLEDGE HAMMER & Hand Held Heavy
Duty Hammer & Hand Held AX $3.00
(650)368-0748

FREE SIZE 38 tan gabardine navy officers uniform great condition Perfect for
that costume party.322-9598”

VINTAGE SHOPSMITH and BAND
SAW, good shape. $1,000/obo. Call
(650)342-6993

LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
NEW DELUXE Twin Folding Bed, Linens, cover, Cost $618. Sale $250. Must
Sell! (650) 875-8159.
NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame
$30.00 (650) 347-2356
NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City
NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OFFICE TABLE, 24"x48" HD. folding
legs each end. 500# capacity. Cost
$130. Sell $60, 650-591-4141
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
QUEEN-SIZED SOFA-BED, beige colored, excellent condition, $99.99 or best
offer. Must Go! (650) 952-3063.
RECLINER CHAIR blue tweed clean
good $75 Call 650 583-3515
RECLINING SWIVEL & high-back chair
(Hampton) exc condition $30 (650) 7569516 Daly City.
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIRS solid wood, great
shape asking 30 dollars each. Call
(650)574-4582 Lily
RUMMY ROYAL poker table top $30.00
(650)573-5269
SHELF RUBBER maid
contract joe 650-573-5269

new $20.00

SOFA & Love seat perfect condition $99
Edie 650 345 8981
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344
THOMASVILLE BEVELED mirror 22" x
12" $50. Call 650-834-4833
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

306 Housewares
10 TULIP CHAMPAGNE
FOR $12 (415)990-6134

GLASSES

LADIES SEQUIN dress, blue, size XL,
pure silk lining, $40.00, (650) 578-9208

309 Office Equipment

LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

FILE
CABINET
metal
2-drawer
18”Dx15”Wx28”H $10 650-595-2494

MAN'S BLACK leather jacket, size 40,
like new. $85.00 (650)593-1780

INK CARTRIDGES
$19, 650-595-3933

for

HP

printer,

NEAT RECEIPTS Mobile Scanner new
in box $79, call 650-324-8416

310 Misc. For Sale
"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.
500-600 BIG Band-era 78's--most mint,
no sleeves--$99.00 for all--650-574-5459
8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908
CIAO SMALL Black Duffel Carry-on,
Overnight or Tote bag with shoulder
strap, $15 650-952-3500
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER,
condition $50 (650)878-9542

good

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133

MEN'S STETSON hat, size large, new,
rim, solid black, large, great gift. $40
(650) 578-9208
NEW JOCKEY Men's Classic Crew
white tshirts (L) 3pk $15/each (5 available) 650.952.3466
NEW WITH tags Wool or cotton Men's
pullover
sweaters
(XL)
$15/each
(650)952-3466
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648
PRADA DAYPACK / Purse, Sturdy black
nylon canvas, like new, made in Italy,
$35 (650)591-6596
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WILSON'S LG Green Suede Jacket
$50.00 (650)367-1508

317 Building Materials

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.

LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537

SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891

PREMIUM MOVING blankets good condition $10.00 each (650 ) 504 -6057

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
SILK SAREE 6 yards new nice color.for
$35 only. C all(650)515-2605 for more information.
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WAGON WHEEL Wooden, original from
Colorado farm. 34”x34”
Very good
“aged” condition $200 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
WATER STORAGE TANK, brand new,
275 gallons. 48" x 46" x 39" $250. 650771-6324

311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

318 Sports Equipment
15 SF Giants Posters -- Barry Bonds,
Jeff Kent, JT Snow. 6' x 2.5' Unused. $4
each. $35 all. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BACK PACK “Camp Trails-Oasis” $20
(650)595-2494
BACK PACK TENT $20 (650)595-2494
BACKPACK THERM-A-REST sleeping
pad $20 (650)595-2494
BUSHNELL NEO XS Golf Watch with
charger. Mint condition. 30,000+ golf
courses. $50. Jeff 650-208-5758
CHILDS KICK scooter by razor with helmet $25 obo (650)591-6842
FITNESS STEPPER compact
(12"x16") Hardly used! $50. Call
650-766-3024

sized

GOLF CLUBS {13}, Bag, & Pull Cart all-$90.00 (650)341-8342
GOLF CLUBS, new, Warrior woods
3/15 degree 5/21 degree 7/24 degree
$15 ea (650)349-0430

Garage Sales

IGLOO BLUE 38-Quart Wheelie Cool
Cooler/Ice Chest $14 650-952-3500
LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104
MEN'S ROSSIGNOL Skis.
good condition, 650-341-0282.

$95.00,

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

PRINCE TENNIS 2 section nylon black
Bag with Prince Pro Graphite Racket$55.(650)341-8342
SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TOTAL GYM XLS, excellent condition.
Paid $2,500. Yours for $900. Call
(650)588-0828
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE NASH Cruisers Mens/ Womens Roller Skates Blue indoor/outdoor sz
6-8. $60 B/O. (650)574-4439
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8
1/2. $50 650-592-2047
YAMAHA ROOF RACK, 58 inches $75.
(650)458-3255

345 Medical Equipment
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

Garage Sales
MOVING SALE
Antiques, household items,.
oak rocking chair, dining
room table (seats 10),
clothes, artwork

SAT, SUN
9am-5pm

734 Neal Ave, San Carlos

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming
garage sale,
moving sale,
estate sale,
yard sale,
rummage sale,
clearance sale, or
whatever sale you
have...
Reach over 83,450 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Call (650)344-5200

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Call (650)344-5200

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $45
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 83,450 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461

PORCELAIN JAPANESE Tea set, Unopened, in wood box, great gift $30.
(650)578-9208.

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

CADILLAC ‘02 Deville, 8 cylinder, perfect condition, like new, cashmere outside white inside 4787 miles $13,000.
(415)850-2370

PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

HARMONICA.
HOHNER Pocket Pal.
Key of C. Original box. Never used.
$10. (650)588-0842

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

LEXICON LAMBDA cubase LE $60.00
call Patter (650)367-8146

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CLICKER TORQUE wrench, 20-150,
$20, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)8511045
CRAFTSMEN 3 saw blades $20. new.
(650)573-5269
DELTA CABINET SAW with overrun table. $1,500/obo. ((650)342-6993
DYNAGLOPRO
HEATER.
Phone: 650-591-8062

$40.00

PAINTING TOOLS - hooks, stirrups 110’
ropes, poles, 20’ plank, 440 Graco Spary
Machine, $500, Asking (650)-483-8048
ROUTER TABLE ryobi $ 99. like new
650-573-5269
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals
AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.
CANARY BIRD cage 24 x 16 for sale.
$40.00 firm. Used, good condition. Call
650-766-3024

CADILLAC ‘99 DeVille Concours,
98,500 miles, $3,500 or best offer.
(650)270-6637
CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$5,500, child’s play three, call
(650)481-5296

GOT AN OLDER
CAR, BOAT, OR RV?
Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the
Humane Society.
Call 1- 800-943-8412

JAGUAR ‘94 XJ6, very clean, 110K
miles, $4,500. (650)302-5523
LEXUS ‘94 GS300 148K miles, very
clean. $2,700. (650)302-5523

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

MAZDA ‘12 CX-7 SUV Excellent condition One owner Fully loaded Low
miles reduced $18,995 obo (650)5204650

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

TOYOTA ‘06 Prius, 149K, clean. $6,500
(650)302-5523

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

316 Clothes
BLACK DOUBLE breasted suit size 38
excellent condition $25 650-322-9598
BOY SCOUT canvas belt with Boy Scout
Buckle. Vintage. Fair condition. $5.
(650)588-0842

call

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

645 Boats
16 FT SEA RAY. I/B. $1,200. Needs Upholstery. Call 650-898-5732.

670 Auto Service
LUXURATI AUTO REPAIR
Smog Check
Repair Services
Collision and Body Work

(650) 340-0026
670 Auto Parts

BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222

GARBAGE CANS: brute 44 gal. Excellent condition $15. 650 504-6057

UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

ATV MOTORCYCLE Lift $50.00
Patter (650)367-8146

SEE OUR AD FOR DISCOUNTS!

BMW ‘07 X-5, One Owner, Excel. Condition Sports package 3rd row seats reduced $19,995 obo Call (650)520-4650

BENCH SAW - 8 INCH includes attached table and accessories $35 (650)3680748

ALPINE STAR motocross boots Tech 8s
size 14 good cond. $75. (650)345-5642

Reach over 83,450
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

FENDER BASS amp 25 watt. electrical
issue box and speaker very good
$45. (650)367-8146

PIANO, UPRIGHT, in excellent condition. Asking $345. (650)366-4769

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
‘89 GOLD WING. 1500 CC. 39K miles.
Call Joe 650-578-8357

Burlingame & San Mateo Locations

COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor
Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630

308 Tools

635 Vans
CHEVROLET ‘06 Mini VAN, new radiator, tires and brakes. Needs head gasket.
$1,200. (650)481-5296

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.

EXCELLENT VIOLIN, previously owned,
first violinist SF Symphony, Mellow
sound. Dated 1894. $5,500/best offer.
(415)751-2416

ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,
Call (650)481-5296

630 Trucks & SUV’s
LINCOLN ‘02 Navigator, excellent condition. Runs great! Must sell! $4,500/obo.
(650)342-4227.

2003 P-15 West Wight Potter sailboat,
excellend
condition.
$7,200.
Call
(650)347-2559

CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield
Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026

MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

29

625 Classic Cars
1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $22,000
obo. (650)952-4036.
CORVETTE ‘69 STINGRAY 327, Horsespeed SPS, 50.000 miles. $18,500.
(650)481-5296.
FORD ‘64 Falcon. 4DR Sedan. 6 cyl.
auto/trans $3,500.00. (650) 570-5780.

FIRESTONE TIRES 215/70/R16 good
condition $50. (650) 504-6057
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

Cabinetry

Construction

Housecleaning

Hauling

Plumbing

Tree Service

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

CHAINEY HAULING

MEYER
PLUMBING
SUPPLY

Hillside Tree

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066
Lic#1211534

General
House &
Office
Cleaning

Cleaning

CALEDONIAN
MASONRY INC
Landscape Design!
We can design your
outdoor living
experience.
*BBQ’s *Pizza Ovens
*Patios *Flagstone
*Concrete/Foundation

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Experience s Reasonable
References s Free Estimates
Magda Perez
650.533.8063

Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo

650-350-1960
Roofing

REED
ROOFERS

PENINSULA
CLEANING

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

Call for Free Estimate

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

Handy Help

(650) 525-9154

AAA HANDYMAN & MORE

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing

License #931457

(650) 591-8291

1-800-344-7771

Call For Free Estimate:

Service

Since 1985

Repairs* Remodeling* Painting
Carpentry* Plumbing* Electrical

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

(650) 453-3002

Concrete

Lic: #468963

Notices

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
*Stamps *Color *Driveways
*Patios *Masonry
*Flagstone *Retaining Walls
*Block walls *Landscaping

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

Free Estimates

(650)533-0187

(650)296-0568

Lic# 947476

Free Estimates

Rambo
Concrete
Works

Remodeling, Plumbing,
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance, New Construction.
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

by Greenstarr

(650)740-8602

TOM (650) 834-2365

Decks & Fences

License#752250 Since 1985

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

T.M. CONCRETE

Lic: #1017155
*Foundation*Stamp Concrete
*Exposed Aggragate *Retaining Walls
*Bricks *Pavers *Driveways
*Flagstones
Free Estimates

David: (650) 642-1614

Lic.#834170

HONEST HANDYMAN

W>ŽÜ>ÞÃÊUÊ ÀˆÛiÜ>ÞÃÊUÊ*>̈œÃ

œœÀi`ÊUÊ}}Ài}>ÌiÊUÊ,iÌ>ˆ˜ˆ˜}Ê
W>ÃÊUÊ-Ì>“«i`Ê
œ˜VÀiÌiÊ
-܈““ˆ˜}Ê*œœÊ,i“œÛ>

Licensed Bonded & Insured

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

SENIOR HANDYMAN

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854

Landscaping

SEASONAL LAWN

MAINTENANCE

Hardwood Floors

ACE
HARDWOOD
FLOORS

Refinish & Repair & Install
Carpet removing & Re coat
Ca.Lic.:712755

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

415 640 4111

www.acehardwoodflooring.com

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Hauling

Painting

Gardening

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

AAA RATED!

JON LA MOTTE

LAWN MAINTENANCE
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Construction
THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

Licensed General and
Painting Contractor
• Int/Ext Painting • Carpentry
• Sheetrock, Dryrot & Stucco Repairs
Lic#979435
CALL FOR GREAT RATES!

(650)701-6072

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Growing your
business could
be

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

69% of Daily Journal readers
have children. If you want to
reach affluent Peninsula families
through advertising, please
phone 650.344.5200

MICHAEL’S
PAINTING

Serving the Peninsula
since 1989

(650) 574-0203
lic#628633

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

Caregiver

Dental Services

Health & Medical

Legal Services

Real Estate Loans

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR

COMPLETE IMPLANT
Dentistry Under One Roof

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

DOCUMENTS PLUS

LEGAL

REFINANCE
HARD MONEY
AT LOWER RATE

seeks individuals to support
adults with special needs.
Receive up to $3,000/month
for your spare bedroom.

Same day treatment
Evening & Saturday appts available

Call Rachel
(650) 389-5787

Peninsula Dental Implant Center
1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

CARE INDEED

I - SMILE

890 Santa Cruz Ave
Menlo Park

(650) 328-1001
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Innovative
650-282-5555

MAGNOLIA
DENTAL
650-263-4703
150 N. San Mateo Drive

Food

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Computer

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
(650) 343-4123

COMPUTER
PROBLEMS?

THE CAKERY

Viruses, lost data, hardware or
software issues? Contact Geeks
On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly
Repair Experts. Macs and PCs
Call for FREE diagnosis.
1-800-715-9068

www.smpanchovilla.com

A touch of Europe

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

DENTURES
IN A DAY!
(in most cases)

Only $1,395 per set
650-419-9674
Roos Dental Care
Redwood City

EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

Insurance

AFFORDABLE

HEALTH INSURANCE
OPEN ENROLLMENT

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
ericlawrencebarrett@gmail.com
(650)619-0370
CA. Insurance License #0737226

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

DIRECT PRIVATE LENDER
ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
Since 1979

WACHTER

INVESTMENTS, INC.

348-7191
Real Estate Broker
CA BRE#746683
NMLS #348288

Real Estate Services
*SALES * LEASING
* PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Sales: 1.49% commission
Property Management: 4% fee
Personalized service

Peninsula Prime Realty
650-591-0119

Sign up for the free newsletter

info@peninsulaprimerealty.com

Massage Therapy

Travel

BEST ASIAN
BODY MASSAGE
$45/hr
Call (650) 787-9969

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP

Free Parking Behind Building
Mon-Fri, 10am-9pm
Wknds-Holidays. Call Ahead.

1838 El Camino #103,
Burlingame

(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

31

32

Weekend • Dec. 3-4, 2016

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Libya’s Tripoli has worst militias clashes in two years
By Rami Musa
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Fighters of Libyan forces gather in Ghiza Bahriya district in Sirte.

BENGHAZI, Libya — Clashes continued for the second
day among heavily-armed militias in the Libyan capital
Tripoli, vying for power and control over the city, with one
dislodging another in at least two posts, a five-star hotel
and a barracks, in what appears to be the worst outbreak of
violence the city has seen in two years.
Competing militias have chopped Tripoli up into fiefdoms and power centers after longtime dictator Moammar
Gadhafi, Libya’s ruler for 42 years, was ousted and killed in
an uprising in 2011.They maintain what observers describe
as a “balance of terror.”
Witnesses in Tripoli said Friday that gun battles rocked
the southeastern Nasr Forest district and adjacent neighborhoods as residents were advised by a local emergency body
affiliated with the Interior Ministry to remain home and
away from windows. The clashes started Thursday and have
reportedly killed at least eight, according to state news
agency LANA. During a lull in the violence late Thursday
night, panicked residents could be seen lining up outside
gas stations to stock up on fuel.
In a statement Friday, U.N. Envoy to Libya Martin Kobler
called for halt to the fighting, saying he is “extremely
alarmed.”
“It’s completely unacceptable for armed groups to fight to
assert their interest and control, particularly in residential
areas, terrorizing the population,” he said.
Reached by phone, a female resident in Tripoli told the
Associated Press that families had locked themselves in
their homes.
“We haven’t slept all night and we haven’t left the house
since yesterday. All we are hearing is screaming, bombings
and gunfire,” she said, “the security situation is going from
bad to worse.”
“We just want the militias to leave,” she pleaded.
The U. N. -brokered unity government’s spokesman
Ashraf al-Tulty said that a ceasefire agreement has been
reached among warring militias but revealed no further
details. Given the fluidity of the situation, it remains to be
seen whether the victors of the clashes will back the internationally-recognized body.
“This is a struggle over power. Each of the warring parties
has its political and ideological agendas,” said Sami alAtrash, a Tripoli resident and a legal expert. “The clashes
are belated. They expected at any moment and finally happened,” he said.
In March of this year, the prime minister of the unity
government, Fayez Sarraj, arrived quietly by boat to Tripoli
from Tunisia. Militias in control of the capital showed no
resistance.

PhilippinesPresident
Duterte calls Trump
By Jim Gomez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANILA, Philippines — Philippine President Rodrigo
Duterte called U.S. President-elect Donald Trump late Friday
and had a brief but “very engaging, animated conversation” in which both leaders invited each other to visit his country.
In a video released by Duterte’s close
aide, Bong Go, the Philippine leader is
seen smiling while talking to Trump and
saying: “We will maintain . . . and
enhance the bilateral ties between our
two countries.”
Rodrigo
Duterte shuffled and looked at some
Duterte
notes during the conversation, which Go
said lasted for more than seven minutes. The presidential
palace earlier announced that Duterte will make a “congratulatory call” to Trump from his hometown in southern
Davao city.
It was not immediately clear if the touchy topic of
Duterte’s bloody crackdown against illegal drugs came up
during the chat. Duterte has lashed out at outgoing President
Barack Obama and the State Department for raising concerns over the crackdown, which has left more than 4,000
suspected drug dealers and users dead.
Duterte, who took office in June, has been antagonistic to
the U.S., his country’s treaty ally, while reaching out to
China and Russia. He has met Chinese President Xi Jinping
twice and Russian leader Vladimir Putin once.
Obama canceled what could have been their first formal
meeting in an Asian summit in Laos in September after
Duterte unleashed an expletive-laden warning for the U.S.
leader not to lecture him on human rights.
During their talk, Trump invited Duterte to visit the White
House next year and Duterte asked the U.S. president-elect
to attend an East Asian summit to be hosted by the
Philippines next year.