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Texas Wesleyan University Lesson Plan

DomainDimensions
Planning 1.1Standards and
Alignment
Planning 1.2-Data and
Assessment
Planning 1.3-Knowledge of
Students
Planning 1.4-Activities
Instruction 2.2-Content
Knowledge and Expertise
Instruction 2.5-Monitor and
Adjust
Learning Environment 3.3Classroom Culture

Lesson Plan Components


Lesson Objective(s): (what students will learn: a measurable action: NOT lesson
activity or task) The student will be able to work in teams to listen to
directions. The students will be able to use graphics to interpret text,
understand transition words and use them in their own writing. The student
will be able to identify multiple meaning words. The students will be able
to write their own stories that include a beginning, middle, and end. The
student will listen to there was an old lady that swallowed a bat and use
graphic flashcards to identify keywords in the text and write their own
story based on the book with 100% accuracy.
Importance of objective(s) to content: (value to students; reason for learning)

Formative assessment(s): (for knowing IF students learned each objective & how deeply
learned) Will assess their knowledge along the way by asking questions and having them tell the
class their story that they came up with in their groups.

Students will learn sequence words and how to use them in their writing.

TEKS: (15) (B). Use common graphics features to assist in the


interpretation of the text (eg. captions, illustrations)
(30). Listening and speaking/ teamwork students work productively with
others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater
complexity. students are expected to follow agreed upon rules for
discussion. (20) (A). understand and use the following parts of speech in
the context of reading, writing and speaking (vii) time order transition
words.
(18) Writing literary texts students write literary texts to express their ideas
and feelings about real or imagined people events and idea. Students are
expected to
(A) write brief stories that include a beginning middle, and end
ELPS:(1) Listening, Kindergarten-Grade 12. ELLs may be at the
beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English
language acquisition in listening. The following proficiency level
descriptors for listening are sufficient to describe the overall English
language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to
linguistically accommodate their instruction.
(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to understand
spoken English in academic and social settings. These students:
(i) struggle to understand simple conversations and simple discussions
even when the topics are familiar and the speaker uses linguistic supports
such as visuals, slower speech and other verbal cues, and gestures;
(ii) struggle to identify and distinguish individual words and phrases
during social and instructional interactions that have not been intentionally
modified for ELLs; and
Revised 12/2015

Texas Wesleyan University Lesson Plan


(iii) may not seek clarification in English when failing to comprehend the
English they hear; frequently remain silent, watching others for cues.
(2) Speaking, Kindergarten-Grade 12. ELLs may be at the beginning,
intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language
acquisition in speaking. The following proficiency level descriptors for
speaking are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency
levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically
accommodate their instruction. (A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little
or no ability to speak English in academic and social settings. These
students: (i) mainly speak using single words and short phrases consisting
of recently practiced, memorized, or highly familiar material to get
immediate needs met; may be hesitant to speak and often give up in their
attempts to communicate;
(5) Writing, Kindergarten-Grade 1. ELLs in Kindergarten and Grade 1
may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of
English language acquisition in writing. The following proficiency level
descriptors for writing are sufficient to describe the overall English
language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to
linguistically accommodate their instruction and should take into account
developmental stages of emergent writers.
(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to use the English
language to build foundational writing skills. These students:
(i) are unable to use English to explain self-generated writing such as
stories they have created or other personal expressions, including emergent
forms of writing (pictures, letter-like forms, mock words, scribbling, etc.);
(ii) know too little English to participate meaningfully in gradeappropriate shared writing activities using the English language;
(iii) cannot express themselves meaningfully in self-generated, connected
written text in English beyond the level of high-frequency, concrete words,
phrases, or short sentences that have been recently practiced and/or
memorized; and
(iv) may demonstrate little or no awareness of English print conventions.

Revised 12/2015

Texas Wesleyan University Lesson Plan

Domain-Dimensions
Planning 1.3-Knowledge of
Students
Instruction 2.2-Content
Knowledge and Expertise
Instruction 2.1-Achieving
Expectations
Instruction 2.2-Content
Knowledge and Expertise
Instruction 2.3Communication
Instruction 2.4Differentiation
Learning Environment 3.1Classroom Environment,
routines and Procedures
Learning Environment 3.3Classroom Culture

Instructional Procedures
Anticipatory set: (the setup to capture students interest AND activate their prior
knowledge) / We will display the cover photo in a powerpoint from There was an Old Lady
who swallowed a Bat. We will ask students the following questions to discuss with the class:
1. what do you think is happening in the picture? 2. What would you do if you saw an old
woman about to eat a bat? 3, What do you think this book is about?
Sequenced instructional strategies/procedures/activities: (include actions of
T & sts; explanations, scaffolding, modeling, questions, grouping structures, management,
etc.)
1. Teacher will introduce the book to the class
2. Teacher will distribute the character popsicle sticks to each student. Explain that while the
teacher is reading, students will hold up the character stick every time that particular character
is mentioned in the story.
3. Teacher will read the story to the class and monitor that students are holding up the right
character. The Co-Teacher will model with the first couple of character sticks (the bat and
owl) so students understand the process.
Mini Lesson:
1. After finishing the story ask students the following:
a. What did you think about the story?
b. Did any of your predictions come true?
2. I now want us to retell the story, but so many things happened that I want to make sure I
tell it in the right order. Let me show you this chart that might help us with retelling the story.
Direct students to the time-order/sequencing anchor chart. Have students think about things
they do in a certain order (example: morning routine, when you get home from school, the
school day). Discuss these examples with the class. Review the words on the chart (first,
second, third, last), then ask what other words we could add that also show time-order (i.e.
next, then, after that, finally).
3. Now lets retell the story we just read together using our time-order/sequencing words.
Who thinks they could retell the beginning of the story? Middle? End?
a. Tell students to use their character sticks to help them think through the order and guide
their sequencing of the story.
b. Prompt students if needed: What happened first?
Activity/ Work Period:
1. Now you are going to get a chance to write your own story about an old lady who eats
different items. In our story, all of the items the old lady ate had something to do with
Halloween. On these cards (hold up event cards) are different events. You and your
partner/group will think of items that have to do with this particular event. Let me show you
an example.
2. Teacher will hold up her event card that says Mothers Day. My card says Mothers Day.
So first I am going to think of items that I might give my mom on Mothers Day. Model an
example
of the writing activity using Mothers Day. The teacher and co-teacher will think aloud
different items someone might eat on this particular day (flowers, card, breakfast, jewelry,
etc).

(Time)
3 mins

Materials
Powerpoint

7 mins

There was an
old lady that
swallowed a
bat book.
Popsicle sticks
with characters

10
mins
Powerpoint

Word Wall
posters

5 mins

Event cards

5 mins

Event cards

Differentiation/Accommodations
Powerpoint will enhance the presentation and
help them see the sequence words visually.

The popsicle sticks will help students participate


while the book is being read. This will also
ensure that the students pay attention in order to
hear when the characters are mentioned in the
story. They will hold up the character popsicle
stick on the first mention of the character during
the reading of the book.
Will display the slide that shows the anchor chart
that shows time order sequence words for
students to see visually.
Will show the vocabulary and sequence words
that can be found in the book for students to see
visually.
Will demonstrate an example of how the event on
the card should be used to write your own story
based on the book There was an old lady that
swallowed a bat.
Will distribute the event cards to the groups of
students that will help them get an idea for their
stories that they will be writing.
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Texas Wesleyan University Lesson Plan


3. Now that we have thought about our story, Im going to use our sentence stem There was
an old lady who swallowed a and put in my first item. Together, my co-teacher and I
would finish writing our story using time-order words to explain what happens.
4. Distribute event cards (first day of school, Thanksgiving, Fathers day, Valentines Day,
Birthday) to each partner/group (mix up cards and have them choose). Students will begin
brainstorming and creating their own There was an old lady who swallowed story.

Planning 1.2-Data and


Assessment
Instruction 2.5-Monitor and
Adjust

Assessments: (checking/monitoring students understanding of objective;


misconceptions;questions to ask; aligned with each objective and instruction)
The big activity riddle story worksheet, where students will individually write their own
stories based on a particular event.

Instruction 2.5-Monitor and


Adjust

Closure: (sts sum-up; questions; sts reflect on learning enabling their consolidation, etc.of
content
)1. You may not be done with your story yet, but we will have time to finish later. So as a
way to wrap up, I want each group to share what your story is going to be about.
2. Display the Coming Soon Powerpoint slide with a sentence stem for each group already
written out.
3. Ask a student from each group to fill in the sentence stem. Take turns having each group
stand and share what their story will be about using time-order words in their retelling.

10
mins

Homework:
Lesson notes: (what modifications need to made to improve lesson effectiveness)
Students will complete their own short story based on a particular event using sequence
words. Students will each get a mini lesson vocabulary sheet that is based on the book.
Professional Practices and
Responsibilities 4.2-Goal
setting

My Teaching goal for this lesson and My Reflection: Will do after the
lesson is taught.

Revised 12/2015