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DAKOTA ACCESS

MOANA ON TOP
AT BOX OFFICE

MENLO WINS
STATE CROWN

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BLOCKS PIPELINE ROUTE


BUSINESS PAGE 10

DATEBOOK PAGE 17

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula


www.smdailyjournal.com

Monday Dec. 5, 2016 XVII, Edition 94

Prosecutor, defender consider legal pot impact


Proposition 64 to affect San Mateo County courts by reducing or dismissing some criminal charges
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Just one month into recreational


marijuana becoming legalized in
California, those most familiar
with prosecuting and defending
crime in San Mateo County are
bracing for the effects of the new
rules.
Exactly how the laws sparked by
Proposition 64 trickle down to the
local courts has yet to be realized,
but the district attorney and head
of the private defender program are

hopeful
the
impacts wont
be severe.
About 120
pending criminal
charges
related to marijuana must be
dismissed in
San
Mateo
Steve
C o u n t y
Wagstaffe
Superior Court,
said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe. Plus, with the law
retroactively
reducing
past

crimes,
an
unknown number of those
p r e v i o us l y
convicted are
expected
to
begin petitioning the court
for their records
to be cleared.
John
Of the pendDigiacinto
ing
felony
charges to be dismissed, Wagstaffe
emphasized many of those defendants are likely facing other alle-

gations that would keep them


behind bars or in the system.
Compared to Proposition 47
the voter-approved 2014 law that
reduced penalties for six crimes
such as grand theft or use of illegal
drugs Wagstaffe said hes not
expecting the Adult Use of
Marijuana Act to have as much of
an effect on the local court.
Instead, he believes there are two
prime issues of concern an
increase in those driving under the
inuence and dealers looking to
skirt new marijuana tax regula-

tions.
I certainly understand the will
of the people here, they spoke
strongly and clearly as to what
they want and we will enforce this
law and were certainly going to
follow it to the T, Wagstaffe
said, emphasizing those who
aunt the rules would be prosecuted.
Attorney John Digiacinto will
also be charged with navigating
the effects of the new law. As chief

See POT, Page 20

New school
deal draws
mayors ire

OAKLAND MOURNS

Attorney claims Charter Square contract


sound, but Foster City official disagrees
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

REUTERS

A woman places flowers at a makeshift memorial near the scene of a deadly fire in the Fruitvale district of
Oakland. The bodies of 33 victims have been recovered from the warehouse which caught fire during a party
late Friday night. SEE STORY PAGE 5.

Bilingual education act lauded


Prop. 58 passing draws cheers, though county impact may be limited
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

County educators praised the


approval of the bilingual education initiative on the fall election
ballot, claiming it will clear the
path to offering local students
improved language instruction
and support.
California Proposition 58 passing on Election Day received
acclaim from officials who believe
the initiative will allow teachers

to hone skills required for students


across the state to stay competitive in a modern education landscape.
But amidst a diverse Peninsula
community where many schools
already offer bilingual education
programs to meet the needs of
their students and families, some
said the new act will likely have
little sway on the services already
offered.
It doesnt change much of what
we have done and what we will do

because our district has already


provided support for English
learners, said Linda Montes, a
director of curriculum and instruction in the Redwood City
Elementary School District.
Seventy-three percent of voters
supported Proposition 58, allowing teachers to offer enhanced lessons in Spanish, Mandarin and
languages other than English. The
initiative
repeals
state

See PROP. 58, Page 18

890 Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025

With the ink barely dry on an


agreement to redevelop a shopping center into the fourth Foster
City elementary school, questions
are already being raised regarding
the legitimacy of the deal.
Foster City Mayor Herb Perez
said he does not believe the $61
million contract allowing the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary
School District to purchase the
Charter Square shopping center
and allow the property owner
Westlake Realty to build the
school holds weight.
But an attorney representing the
school district disagreed and
claimed such a deal is a relatively
common fashion of delivering
similar projects.
This concept of a developerbuilt school is not one that is new
or novel, said Clarissa Canady,
an attorney advising the district
on the deal finalized earlier this
month.
Alternatively, Perez claims
building the development agreement into the terms of the proper-

ty acquisition
opens the district up to the
threat of a lawsuit, because
the construction contract
was not openly
bid to other
p o t en t i al l y
Herb Perez
qualified and
interested companies.
If I were a betting man, I think
it is more likely than not that
someone is going to say something about this, Perez said. I
dont see how they couldnt.
School officials should have
struck a deal to purchase the land,
then encouraged Westlake Realty
to participate in the open bid
process for the construction contract alongside other interested
firms, said Perez, citing the most
conventional method of building
a school.
Canady noted though there are a
variety of legally endorsed and
accepted alternative methods of
building schools which do not

See SCHOOL, Page 18

FOR THE RECORD

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day


As a rule, there is no surer way to
the dislike of men than to behave well
where they have behaved badly.
Lew Wallace, American author

This Day in History

1791

Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


died in Vienna, Austria, at age 35.

In 1 7 8 2 , the eighth president of the United States, Martin


Van Buren, was born in Kinderhook, New York; he was the
rst chief executive to be born after American independence.
In 1 8 3 1 , former President John Quincy Adams took his
seat as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.
In 1 9 1 6 , British Prime Minister Herbert H. Asquith
resigned (he was succeeded by David Lloyd George).
In 1 9 3 3 , national Prohibition came to an end as Utah
became the 36th state to ratify the 21st Amendment to the
Constitution, repealing the 18th Amendment.
In 1 9 4 5 , ve U.S. Navy torpedo bombers mysteriously
disappeared after taking off from Fort Lauderdale, Florida,
on a training mission with the loss of all 14 crew members;
The Lost Squadron contributed to the legend of the
Bermuda Triangle.
In 1 9 5 5 , the American Federation of Labor and the
Congress of Industrial Organizations merged to form the
AFL-CIO under its rst president, George Meany.
In 1 9 6 2 , the United States and the Soviet Union
announced a bilateral space agreement on exchanging
weather data from satellites, mapping Earths geomagnetic
eld and cooperating in the experimental relay of communications.
In 1 9 7 9 , feminist Sonia Johnson was formally excommunicated by the Mormon Church because of her outspoken
support for the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the
Constitution.

Birthdays

Actress Margaret
Singer Little
Actor Frankie
Cho is 48.
Richard is 84.
Muniz is 31.
Author Joan Didion is 82. Author Calvin Trillin is 81. Actor
Jeroen Krabbe is 72. Opera singer Jose Carreras is 70. Pop
singer Jim Messina is 69. College Football Hall of Famer and
former NFL quarterback Jim Plunkett is 69. World Golf Hall of
Famer Lanny Wadkins is 67. Actress Morgan Brittany is 65.
Actor Brian Backer is 60. Pro and College Football Hall of
Famer Art Monk is 59. Country singer Ty England is 53. Rock
singer-musician John Rzeznik (The Goo Goo Dolls) is 51.
Country singer Gary Allan is 49. Writer-director Morgan J.
Freeman is 47. Actress Alex Kapp Horner is 47. Rock musician Regina Zernay (Cowboy Mouth) is 44.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

CIMMI
2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

OMYNE

GAMENA

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Unscramble these four Jumbles,


one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

REUTERS

A skier dressed as Santa participates in a charity run down a slope at Sunday River Ski Resort in Maine.

In other news ...


Macaw poses in mans mug shot
after unlucky court appearance
PORTLAND A 4-year-old macaw
named Bird is an instant celebrity
after appearing in a posed booking
mug shot in Oregon with his unfortunate owner.
Craig Buckner left Bird in a tree outside court in Washington County while
he went in for an appearance Thursday
in an ongoing drug and theft case, said
Sgt. Bob Ray, the sheriffs
spokesman. Buckner was not expecting to be arrested, but when he fell
asleep while waiting for his case to be
called, he was taken for a drug urine
test and failed, Ray said.
When he realized he was going to be
arrested, Buckner got very upset and
deputies finally realized why.
He was very concerned about Bird
the bird, Ray said. Very distraught.
Bird was 30 feet up the tree, Ray
said, and it was getting dark and rainy.
Temperatures were in the low 40s.
Deputies realized there was no way
Bird a tropical parrot would survive overnight, but he would not come
to them.
They eventually brought Buckner
outside and removed the restraints
from one of his hands.
Bird immediately flew down to
Buckner and landed on his shoulder.
The macaw stayed with deputies for
several hours and feasted on peanuts
until they reached a friend who could

Man charged with burglary


after being stuck in pizzeria vent
PENFIELD A man rescued from an
oven vent at a western new York pizzeria is now facing burglary charges.
The Monroe County Sheriffs office
says deputies arrived at Pontillos
Pizzeria in suburban Rochester at 3:45
a.m. Friday after someone reported a
man yelling for help. They found 53year-old Richard Graham of Rochester
stuck in ductwork that led from an oven
to a roof vent.
After Penfield firefighters pulled him
out, Graham was checked out at a hospital before being arraigned in town
court on burglary and criminal mis-

Lotto
Dec. 3 Powerball
8

10

26

33

27

22
Powerball

Dec. 2 Mega Millions


3

33

35

51

49

1
Mega number

SALWEE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

13

20

44

16

11

15

Daily Four
8

52

Daily three midday


3

47

Daily three evening

Mega number

Answer
here:

The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush, No.


1, in first place; Money Bags, No. 11, in second
place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:45.20.

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: DRANK
OUTDO
SHREWD
IGUANA
Answer: The kids on the carnivals carousel were
HORSING AROUND

The San Mateo Daily Journal


1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com
twitter.com/smdailyjournal

chief charges. The sheriffs office says


Graham caused over $2,000 in damage
to the restaurant.
Graham was sent to the county jail
without bail because hes considered a
repeat offender.
It couldnt be immediately determined if he has a lawyer to comment.

Ho ho? Oh, no! Its too warm


for Boston holiday wonderland
BOSTON Santa Claus or Santa
Thaws?
Boston city officials say theyre
postponing the opening of a
European-style Boston Winter outdoor wonderland because its unseasonably warm.
City Hall Plaza was being transformed into a North Pole, complete
with an ice skating path tucked among
chocolate fountains and wooden
chalets selling Christmas ornaments.
But hours before it was to open to the
public, Democratic Mayor Marty
Walsh temporarily called it off.
Walsh tweeted: Warm weather in
December (climate change?) caused ice
skating path to melt, postponing
todays opening. Sad!
City
spokeswoman
Samantha
Ormsby says the path wouldnt freeze
amid temperatures hovering around 50
degrees. Usually the city around this
time of year is in the 30s or low 40s.
Organizers say theyve nudged the
grand opening to next Wednesday.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

Dec. 3 Super Lotto Plus

Saturdays

pick Bird up.


While they waited, deputies let
Buckners feathered friend sit on his
shoulder in a set up booking shot, just
for kicks.
They also took a real booking photo
of Buckner without Bird but the
macaw still managed to photo bomb it
with a few of his colorful feathers, Ray
said.
Its quite funny, he said. How can
you resist that?
The department is proud of how it
landed the Bird, even if it did take extra
time on a busy day, Ray said.
Were not all robots. Were humans,
we love animals and we want to do the
right thing, he said.
For the animal, and for Mr. Buckner
too.

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facebook.com/smdailyjournal

Mo nday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid


50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Mo nday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. A slight
chance of showers after midnight. Lows in
the lower 40s. North winds 10 to 20 mph.
Chance of showers 20 percent.
Tues day : Partly cloudy. A slight chance
of showers in the morning. Highs in the
mid 50s. North winds 10 to 20 mph. Chance of showers 20
percent.
Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 30s.
Wednes day : Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 50s.
Wednes day ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows
in the mid 40s.
Thurs day : Cloudy. A chance of rain. Highs in the mid 50s.
Thurs day ni g ht: Rain likely. Lows in the upper 40s.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Building the next generations business skills


Skyline College entrepreneur program offers training for students
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Aspiring
entrepreneurs
enrolled at Skyline College
can lean on a new program
designed to build their business development skills and
fuel their burgeoning company on the way to success.
The Bay Area Entrepreneur
Center of Skyline College
launched a business incubator
program in early 2014 to offer
classes, training, instruction,
mentoring and other valuable
information to help small
companies grow.
As a portion of its offerings, the center is also hosting a speaker series placing
successful business owners in
front of students, who can
absorb the knowledge and
pepper pros with questions
regarding their recipe for success.
Such
an
opportunity
Thursday, Dec. 1, brought
Eddie Lin, founder and CEO of
marketing
company

NexusEdge, before the students and program participants to share his strategies
for building a brand.
I want to be able to help
students or anyone in the
space that I was in before who
are encountering the same
struggles I had previously, he
said.
Lins speech is the second in
a series of three speakers who
visited the center over the past
month. Global trade expert
Rajaa Bentahar spoke roughly
two weeks ago and intellectual
property attorney Heather
Bennett is scheduled to appear
Tuesday, Dec. 15.
Terri Wade, a business and
marketing consultant for the
center, said she believes
granting access to the wisdom
of accomplished business
people alongside the variety
of other resources available
helps many hopeful entrepreneurs see a path to achievement more clearly.

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Police reports
Causing a racket
A person was seen throwing a tennis
ball at a parked vehicle on Metro Center
Boulevard in Foster City before 6:17
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8.

BURLINGAME
Fraud. A person found fruadulent activity on
their credit card on Burlingame Avenue
before 7:14 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1.
Theft. Someone broke into an unlocked
vehicle and stole a projector on Bayswater
Avenue before 10:56 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 1.
Haras s ment. A person was receiving vulgar and harassing phone calls from a customer on Adrian Road before 8:41 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 30.
Ro bbery . Six to 10 people were seen stealing items and then eeing a store on
Burlingame Avenue before 7:46 p. m.
Wednesday, Nov. 30.

BELMONT

Di s turbance. A woman became irate after


the manager confronted her about sampling
from the olive bar on El Camino Real before
12:54 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1.
Wel fare. An 8-year-old boy was seen on the
RENEE ABU-ZAGHRIBA/ DAILY JOURNAL street asking people for money near Emmett
Eddie Lin, founder and CEO of NexusEdge, shares his expertise with the Bay Avenue and El Camino Real before 11:47
a.m. Thursday, Dec. 1.
See SKYLINE, Page 20 Area Entrepreneur Center of Skyline College.

GIVE THE GIFT OF PREPLANNING

The gift of preplanning and prepaying is something


everyone should consider doing for their loved ones
For more information on pre-need arrangements in
the Peninsula's premier location, please contact
Charlie H. Aho Jr. FD 1848
Community Service Counselor

Charlie.Aho@nsmg.com
Skylawn Funeral Home & Memorial Park

650-235-6659

LOCAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Two firefighters injured in


possible explosion in fire
Two firefighters were injured in a
possible explosion in a threealarm fire Sunday afternoon in
unincorporated Redwood City, a
fire official said.
The fire was first reported at
2:22 p.m. at 651 Vista Drive in
the hilly Emerald Lake area.
The firefighters suffered burns to
their faces and were taken to Santa
Clara Valley Medical Center,
Redwood City Fire Department
officials said on Twitter at 4:51
p.m.
The firefighters were expected to
be released shortly after being
treated.
No one else was injured, Cal Fire
Assistant Chief Mark Steward
said.
The fire burned a three-story,
single-family home, which may

now be uninhabitable, Steward


said.
The residents were not home
when the fire broke out and are
now staying with family.
Building officials will make the
decision whether to deem the
house uninhabitable, Steward said.
Firefighters are not sure what
exploded. The cause of the blaze is
under investigation and fire officials do not suspect foul play, but
they haven't ruled it out until
investigators complete their
work, Steward said.

Belmont burglary
suspects nabbed
Two teens were arrested on burglary charges in Redwood City
Sunday after a month-long investigation involving three cities and
the San Mateo County Sheriff's
Office, according to police.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local briefs
The investigation started in
late October after police arrested
19-year-old Jesus Franco of
Redwood City in connection with
a
residential
burglary
in
Belmont.
Based on the similarity of that
crime to others in nearby cities,
Belmont officers began working
with Hillsborough and Redwood
City police, as well as deputies
from the sheriff's office.
On Sunday, police arrested
Jose Rodriguez, 18, and a 17year-old boy after serving search
warrants on three homes in
Redwood City.
Officers found several stolen
items from an early November burglary in Belmont, as well as other
evidence, police said. An investigation is underway to determine if

Jose Rodriguez

Jesus Franco

the three suspects are connected to


other county burglaries.

Sailors rescued
from capsized boat
Three people trapped by the
ocean tide and steep terrain were
rescued from a beach Saturday
afternoon on the San Mateo
County coast, a Cal Fire battalion chief said.
Fi refi g h t ers res p o n ded at
12:11 p. m. to a capsized vessel

in the surf near Cowell-Purisima


Trai l an d t h e i n t ers ect i o n o f
state Highway 1 and Verde Road,
Battalion Chief Ari Delay said.
Three people on board the
roughly 16-foot boat were fishing off the rocks when the boat
lost power and flipped over.
All three were able to get to the
beach, but they could not find a
way out of the C-shaped cove
because of the high tide and the
steepness of the cliff behind
them.
Firefighters were able to find a
small trail up the cliff and they
helped two people hike out. A
third person was lifted out by the
crew of a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter, Delay said. All three were
treated at the scene by paramedics
and released.
Coast Guard officials are working with the skipper of the boat
to retrieve the vessel.

You are invited!


FRIDAY EVENING SOCIAL
HOURS: 4:30-5:30 P.M.

Enjoy great music,


delicious snacks and
beverages, and the best
company in town!
And if youd like to learn more
about our options for
independent senior living, just
let us know. Wed love to share.

At Sterling Court, were


proud of what we offer.

650 344-8200
Sterling Court, The Community For Seniors 850 N. El Camino Real, San Mateo sterlingcourt.com

We speak Medicare
Let us help you solve the puzzle

Part A
Hospital

Part D
Prescription
Drugs

Part B
Medical

Medigap
Supplemental
Policies

Part C
Medicare
Advantage

Extra Help
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HICAP is the only nonprot authorized by the U.S. Dept. of


Health & Human Services (HHS) Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services (CMS) to counsel beneciaries about
Medicare and their options.
Call to schedule a free appointment near you:

1-800-434-0222 or 650-627-9350

California Department of Aging administers the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy
Program (HICAP). State-registered HICAP counselors do not sell, recommend or endorse any
insurance plans, companies or insurance agents. This publication was supported by HICAP of
San Mateo County with nancial assistance, in whole or in part, through a grant from the
Administration of Community Living (ACL).

The Medicare Counseling Program

890 Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025

BAY AREA

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Horrific Oakland warehouse fire death toll now 33


Teens listed among dead, count expected
to rise as firefighters comb through rubble
By Kristin J. Bender
and Brian Melley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND The death toll


from a fire that tore through a
warehouse hosting a late-night
dance party climbed to 33 on
Sunday as firefighters painstakingly combed through rubble for
others believed to still be missing and made the grim announcement that teenagers were among
the dead.
The building that went up in
flames was known as the Ghost
Ship, had been carved into artist
studios and was an illegal home
for a rotating cast of a dozen or
more people, according to former
denizens who said it was a cluttered death trap with few exits,
piles of wood and a mess of
snaking electric cords.
If you were going there for a
party, you wouldnt be aware of
the maze that you have to go
through to get out, said Danielle
Boudreaux, a former friend of the
couple who ran the warehouse.
The death toll was expected to
rise, as crews using buckets and
shovels slowly made their way
through the building, finding
victims where they least expected them, Alameda County
Sheriffs Sgt. Ray Kelly said.
Less than half of the charred
remains of the partly collapsed
structure had been searched as of
Sunday afternoon, Kelly said.
When we started this investigation, if you had told us that you
would have 33 victims, we
wouldnt have believed you,
Kelly said. I dont know how
many people are left in there.
The victims include 17-yearolds and people from Europe and
Asia and range in age from their
teens to 30-plus years old, Kelly

said. Officials have identified


seven people who were killed
using fingerprints, though they
have not released the identifications.
Among the dead was Donna
Kellogg, according to her father,
Keith Slocum. He declined additional comment.
Anxious family members who
feared the worst gathered at the
sheriffs office to await word on
their loved ones. They were told
they may have to provide DNA
samples to help identify
remains.
As many as 100 people were
there for a party Friday night
when the fire broke out just
before midnight. Fire officials
were still investigating the cause
of the blaze, but they said clutter
fueled the flames, there were no
sprinklers inside and few exits to
escape.
Boudreaux identified the operators of the Satya Yuga collective
as Derick Ion Almena and Micah
Allison. She had a falling out
with Almena when she convinced
Allisons parents and sister
about a year ago that the warehouse was a dangerous place for
the couples three children to
live.
Michael Allison of Portland,
Oregon, the father of Almenas
partner, Micah Allison, said the
couple had a troubled relationship. Michael Allison and other
family members were able to persuade his daughter, Micah, to go
to a drug rehabilitation center in
2015, but Almena talked his way
into the rehab center, and convinced Micah Allison to leave
with him, Michael Allison said.
The familys three children had
lice and needed new clothes,
prompting family to call childprotective services, said Michael

REUTERS

Firefighters work inside the burned warehouse following the fatal fire in the Fruitvale district of Oakland Sunday.
Allison, who wept as he talked.
But Almena and his partner eventually were able to win custody of
the children back and cut off all
communication with Michael
Allison, the father said.
Whenever I could, I would to
talk to (Micah Allison) to get
away from him because I knew he
was dangerous from day one, he
said. All of that has now been
proven.
Almena did not immediately
respond to emails or phone numbers associated with him.
Authorities declined to talk about
the manager, saying they were
focused on recovering the bodies
and consoling families.
No one answered a call to a
number for Micah Allison.
A man identified as Derick Ion
posted a Facebook message early
Saturday, saying, Everything I
worked so hard for is gone.
Blessed that my children and
Micah were at a hotel safe and
sound. He drew rebukes online

from others who said he was


warned the building was unsafe.
The couple rented out five
recreational vehicles and other
nooks on the ground floor as living spaces. A rickety makeshift
staircase led to a second floor
where concerts were held. Former
residents said there frequently
was no electricity or running
water.
Oakland planning officials
opened an investigation last
month after repeated complaints
from neighbors who said trash
was piling up and people were
illegally living in the building
zoned as a warehouse. An inspector who went to the premises
couldnt get inside, said Darin
Ranelletti, of the Oakland
Planning Department.
The city had not confirmed
people lived there, but a former
resident, Shelley Mack, said she
had been lured in part by reasonable rents in a region beset with a
housing shortage and exorbitant

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leases driven by the tech boom.


To a first-time visitor, the
labyrinth of uniquely designed
spaces was stunning, said
Alastair Boone, a University of
California, Berkeley student who
arrived at the party with five
friends around 11 p.m.
Boone said she had just
received a tour of the property
and stepped outside when someone yelled, Fire!
In a couple of minutes there
were flames coming out of the
windows and black smoke was
just billowing out of the house,
she said.
Some of the people who got
out were crying and others stood
silently in shock as firefighters
arrived to put the flames out.
Online records listed the buildings owner as Nar Siu Chor. The
Associated Press could not locate
a telephone number for her
Saturday. Efforts to reach her at
other Oakland addresses associated with her were not successful.

29 West 25TH Ave.


(Near El Camino)
San Mateo

STATE

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Trumps inauguration set to test


nations readiness for healing
By Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON One thing you


can count on during inauguration season in Washington: People of all
stripes will nd a reason to show up
whether its to celebrate or commiserate.
There are parties and protests to
attend, stars to gawk at, receptions to be
worked, deals to be done, drinks to be
consumed.
Less than two months out from
Inauguration Day, theres a different
dynamic surrounding the planning for
Donald Trumps swearing-in than the
unbridled enthusiasm that swirled
around the installation of the rst
black president in 2008.
Crowd expectations are down.
Fewer A-list celebrities are likely to

descend. Hotels still have rooms to be


rented.
But congressional ofces are maxing out on ticket requests for the Jan. 20
swearing-in. Trumps inaugural committee is wooing big donors with candlelight dinners, exclusive luncheons
and premier access to balls. Interest
groups are lining up sideline events.
And among those still mourning
Hillary Clintons loss, there is
plenty of counter-programming
afoot, including plans for a giant
womens march aimed at sending a
deant message to the incoming president.
Before the election, District of
Columbia planners set an early estimate of 800,000-900,000 people for
this years inauguration and they
havent revised that number yet,
according to Christopher Geldart,

director of D.C.s Department of


Homeland Security and Emergency
Management. But theres scant expectation of replicating the 1.8 million
people who descended on Washington
for Barack Obamas rst inaugural.
Nor will Hollywood turn out as it did
for Obama, whose two inaugurals attracted
the likes of Beyonce, Bruce Springsteen,
Usher, Jamie Foxx, Jay-Z, Oprah Winfrey
andmany moreA-listers.
More than any election weve seen
in a very long time, the Hollywood
community was really behind Hillary,
and a lot of people put their reputations on the line, says longtime
Hollywood publicist
Howard
Bragman. Clearly those are people
who are going to be taking their
Xanax and Valium that day and staying in bed with the covers over
them.

REUTERS

A general view of the National Mall is seen from the rebuilt cast-iron dome
of the U.S. Capitol, which was formally completed on Tuesday on time for
the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump.

Democrats task: Rebuild the blue political wall in Midwest


By Thomas Beaumont
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DES MOINES Democrats need


to rebuild the political blue
wall of traditionally Democratic
upper Midwest and Great Lakes
states that Republican Donald
Trump captured with an appeal to
white, working-class voters.
Hi l l ary Cl i n t o n s fai l ure t o
hold key blocs of these voters
helped seal Trumps stunning
electoral victory and leaves
Democrats with a gaping, perhaps long-term, hole in the
partys national battle front.
Trump boasted of his accomplish-

ment at a post-election rally in


Ohio.
The president-elect crowed: We
didnt break it, we shattered that
sucker. We shattered it, man. That
poor wall is busted up.
Trump carried Michigan and
Pennsylvania, where Democratic
nominees had won the previous
six presidential elections. Trump
also won Wisconsin, carried by
Democrats in seven straight
tries, and Iowa, carried just once
by a Republican over the same
period.
In each, Trump vastly outperformed 2012 GOP nominee Mitt
Romney in rural areas, while also

seizing
more
typically
Democratic-voting small cities
and working-class suburbs.
Should Democratic voting continue to lag behind Republicans
in midterm elections, as it did in
in 2014, the results could be devastating in two years when the
party will defend Senate seats in
Michigan,
Wisconsin
and
Pennsylvania, and try to retake
governorships
in
Iowa,
Michigan and Wisconsin.
Democrats suffered the consequences of apathy and select i v e amn es i a o v er t h e p as t
midterms and arrogance over the
p res i den t i al el ect o rat e, s ai d

Haley Morris, a senior adviser


t o Demo crat Gary Pet ers
Mi ch i g an Sen at e camp ai g n ,
among the Democrats few 2014
victories in the region. We got
walloped across the Midwest in
2010 and 2014. Democrats had a
g l i mp s e o f wh at t h e res ul t s
could look like without Barack
Obama on the ticket and ignored
it.
Mark
Jefferson,
the
Republican
National
Committees Midwest regional
political director, said the GOP
consistently focused on bluecollar Reagan Democrats, who
were heavily trending toward

Trump.
County-specific,
unofficial
national voting data tabulated by
The Associated Press shows
Clinton received fewer votes than
Trump in places Democrats had
banked on for consecutive elections, and even decades, such as
Dubuque County, Iowa.
Trump edged Clinton by fewer
than 1,000 votes in this northeast
Iowa county known for its smallcity namesake on the Mississippi
River and its once thriving manufacturing economy. Trump became
the first Republican to carry
Dubuque County since Dwight D.
Eisenhower in 1956.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Trump expands list of candidates to head State Dept


By Laurie Kellman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON President-elect Donald


Trump is expanding his pool of candidates
for secretary of state, leaving unclear
whether former CIA Director David
Petraeus guilty plea for leaking classified
information disqualifies him to serve as the
nations top diplomat.
Theres not a finite list of candidates
for secretary of state, Trump adviser
Kellyanne Conway told reporters on
Sunday. More than four. Who knows how
many finalists there will be?
The remark comes a week after Trumps
aides confirmed that the president-elect had
settled on four finalists for the post. Two
people close to the transition told The
Associated Press that Trump is moving
away from two of the four: former New York
City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Mitt
Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential
nominee.
That would leave Petraeus as a contender,
along with Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob
Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee. Both people close

to the transition said Trumps prolonged


decision-making process has left the door
open to other options. Among other possibilities, one official says is Jon Huntsman,
a former Republican Utah governor who
also served as the ambassador to China and
speaks Mandarin.
The people close to the transition spoke
on condition of anonymity because they
were not authorized to discuss the private
process publicly.
There was other evidence that Trump is
looking beyond the known four contenders. Vice President-elect Mike Pence on
Sunday listed the quartet, but added a fresh
reference to former U.N. ambassador John
Bolton or others who may be added to the
list of candidates.
I think the person who will make the
decision about our next secretary of state is
the president-elect, Pence said on ABC.
And hell factor the totality of Gen.
Petraeus career in making that decision.
Pence also referred to Petraeus as a
hero. But it seemed unclear Sunday even
to Petraeus and Trumps inner circle whether
the retired generals guilty plea has turned
off Trump.

REUTERS

Former CIA director David Petraeus arrives with Anthony Scaramucci, a member of thepresident elect's transition team, to meet with President-elect Donald Trump in New York.

Gun-rights backers vow to go on offense during Trump years


By Ryan Foley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

IOWA CITY Firearms enthusiasts who embraced Donald


Trumps campaign and his fullthroated support of the Second
Amendment are expecting a
sweeping expansion of gun rights
under his administration and a
Congress rmly in Republican
hands.
Among their priorities: eliminating gun-free zones at schools,
reducing requirements for back-

ground checks and ensuring that


concealed carry handgun permits
from one state are recognized
everywhere in the U.S.
This is our historic moment to
go on offense and to defeat the
forces that have aligned against
our freedom once and for all,
Wayne LaPierre, chief executive of
the National Rie Association,
said in a video after the Nov. 8
election. The individual right to
carry a rearm in defense of our
lives and our families does not and
should not end at any state line.

In pursuing their agenda, the


gun lobby and its GOP supporters
could nd themselves at odds with
two other tenets of Republican
orthodoxy: states rights and local
control.
It would be ironic to see conservatives who long have professed a
belief in states rights override
states choices in this area, said
Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the
University of California Irvine
School of Law.
One of the NRAs paramount
goals is getting Congress to pass

a law requiring all states to recognize concealed-carry handgun permits issued by any other state.
Currently, many permit holders
must leave their weapons at home
when traveling or risk violating
other states laws. NRA supporters
say permits should be treated like
drivers licenses.
Trump endorsed the idea during
the campaign, but it is likely to
face intense opposition from
Democrats in states with tight gun
restrictions, including California
and the president-elects home

state of New York.


States make their own judgments
on who should be allowed to have
a concealed carry permit, and their
eligibility requirements vary based
on an applicants criminal history,
age and training.
Many law enforcement organizations warn the change would mean
encountering more guns during
trafc stops and in tourist areas.
They also say there is no way to
easily check the validity of an outof-state rearm permit because
there is no nationwide database.

WORLD

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Renzi quits; Italian populists seek quick vote to win power


By Frances DEmilio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROME -- Italian voters dealt


Premier Matteo Renzi a stinging
defeat on his reforms referendum,
triggering
his
resignation
announcement and galvanizing
the populist, opposition 5-Star
Movement's determination to
gain national power soon.
The outcome also energized the
anti-immigrant Northern League
party, an ally of French far-right
leader Marine Le Pen, a candidate in
France's presidential race.
The blow to Renzi also delivered
a rebuke to Italy's industrialists,
banks and other establishment
institutions, which had staunchly
backed the referendum. The political upset, which could spook
investors, comes just as the government had made some inroads in
cutting the staggering rate of youth
employment and while Italy's
banks have urgent need for recapitalization.
During the campaign, the risk of
political instability in Italy,

Europe's fourth-largest economy,


triggered market reaction, with
bank stocks sinking and borrowing costs on sovereign debt rising.
The Movement, led by anti-euro
comic Beppe Grillo, spearheaded
the No camp on the constitutional
reforms, a package aimed at updating Italy's post-war Constitution
that Renzi had depicted as vital to
modernizing Italy and reviving its
economy.
Characteristically confident -detractors say arrogant -- Renzi,
41, and Italy's youngest premier,
had bet his political future -- or at
least his current premiership -- on a
Yes vote win, and campaigned hard
for a victory in recent weeks to
confound opinion polls indicating
that it would likely go down to
defeat.
With votes counted from nearly
all the polling stations in Sunday's
referendum, the No's were leading
Yes votes by a 6-to-4 margin,
Interior Ministry data indicated.
The turnout of 67 percent was
especially high for a referendum,
and more in line for a vote for
Parliament.

REUTERS

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi speaks during a media conference after a referendum on constitutional
reform at Chigi palace in Rome, Italy,

Fidel Castros ashes interred in private ceremony in Cuba


Christine Armario and Andrea
Rodriguez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTIAGO Fidel Castros


ashes were interred in a private
ceremony Sunday morning, ending nine days of mourning for the
man who ruled Cuba for nearly half
a century.
The military caravan bearing his
remains in a flag-draped cedar cof-

Fidel Castro

fin left the Plaza


of
the
Revolution in
the eastern city
of Santiago at
6:39
a. m. ,
returning empty
two hours later.
Thousands
of
people lined the
two-mile route
to
Santa

Ifigenia cemetery, waving Cuban


flags and shouting Long live
Fidel!
The ceremony appeared to last
about 90 minutes and took place
out of the public eye after Cuban
officials made a last-minute cancellation of plans to broadcast the
events live on national and international television. International
media were also barred from the
ceremony.

Afterward, Cubans were allowed


briefly inside the cemetery to see
his tomb, a simple round stone
about 15 feet high with a plaque
bearing his name. The tomb stood
to the side of a memorial to the
rebel soldiers killed in an attack
that Castro led on Santiagos
Moncada barracks on July 26,
1953, and in front of the mausoleum of Cuban national hero
Jose Marti.

An honor guard of a dozen uniformed soldiers stood in front of


Castros tomb.
Before the ceremony wrapped
up, martial music could be heard
outside the cemetery, where Ines
de la Rosa was among the mourners gathered. She said she would
have liked to watch the ceremony
on television, but we understand
how they as a family also need a
bit of privacy.

Low Back Pain


Research Study
This study is to see if the Erchonia
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low-level laser light, can help to relieve
minor lower back pain that has been
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The study involves eleven visits to
a test site and recording some
information at home.
Compensation up to $200
For qualied participants
Please contact Paul Quarneri, DC at
Neurolink Chiropractic,
San Mateo, CA
at 650-375-2545 for details.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Free range children


By Kent Lauder

aving been around for most of


72 years allows me a certain
perspective, not always available to younger generations, concerning how children are brought up today
compared to my own era (50s- 60s).
Is this another one of those insufferable we walked 10 miles to school
both ways uphill
in the snow comparisons? (Well,
yes, only the last
snow we had here
was one weekend
back in 62 all
two inches of it).
The most significant difference
today is the increase in parental supervision. As kids, we had certain freedoms
denied the youth of today. We would set
out on a Saturday morning, away from
parental control, and not come home
until late in the day, with parents confident knowing that, being with friends,
we could take care of ourselves.
In particular, we did not have highly
organized sports programs, but made do
with our own makeshift activities. We
would go to a nearby field or basketball
hoop and choose teams according to
ability. If the game turned out to be onesided, wed reconfigure the teams; three
good players against four lesser ones,
or whatever. To win was only an immediate goal, and quickly forgotten once
completed. In other words, we took the
responsibility to organize, lay the
ground rules, follow them, then not care

Guest
perspective
about the outcome. No guiding parental
authority or trophy incentive required.
Those of us on the Peninsula now live
in an ultra impacted environment in
which the growing number of children
overwhelms the relatively less open
spaces on which they have to play. With
some of the existing fields now gated,
locked and open by appointment only,
it makes it difficult for kids to spontaneously play the way we once did.
One good compensating factor has
been youth sports programs. These
leagues exist because of the hard work
parents and organizers do in encouraging kids to get out and engage in
healthy activity. The problem is, it is
run by adults.
As a parent, weekends were devoted
to transporting the kids to soccer
games and watching them play. In my
case, as assistant coach, I adopted the
wise, leadership tactic of yelling at
them (Kick the ball!). Fortunately, I
was never a head coach.
I was not necessarily a fervent parent,
but while most of us were rooting for
our kids to excel, we also had an excessive interest in the outcome. Zealous,
abusive parents are not tolerated in
these organized activities, but their
vicarious competitive nature does sometimes rear its ugly head.
There was a survey done some years
back in which very young players were

asked to rate, from a prepared list of


nine or 10 items, what part of soccer
they liked best: i.e. being with friends,
winning, learning skills, pizza after
the game, etc. Pizza of course was number one winning came in dead last.
While they have their priorities
straight, it certainly does not match
the agenda of many parents.
Todays parents seem more controlling than ever; wanting to be in every
aspect of their childrens lives. While it
may seem innocuous enough for them
to cheer on their childrens teams, their
very presence at the games can be
intimidating, and at least in the childrens minds, escalates the idea that success can come only through winning.
I believe children would be happier
playing in an atmosphere of diminished fervor, and for its own sake. But
spontaneous play is harder to come
by, so perhaps in league play, parents
could back off from the distracting
shouting and screaming; or better yet,
just stay home. Since children are
innately fair-minded, we might be
amazed at what they can work out for
themselves when compelled to be
accountable and responsible. That is
what learning is all about.
We all have anxieties for our children
in todays oftentimes scary world, but
parents are doing a disservice by being
overprotective and hovering over
them. For them to succeed in the future,
they may need to count on those lessons they learned all by themselves.
After all, the plays the thing.
Kent Lauder is a retired plumbing
contractor and very longtime resident of
Burlingame.

Letters to the editor


Landslide
Editor,
Mike Brown asserted that Trump won
in a landslide and that, according to
information provided by reputable internet experts, 80 percent of the country
is Republican (Letter to the editor,
Self-absorbed liberal Democrats in the
Dec. 2 edition of the Daily Journal).
That would be a neat trick since
Hillary Clinton got around 65 million
votes to Donald Trumps 62.5 million.
In other words, Trump got his patoot
handed to him in the actual vote count
of people, not that the majority of people who voted for you counts in
elections. If your state has prairie
dogs, you should rightly be able to
count them toward the electoral map as
any right-thinking, aspiring grade
school graduate can tell you. Trying to
square a candidate who lost the popular
vote by a big margin, with an assertion

Jerry Lee, Publisher


Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Samantha Weigel, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Anna Schuessler, Austin Walsh
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

that a minority of the voters equals 80


percent shows that perhaps Trump was
right about the Democrats education
standards. Mike, you shouldnt have
used Common Core math to do your
calculations.

John Dillon
San Bruno

Parks need improvements


Editor,
I read with amazement the front page
story County park goers on the rise
on the Nov. 28 edition of the Daily
Journal.
As a frequent hiker and nature viewer, I
nd it extremely hard to believe that attendance could be 23 percent higher. I
think that number has been grossly exaggerated. I visit almost all the parks and
there seems to be the same amount of
users as always. I have seen the shuttles
that run to Edgewood and Wunderlich

BUSINESS STAFF:
Michael Davis
Charles Gould
Dave Newlands

Henry Guerrero
Paul Moisio
Joy Uganiza

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:


Renee Abu-Zaghibra Robert Armstrong
Jim Clifford
Dan Heller
Tom Jung
Mona Murhamer
Karan Nevatia
Jeanita Lyman
Brigitte Parman
Adriana Ramirez
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Joel Snyder
Megan Tao
Gary Whitman
Cindy Zhang

Robert Stafford
South San Francisco
OUR MISSION:
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accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

parks and they run empty. Why waste


taxpayer money on running empty vans?
I think it is great veterans can enter for
free, but there was a ranger at Coyote
Point who would cut the entry fee in half
if one could prove, with a D.O.D. card,
that they were in the service.
As far as information put out in other
than English, 20 or so years ago there
was brochure printed in Spanish and the
rangers I spoke with told me no one
wanted one and that these were the native Spanish speakers. I realize times
have changed, but should more money
be wasted on brochures no one wants?
Maybe the county could spend some
money cleaning up Memorial Park; that
place has gone downhill over the last
ve or so years. It is just dirty with litter
and unclean restrooms and a staff that
seems unknowledgeable about the park.

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal


Emailed documents are preferred:
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Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.

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Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

What to do about our


lost working class jobs

uring the past presidential campaign, Donald Trump


and Bernie Sanders used the plight of working class
Americans as their main focus. For Trump, it was
opportunism. For Sanders, a socialist, it was his longtime
belief that working men and women were exploited. Both
promised, if elected, they would stop trade deals which
exchanged American jobs for cheaper foreign labor. But will
this bring back jobs? Hardly. If not, what can we do about
lost working class jobs?
***
I thought a friend of mine, a longtime community activist
and Democrat who grew up poor
and lived the life of hard physical labor, might have some
answers. He knew Trump was
going to win. Because faced
with frustrations and feelings of
being abandoned, human always
vote for a perceived strong
man. He agreed with many
other post-election critics, that
the Democratic Party had turned
its back on working class men
and women and instead embraced
identity politics. He showed me
a map where in 44 states its easy to get a permit to carry a
concealed weapon. Only California, New York and a few
other East Coast states have strict regulations. Despite my
protests, he insisted this was important enough to 10 percent of Americans to make a difference in national elections.
***
He agreed that many of these jobs are not coming back.
The biggest threat to blue collar and now white collar workers is automation. This is being felt around the world, not
just in the United States.
Foxconn in China, which makes iPhones, has laid off
60,000 workers. Berkshire Hathaway has consolidated
Heinz operations in Canada and, while most of its ketchup is
made in Ohio, closed a plant in Leamington, Ontario. And so
it goes. Even with the revival of the U.S. automobile industry, workers are not making the $22 an hour they used to
make at General Motors.
***
The best solution is to ensure that anyone working full
time eight hours a day makes enough money to support a
family and be off the public dole. The opposite of Walmart
where low wages equals taxpayer subsidies. In many states,
Walmart employees are the largest group of Medicaid and
food stamp recipients. Other solutions are to increase the
earned income tax credit and the minimum wage.
***
David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker, held a remarkable interview (Nov. 28 issue) with the soon to be former
president. Obama said: The prescription that some offer,
which is stop trade, reduce global integration is not going
to work. We are going to have to redesign the social compact in some fairly fundamental ways . It begins with ...
early childhood education, continuous learning, job training, a basic social safety net, expanding the earned-income
tax credit, investments in infrastructure which ... arent
shipped overseas. All those things accelerate growth, give
you more of a runway. But at some point, when the problem
is not just Uber but driverless Uber, when radiologists are
losing their jobs to A.I., then were going to have to figure
out how do we maintain a cohesive society and a cohesive
democracy in which productivity and wealth generation are
not automatically linked to how many hours you put in,
where the links between production and distribution are
broken, in some sense. Because I can sit out over the internet, and suddenly I just made a couple of million bucks, and
the person whos looking after my kid while Im doing that
has no leverage to get paid more than 10 bucks an hour.
***
Where Trump won votes, many want to keep their health
insurance under the Affordable Care Act. But his new secretary of Health and Human Services, U.S. Rep. Tom Price, a
Georgia Republican, is someone who wants to eliminate it.
However, it is good news for 800 workers at Carrier. Trump
had promised during the campaign to stop Carrier from moving more than 2,000 jobs to Mexico. Now 800 will keep
theirs because of a deal which involves lucrative tax exemptions and most likely promises to its parent company, a
major federal defense contractor. But the thousands of other
endangered Rust Belt jobs may not be that easy to keep. A
manufacturing job is one of the only ladders to fulfilling the
American dream for someone with only a high school education. Service jobs are out there but they dont pay as much,
not enough to afford a home and send your kids to college.
In this changing world there is no one easy answer.
Undelivered promises will make the vulnerable angrier
and hungrier for a strong man who can solve their problems, no matter what the cost to democratic values and
national security.
Sue Lempert is the former may or of San Mateo. Her column runs ev ery Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdaily journal.com.

10

BUSINESS

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Federal government blocks Dakota Access pipeline route


By James MacPherson
ASSOCIATED PRESS

CANNON BALL The U. S.


Army Corps of Engineers said
Sunday that it wont grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil
pipeline in southern North
Dakota, handing a victory to the
Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its
supporters, who argued the project
would threaten the tribes water
source and cultural sites.
North Dakotas leaders criticized
the decision, with Gov. Jack
Dalrymple calling it a serious
mistake that prolongs the dangerous situation of having several hundred protesters who are
camped out on federal land during
cold, wintry weather. U.S. Rep.
Kevin Cramer said its a very
chilling signal for the future of
infrastructure in the United States.
The four-state, $3.8 billion project is largely complete except for
the now-blocked segment underneath Lake Oahe, a Missouri River
reservoir. Assistant Secretary for
Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy said in
a news release that her decision was
based on the need to explore alternate routes for the pipelines
crossing. Her full decision doesnt
rule out that it could cross under the
reservoir or north of Bismarck.
Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of
new information with the Standing
Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, its
clear that theres more work to do,
Darcy said. The best way to complete that work responsibly and
expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.
The company constructing the
pipeline, Dallas-based Energy
Transfer Partners, had said it was
unwilling to reroute the project. It
had no immediate comment

Sunday.
The decision came a day before
the governments deadline for the
several hundred people at the Oceti
Sakowin, or Seven Council Fires,
encampment to leave the federal
land. But demonstrators say theyre
prepared to stay, and authorities
say they wont forcibly remove
them.
As the news spread Sunday,
cheers and cheers and chants of
mni wichoni water is life in
Lakota Sioux broke out among
the protesters. Some in the crowd
banged drums. Miles Allard, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux, said
he was pleased but remained cautious, saying, We dont know what
Trump is going to do.
The whole world is watching,
Allard added. Im telling all our people to stand up and not to leave until
this is over.
Attorney General Loretta Lynch
said Sunday that the Department of
Justice will continue to monitor the
situation and stands ready to provide resources to help all those who
can play a constructive role in easing
tensions.
The safety of everyone in the area
- law enforcement ofcers, residents
and protesters alike - continues to be
our foremost concern, she added.
Carla Youngbear of the Meskwaki
Potawatomi tribe made her third trip
from central Kansas to be at the
protest site.
I have grandchildren, and Im
going to have great grandchildren,
she said. They need water. Water is
why Im here.
Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault didnt
immediately respond to messages
left seeking comment.
Morton County Sheriff Kyle
Kirchmeier, whose department has
done much of the policing for the
protests, said that local law

REUTERS

Protesters demonstrate against the Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock
Sioux reservation in North Dakota.
enforcement does not have an
opinion on the easement and that
his department will continue to
enforce the law.
U.S. Secretary for the Interior
Sally Jewell said in a statement that
the Corps thoughtful approach ...
ensures that there will be an indepth evaluation of alternative
routes for the pipeline and a closer
look at potential impacts.
Earlier Sunday, an organizer with
Veterans Stand for Standing Rock
said tribal elders had asked the military veterans not to have confrontations with law enforcement of-

cials, adding the group is there to


help out those whove dug in
against the project.
About 250 veterans gathered
about a mile from the main camp for
a meeting with organizer Wes Clark
Jr., the son of former Democratic
presidential candidate Gen. Wesley
Clark. The group had said about
2,000 veterans were coming, but it
wasnt clear how many actually
arrived.
We have been asked by the elders not to do direct action, Wes
Clark Jr. said. He added that the
National Guard and law enforce-

ment have armored vehicles and


are armed, warning: If we come
forward, they will attack us.
Instead, he told the veterans, If
you see someone who needs help,
help them out.
Authorities moved a blockade
from the north end of the
Backwater Bridge with the conditions that protesters stay south of
it and come there only if there is a
prearranged meeting. Authorities
also asked protesters not to
remove barriers on the bridge,
which they have said was damaged
in the late October conict.

Trump threatens payback for US companies that move abroad


By Paul Wiseman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON President-elect Donald


Trump is threatening to impose heavy
taxes on U.S. companies that move jobs
overseas and still try to sell their products
to Americans.

But the plan could drive up prices for


U.S. businesses and consumers and risk
setting off a trade war if its legal to
begin with.
In a series of early-morning tweets
Sunday, Trump vowed a 35 percent tax on
products sold inside the U.S. by any business that fired American workers and built

a new factory or plant in another country.


Trump campaigned on a vow to help
American workers but also to reduce taxes
and regulations on businesses.
Trump tweets there will be a tax on our
soon to be strong border of 35 percent for
these companies wanting to sell their
product, cars, A.C. units, etc., back across
the border.
He says companies should be forewarned prior to making a very expensive
mistake.

Gary Hufbauer, senior fellow at the


Peterson Institute for International
Economics, says Trump would face a
potent legal challenge if he tried to impose
taxes, known as tariffs, on specific companies without congressional approval.
Hufbauer also doubts that Trump could
identify a group of companies those that
move jobs overseas, then ship goods back
into America for special tariffs. Im
skeptical, he says, predicting that courts
would block such a move.

US gas prices hold steady


despite production cut
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAMARILLO The average price of regular grade gasoline is unchanged nationally


over the last two weeks, holding steady at
$2.20 a gallon.
Industry analyst Trilby Lundberg said
Sunday that refiners have had little time to
react to last weeks announcement by major
oil-producing countries to slash output.

On the move
Di g n i t y He al t h Me di c al Gro up Sequo i a welcomes orthopedic surgeon and
sports medicine specialist Arati Dunbar,
MD. Both orthopedic surgery and sports
medicine are new additions to the group.
Dr. Dunbar will continue to practice
medi ci n e at Di g n i t y Heal t h Sequo i a
Hospital, and her office at 2900 Whipple

Many retailers have yet to see big price


increases.
Lindberg says to expect higher prices
after OPECs decision to cut production.
She says prices may fall if financial markets dont believe the cuts will stick.
Gas in San Diego was the highest in the
continental United States at $2.69 a gallon
on average on Friday. The low average was
in Houston at $1.91 a gallon.
Ave. , Ste. 210, in Redwood City.
***
Local businesswoman Sai l i Go s ul a,
owner of Sy nerg y Ho meCare o f San
Mateo , has recently purchased Active InHome Therapy, which provides high quality,
in-homephysical therapy,occupational therapyandspeech therapyto residents in the San
Francisco Bay Area. The management team
also includes Gabe Go s ul a Co rtwri g ht,
Sailis son, who is operations manager.

KAP BENCHED: 49ERS TURN TO QUARTERBACK BLAINE GABBERT IN FRANCHISE-RECORD 11TH STRAIGHT LOSS >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, Tom Brady sets


all-time quarterback wins mark
Monday Dec. 5, 2016

State champs!
Menlo brings home
Division IV state title
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

ORANGE Just up the road from Disneyland is where Menlo


Schools volleyball dreams finally came true.
It was three years ago when the Lady Knights last made the trip to
Santiago Canyon College for a state title game when a 1-set lead
and a 24-18 advantage in Game 2 slip away.
So, even though Menlo (25-8 overall) swept past Point LomaSan Diego (24-13) in Saturdays CIF Division IV state championship game 25-18, 25-13, 25-21, senior libero Jessica Houghton
the only Menlo player left from the 2013 team was never entirely at ease with her teams commanding lead.
That was the score of [Saturdays] first game, 24-18, so that was
haunting, Jessica Houghton said.
Menlo certainly played with ease, though, topping Point
Loma in overall match kills 49-24. And the Knights were taking
no chances of a redux of the Game 2 mishap from three years
ago, dominating Saturdays second set with 17 kills to Point
Lomas four.
The Knights serve receive set the tone for the balanced attack,
playing a near perfect game by not allowing an ace against a
usually sharp serving opponent. And once the ball was in play,
Jessica Houghton (14 digs) and younger sister Sianna Houghton
(11 digs) ruled the back row.
Menlos overall effort drew plenty of praise from their firstyear head coach Marco Paglialunga. But the Italian-born coachs
initial reaction was short and sweet.
Bueno, Paglialunga said.
Later he added: I think the girls have to be very proud of what
they did today. This is probably the best game weve played on
blocking and defense. Thats our strength. That needed to be our
strength.
And the rhythm carried over to Menlos offense.
The Knights sparred with Point Loma early in Game 1 but tied at 66, setter Kristen Sellers inverted Menlos attack with two key assists
to outside hitter Sianna Houghton. With Menlos other setter in the 62 offense, sophomore Selina Xu, dominating the right side, Sianna
Houghton took advantage on the left side by tooling back-to-back kills
to give the Knights some breathing room at 8-6.
Point Loma closed the lead to 12-11 on a block by junior Rebecca
Nuanez, but the Knights then turned to middle hitter Mia
Vandermeer for consecutive kills. Then up 24-18 for set point,
despite Jessica Houghton being haunted by memories of her freshman season, the rest of the Knights, having not played for that
2013 state runner-up team, werent affected by any bad memories.

See CHAMPS, Page 14

Raiders overcome 15-point deficit


to rally for yet another comeback
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND When the Buffalo


Bills took a 15-point lead midway
through the third quarter, the game
was right in the comfort zone for
the Oakland Raiders.
Derek Carr led yet another comeback with two touchdown passes in
the second half and Khalil Mack
helped force two turnovers that rallied the Raiders to their biggest
comeback in 16 years with a 38-24
victory over the Buffalo Bills on
Sunday.
The Raiders (10-2) scored the
final 29 points to mount their
sixth fourth-quarter comeback of

Raiders 38, Bills 24


the season and
win their sixth
straight game
overall, remaining one game
ahead of Kansas
City in the
Derek Carr
tough
AFC
West.
We dont want to be in these
positions where were playing
from behind, said running back
Latavius Murray, who ran for two
scores. We want to dominate from
start to finish. We keep finding
ourselves in these situations,
which is the reason we have to con-

tinue to improve and get better.


The Raiders fell behind 24-9 following touchdowns on the first
two drives of the second half for
Buffalo (6-6), before mounting the
biggest comeback win since rallying from 21 points down to beat
Indianapolis 38-31 on Sept. 10,
2000.
Oakland scored touchdowns on
three straight drives, including
scoring strikes from Carr to
Michael Crabtree and Amari
Cooper for his 11th career fourthquarter comeback. With four games

See RAIDERS, Page 13

KIRBY LEE/USA TODAY SPORTS

Latavius Murray celebrates with fans after scoring on a 3-yard touchdown


run in the fourth quarter against the Bills Sunday in Oakland.

12

SPORTS

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

USC claims Brady breaks QB wins record


soccer title
in San Jose
By Kyle Hightower

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE Katie Johnson scored twice in


the final 16 minutes to lead Southern California
to a 3-1 victory over top-ranked West Virginia
in the NCAA womens College Cup championship game Sunday at Avaya Stadium.
I felt like the goal against us was kind of my
fault. I turned a ball over in the middle, said
Johnson, a senior whose career was threatened
two years ago by her second ACL knee injury. I
felt like I had to make up for that. I honestly just
wanted to win.
The second-seeded Trojans (19-4-2) also captured the national title in 2007. They are the
fourth school to win multiple College Cup
titles.
The Mountaineers (23-2-2) lost for the first
time since a 1-0 setback to Georgetown back on
Sept. 18. West Virginia had a 17-game unbeaten
streak snapped, and allowed three goals for the
only time all season.
West Virginia outshot USC 21-8 and held a 91 edge in corner kicks, but trailed 1-0 just 1:22
into the game after Morgan Andrews.
No one finished better than Johnson, who sat
out last season while rehabilitating after ACL
surgery on her right knee. She tore ligaments in
her left knee in high school.
Johnson, who also had winning goal in
USCs 1-0 semifinal win over Georgetown on
Friday, was wide open in front of the net when
Leah Pruitt took a pass up the left sideline, beat
defender Easther Mayi Kith, and delivered a perfect cross. Johnson simply rolled the ball into
the goal to the right of goalkeeper Rylee Foster.
Johnson, selected the College Cups most
outstanding offensive player, scored again off
an assist from Nicole Molen in the 87th minute.

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Tom Brady now


stands alone when it comes to career wins
by an NFL quarterback.
Brady became the leagues leader in victories among QBs, earning his 201st by
throwing for 269 yards and a touchdown to
lead the New England Patriots past the
struggling Los Angeles Rams 26-10 on
Sunday.
Brady, who was 33 of 46, had tied Peyton
Manning last week in a win over the New
York Jets.
Its always been about winning, and Ive
been very fortunate to be on a lot of great
teams, Brady said of reaching the milestone. Im just really grateful.
His lone touchdown pass came on a 14yard pass to Chris Hogan in the first quarter.
LeGarrette Blount scored the games first
touchdown , rumbling for a 43-yard, anklebreaking score in the first quarter while
spinning around safety Maurice Alexander
in the process. He finished with 88 yards on
18 carries.
The Patriots (10-2) have won seven of
their last eight as they prepare for a tough
stretch against three teams with winning
records over their final four regular-season
games.
On the same day that Los Angeles coach
Jeff Fisher and general manager Les Snead
were given contract extensions, the recently relocated Rams (4-8) proved they still

GREG M. COOPER/USA TODAY SPORTS

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady reacts after a touchdown during the first quarter against the
Los Angeles Rams at Gillette Stadium.
have a long way to go after losing for the
seventh time in eight outings.
The Rams entered the game ranked 31st in
total offense, averaging just 295 yards per
game. Those struggles continued Sunday.
They managed just 25 yards in the first half,
the fewest by a team in a game this season.
Los Angeles was outgained 402-162 for
the game.
In his third career start, rookie Jared Goff

was picked off twice, completing 14 of 32


passes for 161 yards.
Thats a record that I dont think will
ever be broken. Hell continue to build on
it, Im sure. Blount on Bradys wins
mark.
I kind of made a point to watch his first
drive. Goff on watching Brady, whom he
congratulated postgame on setting the wins
record.

Rose Bowl set between USC and Penn State


By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

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and Penn State followed two difficult
paths to reach a remarkable reunion
eight years later in the Rose Bowl.
The Trojans will face the Big Ten
champions on Jan. 2 in the 103rd edition of the Granddaddy of Them All. The
rematch of the 2009 game showcases
two venerable football programs that
have emerged from bad times since their
last trip to this traditional postseason
destination for their conferences.
I cant think of a better reward for
our football team after this season,
USC coach Clay Helton said. These
are the things you dream about as a little kid.
USC (9-3) will meet Penn State (112) in a rematch of the Trojans 38-24
victory eight years ago the last trip

to the Rose Bowl for either team. Since


then, both programs were rocked to
their foundations by scandals and
NCAA sanctions.
But both capped years of progress
with breakthroughs this fall, recovering from similarly slow starts to
become two of the nations top teams.
Coach James Franklins Nittany
Lions have won nine straight games,
culminating in a 38-31 victory over
Wisconsin on Saturday night in the Big
Ten championship game. Penn State
finished fifth in the final College
Football Playoff rankings, just ahead
of Michigan.
How humbled and honored we are to
have this opportunity, Franklin said.
I think this is a game and a bowl that
players and coaches grow up dreaming
about having an opportunity to play in
and be a part of one day.
Heltons Trojans have won eight

games in a row, capped by back-toback victories over top rivals UCLA


and Notre Dame. The Trojans barely
missed out on the Pac-12 title game
between Washington and Colorado
who were both beaten convincingly by
USC but overtook the Buffaloes in
the final playoff rankings to snag their
record 34th Rose Bowl berth.
Penn State will make its fourth
appearance in the Rose Bowl, including three against USC. The Rose Bowl
berth is another milestone in the programs revival after the scandal surrounding former defensive coordinator
Jerry Sandusky, who was indicted on 40
counts of sex crimes in 2011.
USC has played in far more Rose
Bowls than any other team. The
Trojans downtown campus is 15 miles
from the stadium, which became the
programs second home during the
dominant years of coach Pete Carroll.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

13

Bears 26, 49ers 6

Chip Kellys
father dies

Kap benched in 49ers 11th straight loss

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By Jay Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO San Francisco 49ers coach


Chip Kellys father has died.
Kelly coached the team against the
Chicago Bears on Sunday, just two days
after his dad Paul passed away.
Team spokesman Bob Lange confirmed
Chip Kelly flew to New Hampshire late
Friday after learning of his fathers death.
He returned in time for meetings on Saturday
evening and coached the team in Sundays
26-6 loss at Soldier Field.
Kelly was on his way back east after the
game to be with his family, including his
mother Jean, who did not want him to miss
the game. Kelly told CSNBayArea.com,
My mom wanted me to coach.
General manager Trent Baalke issued a
statement saying Kelly will take some time
off before rejoining the team this week.
Chip has our continued support as he
mourns the passing of his father, Baalke
said.
Paul Kelly, a retired attorney, was a member of the New Hampshire bar from 1960 to
2000.
In a 2009 story about Chip, The
Oregonian described Paul Kelly as cerebral,
successful and competitive. He was a fixture at his sons sports practices who
emphasized Deeds, not words to his children.

RAIDERS
Continued from page 11
left this season, Carr has already matched the
win total he posted in his first two years
combined as Oaklands playoff drought
reached 13 seasons.
Its an exciting time in Oakland, Carr
said. Its definitely fun times. Weve come a
long way. ... But we still have yet to do anything.
The defense also tightened by forcing three
straight three-and-outs and then getting a
turnover when Khalil Mack deflected Tyrod
Taylors pass that Nate Allen intercepted .
Oakland took over at the 16 and put the game
away with Murrays second touchdown run of
the game to make it 38-24 on Carrs 2-point
conversion pass to Seth Roberts.
The loss was crushing for the Bills, who
entered December with hopes of ending the
leagues longest playoff drought. A big day

CHICAGO Colin Kaepernick and the


San Francisco 49ers tried everything. Deep
throws and out routes. Crossing patterns
and shovel passes. Nothing worked.
Call it a snow day for San Franciscos aerial attack.
Kaepernick completed just one pass for 4
yards before he was replaced by Blaine
Gabbert in the fourth quarter, and the lowly
49ers dropped their 11th straight game with
a 26-6 loss to the Chicago Bears at a wintry
Soldier Field on Sunday.
San Francisco (1-11) finished with a
record-low 6 yards passing while strengthening its position for at least the No. 2
overall pick in next years NFL draft, handing a third win to one of their main competitors for those prized selections at the
top of each round.
The winless Cleveland Browns, off this
weekend, have the pole position for the top
spot heading into the final quarter of the
season.
The April draft is about all 49ers fans have
to look forward to these days.
We have to continue to keep building,
keep progressing, Kaepernick said. This
is a setback, most definitely. But we have to
continue to keep pushing forward.
Whether thats with Kaepernick or
by LeSean McCoy, who had 130 yards rushing, helped stake Buffalo to the big lead, but
it wasnt enough.
The Bills are two games behind Denver for
the second wild-card spot in the AFC and
could be headed to a 17th straight season
without a playoff berth.
It was one of those situations where
everything they did went right and we just
couldnt make a play, safety Corey Graham
said. Ive never really been in a situation
like that where everything went wrong, just
like you couldnt make a play, and then those
guys went on a roll and it was like everything
they did turned to gold.

Carrs finger
A week after injuring the pinkie on his
throwing hand and missing a series, Carr was
able to play without a glove on his right
hand. But the injury still hampered Carr to a
degree as he took no snaps under center to
protect the injury, even in short-yardage situations.

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Gabbert at quarterback
remains to be seen.
Coach Chip Kelly was
non-committal
when
asked about his starter
for next weekends visit
by the New York Jets.
Thats not my decision, Kaepernick said.
Blaine Gabbert My feelings on it really
dont matter at this
point. Im just going to do everything I can
to make sure Im prepared.
Kaepernick attempted five passes and was
sacked five times. Gabbert, who led San
Francisco to a 26-20 overtime win in
Chicago a year ago, was 4 for 10 for 35
yards.
The 49ers previous franchise low for net
yards passing was 10 against Detroit on
Oct. 6, 1963, and it looked as if that number
was safe before Gabbert was sacked by
Leonard Floyd in the end zone with 1:55
left.
We just had breakdowns here and there all
day long and it definitely showed, Gabbert
said.
While the 49ers are barreling toward perhaps the worst season in franchise history,
Kaepernick had been a bright spot of late.
He had passed for 1,110 yards and eight
touchdowns in four starts since San
Franciscos bye week, nearly rallying the

Fast start
The Bills gained a season-high 147 yards
in the first quarter and scored on their first
two drives with a field goal by Dan Carpenter
and Mike Gillislees 1-yard run early in the
second. Buffalo ran just once on nine plays
on the opening drive and then ran on nine of
11 plays the next drive.

Fast finish
The Raiders took over with 30 seconds left
in the first half at their own 15 and managed
to get points. Carr completed four straight
passes for 57 yards to set up Sebastian
Janikowskis 47-yard field goal that cut
Buffalos lead to 10-9 at the half. The last
time a team started a drive shy of its own 20
with 30 seconds or fewer remaining in the
first half and scored came in 2005 when San
Francisco did it for a field goal against
Jacksonville, according to Pro Football
Reference.

49ers to a victory in Miami last weekend.


But San Francisco emphasized the run
right from the start against the Bears and
Kaepernick never looked comfortable while
playing in a steady snowfall on a typical
winter day in Chicago.
I think the weather was something that
definitely played a factor, Kaepernick said.
We have to be able to do a better job managing that, handling it, and being able to
throw the ball still.
Kaepernicks 4-yard pass to tight end
Vance McDonald midway through the second quarter was the first completion of the
day for either team. Phil Dawson then
kicked the first of his two first-half field
goals, helping San Francisco to a 6-0 lead.
Chicago (3-9) got the ball back late in the
half, and thats when Matt Barkley started to
find his footing while Kaepernick continued
to falter. Barkley then directed the Bears to
Jordan Howard rushing touchdowns on three
straight possessions,
putting San
Francisco away.
We didnt handle the weather very well
from a passing game standpoint, said
Kelly, who coached with a heavy heart after
the recent death of his father, Paul. It was
the same for both teams, its not an excuse,
they played in the same conditions.
Connor Barths 45-yard field goal made it
24-6 with 12:55 left, prompting Kelly to
turn to Gabbert. Kaepernick pulled on a red

Womens hoops
No. 11 Stanford handles UC Davis
STANFORD Erica McCall scored 17
points with a season-high 13 rebounds and
No. 11 Stanford handled UC Davis 68-42 on
Sunday.
Brittany McPhee added 11 points for the
Cardinal (8-1), who shot over 44 percent
but went just 3 of 19 from beyond the arc
and 9 of 24 from the line. Karlie
Samuelson, who averages 11. 6 points,
went 1 of 6 for two points. Stanford
enjoyed a 54-38 rebound advantage with
18 offensive boards.
UC Davis (5-2) was led by Morgan Bertsch
with 12 points. The Aggies were 15 of 64
from the field (23.4 percent), 6 of 25 from
beyond the arc and 6 of 10 from the line.
Stanford scored the first six points of the
game and never trailed. The Cardinal led 208 after the first quarter and a 12-point run in
the second quarter led to a 36-20 lead at
intermission.

14

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CHAMPS
Continued from page 11
I wasnt on that team so I didnt really care
about that, Xu said. We were just focusing
our game going forward and not worrying
about that.
Fitting, since it was Xus sixth set kill that
forced set point. Vandermeer followed with a
block to finish off the opening set, the
Knights 16th kill through Game 1.
Sophomore outside hitter Grace King also did
damage with three kills and two blocks.
Junior opposite hitter Ashley Dreyer also
added three kills.
Then in Game 2, Dreyer took charge in continuing Menlos dominance off the right side.
Dreyer and Xu went on to share the matchhigh with 12 kills apiece, 23 of those coming from the opposite side. And after Dreyer
gave the Knights an early 4-3 lead with her
first set kill, they would never trail as the 6-2
junior fronted an attack that saw seven different Menlo players record kills.
I think we varied the attack really effectively, Sellers said.
Once again it was the Menlo defense that
allowed Sellers (21 assists) and Xu (16
assists) to run a balanced attack. And the
back-row exploits ran much deeper than just
the Houghton sisters. Xu and sophomore
defensive specialist Riley Holland each
played clutch defense late in Game 2, including Xu barreling into her own bench to pick
up a dig and extend a rally for an eventual
Point Loma hitting error to force set point.
Sellers ultimately finished Game 2 with a
dump kill to send the Knights into Game 3
riding a wave of momentum.
In Game 3, Holland and Sianna Houghton
set the tone by laying out for several clutch
digs. Up 8-4, they each laid out for one-handed digs to extend a long rally and exploit one
of Point Lomas 17 field errors in the match.
Then up 19-13, with Jessica Houghton rotating off the floor, and Sianna Houghton in the
front row, Holland produced another clutch
dig, and Dreyer scrapped for a reflex front-row
dig, amid a long rally that ended with a Point
Loma fade attempt spinning wide to give
Menlo a 20-13 lead.
Neither team had recorded an ace until late
in the Game 3 when Sellers fired the first of
the match to put Menlo up 22-15. Sianna
Houghton went on to add the only other ace
to force match point. Xu closed out the cham-

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Top left: Menlo School senior Mia


Vandermeer, right, comes up with a block
at middle net during Game 2 of the
Knights three-set sweep of Point LomaSan Diego in the CIF Division IV state
championship game Saturday at Santiago
Canyon College.
Top right: Menlo sophomore Selina Xu
fades a kill off the right side. Xu went on
to share the match-high of 12 kills with
Menlo junior Ashley Dreyer.
Bottom left: Menlo senior Jessica
Houghton, left, sophomore Grace King,
middle, and Kristen Sellers all lay out to
keep the ball from hitting the floor in
Game 3 of Menlos 25-18, 25-13, 25-21 win.
pionship with a kill off the right side, sparking the on-court celebration for Menlo three
years in the making.
For Point Loma, the future is bright. The
Pointers reached the state championship
game this season despite not having a single
senior on roster. The majority of players on

the junior-heavy team come from beach volleyball backgrounds, many playing with the
692 Beach Volleyball Club.
The exciting thing is even though were
disappointed with the outcome of this game,
weve got every player coming back (next
year), Point Loma head coach Davis Ransom

said. We look at it is next year is our year.


For Menlo, this year was the year of destiny, bringing home the first state volleyball
crown in program history.
This is a dream pretty much, Vandermeer
said. And now its a reality which is just awesome.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

15

Big names in play as baseball winter meetings open Holliday, Yanks


By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OXON HILL, Md. Andrew McCutchen,


Chris Sale, Miguel Cabrera and Justin
Verlander could be available for the right price.
As baseball teams gathered for the start of
the winter meetings Monday, star players
were dangled along with the usual crop of
free agents.
When clubs take a dramatic change in
direction or even a subtle one, that type of
player can become available although
often its just talk, New York Mets general
manager Sandy Alderson said Sunday. Well
see what happens.
Having retained outfielder Yoenis Cespedes
last week for the biggest deal thus far this offseason, $110 million over four years,
Alderson is listening to offers for Curtis

Granderson and Jay Bruce.


The other New York
team made a splash with
a free agent Sunday. The
Yankees agreed to a $13
million, one-year contract with outfielder Matt
Holliday, a person familiar with the negotiations
said, speaking on condiAndrew
tion
of anonymity
McCutchen
because the deal had not
yet been announced.
On the eve of the meetings, former
Commissioner Bud Selig was elected to the
Hall of Fame along with John Schuerholz,
architect of the Atlanta Braves teams that won
a record 14 straight division titles.
Only about one-sixth of major league free
agents have agreed to contracts, and the

unsigned group includes closers Aroldis


Chapman, Kenley Jansen and Mark
Melancon; slugger Edwin Encarnacion,
major league home run leader Mark Trumbo
and outfielders Jose Bautista, Ian Desmond
and Dexter Fowler.
Negotiations usually gain pace during the
winter meetings, when nearly all of baseball is
gathered in one hotel. The offseason was
framed last month when general managers met.
Detroit made clear it had shifted into payrollparing mode.
We chose to be transparent, Tigers GM Al
Avila said then. We chose to tell the players
the possibility of things happening.
McCutchen, who revived somewhat in the
late stages of last season, could become a free
agent a year from now. Rather than get only a
draft pick in return then, the Pirates are likely
to be proactive.

Selig, Schuerholz elected to baseball HOF


By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OXON HILL, Md. Bud Selig oversaw baseball during a time of transformation and turmoil
wild cards and a ballpark boom, the cancellation of a World Series and the Steroids Era. For
much of his reign, though, there was one constant: those first-place Atlanta Braves, built by
John Schuerholz.
The former commissioner and the longtime
general manager met up again Sunday, both
elected by an overwhelming margin to the Hall
of Fame.
Even so, Selig didnt see it as a sure thing.
It reminded me of many a ninth inning when
I used to pace around, the one-time owner of the
Milwaukee Brewers said on a conference call.
Schuerholz was picked by all 16 voters on a
veterans committee at the winter meetings in
suburban Washington. Selig was listed 15
times.
The ultimate of honors, Schuerholz said.

It took 12 votes for election, and former player and


manager Lou Piniella was
third with seven. Harold
Baines, Albert Belle, Will
Clark, Orel Hershiser,
Davey Johnson, Mark
McGwire and George
Steinbrenner also were on
the ballot considered by the
Bud Selig
Todays Game Era panel,
and none of them got more than five votes.
Selig became the fifth of 10 commissioners to
reach the Hall. He will be enshrined July 30 in
Cooperstown, NewYork on his 83rd birthday.
His election was sure to draw fire from fans
who link him to some of the games darkest
moments.
He called off the 1994 World Series during a
players strike. He was in charge when illegal
steroids left a cloud of performance-enhancing
drugs that still lingers and that might prompt
some to wonder whether power hitters and power

pitchers who benefited from PEDs should now


be welcomed to the Hall, too.
Sometimes in life you have to go through
certain things to maybe solve the problem,
Selig said.
Under Selig, the playoffs expanded from
four teams to eight to 10 and the leagues
were split into three divisions. Video replay
was added to review umpire calls, revenue
sharing was put in place and 20 new stadiums opened across the majors.
We were a sport resistant to change, he said.
And, yes, I believe in those years as commissioner, thats the most change in baseball history.
There was no variance, however, once
Schuerholz took over as GM of the Braves in the
winter of 1990.
Atlanta had never won even a single playoff
game in its 25-season existence before going
from worst-to-first in its first year under
Schuerholz, starting an unprecedented run of 14
straight division titles.

agree to $13M,
1-year contract
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OXON HILL, Md. Free agent outfielder


Matt Holliday and the Yankees have agreed
to a $13 million, one-year contract, a person
familiar with the negotiations said Sunday,
giving New York a veteran designated hitter as the
team pivots to youth.
The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the agreement
had not
yet
been
announced.
Holliday, who turns 37
Matt Holliday next month, fits into the
Yankees strategy of signing veterans to short-term deals while pivoting toward a youth movement.
A seven-time All-Star with a .303 career
average, Holliday was drafted by Colorado in
1998, traded to Oakland after the 2008 season and then dealt to St. Louis the following
July. He hit .246 with 20 homers and 62
RBIs in 110 games this year, missing substantial time after his left thumb was broken
when he was hit by a pitch on Aug. 11.
Holliday became a free agent when St.
Louis declined his $17 million option.
He figures to be primarily a designated hitter in a lineup where the projected outfield has
Jacoby Ellsbury in center, Brett Gardner in
left and 24-year-old Aaron Judge in right.
Carlos Beltran, another possibility for the
DH spot, agreed Saturday to a $16 million,
one-year contract with Houston, a deal that
has not yet been announced. Holliday spent
84 games in left field this year, 10 at first
and eight at DH.

16

SPORTS

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Sun Bowl

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Switzerlands Lara Gut wins super-G

Cardinal to face
North Carolina

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAKE LOUISE, Alberta Lara Gut won


what the weather turned into a World Cup
super-G sprint Sunday at Lake Louise.
The Swiss ski star claimed a third career
super-G victory at the Alberta resort after
previous wins in 2013 and 2014.
Last seasons overall World Cup champion finished second in the downhill
Saturday, which Gut said was an indicator
shes skiing well.
Its my third win in super-G here so I
knew that super-G wasnt a big issue. It
was always a fight in downhill, Gut said.
Yesterday and the last days I had the feeling I was finally starting to build something.
The start was lowered due to weather a
second straight day. Sundays snow-globe
conditions turned the super-G already a
shorter distance than downhill with more
turns into a dash of just over a minute.
The race was also delayed 75 minutes to

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stanford, with the Pac-12s longest active


bowl streak, will play North Carolina in the
Sun Bowl on Dec. 30.
The
16th-ranked
Cardinal (9-3) are playing in their eighth consecutive bowl game.
North Carolina (8-4) is
going to El Paso for the
Sun Bowl for the fifth
time. Their last was a loss
David Shaw to Texas in the 1994
game.
Stanford is playing in its fourth Sun
Bowl, the last a loss to Oklahoma in 2009.
The two teams have split their only two
previous games, in 1997 and 98.

ERIC BOLTE/USA TODAY SPORTS

Lara Gut of Switzerland during race two of the women's downhill in the FIS alpine skiing
World Cup at Lake Louise Ski Resort.
groom and reset the top of the course.
Im getting to be old enough to learn

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how to handle that, Gut said. I just had


to wait an hour longer, but thats not the
first time thats happened. The key is to
stay focused and take it easy. If they say
the race is on, someone is going to win
and I dont want to go to the start and
already be beaten because I lost all my
energy.
Guts finished in 1 minute, 2. 68 seconds. Tina Weirather of Liechtenstein was
a 10th of a second back of Gut. Italys
Sofia Goggia, second Friday in the opening downhill, was third in 1:03. 27.
Slovenias Ilka Stuhec, the winner of both
downhills, was fifth.
American ski star Lindsey Vonn, who
swept all three races in 2015, is sidelined
with a broken arm. Vonn has made it difficult for anyone else to win in Lake
Lindsey with 18 victories.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

17

Bah Humbug it is
W

Disneys Moana was the most popular movie at the box office for the second consecutive weekend.

Leftovers rule box office


By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Audiences came back for a second


helping of Moana and Fantastic
Beasts and Where to Find Them this
weekend. Both family-friendly films
topped the post-Thanksgiving box
office charts, with Moana bringing
in $28. 4 million and Fantastic
Beasts earning $18. 5 million,
according to studio estimates Sunday.
Disneys animated Moana, in only

its second weekend in theaters and second weekend at No. 1, has grossed
$119.9 million, while Warner Bros.
Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic
Beasts has earned $183.5 million in
three weeks.
Paramounts sci-fi mindbender
Arrival took third with $7.3 million, while the companys World War II
spy thriller Allied placed fourth with
$7.1 million. Disney and Marvels

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See MOVIES, Page 19

Top 10 movies
1.Moana, $28.4 million ($32 million
international).
2.Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,
$18.5 million ($60.4 million international).
3.Arrival, $7.3 million ($4.8 million
international0
4.Allied, $7.1 million ($12.1 million
international).
5.Doctor Strange, $6.5 million ($3.7 million
international).
6.Trolls, $4.6 million ($7.1 million
international).
7.Hacksaw Ridge, $3.4 million ($1.8 million
international).
8.Bad Santa 2, $3.3 million ($1 million
international).
9.Incarnate, $2.6 million ($370,000
international).
10.Almost Christmas, $2.5 million.

eve talked about the danger of holiday chocolates


for pets, and the risks of holiday foods in general.
Weve faced the truth that as much as we may enjoy
Thanksgiving its obviously not the best thing if you happen
to be a turkey. With all that already said, is it finally time to
enjoy the holidays?
Hardly! The risks of the Holiday Season to our animals continue!
My wife and I live in a mid-century house. To reflect that
atmosphere, several years ago
Carolyn found an actual 1950s
Alcoa aluminum Christmas tree. Its
a trip, all decorated with glass pelicans in various holiday attire. But as
regular readers know, we live with
three cats; two of them young
enough to think climbing a tree
no matter how much it looks like a
festive box of tinfoil is fun! So to
make sure that the cats and the pelicans all stay safe, Ive placed three
Ken WHITE
small hooks discretely (one at the
ceiling, two on the walls) and secure the tree with fishing line.
The fact that our tree is anything but natural protects our pets
from two more holiday risks. Water drunk from tree holders can
lead to all sorts of problems, as can swallowing pine tree needles
(That dogs lift their legs on Christmas trees is a risk to the gifts,
not the dogs, so Ill skip that one here).
Christmas is not the only risky holiday, by the way. We also
celebrate Hanukkah, which means lighting candles on my
grandmothers menorah. Years ago, we learned the smell of burning cat hair when my aging, oblivious Lilly set her tail on fire
(A glass of Hanukkah wine extinguishes cat tail fires, we
learned).
Think of it like this: we live with our animals and modify our
homes over time to keep them animals safe. Everything we do
this time of year which impacts that safe environment needs
your careful attention.
Ken White is the president of the Peninsula Humane Society &
SPCA.

18

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

PROP. 58
Continued from page 1
Proposition 227, passed by voters in 1998,
which required parents to sign a waiver
before enrolling their students in special
foreign language support programs.
The previous legislation also mandated
the first month of any bilingual education
program to be taught primarily in English,
which Montes said presented difficulties
during a critical time for students who most
needed additional language support. It limited the amount of foreign language allowed
to be used by bilingual teachers as well, in a
focus on enhancing English literacy.
It created difficulties and challenges for
districts to implement really strong bilingual programs, Montes said of the previous legislation.
While other districts may have been discouraged by the hurdles presented by the

SCHOOL
Continued from page 1
follow the open-bid process. She cited the
method most recently adopted by the district, as well as the lease-leaseback
approach, as two innovative techniques
school systems will occasionally take to
develop campuses.
I do understand that this is not the traditional design-bid-build approach that most
people are used to seeing, she said.
Since signing the deal, school officials
have started reaching out through a series of
community meetings to gather feedback
from residents regarding the proposal to
redevelop the shopping center.
The final in an initial series of three community meetings was hosted in the district
office Wednesday, Nov. 30, during which
officials expressed a desire to usher the
project through the state approval process

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

prior mandates, Montes said Redwood City


officials spent the past nearly two decades
beefing up their language programs.
Currently, between 800 and 900 students are
enrolled in bilingual education or dual
immersion programs in which they can
receive a portion of each day receiving lessons in languages other than English, said
Montes.
She said the commitment to bilingual education has paid dividends, as the district
received widespread recognition for the language support services offered to Redwood
City students. Since the election, Montes
said districts from other communities have
reached out for guidance in establishing
such a model program.
The challenge will be for districts to
ensure they are following best practices,
said Montes.
Though the new acts approval could take
little hold in Redwood City, Montes said
she hoped it would serve students in other
local communities who seek to build more
than solely their English or Spanish skills.

I do believe there is room for improvement in all our districts, she said. I think
that in San Mateo County, we have a big
population of Asian and Latino families,
so we can open the door for students to not
just learn a second language, but a third.
And we need that in San Mateo County
because we have families coming from all
over.
Cheryl Olson, superintendent of the San
Bruno Park Elementary School District,
said she believed the new legislation will be
a tremendous asset in improving the districts programs serving those who do not
speak English at home.
It will be helpful to have additional
options available again, for our English
language learners and how we go about serving them, she said in an email. We will
appreciate the ability to have more flexibility in programs and how we teach.
Chris Ungar, president of the California
School Boards Association, expressed a
similar sentiment in a prepared statement.
Proposition 58 provides greater oppor-

tunities for all California students to learn a


second language that offers social advantages and an enhanced ability to compete in
the global economy and also allows local
school districts to offer language instruction programs that best meet the needs of
their communities, he said.
Montes also claimed the focus of the legislation could lift some of the restrictions
for educators looking to address the most
pressing demands of their students.
Its a very exciting time for the district
and its a great opportunity for all
Californians because they need to be bilingual, she said.
But considering the caliber of language
programs already in place at some local
classrooms, Montes said the quality of education in Redwood City does not stand to be
greatly affected by the new legislation.
Its great for the rest of the state, but for
us it is business as usual, she said. That is
who we are, and what we have done and students have benefited from the opportunity
to learn two languages.

over the next year with an eye to beginning


construction January 2018.
Should all go according to plan, officials
are hopeful to finish the school for approximately 500 students between transitional
kindergarten and fifth-grade in the winter of
2019.
Financing for the project is possible under
voter approval last year of Measure X, a
$148 million bond floated to construct new
classrooms and schools accommodating
enrollment growth across the district.
During the most recent community meeting, officials illustrated a commitment to
being a good neighbor and laid out a variety
of traffic mitigations, visual buffers to the
surrounding homes and other design components proposed to address potential concerns from surrounding residents.
Canady lauded the districts outreach effort
and as example of the interest in gathering
support for the project from local residents.
She noted school officials have also met
with Foster City staff, who seemed receptive

to the initiative.
The district is getting a much better sense
of what the citys concerns are and finding
room for collaboration between the district
and the city to ensure the community at large
is served in an appropriate way, she said.
Perez though said he fears the project will
move ahead with demolition before hitting
an obstacle, such as a lawsuit causing
school construction to stall. He cited a frustrated contractor shut out from the bidding
process, neighbor who opposes the
schools development or displaced merchant formerly operating from the shopping center as a potential source of litigation.
The question is whether the school will
be built or if we will be left with a hole in
the ground? Because the method the district
is using, under anyones interpretation with
any legal background, is patently illegal
and has not been vetted by anyone, he
said.
Canady though pointed to a project in

Fremont where developers agreed to build a


new campus to offset student enrollment
growth generated from recently constructed
homes as a recent example of such a deal
being struck.
Locally now there is a similar transaction happening, she said.
For his part, Perez said he supports the
schools construction, but wishes school
officials had approached the process in a
more traditional fashion assuring they
would be protected from the threat of a legal
challenge.
I have no opposition to the school. I
want it to be done well, correctly and legally so we dont end up with a hole in the
ground and a bunch of angry residents, he
said.
Canady though it is likely too early in the
process to anticipate the variety of challenges potentially facing the project.
There is a lot of bell ringing that, in my
estimation, seems premature, she said.
But that is my own personal opinion.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

19

Items tied to Thomas


Edison auctioned off
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sema Tosun, president and founder of Fund A Need as well as owner of Trapeze Restaurant, left, alongside
Alice with her service dog Batman, Don and Susan, right, during a free Thanksgiving meal offered by the
nonprofit organization.The event served food to more than 30 low-income and homeless seniors in San Mateo
County. Fund A Need also distributed over 15 extra meals to homeless seniors who couldn't attend. Each
senior was given a gift of gloves, scarves and hats. Attendees were surprised by a special visit from San Mateo
and Burlingame police officers along with city officials as well.

DALLAS Keys to the New


Jersey lab where Thomas Edison
invented the phonograph and some
of the lightbulbs that he perfected
sold for more than $60,000 at auction on Saturday.
The keys sold for $10,625 at an
auction run by Heritage Auctions in
Dallas. A bulb created by a German
inventor who claimed to have
invented the incandescent lightbulb before Edison did was sold for
$23,750, while a set of five Edison
bulbs used in a court case sold for
$30,000.
The items were acquired by
Charlie Knudsen, 69, of Pittsburgh,
and had belonged to his great-aunt.
She was married to one of the attorneys whose law firm represented
Edison in patent lawsuits.
Tags on some of the keys list the
doors that they opened, including
Edisons 1876 lab that became
known as the invention factory.

Charl ee Harri s and Mari s o l Sturtev ant, of San Ramon, gave


birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 14,
2016.
***
Shane Co nno l l y and Mi chel l e Wi l s o n, of Belmont, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 17,
2016.
***
Patri ck and Deni s e Lai , o f San Carl o s , gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 17, 2016.
***
Iv an Rai ko v and Oi Li ng Ts o i , of Belmont, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 18, 2016.

MOVIES
Continued from page 17
Doctor Strange rounded out the top five
with $6.5 million, bringing its domestic
total to $215.3 million.
The weekends only new opener, the
micro-budget horror film Incarnate, fell
short of modest expectations and took in
only $2.6 million. The film, which stars
Carice van Houten and Aaron Eckhart, was
expected to earn in the $4 million range.

We are disappointed that we fell short of


our goal and repeating the success of our
previous releases, BH Tilt executive John
Hegeman said. The low-cost nature of the
BH Tilt films and release model enables us
to experiment and take risks, and we look
forward to seeing what we can learn from
this weekend for our future BH Tilt slate
releases in 2017.
In limited release, the Jacqueline Kennedy
biopic Jackie, starring Natalie Portman
in one of the years buzziest performances,
earned $275, 000 from five theaters.
Another awards contender, Manchester by

Another key says motor shed,


and a third shop.
Edison had applied for about 400
patents, including improvements
to the incandescent bulb, before he
left for New York City in 1882, said
Kathleen Carlucci, director of the
Thomas Edison Center in New
Jersey.
The lab itself was built by
Edisons father about 30 miles
northeast of Trenton and was the
worlds largest in its day. Carlucci
said it also was the first research
and development facility.
The bulbs up for auction were
part of a collection used in patent
infringement lawsuits. One bulb
in particular was used in a case
where he (Edison) was able to
prove he had a patent, Knudsen
said.
After making lightbulbs commercially viable, the Wizard of
Menlo Park turned his attention to
New York City where he worked to
develop an electric utility.

***
Carl o s Orti z and Nancy To rres , of Redwood City, gave birth to
a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 20, 2016.
***
Co l i n and Ki mbra McCarthy , of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 20, 2016.
Jos hua and Karen Fi ke, of San Bruno, gave birth to a baby girl
at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 20, 2016.
***
Geo rg e and Jenny Brandt, of Oakland, gave birth to a baby girl
and boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 21, 2016.

the Sea expanded to 156 theaters and


brought in $2.4 million.
Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst for box office tracker comScore, said
that this post-Thanksgiving weekend is
usually pretty slow.
The Thanksgiving holiday is a long,
extended binge of eating food and watching
lots of movies, and then this weekend is the
diet. It is somewhat typical, Dergarabedian
said. Its like were taking a quick breather
before the homestretch.
The weekend overall is expected to be
down about 3 percent from last year, which

saw the Christmas-themed horror film


Krampus rake in $16.3 million. But the
box office for the year remains up around 4
percent.
The question now is whether or not the
2016 box office will surpass last years
record $11.135 billion. While there are still
some big films on the horizon, including
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story and the animated Sing, it remains to be seen whether
or not they will compete with the late-game
2015 juggernaut of The Force Awakens,
which earned $652 million in the last 14
days of the year.

20

DATEBOOOK

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

POT
Continued from page 1
defender of the countys Private
Defender Program, Digiacinto said hes
not expecting his ofce to be as affected
as it was with Proposition 47. Although
hes not a proponent of using marijuana, he thinks its about time resources
are focused elsewhere.
I think felonies for marijuana is really an unfortunate piece of history from
the past. On a scale of what illicit narcotics are available on the black market,
pot is really the least of our problems, Digiacinto said.
Whats no w l eg al ?
Proposition 64 permits adults 21
years and older to smoke marijuana
recreationally although its primarily restricted to inside private residences
or at a licensed facility such as a pot
cafe. It also allows adults to grow up to
six plants for personal use. The state is
now tasked with creating a new licensing system for commercial operations
thats expected to roll out by 2018.
The law also reduced most criminal
offenses. Many felonies previously
punishable by up to three years behind
bars and $10,000 nes, were reduced to
misdemeanors. For example, illegally
possessing or growing large quantities
of marijuana is now a misdemeanor,
Wagstaffe said.
Most of what is illegal under
Proposition 64, such as a use by a minor
or driving under the inuence, are also
simple misdemeanors typically punishable with small nes or six months in
jail. Smoking in public is likely to
result in a ticket or ne.
There are a few rare cases in which
marijuana-related crimes can now be

SKYLINE
Continued from page 3
The speakers are there to offer their
expertise and open up eyes to different
possibilities out there and learning from
those who have been there and done
that, she said.
Ultimately, Wade said a goal of the center and its programs is to encourage
young business owners to constantly
push the boundaries of what they believe
is possible to accomplish.
Many are thinking small and local,
but we want them to think larger, she
said. So we are able to nurture the entrepreneur to take their business to the next
level.
There are only a handful of participants
currently enrolled in the incubator program, said Wade, spanning from those
who want to launch a secure wireless network company to another attempting to

charged as felonies. That includes selling to a minor, transporting it across


state or international lines, if a person
already has two prior convictions since
the November 2016 election, and if
environmental laws are violated during
cultivation, Wagstaffe said.
Chang es i n the co urts
For the pending cases, prosecutors
will make a motion to have the marijuana charge dismissed as it comes before
the court. Wagstaffe said he anticipates
it taking several months but occurring
smoothly. He also doubts there are
many currently in custody on marijuanaonly charges. Instead, most who are
behind bars likely have other counts
such as for more illicit drugs like
methamphetamine, thefts or other types
of felony crimes, he said.
Digiacinto agreed its unlikely many
are facing hard time solely for marijuana
charges.
I dont think police agencies have
been hell bent on getting the D.A. to
le these charges for a number of years,
unless theres a larger quantity of pot
involved. Its hard for me to imagine
itll have much of an impact,
Digiacinto said. The D.A. has not gone
crazy on us, they prosecuted them, but
after a while I think they were pretty
much in anticipation of where this was
going.
What will take some tweaking is the
process for which those who have convictions can petition the courts and
Digiacinto said his ofce would work
with the district attorney.
Wagstaffe said he cant imagine legalizing marijuana having nearly as much
of an impact as Proposition 47 had, particularly on the courts resources.
Weve dealt with over 4,000
Proposition 47 petitions in two years,
Wagstaffe said, noting Proposition 64
was more limited in scope. We dont
build a marketing firm.
Those enrolled can access the variety
of services available at the center, located in downtown San Bruno at 458 San
Mateo Ave., such as conference rooms,
co-working spaces, workshops, seminars and an opportunity to access the network of venture capitalists, local businesses and professionals who may be
able to offer mentoring or stewardship.
The center has established partnerships with the San Bruno Chamber of
Commerce, along with small business
associations in San Francisco and San
Mateo counties for a portion of the advising services.
Incubator members also stand to access
business development money available
from the programs board of directors,
said Wade, though the investment fund
has yet to be launched.
The resources are only available to students who go through an application
process and pay a fee to enroll, which
Wade said is an effective mechanism to
assure those who participate are commit-

expect to see as many, but well see


some Im sure, and that means the court
has to deal with it.
Cri mes may co nti nue
What could prove to be a larger shift
to those working in the courts or law
enforcement is how to prove marijuanarelated crimes occurred.
Wagstaffe pointed to the recent cases
of maritime marijuana smuggling when
panga boats have been found off the San
Mateo County coast and federal ofcials
have pointed to Mexican drug cartels as
the culprit.
Based on the new law, unless theres a
way to prove the marijuana came from
outside California, the smuggling is
just a simple misdemeanor, Wagstaffe
said. Taking lessons from Colorado,
which legalized pot in 2012, he noted
there is still a large opportunity for a
black market industry and those looking to avoid the new tax regulations
which include a minimum 15 percent
sales tax.
Wagstaffe said hes also concerned
about an uptick in those driving under
the inuence of marijuana, for which
there is currently no test to prove.
Although Proposition 64 does set aside
funds for creating such a test, in the
meantime Wagstaffe urged police departments to have more ofcers undergo
specialty training to determine when
someones driving high.
Although Wagstaffe, the prosecutor,
and Digiacinto, the defender, are often at
opposite ends, both agreed adults who
choose to smoke should remain mindful
of the laws limits.
Everybody should follow the law and
do it legally, Wagstaffe said. But
because theres the prot motive
involved and the danger has been
reduced to a misdemeanor, I think law
enforcement will continue to have plenty of activity in the eld.
ted to their endeavor.
Members are asked to spend between
$150 per month for a virtual membership
which grants access to programs but no
office space to $450 monthly for unlimited access to resources along with two
consulting appointments.
Wade said the program was borne from
a desire among many students at Skyline
College to build their talents for growing
a small business into a viable and successful company and interest for the
services has jumped since the incubator
recently launched.
It has encouraged a lot of Skyline students, she said.
For his part, Lin said he is hopeful his
message resonates by encouraging students to overcome the potential fears
associated with taking the risks which
may initially seem intimidating but
stand to benefit a companys growth.
Most people are too scared to talk to
strangers, but that is when the most
interesting things happen, he said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
MONDAY, DEC. 5
Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula Meeting. 1 p.m. 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Free. For
more information contact 345-4551.

Creative Solutions for Dementia


Challenges: Engage, Enrich and
Divert. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Atria at Foster
Square, 707 Thayer Lane, Foster City.
For more information call 293-0274.

Christmas Luau. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 2145


Bunker Hill Drive, San Mateo. $25 per
person. Kids ages 4 to 12 are $10. Kids
under 3 are free. For more information
call 345-2381.

THURSDAY, DEC. 8
Foster City Seniors 55+ Club
Meeting. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. William
E. Walker Recreation and Senior
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City. Join
every Thursday to meet others and
make new friends. There are monthly
entertainments, guest lectures, Game
Day, potluck, and special lunches. For
more information call 286-2585.

Jewish
Superstition
and
Symbolism through Arts. 2 p.m. to 3
p.m. 800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
Trace the history, meaning and
emboitement of Jewish superstitions.
Admission is $4. For more information
go to pjcc.org.
A Wolf at the Gate Story Time. 4
p.m. 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Mark
Van Steenwyk, author of A Wolf at the
Gate, will perform a dramatic reading
of his book. Refreshments will be provided. For more information email
craig@reachandteach.com.
Groovy Judy Shares Holiday Love. 6
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Off The Grid Belmont,
1325 El Camino Real. Free.
Dance Connection with DJ Steve
Edwards. Free dance lessons 6:30
p.m. to 7 p.m. with open dance 7 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. Burlingame Womans
Club, 241 Park Road, Burlingame.
American-style ballroom dance.
Members, bring a new first-time male
friend and earn free entry (only one
free entry per new dancer). New men
get free entry. Admission $8 members, $10 guests. Light refreshments.
For more information call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, DEC. 6
Re-Tooling Your Career Through
Education Panel. 10 a.m. to noon.
Redwood City Public Library, 1044
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Register
at
www.phase2careers.org/index.html.
For more information email
phase2careers.org@gmail.com.
Holiday Cookie Decorating for
Toddlers. 11 a.m. to noon. 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Little kids
and parents are invited to decorate
allergy-free cookies and icing using
only natural food colorings. Both
cookies and icing recipes are free of
gluten, dairy, egg, soy, nut, rice and
potato. $5. For more information contact patti@bondmarcom.com.
Afternoon
Breathing
and
Meditation. 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 P.M.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. RSVP for this session at
tinyurl.com/jepllx3. For more information call 697-7607x236.
Creative Connections. 2:45 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center,
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Are you crafty or do you enjoy
being creative? This can be your
opportunity. Free. For more information call 522-7490.
Holiday Job Outlook by Incoming
County Supervisor David Canepa. 5
p.m. to 9 p.m. North Annex (Room
204), 1500 Easton Drive, Burlingame.
Year-end multimedia show and CSIX
success stories. Free. Bring a favorite
dish to share. For more information
call 522-0701.
Groovy Judy Singer Her Favorite
Holiday Songs. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Off
the Grid Cupertino, Whole Foods
Market, 20955 Stevens Creek Blvd.,
Cupertino. Free.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 7
Start Your Successful Business
Orientation. 9:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.
Sobrato Center for Nonprofits, 350
Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood Shores.
Register
at
www.phase2careers.org/index.html.
For more information email
phase2careers.org@gmail.com.
Peninsula at War! San Mateo
Countys World War II Legacy. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. This new exhibit runs
through Feb. 4 and will depict what
happened on the San Francisco
Peninsula during World War II. For
more
information
visit
historysmc.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Networking Lunch. Noon to 1 p.m.
Pacific Catch Restaurant, 243 South B
St., San Mateo. Meet new business
connections. Join the SMPA for lunch
and networking. New speakers each
week. For more information call 4306500.
Infusion Express Grand Opening. 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. 66 Bovet Road Suite 105,
San Mateo. Facility tours, talks and live
music. For more information and to
RSVP email moniquej@infusionexpress.com.
San Mateo County Reading
Association Holiday Tea. 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. 399 Marine Pkwy at Bridge,
Redwood Shores. Celebrating the life
and tales of A. A. Milne and Winnie the
Pooh. Individual $5, family $10. For
more information contact 368-7148.

Movie for Children. 3:30 p.m. San


Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Attend the December
movie for children: Elf. This film is
rated PG and lasts one hour and 37
minutes. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Visit Santas Farm Animal Friends.
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Hillsdale
Shopping Center, 60 E. 31st Ave., San
Mateo. Animal event is free. For more
information call 571-1029.
Pub Style Trivia. 6:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas.
Beerm wine and pub snacks will be
served. Ages 21 and up. For more
information email belmont@smcl.org.
FRIDAY, DEC. 9
Estate Planning. 7:30 a.m. 6650 Golf
Course Dr., Burlingame. $15 with
breakfast. For more information contact 787-5595.
Equity Summit. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
3300 College Drive, San Bruno. The
purpose of the summit is to immerse
the educational community into the
conversation about equity, race and
student success through the scholarship of experts, and will include presentations by multiple speakers. For
more
information
email
colinc@smccd.edu.
Re-inventing You and Your Career:
Assessment. 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sobrato Center for Nonprofits, 350
Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood Shores.
Register
at
www.phase2careers.org/index.html.
For more information email
phase2careers.org@gmail.com.
A Christmas Carol. 9:30 a.m. 500
Castro St., Mountain View. Peninsula
Youth Theater presents A Christmas
Carol. $10 general admission. For
more information visit pytnet.org.
A Christmas Carol. 11:30 a.m. 500
Castro St., Mountain View. Peninsula
Youth Theater presents A Christmas
Carol. $10 general admission. For
more information visit pytnet.org.
Society of Western Artists Art Sale
and Boutique. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. 527
San Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Silent auction and reception for art from 14 different local artists. The sale takes place
Dec. 10 and 11 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information visit societyofwesternartists.com.
S.T.E.A.M. at CuriOdyssey. 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Dr. San Mateo.
General admission $17 CuriOdyssey
members $12. Explore science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. For more information contact
akhode@curiodyssey.org.
A Christmas Carol. 7:30 p.m. 500
Castro St., Mountain View. Peninsula
Youth Theater presents A Christmas
Carol. $10 general admission. For
more information visit pytnet.org.
SATURDAY, DEC. 10
AARP San Bruno Chapter 2895
Meeting. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Coffee and doughnuts. For more information call 5834499.
Lookmobile Grand Opening. 10
a.m. to 11 a.m. East Palo Alto Library,
2415 University Ave., East Palo Alto.
For
more
information
visit
www.smcl.org/lookmobile.
Holiday Toy Run. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
222 W. 39th Ave., San Mateo. Come for
holiday treats and surprises as Santa
brings toys for children who recieve
care at the San Mateo Medical Center.
Bring an unwrapped toy to donate
and help put a smile on a childs face
this holiday season. For more information call 573-3731.
A Christmas Carol. 11:30 a.m. 500
Castro St., Mountain View. Peninsula
Youth Theater presents A Christmas
Carol. $10 general admission. For
more information visit pytnet.org.
AARP San Bruno Chapter 2895
Meeting. Noon to 3 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Luncheon ticket on
sale for $25 per person. For more
information call 583-4499.
are $15 child/senior and $25 for
adults. For more information visit
twasthenight.org.

For more events visit


smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE

PEARLs BEFORE SWINE

ACROSS
1 Rural elec. provider
4 de foie gras
8 Youngster
11 Fancy singer
13 Geologic divisions
14 Vanity
15 Big-ticket
16 under (gave in)
18 Baked
20 In addition
21 Mark of Zorro
22 Suitable
24 Joined together
27 Go to
30 Redding of blues
31 Shades
32 Jabber
34 Everest or K2
35 Helsinki citizen
36 Collapsed
37 Weirdest
39 Ahoy, !
40 Visa and passport
41 Proof ender

GET FUZZY

42 Zen riddle
45 One of a kind
49 Praise be!
53 Zero
54 Sales agt.
55 Qatar ruler
56 Cotton seeders
57 Alamos
58 Roasting rod
59 kwon do
DOWN
1 Take a header
2 Reject
3 Help along
4 Tea variety
5 Prince Valiants eldest
6 Frat letter
7 PC key
8 Relate
9 Matures
10 Extinct bird
12 Stuns
17 Hepburn nickname
19 Danson or Turner

22 Pharaohs god
23 Liquid amts.
24 Kippur
25 Director Preminger
26 Warm-hearted
27 Dads sister
28 Ivans refusal
29 Cowgirl Evans
31 Snake sound
33 Thickness
35 Nourished
36 Getting lighter
38 Feast
39 Chaps
41 Milk purchase
42 Not-so-funny Marx
43 Mock butter
44 Swiss peaks
46 Go cold turkey
47 Humerus neighbor
48 Threat ender
50 Brown of renown
51 Safe caller
52 Grandson, perhaps

12-5-16

Previous
Sudoku
answers

MONDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2016


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A positive
change will help you improve your position,
reputation and lifestyle. Changes made at home
must be based on your emotional needs. A job
opportunity looks promising.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Plant your feet
firmly on the ground and dont try anything that sounds
the least bit risky. Stick to your game plan and budget.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you dont like
something, change it. Its up to you to walk away from
unsavory situations. Concentrate on getting ahead and
bringing about positive change.

KenKen is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. 2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

weekend PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the


numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Choose your words


wisely and remain firm about what you want to
see happen. Have a plan in mind and present your
solutions with diplomacy and a willingness to make
minor adjustments.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Dont make an
assumption. Its important to be ready to act without
quibbling or gossip. Search for the truth in order to
justify your actions.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You need to exchange
ideas in order to figure out a way to use your skills and
knowledge more diversely. Avoid emotional arguments
about religion, politics or money matters.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you do your own thing,
youll make a lasting impression. Your ability to set

12-5-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

goals and meet them will put you in a good position for
advancement and increased opportunities.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Dont sit back when you
should be looking for ideas and starting conversations
with people who want to make a difference. Set high
standards and impressive goals, and stick to them.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Take a close look at your
financial situation and health. Look for a way to cut
corners without incurring more debt. Set up a health
routine that will strengthen you mentally, physically
and emotionally.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Dont take anything for
granted, and focus on preparation. A detailed approach
to getting things done will help you gain acceptance
and rewards.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Engage in interesting


spur-of-the-moment plans. Taking part in something
will help you recognize what it is you want to pursue.
Dont let anyone deter you from following your dreams.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Dont get angry when
you can get even. Accomplishing your goals and
gaining respect from your peers will help you overcome
lingering bad feelings from a rivals efforts.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

105 Education/Instruction
GROUP BASKETBALL
LESSONS
Come learn from
an experienced coach.
Grades 1 - 8
Trial lessons available.

ATTENTION CAREGIVERS!
Immediate need for Full Time/Part Time
Home Care Providers
$250 Sign on Bonus*
Paid Training & Benets
Must have valid DL and reliable transportation
Call or stop by TODAY!

Dont wait, call or stop by TODAY! Ask for Carol

Call David
(415)527-7023

110 Employment
RESTAURANT - Need Cook/Kitchen
help. Fletchs catering business is taking
off. We need help! Call (650)685-8301

(650) 458-2200

www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #115 in San Mateo

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.

HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED

Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.


Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
90 Glenn Way #2, SAN CARLOS

110 Employment

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

DISHWASHER
NEEDED
Tues, Sat, Sun 8am-4pm

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NOW HIRING
3 Shifts Available!
Assisted Living Community
for Seniors in Burlingame
(Close to Broadway).
Near Public Transportation.

Call Ana
650-771-1127

NEWSPAPER
DELIVERY
ROUTE

Seeking Delivery drivers to manage newspaper routes on the


Peninsula.

Contact us for a free consultation

Requires early morning work six days per week Mon-Sat.


Papers are picked up early morning between 3am and 4:30am

Call (650) 344-5200 or


Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Call 650-344-5200

The leading local daily news resource for the


SF Peninsula seeks an entreprenuerial
Advertising Account Exec to sell advertising
and marketing solutions to local businesses.
We are looking for a special person to join our
team for an immediate opening.
You must be community-minded, actionoriented, customer-focused, and without fail, a
self starter. You will be responsible for sales
and account management activities associated
with either a territory or vertical category.

You will be offering a wide variety of


marketing solutions including print advertising,
inserts, graphic design, niche publications,
online advertising, event marketing, social media
and whatever else we come up with if as the
industry continues its evolution and our paper
continues its upward trajectory.
Experience with print advertising and online
marketing a plus. But we will consider a
candidate with little or no sales experience as
long as you have these traits:

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t1SPmDJFODZXJUIDPNQVUFSTBOEDPNGPSUXJUIOVNCFST
t(FOFSBMCVTJOFTTBDVNFOBOEDPNNPOTFOTFNBSLFUJOHBCJMJUJFT
Join us, if you check off on these qualities and also believe in the future of newspapers.
Please email your resume to ads@smdailyjournal.com
A cover letter with your views on the newspaper industry would also be helpful.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

Job Title:
Project Manager
Job Location: Belmont, CA
Requirements: Masters degree or
equiv. in Bus. Admin.,
Project Mgmt,
Humanities, Finance, etc.
+ 2 yrs. mgmt. or IT
related exp. reqd. (or
Bachelors + 5 yrs. mgmt.
or IT-related exp.).
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept.
20 Davis Drive,
Belmont, CA 94002

LOOKING FOR ENERGETIC PEOPLE WITH


A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE
DELI CLERKS CHECKERS MEAT CLERKS

For the best value and the best results,


recruit from the Daily Journal...

is actually right here in the present, as it has been for centuries The local community
newspaper. We ignore the naysayers and shun the "experts" when it comes to the "demise" of
the newspaper industry.

HOUSEKEEPER/JANITOR For a skilled nursing facility. Experience


preferred, but we will provide training!
$12.00 an hour with health, vacation/sick
leave, and additional benefits. References and work eligibility documentation required. Carlmont Gardens is located at
2140 Carlmont Drive. Drop by between
9:00 and 4:00 M-F to complete an application.

PIAZZAS FINE FOODS

The Daily Journals readership covers a wide


range of qualifications for all types of positions.

The
Future
of local news content

Apply in Person or call


Chef 1 541 848 0038
Sean 1 650 592 7258
1696 Laurel Street,
San Carlos
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required. Starting at $15 per hour.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

IMMEDIATE OPENING
San Mateo
Burlingame

We will help you recruit qualified, talented


individuals to join your company or organization.

110 Employment

FAX RESUME TO:


(650) 367-7341 OR EMAIL:
JOBS@PIAZZASFINEFOODS.COM
San Mateo / Palo Alto Store Locations
Part Time / Full Time
We offer union benets and union-scale wage
progression. We have advancement opportunities.

Exciting Opportunities at

Candy Maker Training Program


Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence
welcome to apply.
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t2VJDLTBMBSZQSPHSFTTJPO
t2VBMJmDBUJPOTJODMVEF CVUBSFOPUMJNJUFEUP'PMMPXJOHGPSNVMBT 
TUBOEJOH XBMLJOH CFOEJOH UXJTUJOHBOEMJGUJOHMCTGSFRVFOUMZ
t"QQMJDBOUTNVTUCFBWBJMBCMFUPXPSLEBZBOEOJHIU
TIJGUBOEPWFSUJNF
t.VTUCFBCMFUPSFBE TQFBLBOEXSJUF&OHMJTI
t1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFJONBOVGBDUVSJOHQSFGFSSFE
t&NQMPZFFTBSFNFNCFSTPG-PDBM
t1PTJUJPOTMPDBUFEBU&M$BNJOP3FBM
4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDP

If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at


(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

THE DAILY JOURNAL


110 Employment

Monday Dec. 5, 2016


110 Employment
TECHNOLOGY
ORACLE AMERICA, INC. has openings
for
the
following
positions
(all
levels/types) in San Mateo County, including Redwood Shores, CA; Alameda
County, including Pleasanton, CA; San
Francisco, CA; Santa Clara County, including Santa Clara and San Jose, CA;
and other locations in the San Francisco
Bay Area. Travel to various unanticipated
sites throughout the U.S. required. Some
positions may allow for telecommuting.
Consultants (TCONS1116): Analyze requirements and deliver functional and
technical solutions. Implement products
and technologies to meet post-sale customer needs.
Sales Consultants (TSC1116): Provide
presales technical/functional support to
prospective customers. Design, validate
and present Oracles software solutions
to include product concepts and future
direction.

Job Title:
Data Integration Manager
Job Location:Belmont, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS,
S/W Engg., CIS, etc.+ 2
yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5)
.Exp. w/ Web Services,
PL/SQL, XML, JavaScript,
Java, Apache Tomcat,
SOAP UI, Putty, SQL
Developer & MS project
reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept.
20 Davis Drive,
Belmont, CA 94002

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales


Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, please call
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com

Software Developers (TSWD1116): Design, develop, troubleshoot and/or


test/QA software.
Applications Developers (TAPD1116):
Analyze, design, develop, troubleshoot
and debug software programs for commercial or end user applications. Write
code, complete programming and perform testing and debugging of applications.
Submit
resume
to
applicant_us@oracle.com. Must include
job #. Oracle supports workforce diversity.

203 Public Notices


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271357
The following person is doing business
as: AltaVoice, 180 Warren Road, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner:
Patient Crossroads, Inc. CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on November 4,
2016
/s/Kyle Brown/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/4/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/28/16, 12/5/16, 12/12/16, 12/19/16
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Marjorie Wallace
Case Number: 16PRO00560
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Marjorie Wallace. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Kimbell
Denise Smith in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Kimbell
Denise Smith be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the
Independent Administration of Estates
Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions
without obtaining court approval. Before
taking certain very important actions,
however, the personal representative will
be required to give notice to interested
persons unless they have waived notice
or consented to the proposed action.)
The independent administration authority
will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and
shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 10, 2017 at
9:00 a.m., Department 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-

203 Public Notices


ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the
Calilfornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under sectioin
9052 of the Callifornia Probate
Code.Other California statutes and legal
authority may affect your rights as a
creditor. You may want to consult with an
attorney knowledgable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alexandra Gadzo
Attorney at Law
260 Sheridan Avenue, Suite 208
PALO ALTO, CA 94306
(650) 397-9300
FILED: 11/30/16
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal on 12/05, 12/12, 12/17)

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

23

210 Lost & Found

297 Bicycles

302 Antiques

304 Furniture

FOUND: KEYS at Westwood Park in


Redwood City, off of Fernside. Call to
claim (650)714-8893

ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

STORE FRONT display cabinet, From


1930, marble base. 72 long x 40 tallx
21 deep. Asking $500. (650)341-1306

ANTIQUE TIGER Oak Curio, curved


glass and four glass shelves, $700 or
best offer. Solid wood Gothic coffee table, $300 or best offer. Antique sideboard, $300 orbest offer. Faux leather
recliner, couch & loveseat, $400 or
best offer. Brown glass dining table with
four chairs, $300 or best offer.
Call (650)781-2773

FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,


(415)378-3634
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Womans diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

60 GIG Ipod, Does not work.


Battery/hard drive not working. $25.
(650)208-5758

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50


OBO (650)345-5644

BAZOOKA SPEAKER 20, +10W, never


used $95. (650)992-4544

COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your


mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)5207045

LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand


painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking


$100. (650)593-4490

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded


Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409

MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good


$59 call 650-218-6528

BULOVA WINDUP Travel clocks.Vintage. Set of eight. $99. gene (650)4215469

BILLY DEE Williams autographed Star


Wars action figure: Lando Calrissian,
space smuggler. $35 Steve 650-5186614

POSTERS TRAVEL, airline, art from


1970s and 1980s; about 50+; $30 for all
(650)595-2494

LOST CAT. Black and White. Black


patch on right eye. REWARD.
Call (323) 439-7713.

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four


rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.


Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta


graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

Books
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502

294 Baby Stuff


BASSINET $25 (Musical, Rocks, vibrates, has 4 wheels, includes sheets &
mattress) (650)348-2306
FISHER-PRICE HEALTHY Care booster
seat - $5 (650)592-5864.
HIGH CHAIR (wooden) excellent condition $35.00 (650)348-2306

296 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER, Portable, 14,000
BTU,
Commercial
Cool
model
CPN14XC9, almost like new! All accessories plus remote included.
20 x 16-5/8 x 33-1/2 $345.
(650)345-1835
CHARCOAL GRILL with cover, 24, almost new $25. (650)368-0748
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487
COLEMAN LXE Roadtrip Grill Red Brand New! (still in box) $100
(650)918-9847
JACK LALANE'S power juicer. $40.
Call 650 364-1243. Leave message.
REFRIGERATOR WHITE Full sized 2
door Whirlpool Perfect condition .$98.
650 583-9901 650 678-0221
TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500

303 Electronics
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

299 Computers
KOGI 15 inch computer monitor. Model
L5QX. $25. PH(650)592-5864.
RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer


Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage


cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard


with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"


x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android


4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855

DINETTE TABLE, 3 adjustable leaf.$30.


(650) 756-9516.Daly City.

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital


Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral


staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker


36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324
ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490

PUZZLES, 20 available, 1000 pcs.


$3.00 each,. (650)596-0513

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15


inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

STAR WARS one 4 orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614

SAMSUNG FLAT TV 20" ex.co.incl.


VCR ,set up $70. (650)992-4544

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper


Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.


Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

THOMAS THE TRAIN; trains, crossing


gate, bridge, track; good condition;
$25/OBO. 650-345-1347.

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

THOMAS TRAINS; Cranky the Crane


$15/OBO; Tidmouth Shed w/turntable
$50/OBO. 650-345-1347.

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE BUFFET Cabinet, with 2 large
drawers w/skeleton key, needs refinishing. $700/obo.. ANTIQUE CHINA cabinet, with doors and legs, dark wood..
$500/obo. (650)952-5049
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call


Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,


72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $500. (650)766-3024

WHIRLPOOL WASHER DRYER, GE


Refrigerator all working and in good condition all for $99.00 650-315-3240.

OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains


Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

COUCH, CREAM IKEA, great condition,


$89, light-weight, compact, sturdy loveseat (415)775-0141

IPHONE 5 Morphie Juice Pack with


charger, Originally $100, now $85.
(650)766-2679

300 Toys

LARGE STUFFED ANIMALS - $3 each


Great for Kids (650) 952-3500

COMPUTER TABLE, adjustable height,


chrome legs, 29x48 like new $30 (650)
697-8481

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a


$60. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
2 TWIN MAPLE bed frames, Cannon
Ball construction **SOLD **
5 FOOT resin folding table, still in the
box $25.00 (650)368-0748
ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529
BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319

DINING ROOM table Good Condition


$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER for $50.
Good shape, blonde, about 5' high.
(650)726-4102
ENTERTEITMENT CENTER 5'x4' glass
door / shell / drawers / roller ex $25/BO
(650)992-4544
ESPRESSO TABLE 30 square, 40 tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
FREE: TWO full-size featherbeds. Excellent
condition.
Redwood City
location. 650-503-4170.
INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
KITCHEN TABLE with 4 chairs, Blonde
wood, Farm Style. Apartment sized.
Good condition. $25. (650)359-0213
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LEATHER SOFA, black, excellent condition. $100 obo. (650)878-5533
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
NEW DELUXE Twin Folding Bed, Linens, cover, Cost $618. Sale $250. Must
Sell! (650) 875-8159.
NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame
$30.00 (650) 347-2356
NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City
NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,


Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290


Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

24

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle


3 Unlike green
tomatoes
4 Star of the ball
5 Tattletale
6 Witty Oscar
7 Astrological Ram
8 Maria __ Trapp
9 Subj. with
grammar
10 Handheld riot gear
11 Marriott facility
12 Advil competitor
13 Macho guys
18 Tempt
22 The Hunger
Games nation
24 Severe pang
25 Carnival
26 Drinks that make
a drink last
27 Troubles
28 Vet sch. course
29 Disdainful click
32 Zagreb native
33 N.Y.-based
educators union
34 Insect in a dusk
swarm
35 Realtors lot unit
36 Allow to borrow
38 Danger
39 Give out
40 Tapered tool
44 Tickled

DOWN
1 Its drawn in a tub
2 Natural skin
By Brock Wilson
soother

45 Less than 1%?


46 Give, as
homework
47 Like the beach
during a storm
48 Star Trek
lieutenant
49 Alma __
50 Rags-to-riches
author Horatio
51 Lindsay who
played Liz in Liz
& Dick

54 Wedding
promises
55 Mature eft
56 Relaxed way to
sit by
58 OHare, for
United
Airlines
59 __ been
thinking ...
60 Org.
promoting
hunter safety

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

xwordeditor@aol.com

2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIRS solid wood, great
shape asking 30 dollars each. Call
(650)574-4582 Lily

OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT


$55 (650)458-8280

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


ACROSS
1 Poets
6 Ocean breaker
10 Former Iranian
ruler
14 From another
planet
15 Golfers club
selection
16 Golfers target
17 What the star gets
on a marquee
19 Express
checkout lane
unit
20 __ Haw
21 Contemptuous
manner, in slang
22 Pet annoyance
23 Dejected
26 Wrap tightly, as
in bandages
30 Poker holding
31 Charged atoms
32 Madame of
physics
34 Guys partner
37 Level of optimal
accomplishment
41 Bygone jet,
briefly
42 Act with passion
43 Caution
44 Song at the Met
45 Like most
peanuts
47 Meeting of world
leaders
52 Name on rented
trailers
53 Lane with a nose
for news
54 Pasta suffix
57 Dirt road grooves
58 Honorable ... and
like the starts of
17-, 23-, 37- and
47-Across
61 Emancipated
62 Pigmented eye
layer
63 Watchdog
warning
64 Part of NIMBY
65 Swiss capital
66 Foul, weatherwise

304 Furniture
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

12/05/16

12/05/16

OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT


$55 (650)458-8280
OFFICE TABLE, 24"x48" HD. folding
legs each end. 500# capacity. Cost
$130. Sell $60, 650-591-4141

SHELF RUBBER maid


contract joe 650-573-5269

new $20.00

SOFA & Love seat perfect condition $99


Edie 650 345 8981
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80


obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with


single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions


$45. each set, (650)347-8061

THOMASVILLE BEVELED mirror 22" x


12" $50. Call 650-834-4833

QUEEN-SIZED SOFA-BED, beige colored, excellent condition, $99.99 or best


offer. Must Go! (650) 952-3063.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with


upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

RECLINER CHAIR blue tweed clean


good $75 Call 650 583-3515
RECLINING SWIVEL & high-back chair
(Hampton) exc condition $30 (650) 7569516 Daly City.
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
RUMMY ROYAL poker table top $30.00
(650)573-5269

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x


17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

306 Housewares
10 TULIP CHAMPAGNE
FOR $12 (415)990-6134

GLASSES

CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield


Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

306 Housewares

309 Office Equipment

311 Musical Instruments

316 Clothes

COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor


Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630

NEAT RECEIPTS Mobile Scanner new


in box $79, call 650-324-8416

FENDER BASS amp 25 watt. electrical


issue box and speaker very good
$45. (650)367-8146

NEW WITH tags Wool or cotton Men's


pullover
sweaters
(XL)
$15/each
(650)952-3466

GARBAGE CANS: brute 44 gal. Excellent condition $15. 650 504-6057

"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,


3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,


(650)343-4461

PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie


Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

PRADA DAYPACK / Purse, Sturdy black


nylon canvas, like new, made in Italy,
$35 (650)591-6596

HARMONICA.
HOHNER Pocket Pal.
Key of C. Original box. Never used.
$10. (650)588-0842

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new


beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99


(650) 583-4549

VINTAGE 1970S Grecian made dress,


size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

PIANO, UPRIGHT, in excellent condition. Asking $345. (650)366-4769

WILSON'S LG Green Suede Jacket


$50.00 (650)367-1508

UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

317 Building Materials

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,


$750. Call (650)572-2337

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity


counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29 x
19 $300 (408)744-1041

PORCELAIN JAPANESE Tea set, Unopened, in wood box, great gift $30.
(650)578-9208.

310 Misc. For Sale

500-600 BIG Band-era 78's--most mint,


no sleeves--$99.00 for all--650-574-5459

PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles


,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack


with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

CIAO SMALL Black Duffel Carry-on,


Overnight or Tote bag with shoulder
strap, $15 650-952-3500

308 Tools
ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,
Call (650)481-5296
BENCH SAW - 8 INCH includes attached table and accessories $35 (650)3680748
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CLICKER TORQUE wrench, 20-150,
$20, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)8511045
CRAFTSMEN 3 saw blades $20. new.
(650)573-5269
DELTA CABINET SAW with overrun table. $1,500/obo. ((650)342-6993
DYNAGLOPRO
HEATER.
Phone: 650-591-8062

$40.00

PAINTING TOOLS - hooks, stirrups 110


ropes, poles, 20 plank, 440 Graco Spary
Machine, $500, Asking (650)-483-8048
ROUTER TABLE ryobi $ 99. like new
650-573-5269
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
VINTAGE SHOPSMITH and BAND
SAW, good shape. $1,000/obo. Call
(650)342-6993

309 Office Equipment


FILE
CABINET
metal
2-drawer
18Dx15Wx28H $10 650-595-2494
INK CARTRIDGES
$19, 650-595-3933

for

HP

printer,

ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER,
condition $50 (650)878-9542

good

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never


used $8., (408)249-3858
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537
LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537
LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537
PREMIUM MOVING blankets good condition $10.00 each (650 ) 504 -6057
RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
SILK SAREE 6 yards new nice color.for
$35 only. C all(650)515-2605 for more information.

312 Pets & Animals


AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.

Garage Sales

SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72


like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891

Call (650)344-5200

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

318 Sports Equipment

379 Open Houses

15 SF Giants Posters -- Barry Bonds,


Jeff Kent, JT Snow. 6' x 2.5' Unused. $4
each. $35 all. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BACK PACK Camp Trails-Oasis $20
(650)595-2494
BACK PACK TENT $20 (650)595-2494

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

316 Clothes

BACKPACK THERM-A-REST sleeping


pad $20 (650)595-2494

BLACK DOUBLE breasted suit size 38


excellent condition $25 650-322-9598

BUSHNELL NEO XS Golf Watch with


charger. Mint condition. 30,000+ golf
courses. $50. Jeff 650-208-5758

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the


Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

BOY SCOUT canvas belt with Boy Scout


Buckle. Vintage. Fair condition. $5.
(650)588-0842

CHILDS KICK scooter by razor with helmet $25 obo (650)591-6842

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving


Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi


color
in
excellent
condition
3/4
length $50 650-692-8012

WAGON WHEEL Wooden, original from


Colorado farm. 34x34
Very good
aged condition $200 San Bruno
(650)588-1946

FREE SIZE 38 tan gabardine navy officers uniform great condition Perfect for
that costume party.322-9598

WATER STORAGE TANK, brand new,


275 gallons. 48" x 46" x 39" $250. 650771-6324

311 Musical Instruments


BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
EXCELLENT VIOLIN, previously owned,
first violinist SF Symphony, Mellow
sound. Dated 1894. $5,500/best offer.
(415)751-2416
LEXICON LAMBDA cubase LE $60.00
call Patter (650)367-8146

LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different


styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648
LADIES SEQUIN dress, blue, size XL,
pure silk lining, $40.00, (650) 578-9208
LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

FITNESS STEPPER compact


(12"x16") Hardly used! $50. Call
650-766-3024

sized

GOLF CLUBS {13}, Bag, & Pull Cart all-$90.00 (650)341-8342


GOLF CLUBS, new, Warrior woods
3/15 degree 5/21 degree 7/24 degree
$15 ea (650)349-0430
Golf Clubs, used set with Cart for $50.
(650)593-4490
IGLOO BLUE 38-Quart Wheelie Cool
Cooler/Ice Chest $14 650-952-3500

MAN'S BLACK leather jacket, size 40,


like new. $85.00 (650)593-1780

LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs


Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104

MEN'S STETSON hat, size large, new,


rim, solid black, large, great gift. $40
(650) 578-9208

MEN'S ROSSIGNOL Skis.


good condition, 650-341-0282.

NEW JOCKEY Men's Classic Crew


white tshirts (L) 3pk $15/each (5 available) 650.952.3466

List your upcoming


garage sale,
moving sale,
estate sale,
yard sale,
rummage sale,
clearance sale, or
whatever sale you
have...

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29


or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

Make money, make room!

Reach over 83,450 readers


from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

CANARY BIRD cage 24 x 16 for sale.


$40.00 firm. Used, good condition. Call
650-766-3024

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx


4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES

$95.00,

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine


(650)368-3037

$99

PRINCE TENNIS 2 section nylon black


Bag with Prince Pro Graphite Racket$55.(650)341-8342
SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TOTAL GYM XLS, excellent condition.
Paid $2,500. Yours for $900. Call
(650)588-0828
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE NASH Cruisers Mens/ Womens Roller Skates Blue indoor/outdoor sz
6-8. $60 B/O. (650)574-4439
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8
1/2. $50 650-592-2047
YAMAHA ROOF RACK, 58 inches $75.
(650)458-3255

345 Medical Equipment


BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 83,450
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles

25

620 Automobiles
MAZDA 12 CX-7 SUV Excellent condition One owner Fully loaded Low
miles reduced $18,995 obo (650)5204650
TOYOTA 06 Prius, 149K, clean. $6,500
(650)302-5523

625 Classic Cars


1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $22,000
obo. (650)952-4036.
CORVETTE 69 STINGRAY 327, Horsespeed SPS, 50.000 miles. $18,500.
(650)481-5296.
FORD 64 Falcon. 4DR Sedan. 6 cyl.
auto/trans $3,500.00. (650) 570-5780.

630 Trucks & SUVs


LINCOLN 02 Navigator, excellent condition. Runs great! Must sell! $4,500/obo.
(650)342-4227.

635 Vans
CHEVROLET 06 Mini VAN, new radiator, tires and brakes. Needs head gasket.
$1,200. (650)481-5296

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
89 GOLD WING. 1500 CC. 39K miles.
Call Joe 650-578-8357
ALPINE STAR motocross boots Tech 8s
size 14 good cond. $75. (650)345-5642
ATV MOTORCYCLE Lift $50.00
Patter (650)367-8146

call

BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call


650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

645 Boats
16 FT SEA RAY. I/B. $1,200. Needs Upholstery. Call 650-898-5732.
2003 P-15 West Wight Potter sailboat,
excellend
condition.
$7,200.
Call
(650)347-2559

670 Auto Service


LUXURATI AUTO REPAIR
Smog Check
Repair Services
Collision and Body Work

Burlingame & San Mateo Locations

(650) 340-0026

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BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run


Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
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BMW 07 X-5, One Owner, Excel. Condition Sports package 3rd row seats reduced $19,995 obo Call (650)520-4650
CADILLAC 02 Deville, 8 cylinder, perfect condition, like new, cashmere outside white inside 4787 miles $13,000.
(415)850-2370
CADILLAC 99 DeVille Concours,
98,500 miles, $3,500 or best offer.
(650)270-6637
CHEVY 10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
99 Van, Good Condition,
$5,500, childs play three, call
(650)481-5296

GOT AN OLDER
CAR, BOAT, OR RV?
Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the
Humane Society.
Call 1- 800-943-8412

JAGUAR 94 XJ6, very clean, 110K


miles, $4,500. (650)302-5523
LEXUS 94 GS300 148K miles, very
clean. $2,700. (650)302-5523

670 Auto Parts

BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run


Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
FIRESTONE TIRES 215/70/R16 good
condition $50. (650) 504-6057
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted


Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Cabinetry

Construction

Housecleaning

Hauling

Plumbing

Tree Service

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

CHAINEY HAULING

MEYER
PLUMBING
SUPPLY

Hillside Tree

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066
Lic#1211534

General
House &
Office
Cleaning

Cleaning

CALEDONIAN
MASONRY INC
Landscape Design!
We can design your
outdoor living
experience.
*BBQs *Pizza Ovens
*Patios *Flagstone
*Concrete/Foundation
Call For Free Estimate:

(650) 525-9154

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal


Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up


www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Experience s Reasonable
References s Free Estimates
Magda Perez
650.533.8063

Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,


Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo

650-350-1960
Roofing

REED
ROOFERS

PENINSULA
CLEANING

Serving the entire Bay Area


Residential & Commercial

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

Call for Free Estimate

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming

Pruning

Shaping
Large

Removal
Grinding

Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal


to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Window Washing

License #931457

(650) 591-8291

1-800-344-7771
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN & MORE
Since 1985

Repairs* Remodeling* Painting


Carpentry* Plumbing* Electrical

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

Concrete

(650) 453-3002

*Stamps *Color *Driveways


*Patios *Masonry
*Flagstone *Retaining Walls
*Block walls *Landscaping

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

(650)296-0568

Free Estimates

Rambo
Concrete
Works

Remodeling, Plumbing,
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance, New Construction.
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

by Greenstarr

License#752250 Since 1985

T.M. CONCRETE
Lic: #1017155

*Foundation*Stamp Concrete
*Exposed Aggragate *Retaining Walls
*Bricks *Pavers *Driveways
*Flagstones
Free Estimates

David: (650) 642-1614

(650)740-8602

SENIOR HANDYMAN

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047


Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs


ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Gardening
LAWN MAINTENANCE
Construction
THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

Licensed General and


Painting Contractor
Int/Ext Painting Carpentry
Sheetrock, Dryrot & Stucco Repairs
Lic#979435
CALL FOR GREAT RATES!

(650)701-6072

Lic.#834170

HONEST HANDYMAN

W>>U i>U*>

i`U}}i}>iU,i>}
W>U->i`
Vii
-}*,i>

Licensed Bonded & Insured

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING

Free Estimates

TOM (650) 834-2365

Notices

Lic: #468963

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

Drought Tolerant Planting


Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Specializing in any size project

Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854

Landscaping

SEASONAL LAWN

MAINTENANCE

Hardwood Floors

ACE
HARDWOOD
FLOORS

Refinish & Repair & Install


Carpet removing & Re coat
Ca.Lic.:712755

Drought Tolerant Planting


Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

415 640 4111

www.acehardwoodflooring.com

Hauling

Painting

AAA RATED!

JON LA MOTTE

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured


Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior


Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

MICHAELS
PAINTING

Serving the Peninsula


since 1989

(650) 574-0203
lic#628633

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

Caregiver

Dental Services

Health & Medical

Legal Services

Real Estate Loans

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR

COMPLETE IMPLANT
Dentistry Under One Roof

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

DOCUMENTS PLUS

LEGAL

REFINANCE
HARD MONEY
AT LOWER RATE

seeks individuals to support


adults with special needs.
Receive up to $3,000/month
for your spare bedroom.

Same day treatment


Evening & Saturday appts available

Call Rachel
(650) 389-5787

Peninsula Dental Implant Center


1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

CARE INDEED

I - SMILE

890 Santa Cruz Ave


Menlo Park

(650) 328-1001
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Computer

COMPUTER
PROBLEMS?

Viruses, lost data, hardware or


software issues? Contact Geeks
On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly
Repair Experts. Macs and PCs
Call for FREE diagnosis.
1-800-715-9068

Implant & Orthodontict Center


1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Innovative
650-282-5555

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

DENTURES
IN A DAY!

650-263-4703

EYE EXAMINATIONS

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters


365 B Street
San Mateo
(650) 343-4123
www.smpanchovilla.com

THE CAKERY

A touch of Europe

1308 Burlingame Ave


Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

Registered & Bonded

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

DIRECT PRIVATE LENDER


ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
Since 1979

WACHTER

INVESTMENTS, INC.

348-7191
Real Estate Broker
CA BRE#746683
NMLS #348288

(in most cases)

Only $1,395 per set

MAGNOLIA
DENTAL
Food

Jeri Blatt, LDA #11

(650)574-2087

650-419-9674

150 N. San Mateo Drive

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract

Roos Dental Care


Redwood City

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
Insurance

AFFORDABLE

HEALTH INSURANCE
OPEN ENROLLMENT

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF


President
Barrett Insurance Services
ericlawrencebarrett@gmail.com
(650)619-0370
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS


Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

Real Estate Services


*SALES * LEASING
* PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Sales: 1.49% commission
Property Management: 4% fee
Personalized service

Peninsula Prime Realty


650-591-0119

Sign up for the free newsletter

info@peninsulaprimerealty.com

Massage Therapy

Travel

BEST ASIAN
BODY MASSAGE
$45/hr
Call (650) 787-9969

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP

Free Parking Behind Building


Mon-Fri, 10am-9pm
Wknds-Holidays. Call Ahead.

1838 El Camino #103,


Burlingame

(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

27

28

Monday Dec. 5, 2016

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

No more room for the dead as Aleppo is crushed


By Sarah El Deeb
ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT The old Aleppo cemetery filled


up a year ago. The new one filled up last
week. Now the dead are left in the besieged
enclaves streets, buried in backyards and
overwhelming the morgues.
Medical officials secured yet another plot
for the dead. But they say they have no way to
dig graves with government troops now
crashing into opposition-held eastern
Aleppo, shelling civilians as they flee and
forcing thousands to squeeze into a chaotic,
devastated and shrinking pocket of neighborhoods.
We have no more room, said Mohammed
Abu Jaafar, the head of the local forensic
authority. His department is so overwhelmed, the staff registering the dead pleaded with him not to take any more bodies.
Even if I were to consider mass burials, I
dont have the machines to do the digging,
he said in a telephone interview.
Dignity in death has been lost as the
rebel-held enclave that has held out for

four years collapses.


For two weeks, government forces bombarded the area, killing more than 310 civilians, including 42 children, and up to 220
opposition fighters, according to the
Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Then
last weekend, ground troops stormed into
the 17-square-mile (45 square kilometer)
enclave, captured half of it and advanced on
the rest.
U.N Emergency Relief Coordinator
Stephen OBrien pleaded Wednesday for
access to eastern Aleppo, home to some
275,000, before it becomes one giant
graveyard.
In some ways, it already has. Bodies have
been left to rot on the streets. Ambulances
and rescue vehicles cant reach them because
they have been targeted or because fuel has
run out. As troops close in, there are now
more, multiple front lines all too dangerous
to approach.
Residents of a southern neighborhood
close to a government advance only learned
that a body was lying in the ditches when a
cat started eating at the corpse.

REUTERS

A soldier walks to a military vehicle in a goverment controlled housing district in Aleppo.

Carter: US, partners should


stay in Iraq after IS defeat
By Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SIMI VALLEY The American military,


along with its international partners, will
need to remain in Iraq even after the expected defeat of the Islamic State group,
Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Saturday.
Carter said the U.S. and its coalition
partners must not stop after completing
the current campaign to expel IS from
Mosul.

He said the militants are on a path to lasting defeat.


But there will still be much more to do
after that to make sure that, once defeated,
ISIL stays defeated, he said, using an alternative acronym for the Islamic State group.
Well need to continue to counter foreign
ghters trying to escape and ISILs
attempts to relocate or reinvent itself. To
do so, not only the United States but our
coalition must endure and remain engaged
militarily.

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