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SELECT

HISTORICAL COSTUMES
COMPILED

FROM THE MOST RELIABLE SOURCES

BY

HENRY

L.

HINTON

NEW YORK
WYNKOOP
18

&

SHERWOOD

BEEKMAN
1868

ST.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 186T, by

HENRY

L.

HINTON,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the

Southern District of

BRADSTREET

PRESS.

New

York.

TO

EDWIN BOOTH,
AS A SLIGHT TRIBUTE TO HIS BARB GENIUS, AND AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT OK

MANY GREAT KINDNESSES,

THIS VOLUME
18

RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

BT

THE EDITOR.

CONTENTS.
No.

A
A
A

A
A

VENETIAN SOLDIER,
LADY BELONGING TO THE SUITE OP THE DAUPHINESS
D'AUVERGNE,
MILITARY COSTUME (15th and 16th
Centuries)
PEASANT WOMAN OF THE CANTON OP
FRIBOURG,

25

CAVALIER (17th Century),

A YOUNG ITALIAN LADY,


A FRENCH NOBLEMAN (1365)

24

26

27
28

29

30

FRENCH LADY OF R AN K,

I5 T H
.

CENTURY.

A FRENCH LADY OF RANK.


HIS costume

is

ta-

ken from a minia-

entitled

which

ture of the manuscript


"

Amoureux"

lichees

is

found in the Royal

The wearer,

Library of Paris.

a noble French lady,

is

decked

with the sugar-loaf head-dress so

commonly adopted during

fifteenth century.

all

band of black

ornamented with an edging of

of the

velvet,

gold, binds

her forehead; the part of the robe which


covers the breast

is

worked

in black velvet

above, and in tissue of gold


girdle; the outer robe

is

down

made

to

the

of blue vel-

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
vet,

bordered with gold, and

trimmed with crimson

is

lined

and

velvet; the ends of

the sleeves are also of crimson velvet; the


veil

is

girdle

of a white, transparent tissue; the


is

green,

with

golden ornaments;

the portion of the under-skirt which

below

is

is

violet; the stockings are black.

seen

GERMAN NOBLE.

A GERMAN

NOBLE.
'HIS costume

ken from

is

ta-

a picture

of Pinturicchio, and

represents a nobleman in
the suite of the
eric,

at

Emperor Fredthe interview when he

plighted his faith to the Princess

of Portugal.

He

wears a red

hat,

held in

its

by a greenish ribbon, passing under


The collar and the hood are yelthe chin.

place

low, bordered in part with gold.


is

white, changing to a bluish

terminated by a border of gold.

The coat

tint,

The

and

is

stock-

ings are red; the boots of a yellowish color,

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

and the spurs are


is

red, with gold buttons.

sword

The

is

The sword-belt

silver.

The

case of the

white, with gilded ornaments.

Italian costumes furnish

of the use of boots; but the

few examples

monuments of

the northern nations prove that the French,


the Germans, and the English very generally
availed themselves of this

mode

of protect-

ing the feet and legs; compelled, doubtless,

by the
mate.

necessities of a cold

and moist

cli-

A PEASANT OF THE G

LT H

AL

A PEASANT OF THE
HE

GEILTHAL.
dress of the

of G-eilthal,

mer times

men

in for-

of an ex-

tremely peculiar fashion,

even at the
unique and
the

hair

cut

short.

crowned sugar-loaf
or black color,

is

day

present

original.

is

They keep
The high-

hat, of a

daily

green

becoming

more rare among them; the hat

is

now

more commonly worn with a low crown;


it is made of felt in winter, and in summer
of straw.
plaited

coat

is

frill,

red,

The neck
sewed
and

is

is

encircled

to the shirt.

with a

The waist-

fastened to the trowsers

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

by green braces; the doublet


trowsers are

brown

ings are of white worsted;

It

is

made

brown; the

or green, and reach no

lower than the middle of the

slippers are

is

calf;

the stock-

the sandals or

of bark.

from the Illyrian peasantry, and

particular those of the


Italian theatre has

some of

its

Geilthal,

in

that the

borrowed the dress of


That of the men,

buffoons.

as

described above, bears some resemblance to


the costume of various burlesque characters
in the ancient shows.
3

A PEASANT

WOMAN OF THE

GEILTHAL.

A PEASANT WOMAN
OF THE GEILTHAL.

HE women
Geilthal
hair

which the

hang

in

of the
their

let

long twists,

unmarried females

intertwine with ribbons of silk


or red worsted.

The head-dress

of the married

women

consists

of a kind of round cap, which

is

sometimes fastened above with a

They wear also a necklace


beads, made to imitate coral, and a

black ribbon.
of glass

broad muslin ruff or


plaits.

frill,

with very small

Their short-sleeved jacket

is

usually

red; the petticoat and apron blue, with bor-

ders

of a

strongly-contrasted color;

wide

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
ruffles

ter a

hang down

brown cloak covers

petticoats seldom

the

knee.

This

and

in win-

the whole.

Their

at the elbow;

much lower than

reach
dress

is

extremely

mode

light,

and well suited

to the

mountaineers.

Their stockings are of white

of

life

of these

or colored worsted; their sandals are tied

with ribbons or thongs.

The waist

is

encir-

cled with a girdle of black fur, adorned with

small plates of copper; upon


knife.

They seldom wear

obliged to do so

it

hangs a closed

their hats, unless

by rain or the heat of the

sun; in general they carry

a ribbon to the arm.

them hanging by

ENGLISH MUSICIANS, REIGN OF EDWARD 3?

ENGLISH MUSICIANS.
REIGN OF EDWARD

III.

the

"JST

houses

great lords,

musi-

cians occupied
first

place

among

of

the

the class

of domestics.

In early Saxon times, the com-

mon

people had their bards,

who

received their support from the contributions

of the

many, while the

kings had their minstrels as part of their

household.

Among
still

the Celtic races musicians held a

more important place

and even

in

our

own day

in domestic
it

life,

can hardly be

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
said that,

among

the Gallic and Scotch peo-

ples, the class of itinerant

the harp and the flute

is

performers upon

entirely extinct as

a recognized element of society.

The

plate

which we give represents a

group of simple musicians of the time of

Edward

III,

and the singularity of

their

costume proves that a taste for the grotesque


in dress

had already made sensible progress

at this period.

ANNE

AUVERGN

E.M37I-KI6.

ANNE, DAUPHINE D'AUVERGNE.


mi-ui6.

HIS

mediaeval cos-

tume, so bizarre to
our modern eyes,

is

'yet so simple in its details

that no description is needed.

Anne D'Auvergne was the wife


of Louis II, Due De Bourbon, who
gained so
English.

Genoese

Shortly

many
after

victories over the


his

solicited the aid of

marriage

the

France against

the pirates of the Barbary States,

who were

making continual inroads upon their commerce; the Due de Bourbon demanded and
obtained the

command
6

of the troops which

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

were sent
the

to their relief.

month

Having

set out in

of May, 1391, with twenty thous-

and men, and disembarking,

at the beginning

of the summer, in sight of the ancient city of

Carthage, he invested that place, and in a


single

day twice defeated the King of Tunis,

who was

forced to sue for peace.

On

his

return he gave chase to the Saracens, whose


vessels infested the Mediterranean,,

and

after

a cruise of a few months re-entered the port


of Genoa, in the midst of the acclamations
of a people

Soon

who

after, the

hailed

him

as their liberator.

protracted illness of the King

of France forced the

Due de Bourbon

to

assume the administration of the government.


History has recorded nothing remarkable
of the wife of this Prince,

whom

our plate

represents in the costume of the time.

"---

YOUNG VENETIAN. BELONGING

TO THE SOCIETY OF LA CALZA.

A YOUNG VENETIAN
Or THE SOCIETY OP "LA CALZA."

'HE Society of "La


Calza" was an assoyoung Venenoblemen and a few stranciation of

tian

gers of high

rank, who, with

the sanction of the magistrates,

bound themselves by the

ties of

p roca l friendship, and had for


their object the pursuit of honor-

able

pleasures.

expense, public

They gave,
fetes,

at their

own

accompanied with the-

atrical representations.

They met together

to discourse music, to hold gondola races,


to

celebrate

masquerades,

and

for

every

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

kind of innocent amusement.


recognize

In order to

each other in the public

fetes,

they wore the right stocking ornamented

with various colors, and even with embroideries of gold, of silver, or of pearls.

The young man of


plate represents is

picture

this Society

drawn and colored

of Carpaccia,
of Fine

bonnet

of violet velvet,

is

the

is

black,
left

adorned with white and black

right

the

of green velvet, with a narrow

permits the shirt to be seen; the


is

The

enriched with

red border below; the doublet

ing

after

Arts at Venice.

golden embroideries and ornaments


jacket

our

preserved in the

Academy
is

whom

stocking

is

scarlet,

and

stock-

stripes;

ornamented

with two palm branches, and with an embroidery

of

pearls

gloves are yellow.

upon

the

thigh;

the

YOUNG

GIRL OF THE CANTON SCHWYTx.

YOUNG GIEL
OP THE CANTON SCHWYTZ.

HE

costume of wo-

men and young girls


in

the

ASchwytz, and

Canton

of

especially in

the chief place of that name,

characterized

by a certain degree of stiffness, and approaches


the ancient French taste
it is
is

something between the dress of


the

peasant and the

It follows,

citizen.

too, the caprices of fashion,

and

is

subject

to various changes.

The ordinary and more or

less

modern

dress of the inhabitants consists at the pres-

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

ent time of a black woolen corset, bordered

with silken trimmings; a

skirt, in

ornamented with blue

stripes

part wool,

or

flowers,

covered with a linen apron of various colors;


shoes ornamented

white cotton stockings;

with

buckles.

little silver

The

hair

is

gath-

ered into a twist at the back of the head;


the principal ornament consists of an original

and unique

and coarse

coif,

laces,

composed of common

rising in

two enormous

butterfly wings,

between which

sue of

flowers, intermingled with

tinsel,

set

artificial

and fastened by a large

transversely in the hair.

dress, singular as it

pleasing

pretty

when

blonde.

coming to
hair

is

it

is,

rests a tis-

silver eagle

This head-

does not

fail

to be

decks the head of some


It

is

naturally less

ladies of a certain age,

gray and powdered.

when

bethe

Finally, as a

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

mark

of feminine

women

piety,

girls

and young

rarely go forth without holding in

the hand a rosary and a book of prayers.

AN ENGLISH LAD Y,

[l5

TH
.

CENTU RY j

AN ENGLISH

LADY.

FIFTEENTH CENTURY.

"HIS

costume

longs

to

be-

the close

of the fifteenth century,

and

most elegant of

is

one

of the

This

this epoch.

noble lady wears over her breast

an

article

fashion,

of

attire of a peculiar

which was very generally

adopted about the end of the

fif-

teenth and the beginning of the sixteenth


centuries.

by the

dress

is

also characterized

long, trailing sleeves of the chemise,

similar in

times.

Her

mode

to those of the

men

of the

GERMAN FALCONER.

A GERMAN FALCONER
HE

chase was, of

others,

ment

the

for

all

amuse-

which the

northern nations of Europe

had

the

strongest

attach-

ment, and which, together with the


'right of

wearing the sword, contheir

stituted

Frederic

II,

composed a

dearest

Emperor of Germany, himself

treatise

upon the nature of birds,

and the care they required.


the

privilege.

modes of

In this treatise

raising birds of prey, such as

the sparrow-hawk and the falcon, are ex-

plained in

full.

This costume

is

taken from a precious


10

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

manuscript preserved in the Library of the


Yatican.

It

would appear that the

of this falconer

was common

The white

employed

in the imperial chase.

bonnet

furnished with red cords.

is

livery

to all those

Bands,

alternately violet, white and green, cross the

which are embroidered with

coat, all of

The coat

open from the

is

girdle

red.

down, as

well as in the upper part to allow the head


to pass through, but

closed over the breast

The under-sleeves are

by buttons.
with

is

black

cords.

blue,

The hose are brown.

The glove of the hand upon which the falcon


The violet hat, which
is borne is gray.
hangs' over the shoulders,

cord.

The

green bag,

is

belt or girdle,
is

black.

He

held by a red

which carries a

holds a bird's wing,

decked with a piece of scarlet ribbon, as an

emblem

of his employment.
10

GERMAN PEASANT

A YOUNG GERMAN PEASANT WOMAN.


'HIS dress
ple that

tion

is

is

so sim-

no descrip-

needed.

It is

taken from the great German

work on costume by Kretschmer.

The custom of drawing

to-

gether the outer garment in front


so as to

form a graceful drapery on

was long practised by the German peasantry, and has not yet fallen en-

the back,

tirely into disuse.

The

colors of the differ-

ent garments, as represented in the plate,


are those most

generally adopted by the

peasants.
11

YOUNG

ITALIAN GIRL.

A YOUNG ITALIAN

GIRL.

easy to per-

is

ceive,

the
ings

by observing

ancient paint-

and the monuments of

the Renaissance, that the

young

Italian girls retained, even in the

thirteenth and fourteenth centuries,

the custom of allowing the hair

to grow,

and of permitting

it

to float

upon the shoulders, after the manner


This mode was
of the early Lombards.

freely

even employed as a sign of distinction be-

tween married women and young

As

to the dress of

women

the poverty of the earlier ages


12

girls.

in general, after

was succeeded

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

by an excessive degree of magnificence, there


arose so
to

many

make

a choice

tumes which

The

variations that

fill

figure

among

it is

difficult

the numerous cos-

the pictures of this epoch.

here

represented,

which

is

taken from a painting of Pinturicchio, has


so

much

of the character of a portrait that

there can be

little

doubt of the authenticity

of the costume depicted.

mode

in its

is

imitates,

of adjustment, the drapery of

the antique statues;

and

The robe

it

is

without sleeves,

secured upon the shoulders by golden

clasps;

it

is

of a violet color.

The

the sleeves and the stockings are

a tissue of gold.

bodice,

woven

small, yellowish veil,

from which her black locks escape and

upon the

is

float

shoulders, partly covers the top

of the head.

tume

of

In other paintings,

this cos-

repeated with the addition of a

light,

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
rose -colored or violet

around the neck,


shoulders, and

is

scarf,

which passes

floats gracefully

tied

over the

upon the back.


12

YOUNG DUCHESS

I3

TI

?CENTURY

A YOUNG- DUCHESS.
THIRTEENTH CENTURY.

HE
rich

accompanying
and elegant

cos-

tume has been ex.tracted

the

from a picture by

Due de

Seyde,

who

died, in the flower of his years, a

^victim to his passion for art.

was

celebrated both

and engraver.
and

At once

as

jects,

them

and

often to treat the

the

friendship

painter

the friend

rival of Albert Durer, a noble

tion led

He

emula-

same sub-

which

united

them was expressed by

a frequent inter-

change of their works.

The

picture from

which the present costume has been copied


14

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
is

one of the most precious ornaments of

the

Academy

of Fine Arts at Pisa.

The young Duchess- who is here represented wears upon her head a small white
hood covered with a black bonnet, edged
with gold; upon this rests a golden crown.

The chemisette
light

band of

is

gold,

white,

and closed at the neck

Through the open-

with a golden button.


ing of the chemisette

may

of the chemise, which

The under-dress

is

trimmed with a

is

black,

be seen the neck

edged with

lace.

ornamented with

pearls across the breast and over the shoulders.

She wears a

little

medal attached

a red cord passing around the neck.


outer robe

is

The

of golden brocade, the open-

ing on the side of which

by

to

is

brought together

rich clasps, permitting the under-skirt to

be seen.

golden chain
14

is

thrown about

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
the shoulders, and hangs low in front.
large sleeves are

made

of some light ma-

terial of a yellowish hue,


color,

The

changing to a lake

and are fastened at the shoulders by

two black

lacets,

be seen.

The under-sleeves, of red

permitting the chemise to


velvet,

are tight, but fuller around the hands, which

they partly cover;

they also have slashes

upon the arms, which are laced with small


white lacets, allowing another white sleeve
to be

seen beneath.

blue girdle with

red cords, clasped with a rich cameo, sur-

rounds the waist.

The shoes are


14

black.

A YOUNG NOBLEMAN.

YOUNG NOBLEMAN.
HIS costume
markable

for

fulness,

This

and the lavish use of

bells, indicate
a*

the

for the stripes of


pinking

over the body of the coat.

for

re-

of the sleeves,

fulness

and

is

a dress designed

festal occasion, as well as the

high rank of the

wearer.

The

head-dress consists of a twisted turban of

gay

colors,

decked with high feathers.


15

A LADY AN D A GALLANT,

1795.

A LADY AND A

GALLANT.

1795.

'HE most

noticeable

features in the cos-

tume of the

gallant

which the plate represents


are the excessively high cravat, the variegated hose, the short

>waist of the coat,

cate fob-chains.

and the dupli-

The extravagance

of the costume in these particulars

beyond that which

is

common

to the time,

together with the great length of the hair,


gives the character something of a dandyish appearance.

This effect

is

still

further

heightened by a striking contrast of colors.


16

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

The

lady, as represented in the plate,

more modestly and


costume bearing a
of the styles

now

is

tastefully dressed, the

slight

resemblance to one

in vogue.

These figures are taken from Kretschmer.


16

AGNES SOREL.

AGNES

SOEEL.

SOREL,

or

Soreau, mistress of

Charles VII, King


of France, was born in the
village of
^

raine.

the

Fromenteau,

in

Tou-

She was the daughter of

Seigneur

Saint-Geraud,

nobleman attached to the house of


the Count de Clermont.

With the

advantages of an elaborate education added


to her natural gifts, she came, as maid-of-

honor to the Duchess d'Anjou, to the court


of France in the year 1431.

was

called the

then in the

full

Maid

Agnes, who

of Fromenteau.

was

bloom of her beauty, and


17

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
easily captivated the heart of the King.

In

order to attach her to his court, he conferred

upon her the position of maid-of-honor

to

the Queen.

The English were then masters

kingdom of France.
urally brave,

had

of half the

Charles, though nat-

fallen

into

a profound

apathy in consequence of a feebleness of


character which unfitted
against misfortune.
in recalling

to his

own

him

to

him

for the struggle

Agnes alone succeeded


a sense of what was due

glory and that of his people.

^She died in Normandy, whither she had

gone to warn the King of a conspiracy.


17

PEASANT OF HALLAU.

A PEASANT

OF HALLAU.

HE

peasant of Hal-

lau wears
black,
felt hat,

and

a large,

three-cornered

in addition, dur-

ing the winter, a black bonnet


or leathern cap, which he also

wears at work when he has not

Around
vat,

his hat.

This bonnet, once put on,

is

removed from

rarely

his

which

his

neck he wears a black


is

tied

head.

silk cra-

on the nape of the neck.

The jacket or short coat is made of linen,


or sometimes of some woolen or cotton material.

It

is

only in winter that he wears,

as here represented, a kind of scarlet waistis

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

coat,

with white or yellow metal buttons.

Above

this waistcoat

mediately over the

summer im-

(and in

shirt)

be seen the

may

gallowses, an indispensable feature in the

costume of the inhabitant of


these are sometimes of
as here, of leather.

known under
made

the

silk,

this district;

and sometimes,

The puffed

name

of

trowsers,

plump -Jio sen,

are

of black woolen or cotton goods; they

are very

full,

and hang

in

numerous

folds.

The knit woolen or cotton stockings are


fastened

to

the

trowsers.

In

place of

buckles, the shoes have leather strings, cov-

ered by a strip

of

leather

length as the shoes.


18

of the

same

YOUNG

LADY.
14

COSTUME OF FRANCE a HOLLAND,


&

I5 T H
.

CENTURY.

A YOUNG

LADY.

COSTUME OF FRANCE AND HOLLAND IN THE FOURTEENTH

AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES.

HE

young woman

who

figures in the

accompanying plate
'holds in her

of

the

hand a feather

peacock.

In the

fourteenth and fifteenth centuries,


'the

peacock, the pheasant and the

heron were to the chevaliers of


the time

what the Styx was

to the gods of

fable.

Whenever an important

was

enterprise

undertaken, a peacock or a pheasant, sometimes roasted,

but always arrayed in


19

its

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

most beautiful plumage, was carried with


great solemnity, by married ladies or maidens, in a large silver or

the

golden basin, into

midst of the numerous assembly of

was presented

in turn to

knights.

It

chevalier,

and each one made

the bird;

it

to

his

vow over

was then placed upon the

be distributed to

all

who

each

table

assisted in the

ceremony.

The

figure

here given,

taken

from

painting of Lucas de Seyde, will serve as

a type of the general costume of the


of France,

women

Holland and Italy during the

fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

The head-dress of
sists

this

young woman con-

of a kind of turban, of a rose color.

The middle band

is

small bonnet which

black, as well as the

falls

border of the bonnet


19

is

over her ears; the


of gold, and the

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

embroideries of

silver.

light,

white veil

covers her forehead, envelops a lock of hair

under the
turban,

end

is

ear, and, passing

tied

upon the

back over the

top, leaving the

to float over the shoulders.

isette is white,

and

adorned with golden

is

The robe

buttons and embroideries.

some green

and

material,

trimmings and

The chem-

fillets

is

is

of

enriched with

of gold.

The short

bound by a lacet and some golden


ornaments. The under-sleeve is of crim-

sleeve

is

son velvet, through the openings of which


is

arm

is

laced

The cloak
is

The

seen the chemise.

is

slash

under the

by two small black

cords.

white, changing to a blue, and

ornamented with a golden border.

girdle

is

violet,

and the hose are black.


19

The

AWOMAN OF

ISTRIA.

A WOMAN OF

ISTEIA.

'HE costume
Istrians

frequent

but

its

is

of the

subject to

modifications,

general character

is

as

follows:

The men wear a


felt hat,

that

it

low, black

with so narrow a brim

affords

no protection from

either the sun or the rain.

hair

is

narrow

cropped short.
collar

Over a

shirt

Their

with a

they don a short white jacket,

of coarse woolen cloth, the sleeves of which


are turned

back to the shoulder.

Their

trowsers are black, or of white and brown


stripes,

and are

tied

below the knee.


20

Most

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
of

them carry

at the girdle a pouch, into

which they place

all sorts

Their

are

stockings

of knick-knacks.

generally

of

white

worsted, and their shoes are of undressed


leather.

The women, both

in

wear gowns of white

summer and
linen; over

the cold season, which

winter,

which

in

of short duration,

is

they throw an over-garment of some dark


material.

The

head, which

hair

is

combed back over the

covered with a turban of

is

white linen, so twisted that one end of this

head-gear

falls

upon the

left

shoulder.

chemise covers the entire neck, and

numerous
liar

folds.

form.

their waist a

which they are fond of setting

a posy of flowers.

attached the

falls in

Their shoes are of a pecu-

They wear about

girdle, within

The

distaff,

To

this girdle

which
20

is

also is

the indispensa-

A SCOTTISH CHIEF, (TIME OF ROBERT BRUCE.)

SCOTTISH CHIEF.
EDWARD L AND ROBERT BRUCE.

TIME OF

HE

representation

of a ship with clouds


flying above,
i

on the

buckler of this warrior, leads


us to

conjecture

that this

personage was a descendant of the


1

ancient kings
race

of the

a lord of the

"lion rampant"

at

Norwegian

The

isles.

the

base

of

the shield, surrounded by a kind of plait,

denotes some
Scotland;

and

affiliation

this

last

with the kings of


circumstance

lead to the discovery of the


Chief.

The costume agrees


21

name

may

of the

perfectly with

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
the

which we form of the Scottish

idea

warriors before their league with France,


as Froissart describes them.

This historian

says that they were very imperfectly cov-

ered with defensive armor prior to the time


of Charles YI,

who

sent to their aid a body

of French knights, together with the suits


of mail

obtained by the

disarmament of

seditious Parisians.

The

chief here represented

a lance;
linen

coif,

upon

his

leans

upon

head he wears a small

such as distinguished most of the

Anglo -Saxon warriors long before the epoch


in question.
The form of his buckler, as
well as that of his large swbrd, belongs to

the time and the reign above mentioned.

The purse which he


idence

The

of

shell

the
is

carries

antiquity

is

also

of this

an ev-

costume.

a kind of trumpet carried for


21

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
the purpose of sounding the appeal of his
clan.

This figure was copied after a large

effigy

on a monument which was found

behind the church at lona or Icolmkill.


21

"sGUNG VENETIAN GENTLEMAN.


'
'

',

''

.1

;:-

'-

Cf. f--ITU

i'.

A YOUNG VENETIAN

OF HANK.

LATTER PART OF THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY.

is

supposed that

the origin and even


the

liberty of the

famous republic of Venice


date

back beyond the Middle

Ages, and the Venetians boast


of never having at any period

been subject

to the

yoke of the bar-

barians.

The costume of a young Venetian, here


represented, though more common, near
the close of the fourteenth century, to the

young nobles of other countries than Italy,


Belonged especially to this most opulent and
22

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
gallant of all

Veneizia la

this

cities,

whose lagoons were so gay with


dolas,

and of

and with vestments of

silk,

betta,

rich gon-

of velvet,

gold.

The representation of a young Venetian


here given

is

taken from a picture of

Crivelli,

preserved in the gallery of Biera at Milan.

His head

is

covered by a bonnet of scarlet

wool, such as was generally

young men of the

is

lined with similar

material, but of a green color,


gold;

shirt-collar,
is

edged with

border of the cloak about the

the

neck, above which

which

the

The small velvet

time.

cloak, of a lake color,

worn by

is

also

not, as in

open on the

seen the edge of the

is

of

gold.

many

side, is

The

cloak,

similar costumes,

thrown up on the

left

shoulder, and partly covers the right hand.

The collar-band

is

of gold, and
22

is

enriched

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

with rows of pearls and precious stones.

The doublet is sky-blue, ornamented with

sil-

ver flower-work; the crimson velvet sleeve,

dashed with gold, open from the wrist to


the elbow, shows the shirt beneath, and

brought together by red

lacets.

The

is

slash

adorned with a

in the side of the doublet

is

braid stitched with gold.

The border below

consists of a

band of gold

lace,

with embroidered work of a lake


girdle

is

ornamented
color.

The

of green velvet, edged with gold.

The hose are made of

scarlet cloth;

the

shoes are red, and are laced with a yellow


cord; or yellow, laced with a red cord.

lance bears a streamer, which

and red below.


22

is

The

white above

A NOBLE LADY OF M LAN.(


I

I5 T H
.

CENTUR V.

A LADY OF BANK

OF MILAN.

CLOSE OF THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY.

HIS elegant costume


is

taken from a

iature
others,

which,

min^.

with

ornaments a small

book of prayers. The execution and finish of these precious


'paintings leave

the

concerning
they belong.

no room

for

doubt

epoch to which

The date may be

fixed as near the close of the fifteenth century.

This lady has her head dressed with a


small white bonnet, bordered with pearls

and enriched with precious


23

stones.

The

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
cloak

red, with golden embroideries

is

green

The outer robe

lining.

some white

material,

is

is

blue.

made

of

bordered with gold

and having a lining of a lake


inner robe

and

color.

The

The stockings are crim-

son,

and are adorned with golden spangles.

The

sleeves belong to the outer robe; they

have a lining of a lake


dered with gold.

color,

The small cord which

passes over the forehead,

with a precious stone,


allowed to

The

fall

and are bor-

is

and

is

adorned

black; the hair

is

unconfined.

ladies of this

period,

as

many

of

the contemporary paintings show, were in

the habit of carrying their book of prayers


in a

kind of a silken or velvet bag, richly

worked.

The noblewoman here represent-

ed holds her book open upon


ment, which

is

this

envelop-

here of crimson velvet.


23

SOLDIER.

A VENETIAN

SOLDIER

-THOUGH
mediaeval

costumes

the

military

were

as

varied as are those of our


'day, yet styles

not materially

dif-

ferent from that of the Venetian

we have

soldier

here given are

found in the old illuminated books of

many
soldier,

of the European nations.

though doubly armed, has on but

comparatively

little

armor, which was falling

gradually into disuse at this time.


consists of a jacket

are

made very

bands

This

at

short

full,

The dress

and breeches, which


and bound down with

distances,
24

forming

puffs.

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

These puffs are slashed, displaying the under-garments, which are white.
feather,

which

dress, does

is

marked

not vary from

it

was sometimes of a bright


ers of a

deep orange.
24

The long

feature of this
in color,

red,

which

and at oth-

LADV

IN

HIT

SUM

Of

HU DAUPHINI

UJ.VI

'

LADY

BELONGING TO THE SUITE OP THE DAUPHINESS D'AUYERGNE.

'HE costume here

re-

presented, of a lady
in

the

suite

of

Anne

D'Auvergne, wife of Louis

Due de Bourbon,

is

II,

copied from

an armorial record of Auvergne.


This lady came to the court of

France with the Dauphiness in 1371.


It

was

in the

fourteenth

century

that the custom began of blazoning armorial

bearings upon the dress; but


the

reign

of Charles

became general

in

France.
25

it

was not

that the

till

custom

PEASANT WOMAN OF THE CANTON FRIBOURG.

A PEASANT WOMAN
OP THE CANTON OF FRIBOURG, IN FESTAL HABIT.

HIS costume

differs

in every respect from

that of the

Romance

peasants.

cap,

surmounted with a crown

of artificial flowers
colors,

of various

grouped harmoniously, and

bound by a

silver cord.

parted upon, the forehead, and

two

The head

dressed in a black bonnet or

is

in

French or

The
falls

hair

is

behind

free, floating masses, confined

by a

ribbon varying from scarlet to green.

Around
of

the neck

a bluish

tint.

is

A
27

an antique linen ruff


fine

black or deep

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

brown under- waist, garnished with black


velvet ribbons,

covers

the

shoulders in winter, while


tiful

iri

arms and the

summer beau-

white linen sleeves, with lace

ruffles,

extend from a scarlet bodice, from which


hangs a petticoat of the same

color.

Above

the ruffs that surround the neck they wear

a black neck-piece of cut velvet, adorned

with black velvet ribbons.

The

corselet

is

laced over the breast with ribbons of vari-

ous colors, mingled with silver and gold;

and over

hung a
is

called

this a silver chain,

upon which

is

box of an oval shape, which


Agnus Dei, and which is more or

silver

less richly

worked, according to the fortune

of the wearer.

black silk apron, tied be-

hind by a large ribbon worked with variegated flowers, or with silver and gold, after
the

manner

of a scarf, completes this singu27

HISTORICAL COSTUMES,
larly rich apparel, which,

person, shows to fine


sides

upon a beautiful
effect, and which becostumes of the

forcibly the

recalls

fifteenth century.

The dressing of the

feet

and

legs

is

very

ordinary, consisting of white stockings, and

black

with large

shoes

buckles.

silver

or

leather

Pointed heels have grown into

gradual disuse.

Only young

girls

have the

privilege

women

of wearing the crown.


are

dressed

in

all

Married

respects

maidens, except that the black cap


set off with the crown.
27

is

like

not

ii

A CAVALI E R.

A CAYALIEE.
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY.

/RESS

at this

epoch
had undergone great
changes in
of

countries

ithe

were

Boots

many

of

Europe.

beginning

to

be very generally used, and the

trunks" or breeches, which for

some time had been

now extended below


cloak

which

across

the

left

had

were

The small

been previously

worn

back was now placed on the

shoulder.

The

and curled; large


and even

the knee.

short,

hair

was worn long


edged with

lace,

lace trimmings to the boots,

were

collars

28

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

much

in vogue.

came

into such general use, appeared about

this time.

The

cane, which afterwards

The exact

style of

costume here

represented prevailed more particularly in

France about the time of Richelieu.


28

A YO U N G ITALIAN LADY. 12QO

A YOUNG

ITALIAN LADY.

FTER observing the


ancient paintings,
is

if

it

easy to perceive that,

the costume of

women

in gen-

eral justified the passage of laws

to restrain their too great

mag-

nificence of dress, nevertheless

the costume of

young

girls

always

united modesty with richness, and

ought to disarm the most severe censors.

Ambroise Lorenzetti did not deem the

tume here represented unworthy

to

cos-

deck

the blessed ones in his picture of

The Last

work

that the

Judgment;

it

accompanying

is

from

figure

is
29

this

taken.

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

The outer robe

of a rose color, and

The under-dress

edged with gold.


blue,

is

and permits the

collar of the

is

is

bright

chemise

The sleeves open from the elbow


the wrist, edged and laced with a golden

to show.
to

cord,

showing another white sleeve beneath.

The

hair,

though held back by a small

chain, falls free

upon her

then the custom with

all

shoulders, as

young

girls

was

before

their marriage.

The shoes are of blue

velvet,

embroidered

with gold.

Rlcordano Malespini, the historian, contrasts the richness of this

costume with the

dress of the Florentines prior to the year

1260:
;

'

Then

the inhabitants of Florence were

sober; their food


sive,

was simple and inexpen-

but their manners were good.

They

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
did not despise the coarsest stuffs for their
dress, or for that of their wives.

Many even

covered themselves with simple skins and


plain bonnets.

narrow petticoat made

of a coarse

material of goat's hair, of a

scarlet color,

and gathered around the waist

by a leathern

girdle,

having a buckle a

V antique; a cloak lined with minever, with

a hood at the back

which the

such was the dress with

women were
29

content."

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.
did not despise the coarsest stuffs for their
dress, or for that of their wives.

Many even

covered themselves with simple skins and


plain bonnets.

narrow petticoat made

of a coarse

material of goat's hair, of a

scarlet color,

and gathered around the waist

by a leathern

girdle,

having a buckle a

V antique; a cloak lined with minever, with

a hood at the back

which the

such was the dress with

women were
29

content."

FRENCH NOBLEMAN, !|365.)

A FKENCH NOBLEMAN.
1365.

OWARD
the

the end of
of

reign

King

John fashionable gentlemen began to pink the borders of their robes; but under

Charles

this

and continued
century.
also of

The

became the

rage,

into the fifteenth

fashion

continued

wearing long half

sleeves,

appendages embroidered with gold, or long


ribbons reaching to

Charles

was

ground.

Under

the Zpitoge, or presidential cap,

laid aside,

stituted

the

and

two wide

in its place
epaulieres,
so

were sub-

or shoulder-

HISTORICAL COSTUMES.

pieces,

which formed

sleeves

and a

at the

same time

The queue

false collar.

false

of the

hood, greatly lengthened during the reign


of

King John, and

prolonged

till it

after

his

death,

was

reached the ground, in the

form of a cord, which was sometimes tied


around the head.

There were

also in fash-

ion certain kinds of cardinals or pelisses,

with several queues, or pinked in various


ways,

and worn often on the shoulders.

Noblemen

ordinarily

wore

for great occasions they

open on the
the

breast

right, or

chapes, or caps;

wore a large cloak

having two

from

slits

down, and furnished with an

Armorial bearings were very

epitoge.

little

used except on state occasions; people contented themselves with taking the armorial
colors

for their

suits of

ordinary garments;

two and sometimes three


30

hence

colors.

BINDING SECT.

JUL2gi8l

PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE

CARDS OR

SLIPS

FROM THIS POCKET

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY

GT

575
H55

Hinton, Henry L.
Select historical costumes