THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

Nurturing
responsibility
Knowledge gained at school becomes widely beneficial when
used to drive real community change. See inside to learn how
and why students should take part in social initiatives.

2 Bright Kids

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

Action comes from compassion
By THERESA BELLE
THE power of charity lies in the
ability to make great change with
small ideas. Children of all ages are
able to reach out to others by
contributing to a cause they are
passionate about, encouraged by
parents, teachers and peers.
Whether tied to the curriculum
or extracurricular societies,
nurturing good values in socially
responsible young citizens are a
priority in schools today.
Students could be passionate
about different causes – animal
welfare, education, health or
refugees – but are united by the
common goal of practising and
applying social responsibility early
on in life to develop a lifelong
charitable spirit and considerate
mind.
Many international schools have
a social awareness and action
element embedded in the
curriculum that facilitates the
learning process by initating
discussions and programme
planning.
One of the popular causes at
school level is the environment –
after all, one of the most
widespread environmental plights
is to “save the planet for our
children”.
In the International
Baccalaureate (IB) programme,
students are given opportunties to
link class content with social
learning initiatives throughout
their time at school.
Principal of UCSI International
School Springhill (an IB World
School), Alexander Trespach
Nenes, explains that this
component within the curriculum
is called Action in PYP in the
Primary Years Programme (PYP),
Service as Action of Community
Projects in the Middle Years
Programme, and long-term service
projects through Creativity, Action
and Service in the IB Diploma
Programme (IBDP).
For example, UCSI’s IBDP
students are running a mini social
enterprise called GForce, which is
aimed at raising awareness on
sustainability and recyling.
“By encouraging students,
teachers and parents to sort their

as these, with parents acting as the
primary role models for children
before they join school.
“Charity begins at home. A
sense of social responsibility is
first nurtured at home, then
strengthened through school
pastoral programmes,” says Br
Lavin.
He adds that a key component of
nurturing socially responsible
students at SJIIM is the Religious
and Values Education subject,
which encourages value
clarification as well as promotes an
understanding of and commitment
to social responsibility among
young ones.

Beyond charity

trash before disposing, these
students have helped the school
reduce the amount of garbage sent
to the local landfill by 40%,” says
Nenes.
Another hands-on initiative at
the school is Service Day, where
students, parents, faculty and local
community members get together
to engage in activities such as
beach cleaning or visits to the old
folks’ home in neighbouring Port
Dickson.

Values-oriented
Extracurricular involvement is
another way to get students to
exercise their charitable muscles.
According to Ada Chan, Interact
teacher advisor at elc International
School, peer influence is a major
aspect of getting kids interested in
these activities.
The Interact Club, for example,
is a chapter of non-profit
organisation Rotary International,
set up for young people aged 12 to
18 to take on community issues

they are passionate about.
“When Interactors start
something and share with their
friends, they tell them how they
feel about helping others. When
other students see the joy of the
friends carrying out social work,
they will take action too. One
affects another,” she says.
Through the Interact Club at elc
International School, there are
plans being made for students to
visit refugee, children or old folks’
homes regularly.
Kumar Nagappan, acting head of
secondary and head of pastoral
care at elc International School,
says that students in this club are
encouraged to get involved at the
grassroots level as the value of
helping others can only be learnt
through active engagement.
“One-off projects where you
raise funds, go to a home for a day,
hand over the money and come
back are not as impactful to
students,” opines Kumar.
“Students are encouraged to get
involved with planning and

coordination in school, but a lot of
the active engagement happens
outside school hours.”
Then, there are schools that
espouse charity and service as part
of the values education. One of
these is St Joseph’s Institution
International School Malaysia
(SJIIM), where there are weekly
formation programmes in
Lasallian values with a continuous
emphasis on service.
“At the heart of our education
are the core Lasallian values of
faith, service and community,
expressed in our mission statement
as ‘empowering our students to
become people of integrity and
people for others’,” says Br Thomas
Lavin, Brother President at SJIIM.
The new school has already
started the ball rolling with
shoebox collections for needy
families, bake sales and a
Christmas fundraising drive for
Lasallian service projects in the
country.
Parental involvement is
important in social initiatives such

Social work is about personal
and professional development as
much as it is about giving to others,
and educators recognise this as a
crucial aspect of modern
education. Students stand to reap
multiple benefits through planning,
organising, implementing and
following up on social initiatives.
“At the most basic level, students
get to improve their engagement
with people, improve their
communication skills and feel good
about themselves. This feeling they
get in their hearts is something that
simply cannot be bought,” says
Kumar.
He ties this to better selfsatisfaction and mental health
among students, asserting that
making a positive difference in the
lives of others gives meaning to
one’s life.
“When you’re doing charity, it is
always about teamwork. Students
learn to respect each other, stay
humble and learn from each other.
They will learn about leadership,
how to work with others, and to
put differences aside in working
towards a common purpose,” says
Chan.
After all, being part of a
community in which you can make
significant contributions is a
hallmark of a harmonious society.
Coming together to consolidate
efforts and expertise provides an
altogether more rewarding
experience and it is never too early
for children to learn this.

Bright Kids 3

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

DID you know that there are
significant differences between the
common cold and the flu?
While colds are mild viral
infections that one recovers from
within a week or two, influenza,
also known as the flu, is a more
severe viral disease that affects
humans and many animals.
These viruses attack the
respiratory system to cause
problems in the nose, throat and
lungs.
Although the flu can be treated
with medication, fluids and rest, it
can also lead to serious health
complications such as pneumonia,
bronchitis and asthma flare-ups
among high-risk individuals.
Every year, infants, children,
teenagers and adults die from the
complications brought about by the
disease.
Understanding the symptoms,
risk factors and effective treatment
methods can help keep your family
safe from the detrimental effects of
influenza.

Signs and risks
Influenza can be caused by
several strains of viruses that enter
the body via the nose or mouth.
These viruses are transmitted via
the air in droplets when an
infected person coughs, sneezes or
talks.
Typical signs of the flu include
fever and chills, sore throat, cough,
headache and runny or stuffy nose.
It is also common to experience
muscle aches and fatigue when
you catch the flu.
This disease can pose a
serious health risk to people of all
ages but is particularly dangerous
to children. Children under the
age of two are at high risk of
hospitalisation due to
complications brought about

Understanding the flu

Vaccination can protect you and your children from influenza.
by influenza.
This is because the immune
system of a child is not yet fully
developed to protect against viral
infections.
On a related note, individuals
with weakened immune systems
are also more susceptible to
developing severe complications,
as are babies, adults older than 65
years old and pregnant women.

Handle with care
So what should you do if you
suspect you have the flu?
In mild cases, it is important that
you stay home to prevent
spreading the virus to others in
your office, school or social circle.
Use this time off to get sufficient
rest and drink lots of fluids to
replenish your body.

Influenza should not be taken
lightly, especially if you begin to
display serious complications. Visit
a doctor or go to the emergency
room if you are experiencing:
l Difficulty in breathing or
shortness of breath
l Pain or pressure in the chest
or abdomen
l Sudden dizziness
l Confusion
l Severe or persistent
vomiting
A healthy balance of
nutrients can help keep
the immune system strong
to protect the body from
infections.
Hence, steps you can take
to prevent the flu include
consuming vitamins, especially
vitamin C. Also, be sure to

consume enough vegetables and
fruits daily to fulfil your fibre
requirements.
The best way to protect your
children from the seasonal flu is
vaccination. Vaccines not only
protect the immunised but those
around them too, thanks to the
cultivation of herd immunity.
All individuals above the age of
six months should get vaccinated
against influenza every year for
optimum protection.
However, not all individuals are
eligible for the influenza vaccine.
For example, those who have
previously experienced a
life-threatening allergic reaction
to a dose of the vaccine are advised
to avoid immunisation.
Those suffering from or with a
history of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

are also advised to not receive the
flu vaccine.
It may not be risky to get this
vaccine when you are down with a
mild illness, but you may be asked
to return for it when you feel
better to prevent exacerbating
your condition.
Be proactive and practise good
hygiene habits such as hand
washing at all times to keep
harmful viruses away.

n This article is brought to you by
your partner in health, Guardian
Health and Beauty Sdn Bhd.

Although the flu is a potentially severe viral disease that attacks the
respiratory system, it can be treated with medication, fluids and rest.

4 Bright Kids
THE crowd went wild as R.E.A.L
International Schools Junior 4
student Jayden Ng Kyler appeared
on stage with a white glove on his
left hand, donning a white fedora.
Ng danced Michael Jackson’s
signature moves while singing to
They Don’t Care About Us as it
blasted from the speakers.
This was one of the many
entertaining performances on
show during the R.E.A.L Got Talent
event organised by the R.E.A.L
International Schools, Shah Alam
Campus.
Scheduled to take place every
school term, this year’s finals were
held on Nov 25 at the school’s Hall
of Character.

A concert with a charitable
cause
A group of orphans from the
Praise Emmanuel Children’s Home
(PECH) was invited to witness
the event as part of the school’s
long-term engagement with local
welfare homes and non-profit
organisations.
Various activities and social

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

Talents take centre stage
Left: Hydra, a local
cover band, was one
of the guest artistes
who performed at
R.E.A.L Got Talent.
Right: R.E.A.L Schools,
Shah Alam Campus
general manager
Serena Chow
(leftmost) with the top
three winners of
R.E.A.L Got Talent.
outreach programmes are organised
throughout the year in collaboration
with selected orphanages.
This is so that R.E.A.L students can
play their part in contributing to the
community and make a difference in
the lives of the less fortunate.
This is the hallmark of R.E.A.L
education. Beyond academic pursuits

and achievements, a bona fide
R.E.A.L student is nurtured to be a
well-rounded individual – one who is
committed to being a lifelong learner
and equipped with exemplary values,
creativity and confidence.
At R.E.A.L Schools, students are
encouraged to be actively involved in
their learning processes. Pioneering

projects such as R.E.A.L Got
Talent are geared towards
enhancing students’
transformative learning
experiences. Hence, the
education at R.E.A.L Schools is
more than just learning, it is an
experience.

A touch of star quality
Adding to the glitz and
glamour were specially invited
guest artistes comprising local
singers and musicians who
took time off from their busy
schedule to attend the event
and play their part for the
orphans.
They entertained and inspired
the younger generation to
nurture their talents so that they
may chase their dreams and
ambitions.
The line-up of professional
performers included Bhizhu,
Chanelle, Sha Sha and Din as
well as top cover band, Hydra.
Each artiste brought
something different to the plate,
from jazz music to catchy guitar

acoustics and powerful vocals.
The diverse mix of music
genres appealed to the eclectic
taste of the audience, who had
fun singing and swaying along
to pop songs by the likes of
Bruno Mars, Jessie J and Michael
Buble.
“The response of this event
was encouraging. R.E.A.L Got
Talent is not just a showcase of
what our students are capable of
but is also an avenue for parents
to see their children build
confidence on stage and be able
to perform in public.
“It is also hoped that all the
guest artistes who have
graciously made time to attend
this event will inspire our young
participants to reach greater
heights,” said Serena Chow,
general manager of R.E.A.L
Schools, Shah Alam Campus.

n For more information, call
03-9021 3601 (Cheras Campus),
03-7842 3228 (Shah Alam
Campus) or 07-386 4468
(Johor Bahru Campus) or visit
www.realschools.edu.my.
Hor Shing
Huann
(left) and
his father
Hor Cheng
Chang
have many
customers
who come
to their
shop to
buy
Morinaga
Chil-kid
products.

Milking the benefits
HOR Cheng Chang Enterprise
started its operation in 2005 as a
mini market to cater for the
people around Setapak.
Over the period of more than
10 years, its business grew and
expanded. It recently adopted
the modern concept of mini
market, whereby it not only
carries more products but offers
wholesale trading too.
You can find a wide range of
products under the roof of this
one-stop mini market, including
milk formulae, baby diapers,
sundry products and daily
necessities. It also offers
customised hampers for all
festive seasons.
The father-and-son team has
been taking care of the shop’s
operation for many years. They
are happy with Morinaga’s
products and its sales services.
They started selling Morinaga
milk products a year ago. Since
then, they have experienced

tremendous sales growth,
gaining confidence from
consumers.
According to the son,
Shing Huann, many customers
turn to Morinaga Chil-kid when
their children have constipation
or poor appetite.
The milk formula contains
prebiotics, which are helpful in
strengthening children’s
immune system.
If you wish to let your loved
ones try Morinaga Chil-kid, you
can apply for a voucher at
morinagatpv.oz-marketing.com
to get a box of Morinaga Chil-kid
Trial Pack 700g at RM20 (retail
sale price is RM52).
This promotion is only
applicable for children one year
old and above. One family is
entitled to one voucher only.

n For more information, call

Hor Cheng Chang Enterprise at
03-4024 0272.

Bright Kids 5

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

DO you want your children to fulfil
their potential? If yes, give them
the best possible start in life at
Beaconhouse.
Beaconhouse strives to help
students achieve their intellectual
potential as well as develop their
confidence and lifelong learning
skills through a holistic learning
experience.

Inspiring global learners
20. BISC is part of Beaconhouse’s
effort to inculcate the independent
global learner in each of its
students. The first BISC was hosted
by Beaconhouse Thailand early
this year.
The event serves to bring
together Beaconhouse’s worldwide
network of schools, leading to a
global community of students and
teachers.
Participants from Pakistan,
Thailand, Oman, the Philippines
and Malaysia will converge at the
Panasonic Stadium, Shah Alam,
to participate in sporting activities
such as futsal, basketball, athletics,
swimming and badminton.
In addition, co-curricular
competitions such as art and
science exhibits, B-Talks
(Beaconhouse talks), quizzes,
Beaconhouse Idol and cultural
performances will be held at the
newly launched sports complex at
the Sri Inai International School,
Petaling Jaya.

The Beaconhouse group
Established 41 years ago, the
Beaconhouse group is dedicated to
providing quality education from
preschool to postgraduate levels.
Today the group is one of the
largest, most established school
networks in the world with more
than 247,000 students in eight
countries – Malaysia, the United
Kingdom, Oman, the United Arab
Emirates, Pakistan, the Philippines,
Belgium and Thailand.

Beaconhouse Malaysia
In Malaysia, Beaconhouse owns
and operates 12 schools within the
Klang Valley. They comprise eight
preschools, two private primary
and secondary schools that offer
the national curriculum, and two
international schools that offer the
Cambridge International General
Certificate of Secondary Education
programmes.

Beaconhouse Newlands
Early Years
This month, Beaconhouse
Malaysia is introducing a new
international preschool, the
Beaconhouse Newlands Early Years
(BNEY). Parents can register their
children at BNEY as admissions are
open for the 2017 intake.

The Beaconhouse group was established 41 years ago, striving to empower students to become independent global
learners.
The BNEY programme provides
students with a holistic education
by combining the best of the UK
early years foundation stage (EYFS)
framework with the Beaconhouse
School System curriculum.
BNEY is based on international,
developmentally appropriate
practices to provide a dynamic
start in a child’s early years. The
structure for BNEY embraces the

philosophy of constructivism
where children are natural leaders
of their own learning experiences.
BNEY creates opportunities to
inspire and nurture children to
build on their enthusiasm,
curiosity and creativity.
Imaginative play as well as
designing and constructing
through physical play are
encouraged to help children

explore and discover that learning
is fun.

Beaconhouse International
Student Convention
Next year, Beaconhouse will
be hosting the Beaconhouse
International Student Convention
(BISC) in Malaysia from Jan 18 to

High standards
Beaconhouse aims to bring
success within the reach of every
student through its high teaching
standards and challenging
programmes.
Let Beaconhouse help prepare
your children for their future by
empowering and inspiring them to
excel and become independent
global learners.

n For more information, call
03-5632 2100 or e-mail
marketing@beaconhouse.edu.my.

6 Bright Kids
AS we enter the season of giving, it
is gratifying to note that Malaysia
ranks 10th in Charities Aid
Foundation’s CAF World Giving
Index 2015.
It just goes to show how much
our society is beginning to accept
and embrace altruism as a way of
life.
Thus, despite the many
inequalities, lack of medical
supplies, and deaths and
destruction affecting humanity, we
have a reason to hope for a better
future and world.
There are many causes, ranging
from people and animals to the
environment, that need our
support and awareness.
You might ask, “How do I get
myself involved?” You can begin
by considering what stirs up your
sense of purpose, sparks your
passion or stokes your indignation,
but no matter which angle you
take, it all starts with you.
In Malaysia, it could be the
rampant destruction of our
rainforest, the dwindling number
of Malayan tigers or the negativity
and apathy that society shows
towards refugees – the list goes on.
When we combine our efforts
with other organisations and
individuals, we make an even
bigger impact.
Like interconnected neurons
that link to one another to form a
working system that supports an
even bigger mass of needs, we
each create a significant point of
contact.
Within Malaysia, elc
International School is one such
link in the continually expanding
network of organisations and
individuals working together to
support social work and charity.
Through collaborations with The
Truly Loving Company and the

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

Social work and charity
or Do Something Good (Malaysia).
Engaging yourself in social work
and charity does not have to
be a full-time occupation or
commitment. It is another aspect
of life such as work and family that
adds value to your personal
growth and experience.
In reality, it is we who decide
how much of ourselves we put into
the different facets of our lives,
including altruistic living.
So, would you walk hand in
hand with the growing number of
Malaysians who are choosing to
make a difference? Think about it.
– By Jessie Mohanraj, ECA
(extracurricular activities)
coordinator at elc International
School

n For more information, visit
www.elc.edu.my.

Students at elc International School engage in various charitable causes throughout their time at school.
Rotary Club Malaysia via the
school’s Interact Club, elc
International School’s goodwill has
a reach beyond that of a solitary
organisation or individual. This is
where the principle of unity in
numbers comes to life.
When we each try doing our
individual part by supporting a
cause, it can seem overwhelming
and our efforts deemed as
insignificant as pushing against the
ocean waves, but you should not
give up.
There is strength in numbers,
but if the numbers are not on your

side, remember that fighting with
you against this ocean tide are the
courageous few who wave their
flags and banners about for change
and a better future.
In the words of American
cultural anthropologist Margaret
Mead, “A small group of thoughtful
people could change the world.
Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever
has.”
Your action may not seem like
the most elaborate gesture of
goodwill, but in your own way, you
can make the world a better place.
Think about the best way

forward for you or ask
your friends and
family what causes
they support to see
how you too could
get involved.
You could
even connect
with the
various local
causes and
nongovernmental
organisations
via networks
such as Hati.my

Organisations such as the Interact Club allow
students to extend their reach of goodwill.

Bright Kids 7

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

CAN critical and creative thinking,
conceived as excellence in
thinking, be taught to children?
Would solving mathematical
problems help children develop
these thinking skills?
Dr Fong Ho Kheong, founder of
BrainBuilder, Dr Fong Singapore
Maths and director of Dr H. K.
Fong BrainBuilder Sdn Bhd,
addressed this issue when he
delivered a keynote speech in June
this year at the University of
Oxford, the United Kingdom.
He discussed how his strategies
and techniques can help students
increase their mathematical
capabilities as well as nurture their
critical and creative thinking
abilities.
Critical thinking is the ability to
analyse a problematic situation
through a series of questioning and
proposing possible solutions to
the problem. It also involves
connecting knowledge embedded
in the person’s short-term and
long-term memory.
Dr Fong did a research on
critical thinking to discover if
students could respond critically to
the question: “What will happen to
a glass ball when it is dropped to
the floor?”
Students responded to this
question at different cognitive
levels. Many said the glass ball
would break as it was made of
glass. Some students thought
critically and asked, “What sort of
floor do you have? Is it made of
concrete or thin or thick carpets?”
Students with higher-level
thinking skills were able to connect
to other variables mathematically,
saying that it depended on the size
of the glass ball and from what
level it was dropped.
Creative thinking is the ability to
connect knowledge through critical

Empowering minds
The strategies
and
techniques
developed by
Dr Fong (right)
not only
increase
mathematical
capabilities
but also aid in
nurturing
critical and
creative
thinking
abilities.
thinking and produce a new idea.
In his speech, Dr Fong concluded
that students can develop creative
and critical thinking skills through
the right method of mathematical
problem-solving.
Dr Fong’s BrainBuilder
programmes have been carefully
designed based on the proven
Singapore Maths methods to equip
students with critical and creative
higher-order thinking skills.
Students are continuously
challenged, intellectually
stimulated and encouraged to look
at different methods to solve one
problem.
BrainBuilder Learning Centres
offers a list of programmes to help
children achieve their individual
needs – Power Maths, Enrich Plus,
Funda Maths, Test and Competition

unique to the programme
l To master dynamic and
effective strategies to solve verbal
problems, which many students
find difficult
l Higher-order thinking and
reasoning skills, which include
application, analysis, synthesis
and evaluation

Preparation, and Holiday Program.
The Power Maths programme is
designed for students who aspire
to succeed in mathematics at
school or learn Singapore’s
mathematics curriculum and
strategies.
It aims to build a solid
mathematics foundation for your
child – from basic concepts to
more challenging mathematical
problems.
Students of this programme
learn:
l To equip themselves with
basic skills prior to embarking on
more challenging problems of each
topic using the “scaffolding” and
concrete-pictorial-abstract (CPA)
approaches
l To use powerful and effective
problem-solving strategies that are

Enrich Plus is an extension
programme designed for
higher-level students who wish to
excel in mathematics at the highest
level.
The programme is suitable for
students who will be sitting for
any competing mathematics
assessments such as the Australian
Mathematics Competition (AMC),
International Competitions and
Assessments for Schools (ICAS),

Singapore Mathematics
Achievement Tests (SMAT) and
various Maths Olympics
competitions.
Students in this programme
develop a higher level of thinking
skills through:
l Exploring various creative
strategies for solving challenging
mathematical problems
l Identifying the best, most
dynamic and powerful strategies
for solving mathematical
problems that require higherorder thinking
l Training their ability to solve
problems in depth and breadth
BrainBuilder involves four
stages of assessment to monitor
students’ progress. Upon
enrolment, students are assessed
using the placement test to
determine the appropriate level
to begin their mathematics
programme. They are also
monitored through an informal
assessment for each topic studied.
In the middle and at the end
of each year, students sit for
diagnostic and formal
assessments respectively, using
the SMAT designed by Dr Fong.
Brain Builder has been voted by
Parents magazine of Singapore as
the best mind development
programme in Singapore,
focusing on critical and creative
thinking.

n For more information,

call 65-9756 6989, e-mail
mail@drfonghokheong.com or
visit brainbuildermaths.com.

Talks by Dr Fong Ho Kheong

Singapore Maths Achievement Tests (SMAT)

Attractive Prizes and Scholarships to be won
Year: Year 1 to Year 6
Date: 9 Jan 2017
Time: 3pm
Fees: MR35 Each participant to be issued with Certificate
Examination Centres: Petaling Jaya, Penang and Johore Baru

Talks at the following BrainBuilder centers.
Call for details and RSVP:

07 Jan 2017
3.00pm
08 Jan 2017 11.00am
08 Jan 2017
3.00pm
14 Jan 2017 10.30am
14 Jan 2017
3.00pm
15 Jan 2017 10.00am
15 Jan 2017
2.30pm

 A Maths competition to assess your strengths in solving maths problems
 The Test is benchmarked against the Singapore Maths standard
Call 012 5224522 / 016 594109 or Mail the form and cheque (MR35) to:
Dr H K Fong Brainbuilder Sdn. Bhd.
C-20-02, Dataran 3 Two, Jalan 19/1, 46300 Petaling Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan
Name of Student:

Age :

School year std:

(in 2016)

016 772 0264
013 353 9511
018 203 1788
012 952 5377
010 522 4522
011 11810199
012 9643684

Bring your children for free Maths assessment.
Priority given to parents who bring their children
along for assessment.
Register now. Seats limited.

Name of School:
Previous competitions sat and achievements obtained:
Name of Parent/Legal Guardian:

Taman Megah
Sri Petaling
PJ Section 14
Cheras
Setapak
Subang Jaya SS18
Sri Damansara

Phone number:

Email Address:

BrainBuilder Centers in Malaysia •Enrol your child to the nearest Centre • Contact and make an appointment for a free Maths assessment of your child
Petaling Jaya & Kuala Lumpur
Cheras
Puchong
PJ Section 14
Setapak
Setia Alam
Sri Damansara

012 952 5377
012 952 5377
018 203 1788
010 522 4522
016 594 1099
012 9643684

Penang & Bukit Mertajam
Sri Hartamas
Sri Petaling
Subang Jaya SS18
Subang Jaya USJ21
Taman Megah
Taman Tun Dr Ismail

016
013
011
011
016
012

391 3185
353 9511
1181 0199
3696 9108
772 0264
366 8377

Bukit Jambul
Tanjong Tokong
Bukit Mertajam

Perak

Ipoh Garden (South)

017 340 4131
017 636 0377
012 410 7361
012 320 1268

Johore
Batu Bahat
Plentong J.B.

Malacca

Malacca

BrainBuilderMY SMAT@brainbuildermaths.com.my

016 594 1099
010 522 4522
016 668 6819

http://brainbuildermaths.com/

8 Bright Kids

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

Head-to-toe
freshness

MAINTAINING good hygiene is a lifelong
lesson that parents begin teaching their
children early in life.
Among the first essential hygiene habits
children learn are washing hands before
meals, brushing teeth regularly and wearing
fresh clothes. As they get older, kids also
learn to clean up and take showers
independently.
All of these are important milestones in
learning about being hygienic. Children
should also know why it is important to
keep themselves clean.
Staying clean and looking good are not
only beneficial in creating positive first
impressions but will ensure kids grow up
prioritising personal hygiene and wellbeing. This cultivates responsible habits to
nurture healthy kids that take self
grooming seriously.

Fun, fragrant formula
Guardian Kids Yoghurt Head to Toe Wash
is specially formulated to deliver the
goodness of yoghurt and honey to cleanse
and moisturise hair and skin.
This mild and gentle wash is enriched
with yoghurt powder, which contains
vitamins A, B1, B2, B5 and B6 as well as
minerals to provide nutrients to the skin,
scalp and hair – all in one bottle.
It is suitable for kids of all ages thanks to
the tear-free, pH-balanced formula, which is
safer for little ones who may get soap suds in
their eyes during bath time.
The addition of honey in this refreshing
head-to-toe wash helps retain moisture on
the body and hair while the pH balance

A passion to learn
WITH almost 200 centres regionally, Q-dees
has successfully prepared more than 200,000
students for national and international
schools for more than 25 years.
Q-dees Starters, its cutting-edge preschool
programme, includes interactive learning
materials that are meticulously integrated to
ensure children are constantly engaged in
achieving fruitful learning outcomes.
The language programmes are geared for
children to master English, Bahasa Malaysia
and Mandarin. Taught thematically and
phonetically, the lessons encourage children
to expand their vocabulary and foster
correct usage of the languages.
At Q-dees, seemingly complex
mathematics concepts are made simple and
fun for children. The Hands-On Mind-On
Mathsboard allows children to explore
concepts as they learn to count and think
efficiently and logically.

Guardian Kids Yoghurt Head to Toe Wash
comes in Orange Zest and Strawberry Splash
variants.
leaves skin soothed, conditioned and velvety
soft with an invigorating scent.
All of these come together in a fun,
fragrant formula to make bath time
enjoyable for your young ones.
Guardian Kids Yoghurt Head to Toe Wash
comes in 800ml bottles in Orange Zest and
Strawberry Splash variants.

n This article is brought to you by your
partner in health, Guardian Health and
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Q-dees offers a range of programmes to
nurture well-balanced children with inquisitive
minds.

The science programme is designed to
make science simple and stimulating to
learn. Its lessons encourage active
participation from children, igniting their
curiosity.
Q-dees’ art and craft programme develops
children’s creativity and imagination in
tandem with the daily theme.
Through the Gymflex programme, they
develop fine and gross motor skills through
fun physical activities and games.
In unison, Q-dees Love to Life programme
is infused with good values that teach
children to be responsible and caring
individuals.
Q-dees Scholars offers primary level
enrichment programmes in IQ Math and
International English, which are
internationally benchmarked to prepare
children for primary education and beyond.
The award-winning Q-dees Link & Think
Methodology applied in Q-dees Scholars
guides your child to link logical and creative
thinking as well as accelerates intellectual
and artistic developments.
It links what young individuals have
learnt at Q-dees Starters preschool to the
next level in primary school.
IQ Math caters to inquisitive minds by
providing a platform to conceptualise logical
processes.
The Q-dees Scholars International English
programme is designed to instil children
with the confidence to listen, read, write,
converse and exhibit their expertise in the
English vocabulary through the use of
interactive multimedia.
The Q-dees Scholars programmes’ usage of
interactive multimedia through the Q-dees
Hub (digital learning software) stimulates
your child’s interest through the use of
graphics and songs as well as increases your
child’s grasp of technological advancements.

n For more information, call 1700 815 077
or visit www.q-dees.com.

Bright Kids 9

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

A GOOD quality of life is achieved
through service towards others.
This service is beneficial to the
person who serves as well as the
recipient of this service. As Robert
G. Ingersoll said, “We rise by lifting
others.” Through acts of service,
we grow.
The UCSI International School
Subang community strongly
believes that service towards
others is a step towards enhancing
and touching lives.
After conducting research to
identify the community they would
like to aid in, the student body
determined that they would
support the Rohingya children’s
commmunity because the students
felt they could relate to and
understand the needs of the
Rohingya children as they are kids
themselves.
The school community first
went to the Rohingya children’s
learning centre to get first hand
insight into their lives.
This allowed the students to
plan activities to raise awareness
and educate the USCI school
community on the plight of the
Rohingya children.
The objective of the activities is
to raise funds for the different
needs of the Rohingya children.
These activities allowed the school
community to bond as they worked
together towards a common cause.
Ideas were generated and voices of
students were heard.
As a result, the students
managed to raise enough funds to
purchase required resources such
as educational books, stationery

Service-based learning
Students
baked and
sold cakes
during lunch
and break
time to
raise money
for the
World
Scholar’s
Cup,
Tournament
of
Champions.
and food for the children.
These funds were raised through
events such as the annual charity
carnival, bake sales and charity
run. The Rohingya children
attended the charity carnival and
participated in the activities held.
Their excitement on the day
was infectious as the joy they had
on their faces in having the
opportunity to play football was
remarkable.
Through this experience, the

The Immunolicious gummies come in the Super-Strawberry,
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Healthy treats
PREVENTION is better than cure
– this is especially true when it
comes to the health of your
children. Instead of getting them
treated when they fall sick, it
is much better to build their
immune system so that they can
defend themselves from health
threats.
To strengthen children’s
natural defence mechanism,
start by supplementing their
diet. Ideally, the supplement you
give them should activate their
innate immune cells without
overstimulating the immune
system.

Throughout the body
Wellmune is a gluco
polysaccharide derived from
highly purified proprietary
yeast.
Once ingested, it will be sent
to various immune organs
throughout the body by the
immune cells in the
gastrointestinal tract.

Optimal absorption
In the organs of the immune
system, marcophages (a type of
immune cells) will slowly break
it into smaller fragments to be

slowly released over a number of
days. The fragments will then be
bound to neutrophils, the most
abundant immune cells in the
body.

Key features
Widely available as a natural
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this kosher, halal, non-allergenic
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Power up your child’s
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n For more information,
call 03-2161 1585 or visit
www.ajrph.com.

UCSI International School students
realised that they are privileged
and may have taken things for
granted.
One of the students even
prepared lunch for the Rohingya
children, which they enjoyed.
Overall, it was an unforgettable
day.
Another aspect of service
that UCSI International School
Subang engages its students in
is supporting the community

within the school.
The most recent fundraiser
brought together the school
community to support a group of
students participating in the World
Scholar’s Cup, Tournament of
Champions held at Yale University.
Since the cost to attend the
tournament was expensive,
students organised various food
sales to raise funds.
Everyone supported and
contributed to this cause,

demonstrating the supportive spirit
of the school.
The school is proud that the
students are closely knitted and
came out of their comfort zone to
help others. Through service, they
grow and develop as global citizens
with compassion, empathy and a
sense of responsibility.

n For more information, visit
www.ucsiinternationalschool.edu.
my.

10 Bright Kids

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

Overcoming mealtime challenges
SITTING children down at
mealtimes is not the easiest thing
to do and this is particularly more
challenging when trying to get
them to eat healthy and nutritious
food.
Oftentimes, parents face an
arduous task dealing with picky
eaters and children with poor
appetite.
There are multiple reasons this
happens, such as them not
enjoying the texture and taste of
vegetables, unhealthy eating
habits and stress due to school.
Children are naturally attracted
to foods that are sweet and fatty.
As fast foods, snacks and soft
drinks become increasingly
accessible, it is often easy for
parents to cave in to picky eaters’
demands, but doing so may have
disturbing consequences.
Poor diet in children can cause
a myriad of issues such as poor
immunity, illness and obesity.
According to the National
Health and Morbidity Survey
2015, 8% of children under five
years old suffered acute
malnutrition or wasting.
Poor appetite and picky eating
in children can lead to
complications that affect the
physical, psychological and
emotional well-being of parents
as well.
Therefore, it is important to
identify the root cause of your
child’s poor appetite and find
ways to tackle the respective
issues. Parents can help their
children enjoy mealtimes by
following a few tips.

Firstly, make mealtimes
interesting by making it happy
and social. Praise them when they
try new types of foods and join
them in eating these foods.
This is also a great time for the
family to get together. Everyone
can encourage healthy eating
among one another.
Try to make healthy eating fun
such as by cutting sandwiches into
interesting shapes and getting
children involved in the kitchen
when food is being prepared.
This will allow them to see the
cooking and preparation process
as well as allow for parents and
children to talk about the
importance of healthy food.
Cultivating good habits is a
slow process, so have realistic
expectations when you are
introducing children to healthy
eating. Ask your children to try all
the food on the plate or take a few
mouthfuls.
As time goes by, encourage
them to eat more as well as offer
them dishes cooked in different
ways. They may prefer a certain
preparation over others.
As your children continue to
receive supplementary nutrition,
it is also a great time for parents
to encourage children to try a
variety of foods.
Children require all the right
nutrients for optimal overall
growth. Hence, dietary
supplements that contain
important multivitamins, lysine
and prebiotics are crucial to
enhance appetite and improve
digestion.

Parents can
encourage
children to
eat healthily
by making
mealtimes
interesting
and
involving
them in
meal
preparation.

Lysine is an essential amino
acid that the human body cannot
produce and needs to be obtained
through diet.
Apart from being an important
building block of our body
structure, it also plays an
important role in enhancing
metabolism and improving
appetite.
Having a balanced diet and
healthy appetite goes hand in
hand with a healthy digestive
system to enable better digestion

and absorption of nutrients.
The human intestine is made
up of both beneficial and
harmful bacteria. Prebiotics such
as inulin and oligofructose are
types of fibre that act as a food
source to stimulate the growth of
good bacteria that, in turn,
promote healthy digestion and
effective nutrient absorption.
In summary, encouraging a
healthy eating habit is a collective
effort and parents must have
patience and learn to

communicate with their children
effectively.
At the same time,
supplementation with
multivitamins, lysine and
prebiotics can help your children
acquire crucial nutrients that they
may lack in their daily meals as
well as boost their appetite and
improve digestion, giving parents
peace of mind during mealtime.

n This article is brought to you by
Kotra Pharma (M) Sdn Bhd.

Bright Kids 11

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

CAMBRIDGE English For Life
(CEFL) is proud to announce a
new, exclusive partnership with
National Geographic Learning.
Beginning in January next
year, all CEFL centres will be
conducting classes using books
from National Geographic
Learning.
Designed for 21st century
learning, these resources bring the
world into the classroom and the
classroom to life through stunning
books with award-winning
photography as well as interactive
technological tools.
As the leading provider of
accredited English language
courses, CEFL is dedicated to
empowering learners to become
responsible global citizens in the
21st century by engaging and
motivating children to learn
English through real and
meaningful stories, images, and
videos as well as by exposing
them to the beauty and diversity
of the world.
Children in the 21st century are
digital natives – they want to be
challenged and inspired in their
learning process. They want to

Knowledge for life

CEFL’s collaboration with National Geographic Learning is aimed at inspiring
students to learn through the exposure of the world’s beauty and diversity.
collaborate with their peers and
incorporate technology into their
classroom experience as much as
they can.

Children all
around the
world have
initiated
social
enterprises,
including
Alexandra
Scott of
Alex's
Lemonade
Stand
Foundation.

Child-led causes
HERE are the stories of three
children who took their social
concern one step further,
building charitable organisations
that continue to serve their
communities till this day.
l Mackenzie Bearup,
Sheltering Books – Bearup
found refuge in reading at a
young age to get through a
severe pain in her knee.
When she heard that a nearby
children’s centre had just built a
library but had no books to
fill it, she began a drive in her
community through door-to-door
visits, flyers, advertisements and
a website in hopes of getting 300
books.
Her efforts were so successful
that Bearup was finally able to
donate 3,000 books to the centre.
This inspired her to keep the
book drive going, reaching out to
children in shelters with scarce
access to reading materials.
Besides encouraging other kids
to find comfort in reading,
Bearup hopes to enrich their
educational experience and help
them excel at school so that they
can build better futures for
themselves.

l Hannah Taylor, The
Ladybug Foundation – At five
years old, Taylor resolved to help
the hungry and homeless after
witnessing a man foraging a bin
for food.
By the time she turned eight
years old, Taylor had founded
The Ladybug Foundation to raise
funds for homelessness projects
and empower other young

people to lend their assistance.
The young girl began travelling
Canada to speak to groups of
people about her cause, also
organising Big Boss Lunches
donation drives.
One of her greatest
accomplishments is perhaps The
Ladybug Foundation Education
Program, which has inspired the
development of the makeChange
learning resource used in schools
across Canada to get kids
involved in making social
change.

l Alexandra Scott, Alex’s
Lemonade Stand Foundation –
Scott was diagnosed with
neuroblastoma (a cancer
affecting children) just before
her first birthday.
After receiving a stem cell
transplant at the age of four, she
set up a lemonade stand to raise
money for doctors to help other
kids like how they helped her.
Her initial effort raised a
significant donation, which
inspired her family and people
around the world to open
lemonade stands for annual
fundraising events while she
fought her battle against cancer.
By 2004, donations of more
than US$1mil (RM4.4mil at
current exchange rate) had been
channelled into cancer research
organisations.
Although Scott passed away
that year at the age of eight, her
foundation lives on through her
family and volunteers
determined to help find a cure
for the disease.

Today’s technology provides
more opportunities for students of
diverse learning styles to engage
with ideas in ways not previously

possible. Students can be exposed
to rich visuals and audio to
supplement concepts on printed
pages.
CEFL’s courses challenge
students to go one step beyond
their current stages of cognitive
and language development.
As a result, they are exposed to
a wide range of topics that may be
outside their school curriculum,
broadening their horizons and
acquiring knowledge in geography,
history and various cultures.
Students need to be able to think
and work creatively in both digital
and non-digital environments to
develop their language skills.
As they must possess the ability
to collaborate seamlessly in
physical and virtual spaces, classes
at CEFL encourage a lot of group
work so that students constantly
co-create in technological
environments.
Oftentimes, students are unable

to do this in school, resulting in
them becoming disengaged in
their learning.
CEFL applies the communicative
approach to language learning,
allowing learners to develop their
language skills at their own pace
in stimulating and engaging
contexts.
With the largest network of
60 language centres in Malaysia,
CEFL is dedicated to offering
learners from four-year-olds to
adults the right English language
course to help them achieve
greater heights in life.
At the end of the course, they
may sit for the Cambridge
English Language Assessment
examinations and obtain a
world-renowned qualification.

n For more information,

call 03-7883 0912, e-mail
info@cambridgeforlife.org or visit
www.cambridgeforlife.org.

12 Bright Kids

THE STAR, TUESDAY 6 DECEMBER 2016

SUNWAY International School (SIS)
had its first intake in January 2008
at the Bandar Sunway Campus and
is part of the Sunway Education
Group that is owned and governed
by the Jeffrey Cheah Foundation.
SIS takes pride in three key
pillars in its education –
programmes, people and
positioning – to enrich its students’
learning experience in school.

Three pillars of learning

Quality curriculum
The Canadian curriculum has
been consistently ranked top in the
Programme for International
Student Assessment (PISA) under
the aegis of the Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD).
SIS is one of the few schools in
Asia to offer the Ontario Ministry
of Education’s secondary
curriculum.
In Malaysia, SIS is the only
school that offers programmes
from grades 7 to 12.
The school is inspected annually
by the Ontario Ministry of
Education and is authorised to
grant credits leading to the Ontario
Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).
The OSSD is considered one of
the most highly recognised
secondary school qualifications in
the world and is accepted by
top-tier universities worldwide.
The objective of assessments and
evaluations is to promote learning
to determine each student’s
capability. In this regard, teachers
design lesson plans that support
student’s strengths and potential.
Assessments are an ongoing
and cumulative process, resulting
in a flexible and comprehensive
learning experience for students.
Seventy per cent of final grades
are determined by work completed

SIS is the only school in Malaysia that offers the Ontario Ministry of Education’s programmes from grades 7 to 12.
throughout the course and 30% are
determined by final evaluations.
The Ontario curriculum at SIS is
delivered by trained and qualified
Ontario teachers. Additionally, SIS
teachers are certified annually by
the Ontario College of Teachers and
licensed to teach in Ontario school
systems.
Parents play a big role in
their children’s learning and
growth. SIS believes with parents’
active engagement, students’
growth will be at its best,

academically and socially.
The collaboration between the
students, parents and school are
the backbone of SIS.
The practice, called the threelegged stool approach, has been
developed and enhanced over
the years so that parents have
opportunities to actively
contribute and partner with the
school.
The school supplements parent
engagement through a variety of
planned activities, both social

st century
1
2
e
c
n
Experie
learning at

Beginning in January 2017, our students will use
interactive books and materials from National
Geographic Learning. Lessons are enhanced
with the use of TVs and laptops in classrooms.
Learn one step beyond cognitive and
language development.
Expand horizons to include knowledge in
geography, history and various cultures.
Obtain a world-renowned qualification (the
University of Cambridge English Language
Assessment).

Call: 03-7883 0912

Visit: www.cambridgeforlife.org

Cambridge English For Life Sdn Bhd (386971-H)

A-1-11, Merchant Square, No 1, Jalan Tropicana Selatan 1, PJU3, 47410 PJ, Selangor

and educational, to produce
significant benefits to students,
parents and the school. The SIS’
Parent Council is actively
involved in the life of the school.

A trusted brand
By votes of consumers in
Malaysia, SIS won the Reader’s
Digest Trusted Brand Award
(Gold) in the Private/International
School category for two
consecutive years. This is a

testament to SIS’ excellence.
SIS’ accolades this year include
a five-star rating for private
and international schools by the
Education Ministry.
SIS was rated excellent for
achieving the highest rating in
the Standard Kualiti Institusi
Pendidikan Swasta (SKIPS) 2015.
The five-star rating is the highest
level of recognition granted to
schools with excellent results in the
required criteria.
The SKIPS assessment, developed
and monitored by the Education
Ministry, encompasses numerous
criteria including the school’s
curriculum, teaching and learning,
academic excellence, facilities and
quality processes.
The SKIPS rating is the Education
Ministry’s benchmark set to ensure
private and international schools
in Malaysia provide quality
education and outstanding services
to the community.
SIS’s new campus in Sunway
Iskandar is scheduled to welcome
its first intake of students next year
and will offer early years,
elementary and secondary levels of
schooling.
SIS campuses have recently been
officially authorised, accredited
and accepted as an International
Baccalaureate (IB) World School
and will be offering the IB Diploma
Programme in January 2017.
Admission for the January 2017
intake is open.

n For more information, visit
www.sis.sunway.edu.my or call
03-7491 8070.