You are on page 1of 116

P.30 FAMILY BUSINESS REDO P.52 WIRELESS WORKFLOW P.

78 CREATURE COMFORT
Turning the numbers

At social media speed

Tim Flachs animal subjects

Nothing
finer

DIAMOND
PHOTOGRAPHERS
OF THE YEAR

PATRICIA TAKACS

JANUARY 2015

Metal Prints Rock!


8x10 Metal Prints

16.95

IMAGE BY REX
KES

LER

Hanging options:
Easel back
Float Mount
Shadow Mount
Standout

Easel Back
shown.

Metal Prints

Inks are infused directly into specially coated aluminum


sheets, using high temperature and pressure. Your
images take on a bright, vibrant, luminescent quality
when printed on metal through this process.

We offer the highest quality photographic


prints in over 80 sizes, up to our 10 ft.
Panoramix prints. We also offer a wide
variety of other products, including:
standouts, books and albums, cards,
iPhone covers, mugs, and much more.
Visit our website to browse through all our
products and see pricing. You can sign up
and begin ordering today.

PROFESSIONAL PRINTS

8x10 $1.69
for
only

Your choice of LAB CORRECTED or


NOCORRECTION for the same price.

4 different finishes available


Sizes from 4x8 to 30x40
Rich vibrant color
Durable prints without glass
Waterproof

Great Prints. GreatPrices. Easy Ordering. Its that Simple.

www.meridianpro.com | 800-544-1370

IMAGE BY
THER

ESA THUR
MAN

Exposure has been a great complement to our studio


workflow. It gives us total control when it comes to enhancing
the color, grain and texture of our imagery. Cliff Mautner

PHOTO 2015 CLIFF MAUTNER.

Now with non-destructive RAW editing functionality and a host of new


textures and presets, Exposure 7 brings even more of the warmth and
artistry of the darkroom to your digital workflow.
With Exposure, your photo will look handcrafted rather than computer-generated. Offering over 470 presets right out
of the box, Exposure provides an even wider range of creative options for developing your look. Exposure 7 fits into
any workflow. It integrates seamlessly with Photoshop and Lightroom and with its new file browsing functionality,
crop and rotate tool and lightning-fast processing, delivers excellent results as a standalone application.

Visit alienskin.com to try Exposure for free.


2015 Alien Skin Software, LLC. All rights reserved. Exposure and Alien Skin Software are registered trademarks of Alien Skin Software, LLC.

LOAN COLLECTION / KATE HIGDON

TIM FLACH

MICHAEL GREENBERG

86

78

PPM AG.COM

ppmag.com
CONTENTS | JANUARY 2015

60

Brilliant
Diamond Photographers of the Year
By Jeff Kent

78

Creature comfort
The animal portraits of Tim Flach make
us question what it means to be human
By Eric Minton

86

Take it easy
Heart and soul are front and center in
Michael Greenbergs technique
By Will Pollock

94

Method man
Ryan Brenizers outsourcing strategy works
By Stephanie Boozer

On the Web
ppmag.com/tryedu
Lighting and
posing women

ppmag.com/productinfo
Products in this issue

By Jen Hillenga

ppa.com/copyright
Copyright resources

ppmag.com/win
January giveaway

ppa.com/squareone
Square One

DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

60

IN EVERY ISSUE
10 Editors note
18 Giveaway
69 On the cover
102 Perspective
114 Final frame

FOREGROUND
13 Luminous life
14 Quintessential Malkovich
15 Grunge luck
16 Running with the big dogs
16 Free video: Posing to flatter

SUCCESS
23 Time for a wedding
24 Pay yourself
By Bridget Jackson
26 Effusive branding
By Angela Pointon
30 Behind the price tag
By Jeff Kent

THE GOODS
47 Build your bag: Porteen Gear
48 Nikon D750
By Ellis Vener
52 Instant gratification:
wireless workflow
By Jaren Wilkey

Professional Photographer (ISSN 1528-5286) is published monthly for $27 per year (U.S. rate) by PPA Publications and Events, Inc., 229 Peachtree Street, NE, Ste. 2200, Atlanta, GA 30303-1608.
Periodicals postage paid at Atlanta, Ga., and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Professional Photographer magazine, P.O. Box 3606, Northbrook, IL 60065-3606.

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

Professional Photographer is the official journal


of Professional Photographers of America

Director of Publications
Jane Gaboury
jgaboury@ppa.com
Senior Editor
Joan Sherwood
jsherwood@ppa.com
Associate Editor
Amanda Arnold
aarnold@ppa.com
Art Director/
Production Manager
Debbie Todd
dtodd@ppa.com
Editor-at-Large
Jeff Kent
jkent@ppa.com
Contributing Editors
Don Chick & Ellis Vener
Director of Sales
& Strategic Alliances
Wayne Jones
(404) 522-8600, x248
wjones@ppa.com
East/West Region Ad
Manager
Tara Truitt
(404) 522-8600, x230
ttruitt@ppa.com

EDITORIAL OFFICES
Professional Photographer
229 Peachtree Street NE
Suite 2200
Atlanta, GA 30303-1608 U.S.A.
(404) 522-8600
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Professional Photographer
P.O. Box 3606
Northbrook, IL 60065-3606
(800) 742-7468
ppmag@omeda.com
TO RENEW OR SUBSCRIBE
ppmag.com/subscribe
(800) 742-7468
PPA MEMBER SERVICES
Professional Photographers
of America
(800) 786-6277
csc@ppa.com, ppa.com
Periodicals postage paid in
Atlanta, Ga., and additional
mailing offices.
POSTMASTER
Send address changes to
Professional Photographer
P.O. Box 3606
Northbrook, IL 60065-3606

Central Region Ad Manager


Marina Anderson
(937) 902-8217
manderson@ppa.com
Advertising Services Manager
Cheryl Pearson
cpearson@ppa.com
Advertising Services
Coordinator
Valencia Jackson
vjackson@ppa.com

2014-2015 PPA
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President
*Susan Michal
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI
smichal@ppa.com
Vice President
*Michael E. Timmons
M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP,
F-ASP
mtimmons@ppa.com
Treasurer
*Lori Craft
Cr.Photog.
lcraft@ppa.com
Chairman of the Board
*Ralph Romaguera Sr.
M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, API, F-ASP
rromaguera@ppa.com
Directors
Rob Behm
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
rbehm@ppa.com
Stephen Thetford
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
sthetford@ppa.com
Audrey L. Wancket
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
awancket@ppa.com
Mike Fulton
Cr.Photog.
mfulton@ppa.com
Greg Daniel
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP
gdaniel@ppa.com
Mary Fisk-Taylor
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, API
mfisktaylor@ppa.com
Barbara Bovat
Cr.Photog.
bbovat@ppa.com
Steve Kozak
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
skozak@ppa.com

PPA STAFF
Chief Executive Officer
David Trust, CAE
trustd@ppa.com
Chief Financial Officer
Chief Operating Officer
Scott Kurkian, CAE
skurkian@ppa.com
Senior Manager of
Certification
Julia Boyd
jboyd@ppa.com
Director of Publications
Jane Gaboury
jgaboury@ppa.com
Director of Membership
Kristen Hartman
khartman@ppa.com
Director of Events
Fiona Hendricks
fhendricks@ppa.com
Director of Sales
& Strategic Alliances
Wayne Jones
wjones@ppa.com
Director of Education
Angela Kurkian
M.Photog.Cr.
akurkian@ppa.com
Director of
Information Technology
Scott Morgan
smorgan@ppa.com
Director of Administration
Wilda Oken
woken@ppa.com
Director of Marketing
and Communications
Carla Plouin
cplouin@ppa.com
Executive Assistant
Sandra Lang
slang@ppa.com
*Executive Committee of the Board

Industry Advisor
Lou George
lgeorge@ppa.com
Professional Photographer, official journal of the Professional Photographers of America Inc., is the oldest exclusively professional photographic publication
in the Western Hemisphere (founded 1907 by Charles Abel, Hon.M.Photog.), incorporating Abels Photographic Weekly, St. Louis & Canadian Photographer,
The Commercial Photographer, The National Photographer, Professional Photographer, and Professional Photographer Storytellers.
Opinions expressed by Professional Photographer or any of its authors do not necessarily reflect positions of Professional Photographers of America, Inc.
Acceptance of advertising does not carry with it endorsement by the publisher.
Copyright 2015, PPA Publications & Events, Inc. Printed in U.S.A.

PPM AG.COM

Portrait - Lee Varis, Author of Skin: The Complete Guide to Digital Retouching.

@2014 Bobbi Lane | FUJIFILM X-T1 Camera and XF56mm Lens at 1/8 sec at F9, ISO 200

The
you
carr y is as
important as the
you make
"The new FUJIFILM X-T1 is my new camera of choice. It's a
light weight camera with DSLR quality. My goal always as
a photographer is to use the tool that is appropriate to my
vision, so whatever gear I need to get the job done, is the
right tool. The X-T1 is good, really good, far better than I
expected from a small camera."

-Bobbi Lane / Commercial Photographer

FUJIFILM, FUJINON and ENGINEERED TO INSPIRE are trademarks of FUJIFILM Corporation and its affiliates.
2014 FUJIFILM North America Corporation and its affiliates. All rights reserved.

ENGINEERED
TO INSPIRE
www.FujifilmExpertXT1BLane.com
facebook.com/fujifilmcameras
FujifilmUS

EDITORS NOTE

LEADING LINES

YEAR IN
PREVIEW
DAILY INTENTIONS FOR 2015

1. Gratitude. I resolve to reflect often on the bounty of my life. Thank you,


legs, for last evenings walk. Thank you, heart, you tireless, ceaseless wonder.
Thank you, yeast, for rising the bread and brewing the beer. Thank you, husband, for your best-friendship, your truth-telling, your immutable love.
2. Eat real food. If theres no nutrition label on it, thats because it came out
of the ground.
3. Move it. Exercise a little bit
Thank you, yeast ...
every day and a lot several times
a week. Make it non-negotiable, like
brushing my teeth, because I feel
more alert, think more clearly, and sleep more deeply when I invest time
in health.
4. Meaningful work. I find fun and challenge and meaning in what I do.
I enjoy working with people who think differently than I do and have experiences I havent had. Never get up and dread the tasks ahead. Thats just wishing my life away.
5. Connect with humans. Its easy to stay connected with the people I love.
Be mindful about recognizing the humanness of acquaintances and strangers,
too. Everyone is a story, and theyre always more fascinating that I could have
imagined.
6. Each day, joy. Arise with anticipation. There is joy to be found in every
day, whether its the taste of a perfectly ripe pear or the satisfaction of wrapping up a work project. Recognize the happy.
7. Think good thoughts. When I find myself on the verge of losing patience with
anyone, remember this: Theyre doing the best they can. I have no idea what
challenges they may be facing on this day. Kindness is a gift I can give us both.
8. Natures plenty. Raise my face to the night sky and behold the silver sliver.
Its the same moon I gazed at with my father so many years ago. The wonder of
it touches me no less today than when I was 10.
9. Check out. Put down my pen, turn off the phone, and just walk away once
in a while. Take a vacation. Devote attention to my life partner and our adventures together.
10. Sleep, sleep, sleep. This is the easiest promise I make to myself. Because
myself likes her sleep and feels no shame in hitting the sheets at an hour when
most people are still watching Dancing With the Stars.

COMING NEXT MONTH


Force of nature
Clyde Butcher hasnt heard that a swamp is no
place for a large-format camera.
Boutique weddings
The secret strategy behind Moshe Zusmans
success? Being a master of all trades.

MOSHE ZUSMAN

Always on
It went out of favor in the 1950s, but now
continuous light is finding new fans.

STAY IN TOUCH
editors@ppmag.com

twitter.com/ppmagazine

facebook.com/ppmagazine

theloop.ppa.com

10

Jane Gaboury
Director of Publications

PPM AG.COM

OVER 26 YEARS
OF INNOVATION
Vanguard is a global leader in photography
accessories and sporting optics with
rst-of-its-kind features and capabilities.
With over 26 years of expertise, these innovative
products are hailed around the world.

High Expectations, Greater Achievements


Since 1986, Vanguard has won numerous awards for its lineup of photo/video accessories from the Technical Image Press
Association, Red Dot International Design Awards, iF Product Design Awards, and Popular Photography magazine, among others.
We pride ourselves on manufacturing and distributing only the highest quality products, ensuring optimal functionality and style.
Vanguards Tripods and Heads, Camera Bags, Cases, Sporting Optics, and Accessories are available
from Authorized Vanguard Dealers or online at vanguardworld.com

FOREGROUND
Edited by Amanda Arnold

LUMINOUS LIFE
BOOK OF INTRIGUING INVERTEBRATES

Susan Middleton made this portrait of a


juvenile black-eyed squid at the University
of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories
in San Juan Islands, Washington. The lab
captures sea life and houses specimens in
large holding tanks while it conducts research, then releases the animals back into
the wild.
To set up the shot, Middleton moved the
creature to a modified aquarium with pristine glass and filtered water for optimum
optical clarity. She placed a black velvet
backdrop about 6 inches behind the aquarium and pointed a Broncolor strobe light at
the animal.
The biggest problem I have is getting the
color to be as vivid as it is in real life, Middleton says. I wouldnt want to exaggerate
the color; I want to render it as true as possible. Getting it right was doubly hard because
the squid was translucent and very active.
The young creature was captured off a
dock by researchers, but adults of the species live in waters 1,600 to 2,600 feet deep.
Im inspired by things that are not easily or
often seen, Middleton says. That certainly rings true with this project more than any
other work I have ever done.
Middletons photo book, Spineless: Portraits of Marine Invertebrates, the Backbone
of Life was published in October 2014.
SUSAN MIDDLETON
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

13

FOREGROUND

TOP OF MIND

QUINTESSENTIAL
MALKOVICH
SANDRO MILLERS PROJECT SALUTES ICONIC IMAGES
u The 1999 fantasy film Being John Malkovich, finds characters entering a portal
in John Malkovichs brain. Photographer
Sandro Millers recent project required
the reverse: Malkovich climbed inside the
minds of photographys most compelling
subjects, striking pitch-perfect poses that
helped Miller recreate historic works.
The images Miller selected to pay tribute
to in his series Malkovich, Malkovich,
Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters are those that have affected him over
his 40-year career. You look at these shots
and youre honored that theyre out there
for you to view, says Miller of the originals. They are so perfectly done and leave
you wanting so much more. He emphasizes that the series is not intended to
parody, but to celebrate, the photographers
of these iconic works.
Replicating the images involved more
than a year of research, with much focus on
lighting. We dissected these shots down
to the moment that they could have happened. About a month before the session,
he assembled a crew and finalized each
photo setup, replicating the lighting very
closely with his studio lighting systems.
Wardrobe was another priority, entrusted to stylist Leslie Pace, who either
tracked down identical clothing or used a
seamstress to reproduce pieces such as the
dress in Diane Arbuss Identical Twins.
The essential element in making each
photograph credible was the genius
Malkovich brought to the project, Miller
notes. He is fearless in experimenting. To
ask a man to bluff a sensual pose like Marilyn Monroe [in Bert Sterns Marilyn in
Pink Roses] or the very difficult posing of
Bette Davis [in Victor Skrebneskis Bette
Davis], you have to have somebody whos

very confident in himself and can work


himself into these people. There is nobody
like John.
While Malkovich sat for a 2-hour hair and
makeup session for each photograph, he
analyzed the original, which Miller taped
to the makeup mirror, and imagined how
the subject felt at the moment of capture.

I watched John become a boy, girl, man,


woman, Marilyn, Picasso, Hitchcock, Bette
Davis, Che Guevera, Miller says. He could
get into their heads.
Miller plans to produce 11 more images
to complete the series. The collection is
slated to travel to multiple cities, including
Los Angeles, Dallas, New York, and Paris.

IMAGES SANDRO MILLER

14

PPM AG.COM

GRUNGE LUCK

A TRYING SESSION BECOMES A LASTING WORK

Sometimes a photo session runs exactly


as planned. Sometimes it doesnt.
It was a commissioned story for the London Observer Sunday magazinea cover
storyand it was a big story to them, recalls
Jesse Frohman of the job he landed in
1993 to photograph grunge-era musician
Kurt Cobain and his band, Nirvana. Wed
scheduled a five-hour shoot with the band to
cover various locations. But when Frohman
arrived at the hotel as planned, the bands
manager told him hed need to capture the
photos in a basement conference room.
Even though Id dealt with a lot of sudden
changes of schedule in the past, it was still
a shock, says Frohman.
Frohman found a seamless backdrop in his
production van and used that and the strobe
lights hed brought to turn the conference
room into a makeshift studio. The other challenge was Cobain: The singer was hours late.
I felt pressure to get as much as I could,
but I always know that its better to get one
thing thats great than several things that
arent so great, Frohman says. So I focused
on a good portrait of the band and a good
portrait of Kurt with as much variety as I
could get.
One thing that added interest to Frohmans images was Cobains look when he finally arrived. Being a celebrity doesnt equal
having great style, but Kurt did have great
style, Frohman says. The musician showed
up wearing a pair of white, Jackie O-inspired sunglasses and carrying a bundle of
clothes under his arm that included a leopard print jacket. A lot of celebrities have
a team of people working with themhair
and makeup and all of that, Frohman says.
But what I love with portraits is to really
capture the person. Some of the greatest portraits Ive seen of musicians are just them
being them in the clothes they are wearing.
Zeppelin and the Stonesthey werent styled.
What began as chaos transformed into
history as the session became one of Cobains last before his death in April 1994.
Because I didnt have much time, I didnt
u

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

IMAGES JESSE FROHMAN

think it was a success. But after I saw the


film, I knew I had some wonderful images,
says Frohman.
Some of the photos were published in the
Observer piece, and the rest languished in
Frohmans files until recently, when he realized their historic value and gunned for a
book deal. Kurt Cobain: The Last Session
(Thames & Hudson) was published in November 2014.

RUNNING WITH THE BIG DOGS


FOREGROUND

TOP OF MIND

WITNESS TO THE IDITAROD

u It was luck that Jeff Schultz met Joe Redington Sr. in 1979 at a bluegrass concert
benefitting the Iditarod dog sled race.
Schultz, who had just started a photography
business in Alaska, asked Redington, the
founder of the annual 1,000-mile trek, to
sit for a portrait. Eager to get everyone involved in the fledgling race, Redington then
invited Schultz to take photos of the event.
Intrigued by the challenge, Schultz contacted an oral surgeon who also flew an
Alaska bush plane, who offered to fly
him at no charge if Schultz paid for fuel.
The pair flew as far as a few hundred dollars could take them; then Schultz donated
the photos to the Iditarod committee, who
asked him to return the next year, offering
to pay his expenses. Thus began Schultzs
34-year run photographing the Iditarod.
According to Schultz, logistics is the great-

JEFF SCHULTZ

est challenge. Much of the race takes place


in frigidly cold remote areas not navigable
by car, so he reaches teams via snowmobile
and takes 20 percent of his shots from the
air. Photographing a sled moving at 6 to 8
miles per hour from a plane thats moving 100 miles per hour is a feat. He uses
a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and two EOS-1D
X cameras with lenses from 14mm up to
400mm, shooting at a fast shutter speed
and relies on his long-time pilot to put the
plane in position.
Three years ago Schultz, who recently
wrote Chasing Dogs: My Adventures as the
Official Photographer of Alaskas Iditarod,
began hiring assistants to edit and post
images online as the race happens. And although Schultz has been in some tight situationsincluding a plane crash 20 years
ago that he and his then-pilot walked away
fromhe would never relinquish the field
work, he says: I want to be out shooting. I
just love the adventure. Finding that shot.
Finding the dog team in a great location
and capturing that. Just being there.
This years race begins March 7.

ON THE WEB: PPMAG.COM/TRYEDU

The CPQ Uptown Albums & More...

In her instructional video Lighting and


Posing Women, Jen Hillenga,
M.Photog.Cr., demystifies posing:

Focused on
Your Success.
Your Vision and Talent Start
the Creative Process...and
Were Here to Support and
Help You Complete the Story.

CPQ has the perfect products to help


your customers tell their story. Gallery Wraps,
Albums, CD Covers are just a few you can select.

CPQ always impresses me with new, quality products. Its


important to stay fresh and new in this business and I think CPQ
does this so well. I also love the great customer service. Its a
great feeling to be helped by the same people every time.
Angie Monson
Simplicity Photography
simplicityphotography.com

Jan. 2015 1/3 Page PPA ad

FREE VIDEO:
POSING TO
FLATTER

Have the subject put all her weight on


one foot, so hips, shoulders, and
knees are at varying heights.
To guide your subject into poses
easily, ask her to mirror your
movements.
Whats illuminated appears larger,
so turn the subjects body away from
the light and her face toward the light.

1.800.537.8399

cpq.com

PPM AG.COM

ALL NEW

siros

Come see us at ImagingUSA Expo booth #273


for the latest in high-end professional imaging.

Hasselblad CFV-50c
Digital Back - Seamless
V system Integration

REFLECT.
DIFFUSE.
CREATE.
Hasselblad Bron Inc. 1.800.367.6434 | www.hasselbladbron.com

Hasselblad H5D-50c Wi-Fi


Superbly engineered
50MP CMOS sensor

JANUARY GIVEAWAY

LEXAR PROFESSIONAL
WORKFLOW DD256,
DUAL-SLOT READER,
AND 32GB CARD
The new Lexar Professional Workflow
DD256 gives you 256GB of solid state storage
in a small USB 3.0 drive that you can access
via cable or pop into a Lexar Professional
Workflow Hub (DD512 also available). It provides transfer speeds up to 450MB/second.
Youll also get a Lexar Professional USB 3.0
Dual-Slot Reader and a Lexar Professional 32GB
1066X CompactFlash Card. lexar.com
u

Win a Lexar Professional Workflow DD256,


a $150.99 value, a Lexar Professional 1066x
32GB CompactFlash card, a $116.99 value,
and a Dual-Slot Reader, a$49.99 value.
Enter today: ppmag.com/win

Quality, Reliability and


Affordability in a Compact Size!
Introducing the
Color Stream CS2
6-Inch Compact Printer
from Sinfonia
Superior image quality
Warranty and support
Low waste, jam-free, roll-fed
Easy maintenance

KG ProPhoto

www.kgprophoto.com/PPA2015

100 Randolph Road, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 800-597-4351

Imaging USA
Booth 1040
Nashville
February 1-3, 2015

All prices include VAT. Shipping not included. Subject to corrections or changes without prior notice. Avenso GmbH, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 2, 10587 Berlin, Germany.
All rights reserved. Photographer: Marc Krause. *Not valid with other discounts or offers.

Ever worked with


a real control freak?
Theres nothing better.
Experience your photos in gallery quality.
Made in the photo lab of the pros.

WhiteWall.com

ORIGINAL PHOTO PRINT


ON ALUMINUM DIBOND
12 x 8 inches

starting at just

$ 50.95
Save $10

Coupon code: WW14PRP12


Minimum order value: $70
valid until 2/25/2015*

Geoff Duncan

NG

ith F
w
D
N

N
VER
O
E
E

IPPI
T SH

IGH

ROU

DAY
2-3

NA
TUR

Coming Soon

Grow your offering with the industrys first printed wood album cover.

Visit www.millerslab.com to learn more about Millers Signature Albums.

BE MORE

t s t o...
n
e
li
c
r
u
Ge t yo

Do consumers know the difference a professional photographer can make?


Yes they can! But you have to show them.
PPA can help you with a consumer-focused campaign called See the Difference.
It helps consumers see the difference when theyre evaluating their photographer options
and realize how important it is to hire a pro. Hence the name. See the Difference offers you
online advertising and social media to drive prospects to landing pages with comparative
image galleries, videos and PPAs Find-a-Photographer database.
These resources are here for you! Download them, link to them, print them, share them and
show everyone what hiring a professional photographer means.

Videos for
consumers
Download
or share

4 powerful tools
to share: overview,
wedding photography,
senior photography and
whats a picture worth?

Side-by-side
image gallery
Leverage

Show expensive camera vs.


professional photography.
Comparing will become
a no-brainer.

BE MORE
PPA.com/Difference

Brochure
templates
Customize
and use

Swap the template images


with your own. People will
see the difference!

SUCCESS
STRONGER BUSINESS, BETTER LIFE

TIME FOR A WEDDING


Even the most experienced wedding photographer can get caught up in a job and devote too much time to an assignment. Rein in
your fervor by allocating your time consistently. Youll be able to spend more time enjoying your life without affecting your income.
Engagement photo session
Planning, driving,
photographing

Wedding assignment
with album
Wedding assignment
with no album

6 hours
Follow-up
Contract, questions,
email, phone calls

Consultation
Driving,
meeting,
pre-sales

60 hours total
12 hours

3 hours

Preconsultation
Email,
phone calls

2 hours

Wedding
Planning, driving,
photographing

ours total
h
7
4

2 hours

13 hours
20 hours
Album design
Planning, design

Viewing session
Image presentation, sales
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

2 hours

Post-production
Downloading,
backing up, editing

: SOURCE: PROFESSIONAL
PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA

23

SUCCESS

MAKING MONEY

need to make on a monthly basis, its time


to determine what your studio can afford to
pay you. If you havent done so already, separate your personal expenses from business expenses; that way you can see what
your studios cash flow actually is and how
much your studio can afford to pay its owner
while still sustaining that cash flow. By law,
Subchapter S corporations must pay owners and employees a reasonable salary.
Theres no rule of thumb, but PPA suggests
40 to 50 percent of net profit (before owners compensation) as a reasonable salary.

VEER

PAY YOURSELF

A HEALTHY STUDIO COMPENSATES ITS OWNER

by Bridget Jackson
u One of the biggest mistakes studio owners make is to forego a salary. Whether its
a monthly salary for the owner of a corporation or a monthly distribution for the
owner of an LLC or a sole proprietor, its
imperative that you not only plan to pay
yourself but that you actually do pay yourself. Youre not working for free and youre
not working to pay your employees. While
theres no industry standard for how much
a studio owner should earn, a few calculations will put you on the right track.

GET PERSONAL
How much money do you need to earn on
a monthly basis to support your lifestyle?
Prepare a personal budget that includes not

24

just your monthly expenses but also your


savings for retirement, vacation, etc. Then
calculate how much you can draw from
other personal income or savings. The difference should be your salary (distribution)
goal. Initially, it might be minimal, but keep
in mind that youre in business to make a
profit. So even if you cant pay yourself equitably now, plan to do it eventually. The
IRS has rules regarding profitability. You
need to understand what they are and their
ramifications. If your business doesnt show
a profit for at least three out of five years,
for example, there are tax consequences.
STUDY YOUR CASH FLOW
Now that you know how much money you

USE SQUARE ONE


Knowing what salary you deserve is one
thing; earning enough to deliver that salary is another. Thats where PPAs Square
One comes in (ppa.com/squareone). This
online tool helps photographers calculate
how much money the studio must earn to
cover its expenses, including salaries. The
tool takes into account the number of sessions and the average sales per session to
calculate owner earnings. When using the
tool, be sure to build in both personal and
business reserves, as well as money to pay
down debt. Establishing reserves reduces the likelihood of taking on additional
debt. If cash flow becomes a challenge at
some point in time, youll use the reserve
to smooth out any deficits, being mindful
that when positive cash flow returns, the
reserve must be replenished.
To have a sustainable business, you have
to set up a plan to achieve profitability,
pay yourself a salary, and be accountable.
Establishing the plan is only half the battle;
tracking it against actual accounts and adjusting the business to keep it on track
to achieve profitability is
the ultimate goal.

Bridget Jackson manages PPAs


consulting services, which helps
photographers be more profitable.
She is a certified public accountant.
Reach her at bjackson@ppa.com.

PPM AG.COM

Both the interior and exterior of Little Nest


Portraits convey the brand message.

SUCCESS

MAKING MONEY

LAURA NOVAK MEYER

feel, smell, sound, and look when theyre


working with you.

EFFUSIVE BRANDING
REACHING THE SENSES

by Angela Pointon
u I met child and family portrait photographer Laura Novak Meyer, founder of
Little Nest Portraits, through a Facebook
networking group of photographers with
a passion for business. After discovering
that we live and work just a few miles from
one another, we decided to meet for coffee
across the street from one of Lauras studios in Wayne, Pennsylvania.
There are two Little Nest Portraits studios
in eastern Pennsylvania located just outside
of Philadelphia. When we met, Laura had
just announced shed be opening franchise
locations along the East Coast and had longterm plans for nationwide franchising. As I
chatted with Laura, I became curious about
her downtown Wayne studio, which occupies a quaint historic building, and asked if
I could take a peek inside.
When I entered, I was blown away by the

26

textures, soft color palette, decor, and most


significant, the comprehensive branding of
Little Nest Portraits.
Heres what I learned about Lauras
branding efforts:
Tell me what Little Nest Portraits brand
means to you.
Meyer: A lot of the brand is about the values
we stand for. Each employee goes through an
orientation, and one of our values is creating a wow customer experience. From the
way clients are greeted to how theyre presented their products to how the studio smells,
were passionate about every little detail.
So for you, branding is about experience?
Meyer: Yes, branding is all about the different experiences people have with your
company. Its everything from how things

A lot of people think branding means a


logo or a website. Why put so much focus
on the entire customer experience?
Meyer: As portrait photographers, were asking people for their discretionary income.
Were asking people to spend the extra
money they have left over when all their
needs are met. We have to convince someone to buy something compelling that feels
good, or else they wont.
What are some other ways your brand is
communicated?
Meyer: We spend a lot of time on our email
communication and written word. Were
cheerful, upbeat, and convenient for our
customers. Making things clear and really
simple to understand is critical to a good
brand experience. If people are confused or
unsure, theyre less likely to buy.
For more ideas about how to create a phenomenal customer experience, check out
Lauras guide at ppmag.com/profit-center.
Angela Pointon advises photographers
through Hand Select Your Clients. Visit
handselectyourclients.com and click to add
her on Google+, Facebook, and Pinterest.

PPM AG.COM

T H E A W A R D - W I N N I N G O LY M P U S O M - D S E R I E S .

AS AMBITIOUS AS YOU ARE

OM-D E-M10
OM-D E-M5
OM-D E-M1

Image shot with the Olympus OM-D


E-M1 and M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8 PRO lens by
Olympus Trailblazer, Peter Baumgarten.

The revolutionary, light and portable Olympus OM-D series does more than just capture amazing photos, it lets you tell
powerful stories from anywhere. Thats because the OM-D series has some of the smallest, lightest bodies in its class with the power
to capture the color and detail you expect. Every OM-D has a blazing fast image sensor and powerful processor designed to unleash
the magic of M. Zuiko lenses.
With the purchase of an OM-D, you can build an amazing system with our savings program for lenses. Or if you want to upgrade
your existing system and get rid of your big, bulky DSLR, simply add a lens adapter to an OM-D body. Check out our entire line of
incredibly small and portable OM-Ds and start shooting like a pro. getolympus.com/omd

Move into a New World

Its such a great feeling when you get that spark.


Your heart and mind ignites and you spring into
action. Everything falls into place before your lens
just as you imagined. Then click, you capture the
moment forever.
Now how do you sustain that for the rest of the
year? What about an entire career? How do you
stay inspired and keep it all fresh, while developing
your business? As a professional photographer,
these questions are important to your work, your
happiness and your sanity.

PPAs Business Basics Workshop


has completely changed how I run
my business. Abbie Welch
Professional Photographers of America (PPA)
serves more than 27,000 photographers just like
you and understands how challenging it can be to
nurture your creativity. Thats why PPA provides the
education and inspiration photographers seek to
thrive as professionals.
Start off running at PPAs annual convention and
expo, Imaging USA, (Nashville, TN, February 1-3,
2015). Over 10,000 photographers will kick off their
year in the Music City, eager to set the tone and
get a leg up on their competition. Youll network

with photographers, speakers and mentors, gain


new ideas and practices at presentations from the
biggest names in the industry. Youll even snatch
exclusive discounts on all sorts of products. And
if its your first year with PPA, your registration fee
for an all-access pass is automatically waived! As a
nonprofit, thats how much PPA believes in helping
photographers be more by getting your feet wet at
Imaging USA.
From there, PPA benefits will help you keep
things rolling through the year. Dig into PPAedu, a
personalized learning program with more than 250
info-packed videos available 24/7. Portrait and
wedding, posing and lighting, digital retouching
and workflow, landscape and commercial, sales
and marketing strategiesits all there for you to
hone your skills and strengthen a weakness. The
new acquisition of the popular PhotoVision adds to
the extensive library. Ready to sponge it all in?
If you really want to be more, take things a step
further with Super 1 Day, semiannual workshops
held across the country by your peer photographers
at a studio near you. Then learn how to start
making some serious money with PPAs business
workshops and consultations.
Theres so much more information at PPA.com.
Find your inspiration and Be More with PPA.
ADVERTISEMENT

IMAGES ROBERT CHARLES PHOTOGRAPHY

SUCCESS

CASE STUDY

BEHIND THE PRICE TAG


RENOVATING A FAMILY BUSINESS

by Jeff Kent
u
Almost 30 years ago, Robert Charles Zemba founded Robert Charles Photography
in East Longmeadow, Massachusetts. He steadily built the business, earning a place of respect in the community and growing the
studio to the point where he could hire several family members and bring on his two
sons, Edward Zemba, Cr. Photog., and Robert
Francis Zemba, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, as partners.
About 15 years ago, the Zembas were seeing inconsistencies in their business. Clients
were happy. Sales were excellentsome of
the best in the country for a studio their size.
But although money was coming in, profits
were too low, and the owners werent meeting their expectations for a reliable income.
About this time, PPA was launching a
pilot program of providing business and
financial services to members. The goal
was to help photographers improve their financial management and bring home more
money. PPA Chief Financial Officer Scott
Kurkian sat down with the Zembas to start
unraveling their financial mystery.

30

SITUATION
Robert Charles had built the studio on an
uncompromising approach to quality. The

Zembas bought the best cameras and computers, contracted the best labs, used the
best materials. They hired the best talent.
This earned them a loyal clientele and
plenty of accolades, but it also meant very
high expenses.
It was obvious that too much money was
going out the door. However, the Zembas
were reluctant to do anything that might
affect the quality of their work. They
needed industry guideposts to put their
situation in perspective and inform their
actions. We had discussed several ideas
for improving profitability, things like performance-based pay, higher prices, finding ways to lower production costs, says
Edward Zemba. But absent any evidence
that those changes would work, those
ideas sounded more like opinions than
fact-based solutions. We knew we had to
do something, though, because we were
working so much and getting very little in
return. It wasnt sustainable.
When Kurkian started working with the
Zembas, one of the first things he did was
compare their numbers to data from the
PPA Benchmark. That put into context the
two biggest problems for Robert Charles
Photography: high expenses and low prices.
First, the studios general expenses and cost
of sales were both too high. Salaries, in

PPM AG.COM

(4.8 / 5.0) 58 Reviews

particular, were a problem. Employees enjoyed annual cost of living raises, but the
studios production levels had not risen commensurate with the increasing salaries.
Nothing was performance-based, so employees continued to earn more money
whether the studio was more profitable or
not. In addition, the staff salaries were not
realistic: Several employees were making
more than the owners.
The cost of sales was also high, in part due
to high salaries paid to production employees (people who work directly on producing
products for sale), as well as the cost of using top-quality materials and vendors. At
the time, PPA was recommending a cost of
sales of 35 percent, meaning no more than 35
percent of total sales should go toward producing products (the current recommended cost of sales benchmark is 25 percent).
Robert Charles Photography was operating
with a cost of sales closer to 50 percent.
Cost of sales and product pricing are inextricably linked; when it costs a lot to produce products but you dont charge enough
to cover those costs with a good margin,
then your cost of sales percentage will be

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

too high. There are two ways to fix this:


raise prices and lower costs.
Another problem was the studios marketing. Robert Charles Photography did a lot
of traditional marketing with newspaper
and Yellow Pages ads, which werent producing great results. They werent paying
attention to what kind of marketing really
worked or evaluating the return on investment for their marketing dollars. Looking
at how they spent their marketing dollars
would be essential for turning around the
studios fortunes.
SOLUTIONS
The Zembas started working with PPAs
business mentors to get to the root of the
problem. The first job was to familiarize
the Zembas with PPAs key financial benchmarks, things like cost of sales, general
expenses, bottom-line profit, and the other
data tracked by the PPA Benchmark Survey. Once they understood their numbers
and all the factors that go into them, the
Zembas were ready to act.
The first area of change was pricing.
The Zembas couldnt achieve their goals

Ball Heads
Video Rigs
Gimbal Heads
Custom L-Bracket Plates
Arca-Type Plates
Clamps

BENCHMARK
SUCCESS

CASE STUDY

PPA tracks several financial benchmarks for photographers, updating


them every three years with the PPA
Financial Benchmark Survey. The
benchmarks are expressed as a percentage of total (gross) sales. Some of
the critical benchmarks include:
COST OF SALES: Cost of sales, also
known as cost of goods sold, refers
to all post-capture time and materials that go into making the products
you sell. Frames, paper, retouching,
printing, merchant fees, the photographers time, and more factor into the
cost of sales. The current cost of sales
benchmark is 25 percent.
GENERAL EXPENSES: Sometimes
called fixed costs, these are the expenses that stay the same no matter
how much you sell. Rent, utilities, office supplies and non-production employee salaries are some examples.
The current benchmarks for general
expenses are 30 percent for home
studios, 40 percent for retail studios.
OWNERS COMPENSATION + NET
PROFIT: Also known as bottom-line
profit, this is the total amount the
studio owner takes home or reinvests
in the company. The current benchmarks for owners compensation plus
net profit are 45 percent for home studios, 35 percent for retail studios.

Edward Zemba
(left) and
Robert Francis Zemba
Robert Charles
Photography
robertcharlesphoto.com

32

through cost-cutting alone; their prices


had to increase. They had been hesitant to
raise pricing because they were already
considered expensive for their market. But
with Benchmark data in hand, they resolved to bring up pricing in steps. For example,
they raised the price of an 8x10-inch
print from $45 to $95 in stages over a
couple years. It had to be done, says
Edward. Either the market would support
the pricing at the level it needed to be for us
to produce a top-quality product, or we

would close our doors and do something else.


During this process the Zembas discovered something interesting. Because they
were already expensive for their market,
people considered the photography of
Robert Charles Photography to be a luxury product. They expected it to cost more.
What the Zembas were lacking was the
confidence behind their pricing.
By gaining a full understanding of all the
costs associated with their work, they were
able to put more conviction behind their

PPM AG.COM

price increases. They werent just raising


prices and bluffi ng their way through the
justifications. They had evidence. This
understanding allowed the entire Robert
Charles Photography staff to present the
studios pricing with confidence, and to
project a sense of worth.
The Zembas also cut expenses. They
maintained most of their best-in-class materials selection and focused on processes. For example, studio staff used to go
through a tedious, antiquated process for
custom framing, and it could take three
hours or more to write up an order. They
devised an efficient new system for writing
up a complete framing order within four
minutes, saving 176 minutes of time while
reducing the number of mistakes. This improved quality and reduced costs.
Another expense-cutting tactic was tying
employee compensation to performance,
which helped reward good employees without letting salary expenses grow inconsistent with the studios growth and revenue.

TAKEAWAYS
NUMBERS TELL THE STORY. Family businesses are fraught with emotion,
which can cloud decision-making. However, making decisions based on verifiable financial data removes the emotional component so you can make clear-headed business choices.
ASK WHY. When you want to buy a camera or new computer, ask yourself why. What
benefit will it have for the business? Will it help you make more money or produce a
noticeably higher-quality product? If not, rethink that purchase.
LOOK FOR HIDDEN COSTS. Material costs are often the smallest factor in cost of
sales. So many other factors influence what you should charge: rent, utilities, software licensing, computers, cameras, salaries, continuing education, travel expenses, marketing, etc. Understanding those costs helps you justify higher prices.
INCREASE QUALITY, DECREASE COSTS. By creating more efficient workflows and
maximizing the talent allocation in your studio, you can often do things cheaper while
improving the quality of the work.
TRUST YOUR GUT, BUT BACK IT UP WITH DATA. How many times have you had a gut
feeling that you were afraid to follow? When you have hard data to back up your gut
feelings, you get the confirmation you need to make necessary changes.

Capture a Moment

Look to Tap Packaging Solutions for the largest variety of


premium photo packaging in the industry.
To learn more, contact a Tap Customer Service representative,
or visit photo.tap-usa.com to place an order.
photo.tap-usa.com 800-827-5679

Call to receive a copy of the new 2015 Tap Photo Packaging Catalog

Need Help
With Your
Contracts?

Here.
PPA has dozens of sample contracts,
forms, videos and legal articles for
photographers, including:
Commercial contracts
Independent contractor
agreements
Licensing agreements
Model releases
Portrait contracts
Sports-action contracts
Wedding contracts
How-to webinars
And more!

Find the contract you need


FREE for PPA photographers:
PPA.com/Contracts
Not a PPA member?
PPA.com/Join

And fi nally, they adjusted their marketing to prioritize new media avenues that allowed them to track return on investment
and assess upcoming campaigns. They tied
in social media activity with mall displays
and saw an almost immediate uptick in
new business leads.
RESULTS
Within the fi rst year the Zembas started to
see their profitability turn around. The full
result of their efforts took nearly two years
of hard work and gradual implementation
of PPA best practices. At that point we felt
like something profound had happened,
says Edward. We were on a new trajectory
with new expectations, more excitement,
more enthusiasm.
Robert Charles Photographys cost of
sales dropped from almost 50 percent to
less than 30 percent. Net profit went from
very red to very black. The studios bottomline profit increased by several hundred
percent. Edward and Robert Francis were
able to pay themselves consistent salaries,
and their father was able to retire and draw
from the companys profits for many years.
The newfound fi nancial security helped
the Zembas change the course of the business so they could focus on what they enjoy

and where they could excel beyond their


competitors. For example, about seven years
ago, the Zembas phased out weddings. At
one point, weddings accounted for about
95 percent of the studios business. But the
Zembas saw that their market was changing and they could exert a better competitive advantage elsewhere, particularly in
portraiture and commercial photography.
Knowing their numbers and what they
could afford to do by making adjustments
to the business, the Zembas scaled down
their wedding work while ramping up other specialties. Weddings account for about
5 percent of gross revenues today.
An ounce of fact is worth a pound of opinion, says Edward. The PPA Benchmarks
gave us the data we needed to back up our
decisions. We could remove emotions and
opinions and just follow the facts. We now
believe that were in charge of our future.
Getting a handle on the fi nancials was
fundamental to helping us create the art
we wanted to create, and build the business we wanted to build. With the help of
PPA, we were able to become known as the
leading studio in our market while simultaneously keeping costs in line with industry benchmarks. It wasnt easy to do, but we
found the formula that made it all possible.

PPM AG.COM

February 1-3, 2015 Nashville, TN

10,000+ Pros 3 Days Photographys Best Practices, Products & Inspiration

BRY COX, M.Photog.Cr., CPP


Portrait
BryCox.com
@BryCox007

BOB DAVIS

JODY & ZACH GRAY

WILLIAM INNES

BRIDGET JACKSON, CPA


Business
PPA.com/Benchmark
Professional Photographers
of America

ANDY MARCUS

EDWARD MONAHAN

NATHAN REGA

Wedding
BobAndDawnDavis.com
@bobdavis_1

M.Photog.Cr.
Business
FredMarcus.com
@AndyMarcus

Business, Wedding
ZackAndJody.com
@zachandjody

Business
KodakAlaris.com

Business, Wedding
InnesPhotography.com
@williaminnes

Portrait
HarperPoint.com
Harper Point

See the latest speaker list at

ImagingUSA.org
GIULIO SCIORIO
Portrait
GiulioSciorio.com
@giuliosciorio

MOSHE ZUSMAN
Portrait, Wedding
MosheZusman.com
@moshezusman

*Classes and speakers are subject to change without notice. Visit ImagingUSA.org or download the app at ImagingUSA.org/App for the latest.

Special Keynote Speaker:

Peter Lik, M.Photog.


Hes the most acclaimed landscape photographer in the
world right now. Thats right, Peter Lik is part of the speaker
line-up for Imaging USA 2015 and will lead a special
session. This high-octane Aussie and Weather Channels
From The Edge superstar will bring along some of his most
well-known images like Ghost and One and share the
stories behind them. Get ready for a treat, you wont want
to miss this one!

Sam Abell

Mary Fisk-Taylor, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, API

Larry Lourcey, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Mariah Ashley

Thomas Flanders, CPP

Andy Marcus, M.Photog.Cr.

Roy Ashen

Tim Flach

Al Audleman, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API


Kareem Black

Clay Blackmore, M.Photog.Cr.

Anamaria Brandt

Barbara Breitsameter

Alex McClanahan

Don Frankle

Kira Friedman

Britney Fullgraf, Cr.Photog., CPP

Angela Carson, Cr.Photog., API


Carl Caylor, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Jeremy Chan

Tony Corbell, Cr.Photog., API


Bry Cox, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Gregory Daniel, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP


Bob Davis

Stephanie Davis

Ed Monahan

Jodi Gray

Ann Monteith, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,


CPP, ABI, API, A-ASP

Zack Gray

Michael Grecco

Prem Mukherjee, Cr.Photog.

Michael Greenberg

Tomas Muoz, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Marty Grivjack, Cr.Photog.

Ann Naugher, M.Photog.M.Artist, CPP

Jeff Gump

Booray Perry, CPP

Bridgette Harmon-Smith

Jared Platt

Russ Harrington

Jennifer Hillenga, M.Photog.Cr.

Zabrina Deng

Don Dickson, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,


CPP, Hon-EA-ASP
Jim DiVitale, M.Photog.MEI.Cr., API, F-ASP
Daniel Doke, Cr.Photog., CPP
Bruce Dorn

Terry Dunlap, M.Photog.Cr.

Adam Hunter, M.Photog.Cr., CPP


Peter Hurley

William Innes

Luke Edmonson, M.Photog., CPP

Donald Emmerich, M.Photog.M.Artist.MEI.Cr.,


API, F-ASP
Nancy Emmerich, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API,
F-ASP
James Ferrara, M.Photog., CPP

John Pyle

Joseph Reda, CPP


Nathan Rega

Ralph Romaguera Jr., M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Thom Rouse, M.Photog.MEI.Cr., CPP, F-ASP

Bridget Jackson, CPA

Dan Rowe

Jon Johnson, M.Photog.Cr.

Giulio Sciorio

Allison Tyler Jones, CPP

JuliAnne Jonker, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Stephen Eastwood

Gary Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API, A-ASP,


EA-ASP
Tanja Melone

Trish Gilmore

Pat Cahill, Cr.Photog.

Dan McClanahan, M.Photog.

Kathy Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API

Chris Garcia

Joy Cahill

Rod Evans, Cr.Photog.

Jennifer Mason, CPP

Hanson Fong, M.Photog.Cr.

Suzy Fulton, M.Photog., CPP

Ryan Brenizer

Jeff Lubin, M.Photog.Cr.

Julia Kelleher, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Ben Shirk, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr.


Michelle Tibbils

Tim Kelly, M.Photog.Cr., F-ASP

Timothy Walden, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.


Cr., CPP, F-ASP

Julieanne Kost

Jaren Wilkey

Christie Kline, M.Photog.Cr.

Steve Kozak, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Angela Kurkian, M.Photog.Cr., CPP


Peter Lik, M.Photog.

Q: Hey! Whats up with those crazy


letters after the speakers names?

Audrey Wancket , M.Photog.Cr., CPP


Audrey Woulard

Chris Wunder, Cr.Photog.


Moshe Zusman

A: Those represent the speakers


degrees, certifications, and honors!
Learn more at PPA.com/Degrees

This year at

.org
Special keynote speaker, Peter Lik

4 free all-access pass scholarships


Mobile app game with prizes
Daily live demos

5K Fun Run on Sunday!


Big Game Super Party
Imaging USA Kick Off

PPA Charities shoe drive


New member reception

Plan for Your Success workshop


FREE for new members

Extended hours for the IPC exhibit


Peter Lik photography exhibit
IPC guided tours

New Member/Alumni program


Daily Solutions Roundtables
and lots more!

Be More Charitable

Good things from PPA Charities that will make you feel even more
wonderful to be part of this bustling photography crowd Imaging USA:
PPA Charities Celebration
Kick off Imaging USA in good
spirits. This is open to any
Imaging USA attendee, so come
enjoy the fun and browse the PPA
Charities auctions.
Sat. 1/31, 8 10pm
Governors Ballroom South
C & D, Level 2

PPA Charities 5K Fun Run


Its healthy to give back!
The race begins and ends (its a
loop) at the Convention Centers
entrance near the Presidential
Porticodont be late!
Sun. 2/1, registration 6:30am,
race begins 7am

Shoe Drive for Dando Amor


Used shoes will be collected at
Imaging USA and re-purposed for
orphanages in South America and
Africa. Drop-off bins will be located
by the Expo entrance and by the
registration kiosks!
Sun. 2/1 Tue. 2/3

More info at ImagingUSA.org/Events

Pre-convention

classes
Thursday
I

SSE

9am 5pm

$129
The Beauty of Childhood
Ann Naugher, M.Photog.M.Artist, CPP
$129
$1,000 an Hour from School
Photography. Its Elementary!
Chris Wunder, Cr.Photog.

Friday
P
A

SSE

B
B

$249
Business Basics for Portrait
Photographers
Ann Monteith, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.
Cr., CPP, ABI, API, A-ASP
B

$199
The Secrets to Success When Turning Pro
Steve Kozak, M.Photo.Cr., CPP &
Britney Fullgraf, Cr.Photog., CPP
B

$944
Business Breakthroughs Workshop
Allison Tyler Jones, CPP
T

$299
Certification Prep Class
Al Audleman, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API
Gary Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API, A-ASP,
EA-ASP & Kathy Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API

Saturday
T

$79
The Complete Digital Photography
Process
Jim DiVitale, M.Photog.MEI.Cr., API, F-ASP

Saturday
B

1:30 5pm

$79
Super Fast Lightroom Workflow From
Start to Finish
Adam Hunter, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Saturday
B

9am 12pm

5 7pm

FREE!
How to Put Charitable Marketing
to Work
moderated by Ann Monteith, M.Photog.
Hon.M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, API, A-ASP

ADOBE

BUSINESS

SENIOR PORTRAIT

FAMILY/CHILDREN PORTRAIT

TECHNIQUE

INSPIRATION

WEDDING

PORTRAIT

FC

SSE

9am 5pm

Saturday

$129
If You Dont Get Layers, Get Lightroom!
Marty Grivjack, Cr.Photog.

P
A

$129
The Complete Team Photographer
Jaren Wilkey

$249
Business Basics for Portrait
Photographers
Ann Monteith, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, ABI, API, A-ASP

SSE

$199
The Secrets to Success When Turning Pro
Steve Kozak, M.Photo.Cr., CPP &
Britney Fullgraf, Cr.Photog., CPP

$944
Business Breakthroughs Workshop
Allison Tyler Jones, CPP

$299
Certification Prep Class
Al Audleman, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API
Gary Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API, A-ASP,
EA-ASP & Kathy Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP,
API

Saturday

SCHOOL, SPORTS & EVENTS

9am 5pm

$129
Photoshop for Portrait Photographers
ONLY!
Don Emmerich, M.Photog.M.Artist.MEI.Cr.,
API, F-ASP
$129
How We Navigate Images & the
Significance of Left Gaze Bias
Tim Flach
$129
Sports Photography Its Time to Make
Some Money!
Jeff Gump
$129
The Art and Business of Pregnancy and
Newborn Photography
Anamaria Brandt
$944
Business Breakthroughs Workshop
Allison Tyler Jones, CPP
$299
Certification Prep Class
Al Audleman, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API
Gary Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API, A-ASP,
EA-ASP & Kathy Meek, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API

9 11am

1 3pm

4 6pm

HANDS-ON PHOTOGRAPHY $79 for 1 class $129 for 2 classes $159 for 3 classes
P

Hands On Photography: Boom!


Big Modifier Lighting
Dan Rowe

Hands On Photography: Rewarding with


Relationships: Lets Get Personal
John Pyle

Hands On Photography:
Relevant Senior Portraiture
Dan McClanahan, M.Photog. &
Alex McClanahan

FC

Hands On Photography: Things I Learned


the Hard Way (So You Dont Have To)
Ryan Brenizer
Hands On Photography: Images that
Speak
Tim Walden, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, F-ASP
Hands On Photography: Childrens
Photography
Tanja Melone

Hands On Photography:
Natural Light Portraiture
Carl Caylor, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Hands On Photography: People


Photography 101
Hanson Fong, M.Photog.Cr.

Hands On Photography: The Power of Light


Tony Corbell, Cr.Photog., API

Hands On Photography: Boudoir


Jon Johnson, M.Photog.Cr.

*Classes and speakers are subject to change without notice. Visit ImagingUSA.org or download the app at ImagingUSA.org/App for the latest.

February 1

Sunday

More classes being added

Schedule is subject to change. For the most


up-to-date info, go to ImagingUSA.org or
download the app at ImagingUSA.org/App

7:30 9am
P

Beauty and Grace of the LIVE


DEMO
Classic Portrait
Audrey Wancket, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

P
SSE

I
B
P

Tweens, The Forgotten Market


Audrey Woulard

Posing for the Large Company and More


Tom Flanders, CPP
The Case for Fine Art
Thom Rouse, M.Photog.MEI.Cr., CPP, F-ASP

P
T

4K Photo Shoot Live with Giulio Sciorio


Giulio Scioro
Sponsor: Panasonic

B
W

How to Avoid What Most Small


Businesses Do - Fail
Zack & Jody Gray
Sponsor: Bay Photo Lab

9:30 11:15am
P

High-Fashion Lighting for Seniors


Rod Evans, Cr.Photog.

LIVE
DEMO

Sponsor: ACI
B
P
W

The $5K Engagement Session


Zabrina Deng & Jeremy Chan

Road Lighting
Joseph Reda, CPP

Sponsor: Millers Professional Imaging


B

Sponsor: WHCC

#BeMoreSuccessful
Mary Fisk-Taylor, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, API

T
W

Solutions Round Table


Angela Carson, Cr.Photog., API
Need Light? Speedlite!
Bob Davis & Stephen Eastwood

LIVE
DEMO

Sponsor: Canon

Sponsor: WHCC

Whos Upside Down; Us, or the Bats?


Tim Flach

IMAGING EXPO 11:30AM 5PM


5 6:15pm
P

All Up In Your Space


James Ferrara, M.Photog., CPP

LIVE
DEMO

SSE

Making Money with Composites


Ben Shirk, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr.
Sponsor: Millers Professional Imaging

Your Studio Can Profit With Underclass


and Sports
Pat Cahill, Cr.Photog. & Joy Cahill

Sponsor: ACI
B

The Benchmark Is In Whats Your


Number?
Bridget Jackson, CPA

How to Rock Weddings


Dan McClanahan, M.Photog. &
Alex McClanahan

Sponsor: Millers Professional Imaging

Solving Your Biggest Sales Problem;


One Tool That Could Make Your Year
Gregory Daniel, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP

BIG GAME SUPER PARTY IMAGING USA KICK OFF 5:30 9:30PM
SPONSORED BY CANON

LIVE
DEMO

February 2

Monday

ADOBE

BUSINESS

SENIOR PORTRAIT

FAMILY/CHILDREN PORTRAIT

TECHNIQUE

INSPIRATION

WEDDING

PORTRAIT

FC

SSE

SCHOOL, SPORTS & EVENTS

7:30am
8 9:30am
9am
P

Go Your Own Way - Living Your Dream


in Portrait Photography
Tim Kelly, M.Photog.Cr., F-ASP
Sponsor: Kodak, WHCC

SSE

LIVE
DEMO

B
P

Its Not Just About Football


Nancy Emmerich, M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, API, F-ASP

Easy Techniques to Triple Your $/hr


Prem Mukherjee, Cr.Photog.

Solutions Roundtable
Angela Carson, Cr.Photog., API

Wedding Photography: Prepare to


Succeed
Booray Perry, CPP

Streamline Your Wedding and Portrait


Post Production in Lightroom and
Photoshop
Jared Platt

Sponsor: Millers Professional Imaging

LIVE
DEMO

Sponsor: ACI

Sponsor: Adobe

Photographing Ideas The Unconventional Path of


Conceptual Portraits
Kira Friedman & Nathan Rega
Sponsor: Millers Professional

10
9:30am
11:30am
11:15am
W

Killer Lighting
Daniel Doke, Cr.Photog., CPP

LIVE
DEMO

Long-Term Success: 5 Top


Photographers Share Their Tips
Angela Carson, Cr.Photog., API; Tim
Walden, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, F-ASP; Andy Marcus; JuliAnne
Jonker, M.Photog.Cr., CPP & Jeff Lubin,
M.Photog.Cr.

Outdoor Lighting
Stephanie Davis
From Camera to Client Winning
Workflow for Success
Julieanne Kost

Expanding Imaging into Cine Style


Motion Capture
Bruce Dorn
Sponsor: Canon

Sponsor: Adobe

Music & Celebrity Portraits


Russ Harrington

IMAGING EXPO 11:30AM 5PM


5pm
5
6:15pm
6:15pm
P

Its Showtime! Time to Look Good!


Hanson Fong, M.Photog.Cr.

LIVE
DEMO

SSE

Sponsor: Canon
P
I

The Portrait as an Art Form


JuliAnne Jonker, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Seven Secrets to Six Figure Sales
Allison Tyler Jones, CPP

From Sports to Seniors


Terry Dunlap, M.Photog.Cr.
Sponsor: H&H

SSE

Steps to a Profitable Action


Photography Event
Don Frankle

Adding Motion to Stills Extending


Your Reach and Increasing
Your Revenue
Clay Blackmore
Sponsor: Adobe

Sponsor: WHCC

GRAND IMAGING AWARDS 6 7PM


AN EVENING WITH PETER LIK, M.PHOTOG. 8 9PM
*Classes and speakers are subject to change without notice. Visit ImagingUSA.org or download the app at ImagingUSA.org/App for the latest.

LIVE
DEMO

February 3

Tuesday

ADOBE

BUSINESS

SENIOR PORTRAIT

FAMILY/CHILDREN PORTRAIT

TECHNIQUE

INSPIRATION

WEDDING

PORTRAIT

FC

SSE

SCHOOL, SPORTS & EVENTS

8 9:30am
A

Bringing out the Best in Every Image


Quick Retouching for the Most
Common Situations
Bry Cox, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Sponsor: Adobe

T
W

Pre-School Green Screen


Bridgette Harmon-Smith

Sponsor: H&H

LIVE
DEMO

Sponsor: Bay Photo Lab

T
SSE

Perfect Venue Lighting


Moshe Zusman

Creative Lighting on the Run


Michael Greenberg

Learning to See: The Challenge of IPC


Moderated by Angela Kurkian, M.Photog.
Cr., CPP, with Suzy Fulton, M.Photog., CPP,
Christie Kline, M.Photog.Cr., CPP &
Tomas Muoz, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

Just Added
Roy Ashen

Sponsor: Triple Scoop Music

10 11:30am
P

SSE

Posing for Couples


Jen Hillenga, M.Photog.Cr.

The Art of Senior Photography


Larry Lourcey, M.Photog.Cr., CPP

LIVE
DEMO

Sponsor: WHCC

Be Known By Sight
Luke Edmonson, M.Photog., CPP

LIVE
DEMO

Solutions Roundtable
Angela Carson, Cr.Photog., API

The Life of a Photograph


Sam Abell

Sponsor: Canon
A

How to Increase Your Sales 1,000%


Don Dickson, M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.
Cr., CPP, Hon-EA-ASP

Mastering Selections, Layers, Masking


and Typography to Create Seamless
Composites
Julieanne Kost
Sponsor: Adobe

EXPO 11:30AM 3:30PM


3:30 4:45pm
P

From Zero to #SHABANG!


Peter Hurley

LIVE
DEMO

Best in Show Creating Fine Art Pet


Photography
Barbara Breitsameter

P
T

Turn it Around in a Year! 10 Steps to


Get your Business Booming and Cash
Flowing
Trish Gilmore & Mariah Ashley

B
I

What Consumers Want Insights For


Todays Professional Photographer
Ed Monahan
Sponsor: Kodak

Advanced Portrait Lighting


Michael Grecco
Sponsor: Panasonic

5:15 6:30pm
I

A Portrait Photographers Survival


Guide to a Changing Industry
Kareem Black
Just Added
Chris Garcia

Sponsor: Richmond

Put your Photography Business


on Autopilot
William Innes

B
SSE

Sponsor: Panasonic
B

Your Numbers Up!


Michelle Tibbils
Sponsor: WHCC

Kill the Commission Publishing


Yearbooks Made Simple
Ralph Romaguera Jr., M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Success, Its All in Your Head!
Julia Kelleher, M.Photog.Cr., CPP;
Jenny Mason, CPP
Sponsor: WHCC

AWARD & DEGREE CEREMONY 6 7PM


*Classes and speakers are subject to change without notice. Visit ImagingUSA.org or download the app at ImagingUSA.org/App for the latest.

Big Game Super Party

Imaging USA Kick-Off


Dont worry about missing the big game; it will be on for
you at Imaging USA! This will be the biggest Super Bowl
party around.
Come on out! Rock your favorite teams jersey and mix it
up with some of the best photographers in the world.
Kick off starts at 5:30pm, music and dancing
shenanigans start at 6:30pm
Giant screens and dance floor topped with a
yummy buffet, drinks and lots and lots of games!
Fun stuff galore including pool, air hockey,
doubleshot basketball, skee ball, fastest pitch cage
+ many, many more!
All included with your Imaging USA All-Access Pass.
Tickets also available on site.
Delta Ballroom A and
Foyer, Level 2
Sponsored by Canon

Special thanks to our sponsors!


Platinum

Gold

Silver
Bronze

Richmond
Professional Lab since 1938

Meet up in

Nashville

The Imaging USA experience is so unique because it continues beyond the classes and tradeshow
hours. Its your chance to meet, mingle and network with those who love photography as much as
you. And this year its easier than ever since the hotel and convention center are in the same building!

oa

&

Co

on
ve
nt
io

n&

nv
en
t ion

Visit
orss C

Cen
ter

enter

For your after-hours fun, there are plenty of entertainment options right within Opryland and many
more nearby. Here are a few:

lord

al J a
G e n er

on
cks

Sh

ow

t
Ho

el

G ay

Op

d
an
r yl

fN
yo
r tes
Cou

il
hv
as

le

Gaylord Opryland

General Jackson Showboat

Grand Ole Opry House

Get to know your Imaging USA


headquarters. Walking around
the beautiful atriums is quite an
experience in itself!
ImagingUSA.org/Hotel

Head out on the water for live


entertainment and delicious cuisine on
the largest paddlewheel riverboat in the
country!
GeneralJackson.com

Take a quick (free!) shuttle ride down


the road to tour the Grand Ole Opry
House! Youll get a rare glimpse at
what happens behind the scenes.
Opry.com

Pre-convention programs
There is so much to share, see and experience during
Imaging USA that three days are just not enough. Thats why
you have 3 EXTRA DAYS prior to the convention to enjoy more
in-depth and intimate pre-convention classes.

@ImagingUSA #ImagingUSA

Imaging

expo

Sunday..........................11:30am 5pm
Monday.........................11:30am 5pm
Tuesday.........................11:30am 3:30pm
The three-day Imaging Expo is way more than a trade show. Its a
smorgasbord of the latest products and most innovative solutions
for the photographic business owner! Prepare to get your mind
blown with all the possibilities that await.

See how the experts use these new


products via the in-booth demos.
Build vendor relationships & pick their
brains for new solutions.
Create lifelong connections with
industry friends.
Kick your creativity into gear at the
International Photographic Exhibit.
Grab show-special deals for tools
& accessories youve been eyeing online.

Get down to business

Position your business to get where you dream of going! PPA offers business workshops to
help you create a profitable and sustainable business. These one-of-a-kind pre-convention
classes* teach skills specific to starting and growing a photography studio.

Business Basics for Portrait Photographers


Business Breakthroughs

Practice what they preach

Learn by doing with the Hands-On Photography pre-convention classes*, featuring marketing,
studio & on-location lighting, wedding, family and child photography.

7 instructors, each teaching 3 times on Saturday, January 31


Learn & shoot with up to 3 different instructors
30 attendees per class time, so register early!

*Additional fees apply for pre-convention classes. See ImagingUSA.org for details.

Grow your craft and business knowhow


Sample & get hot new photography products
Build up your network with more passionate & talented friends

Imaging USA is taking over the Gaylord Opryland Resort &


Convention Center in Nashville, TN. No back and forth this year;
the hotel and convention center are under the same roof!

THE GOODS
PRODUCTS, TECHNOLOGY & TECHNIQUE

TACTILE
TO ORDER
BUILD YOUR BAG

Why buy an off-the-rack bag when


you can design your own version from
a lush tapestry of fabrics, distressed
leathers, waxed canvas, and tweeds?
Its a lavish banquet of choices. Handmade in Michigan, Porteen Gear bags
reflect your individuality.
Structurally durable and intended
to look more beautiful with age, the
medium DSLR size (pictured) is designed to hold a pro DSLR body,
speedlight and lens, or a body and
two lenses.
Porteen Gear has sold more than
9,000 bags and delivered to more
than 60 countries. $160.
porteengear.com

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

47

THE GOODS

PRO REVIEW

The Nikon D750 may not be getting


the attention it deserves from professional photographers. Its fullframe 24.3-megapixel sensor can
capture an impressively wide dynamic
range and perform well in the high
ISO range, but it comes in a small
package with controls arranged
differently from the pro bodies.
IMAGE COURTESY NIKON

AN UNDERRATED
UPGRADE
NIKON D750

by Ellis Vener

PROS
Large dynamic range, good high ISO
Excellent autofocus system

48

CONS
Control layout not as good as on
Nikon pro bodies

3.2-inch vari-angle LCD

You need to look at monitor to change


white balance

Built-in short-range Wi-Fi

Shutter speed tops out at 1/4,000

u In August 2008 Nikon released the 12.1megapixel D700, its second full-frame digital SLR and the second to use the 24x36mm
CMOS sensor, which was deployed in Nikons
first full-frame DSLR, the D3. Now comes a
successor, the 24.3-megapixel D750. Weve
come a long way. To put the progress in
perspective, in the past year alone Nikon
has released three other full-frame DSLRs
(the 16.2-megapixel D4S, the 24.3-megapixel
D610, and the 36.3-megapixel D810) as well
as the 24.1-megapixel APS-C DX-format
D7100 and the 24.2-megapixel D5300. If youre
in the market for a full-frame or high-resolution Nikon DSLR, you have lots of choices.
Nikon markets the D750 as a camera
for enthusiasts, but many of its features
appeal to professionals: Its comparable
to the D810 in its high-end capability and
the D610 on the simpler side. While the
D750 lacks the pixel count, rugged frame,
and mirror-up electronic front-curtain
shutter of the D810, at ISO settings above

PPM AG.COM

ISO 400, it has a better signal-to-noise


ratio and a slightly different autofocus system. And it features a tilting monitor and
builtin Wi-Fi, both of which proved to be
more useful than I anticipated.
Compared to the D610, the D750 has a sturdier build, better and more sophisticated
autofocus, and a more advanced CMOS sensor, the newer Expeed 4 image processor,
plus the Wi-Fi and tilting monitor. The D750s
control layout is closer to that of the D610
than the D810, D800, or even the D700. It
also has new body shape and size. I didnt
think the body design, Wi-Fi, tilting monitor, autofocus improvements, and control
layout would make a significant difference
until I used the D810 and the D750 side by
side on several assignments. With the exception of the control layout, the new features all proved their worth.
IMAGE QUALITY
During my time with the D750 I shot 14bit losslessly compressed NEFs exclusively.

The D750 has the same control layout as the D610


and the D7100. Its not an easy switch for pros to
make from a D810, D4, D4S or other Nikon pro body.
The monitor tilts up or down in a 180-degree arc.

ELLIS VENER

The Nikon D750 does an excellent job of rendering a wide variety of skin tones and has a better signalto-noise ratio at ISO settings over 400 than the D810. Exposure: 1/250 second at f/4, ISO 1600.

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

BODY SHAPE AND SIZE


When held in hand, the D750 feels sturdier than the D610 and more secure than the
D700 and D810. Much of this difference in fit and feel is thanks to the D750s deeper
and more contoured handgrip. By placing the battery compartment parallel to the
main part of the body, squaring off the areas surrounding the lens mount, and redesigning the chassis, Nikons design team came up with a smaller camera body that
fits better in hand.

D750

D700

D610

D810

HEIGHT

4.5 inches

4.8 inches

4.4 inches

4.9 inches

WIDTH

5.6 inches

5.8 inches

5.6 inches

5.8 inches

DEPTH

3.1 inches

3.0 inches

3.2 inches

3.3 inches

WEIGHT

26.5 ounces

35.0 ounces

26.8 ounces

31.1 ounces

The D750s native ISO range is 100 to 12,800


with 1/3-stop boosts to Hi-1 (ISO 25,600
equivalent) and another full-stop boost to
the Hi-2 setting. On the low end you can
switch down to an ISO equivalent of ISO
50 in 1/3-stop increments. While I found slight
but progressive increases in the noise-tosignal ratio and a slight decrease in overall dynamic range at all settings up to ISO
6400, with the camera set to 6400, even
photos shot in less than ideal light are remarkably clean, and highlight details are
retained. Id feel comfortable shooting at
ISO 12,800 but would do so only if absolutely necessary. If youre shooting in abysmal
light where higher sensitivity settings are
required, youre in the provinces of the D4
and D4S. The D750 NEFs do an excellent
job of rendering a wide range of flesh tones
of various ethnicities from very pale to very
dark.
The D750s NEF files provide a solid foundation for creative processing. The intrinsic
dynamic range of images shot at ISO 100 to
400 on the D750 NEFs can in many circumstances reduce the need to bracket exposures widely for true HDR work.
For autofocus the D750 uses a 51-point
array with 15 of those being cross-type
sensors, 11 being able to work with lenses
with a maximum aperture of f/8. The array is part of Nikons Multi-CAM 3500FX II
autofocus system, similar but slightly different from the one used in the D810, D4,

and D4S. Nikons specs say the AF detection range goes from +19 on the bright end
(snow on a sunny day) down to -3 (moonlit
landscapes), but I think thats a bit conservative. As long as the AF system could fi nd
some contrast, the camera was able to lock
on to it. In this regard, it performs similarly to the D4S.
There are two differences between the
autofocus systems in D750 and those in the
D4 and D810. One is the D750s new group
autofocus mode, which is very useful for
moving subjects, and the other is that the
overall area and spacing of the 51 sensors
is slightly smaller and tighter in the D750.
The D750 body I used for this review required minor, if any, AF fi ne-tune settings
with a variety of Nikkor lenses, including ones
that were rented. The lenses I used included the new Nikon AF-S 20mm f/1.8G, the AF-S
24-120mm f/4G VR, the AF-S 24-70mm
f/2.8G, and AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8G VR II.
DESIGN
The most noticeable feature of the D750 is
the monitor assembly. The 3.2-inch diagonal high-resolution display is on a hinged
metal frame that can be tilted at any angle
over a 180-degree arc to face up or down.
This feature is perfect for low-level and
over-the-head shooting angles and for live
view and tripod setups lower than eye-level.
The two-point hinged support frame is much
more robust than mounts on many other

PPM AG.COM

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

ELLIS VENER

cameras, and the displays color balance


can be fine-tuned.
The D750s body design has two drawbacks. The first is the arrangement of controls on the left side of the camera. The
D750 has the same layout as the D610 and
D7100: The buttons for the white balance,
ISO, and quality menus are on the back of
the camera, left of the LCD, while the metering mode button is near the shutter release.
Id rather have the white balance, metering pattern, and ISO settings on the control
cluster and the camera control mode selection (M, A, S, P) near the shutter release, as
they are on the D800, D810, D700, and the
D1/D2/D3 and D4 series bodies.
The second issue is more minor. Theres
no white balance setting indicator on the
top deck LCD or in the viewfinder. so you
have to check the menu on the monitor.
When changing ISO settings, you can see
the chosen ISO setting on the top deck and in
the viewfinder. But in both cases you need
to move the camera away from your face to
see if youre pressing the right button.
The D750 is also the first Nikon DSLR
to feature a built-in Wi-Fi transceiver. It
works over a limited range in conjunction
with Nikons Wireless Mobile Utility app for
iOS and Android devices to create an ad
hoc Wi-Fi connection so you can download
JPEG versions of your photos to your wireless device of choice. With the app open and
the camera set to transmit, its easy to download files, and you can also use your mobile smartphone or tablet as a remote live
view/screen and camera trigger. Unfortunately you cant (yet?) control the camera settings the way you can with a CamRanger.
I had no problems using the D750 for
assignment work. For professional work
its a better choice than the D610. It handles well, and if you dont want or need the
36-megapixel resolution of the D810 or the
high frame rate and superlative ultra-high
ISO and rugged build of the D4 and D4S,
its a great general-purpose camera. I cant
make any significant comments on the
cameras video capability except to say the
image quality and dynamic range are quite
good, blacks are solid, and the face recognition algorithms in the autofocus module
work well.

A 1/60-second exposure at f/9, ISO 100, inside a dimly lit room shows the broad dynamic range the D750
can nail in one capture.

51

THE GOODS

WORKFLOW

BYU defensive end Ziggy Ansah at the 2013 NFL


draft. The photo was posted to Jaren Wilkeys
FTP site within 30 seconds of being taken, and
Wilkeys social media manager posted it online
for BYU fans within a minute of receiving it.

JAREN WILKEY / BYU

before any photos were edited and posted


online. At basketball games I sometimes
kept my laptop with me on the sidelines to
send photos, which meant Imissed far too
many great plays because I was cropping
a photo instead of taking one. The fundamental question remains: How do I efficiently get high-quality photos delivered to
my social media networks while maintaining my focus on photographing the event?

INSTANT GRATIFICATION
FEED SOCIAL MEDIA VIA WIRELESS WORKFLOW

by Jaren Wilkey
In the 16 years Ive served as a team
photographer for Brigham Young Universitys (BYU) 19 athletic teams Ive seen a lot
of change. It wasnt that long ago that Id
spend a nice Saturday afternoon shooting
a BYU football game and then walk back to
the office, set the 20 or so rolls of exposed
fi lm on the counter and go home. On Monday morning Id send the rolls to a lab for
processing, and Id get a fi rst look at the
slides on Wednesday or Thursday.
It may have been a simpler time, but its
defi nitely ancient history. Now, whenever a
great play happens on the field, somebody
is in my ear asking me if I got it (of course I
did) and how quickly they can get the photo
posted to the teams Facebook, Twitter, and
Instagram accounts.
Social media has changed how we participate in live events. Viewers at home now watch
football games with a remote in one hand
and a mobile device in the other. They use

52

their second screen to check for updates and


make comments right when a play happens.
According to Twitter, 24.9 million tweets
were posted during the 2014 Super Bowl, but
whats even more interesting is that these online interactions dropped off precipitously
within just 15 minutes of the fi nal snap.
What can we learn from this? First,
that people interact via social media while
the event is happening, not afterward. If we
wait until the game is over to post photos
online, weve missed a huge opportunity to
interact with our most invested audience.
Second, if we provide high-quality photos to viewers while theyre watching the
event, theyll share them within their circles, thereby extending our photos reach.
When BYU made the switch to digital,
we had assistants who ran CompactFlash
cards full of photos to the press box after every quarter of a football game. Despite our
best efforts, it still took 15 to 20 minutes

LEVERAGING WI-FI
BYU has used Wi-Fi transmitters with our
cameras for several years to provide a wireless
tether to an iPad. At fi rst we used a simple
Eye-Fi SD card that sent images to the iPad
via the ShutterSnitch app. When we upgraded to the Canon EOS-1D X cameras, we also
tried out the new Canon WFT-E6A wireless
transmitter. The E6A was far more robust
and reliable than the Eye-Fi card, which got me
wondering how I could use it to transmit photos in real time. After several months of
tinkering, I figured out a reliable system.
There are three main components to our
wireless workflow:
1. A camera that can transmit photos
wirelessly
2. A router or a hotspot to provide Internet connectivity
3. An FTP site to receive the photos
My Canon EOS-1D X shoots in raw/JPG
mode, so its capturing a raw fi le and a small
JPG of every photo, but the camera is set
up to send just the JPG fi les wirelessly. The
JPG is set to a quality of 7 on the M2, or
medium 2, setting, which is 3,456 pixels wide
and 1 to 2MB in size. The Canon WFT-E6A is
plugged into the side of my camera and connected to a wireless network that I set up
with an Apple AirPort Extreme base station.
We dont transmit every photo we take, just
the best ones. To send the photo, I push the
Set button on my camera, and the camera

PPM AG.COM

UH

3/

0:0

0:2

UH

4/

0:0

0:2

UH

5/

0:0

0:2

D
UH

6
0:0

21

/ 0:

7/

0:0

0:2

8/

0:0

0:2

UH

9/

0:0

0:2

UH

0/

0:1

1
0:2

THE GOODS

WORKFLOW

JAREN WILKEY / BYU

When a great play happens, Wilkeys team can


have it on social media within two minutes of capture, while the fans are still excited about it.

transmits the JPG via FTP to our website.


All of this is done without a laptop or iPad.
Weve used PhotoShelter for several years
to sell photos, and it also provides an option
to host FTP sites. To set one up, you just
create a gallery, enable download access
to it, and on the upload tab, click Add FTP
User with a username and a password. Our
social media managers have a password to
the gallery that allows them to download
the photos as soon as they arrive via FTP
and then post them to Facebook, Twitter,
and Instagram while the game is still happening. With this system weve been able to
get images on our social media sites within
two minutes of capture.
At football games, I have two Wi-Fi networks set up: one in the north end zone and
one in the south end zone. Depending on
our photographers positions on the field,
they select the closest network with their
camera and send photos as they capture
them to our PhotoShelter site. One of our
student employees is up in the press box

editing the photos as they come in, and he


or she emails the edits to our social media
managers. At basketball games I have one
router set up on press row, and the social
media manager pulls the photos directly
from our PhotoShelter site.
BEAT THEM TO THE PUNCH
The big test came when I was asked to attend the 2013 NFL draft in New York City.
Ziggy Ansah, a graduating BYU defensive
lineman, was projected to be a top-10 pick
in the draft. BYU wanted a photo of him
holding his new teams jersey with Roger
Goodell, which could be posted to BYUs
Facebook page as soon as possible. At Radio City Music Hall I plugged my wireless
router into the ethernet cable at my assigned workspace on the floor. My router
was a good 200 feet from the photographers pit, but several tests showed that the
distance wouldnt be a problem.
Finally the moment came and the Detroit
Lions chose Ziggy Ansah, the fi fth pick over-

ER YOUR
RD
O

FREE

5
1
0
2 ALOG
CAT

!
T O D AY

MANUFACTURING CO., INC.

The Worlds Largest Manufacturer of Photographic Backdrops and Props.

800.844.5616 WWW.DENNYMFG.COM WWW.PHOTONOVELTY.COM


CPM7483 Cabin Door Freedom Cloth Backdrop | Photographed by Amanda Reed

MEGAN LARSEN / BYU

THE GOODS

WORKFLOW

BYU team photographer Jaren Wilkey sets up an


Apple AirPort Extreme Wi-Fi router on the sidelines before a BYU Football game.

all. Ansah walked out onto the stage and


posed with Roger Goodell and Barry Sanders while holding up his new jersey. I got
the picture I needed and immediately hit
the Set button on my camera; the photo was
on our FTP site within 30 seconds. Our social
media manager posted it to the BYUFacebook page within a minute of receiving it,
and then it was shared on our other chan-

56

nels. Im certain that I beat every other media organization in getting that photo out of
the building and posted online.
The system works best if you have a dedicated wireless network for your camera to
connect to, but you can also use an existing
wireless network provided it doesnt have a
splash login screen. This has been the problem for most of the venues on our campus, so
we usually take a router and plug it in to an
ethernet jack to create our own network.
When I travel with our teams, Im never
able to get a useable network connection for
our router. I work around the problem by
sending photos directly to our PhotoShelter FTP site via a hotspot I create with my
iPhone or iPad. Its slower, but it requires
no time for setup, and my phone is always
with me. Since most smartphones have the
ability to function as a hotspot, this setup
is the easiest one to start with.
This system works so well that weve used
it for events such as graduations, academic
conferences, and homecoming. Our clients

love the fact that they can immediately


share our high-quality photos through
their social media accounts. The biggest obstacle to using this wireless workflow is that it can be complicated to set
up the first time, and the camera manufacturers dont make it easier with
their less than user-friendly menus and
manuals. Weve created a few PDFs that will
walk you through the process of setting up
the camera, router, hotspot, and FTP site,
available at jarenwilkey.com/wireless.
After 16 years of covering the highs and
lows of collegiate athletics, I still love that
moment after an amazing play when I look
at the back of the camera and see my photo
for the first time. Thanks to social media,
our fans can now experience that same
thrill. Our wireless workflow has bridged
the gap between me and the fans, and that
is a change I can live with.
Jaren Wilkey is manager of Brigham Young
Universitys photography office, which provides
services to the BYU community.

PPM AG.COM

ADVERTISEMENT

PROMEDIAGEAR
BENEFITS OF FLASH BRACKETS

Q: TELL US ABOUT PROMEDIAGEAR.


A: ProMediaGear is an American manufacturer of premium photo and video
accessories. We produce custom camera plates, L-bracket plates, ball
heads, gimbal heads, video sliders, video rigs, and of course the Boomerang
Flash Bracket, which were talking about today.
Q: WHATS THE PURPOSE OF A FLASH BRACKET?
A: The purpose of a flash bracket is to control the on-camera flash in fastpaced environments, such as weddings and events. By positioning the
flash above the lens, and lighting the subject from above instead of from
the side, the flash bracket effectively eliminates unsightly subject shadows.
Its also a great add-on for bounce flash photography, where you soften
the light by bouncing the flash off the ceiling or wall. When you need to
change the camera orientation from landscape to portrait, the flash bracket
allows you to move the flash over the lens in a fraction of a second.
Q: WHATS SO SPECIAL ABOUT THE BOOMERANG FLASH BRACKET?
A: The Boomerang Flash Bracket is made from aluminum and titanium
alloys, materials used widely by the aerospace industry for their high
strength-to-weight ratio and durability. Cut from solid blocks of metal in

58

our Chicago-area facility, the result is a flash bracket thats lightweight


yet hardy. The Boomerang is part of a larger system configurable with
L-bracket plates, handles, and custom camera mounting plates. Because
it can be customized for each camera, the photographer still has easy
access to buttons and battery. The Boomerang is engineered to be mounted
to Arca-type tripod heads, but for added flexibility, threads for other types
of quick-release plates are built in. The whole bracket weighs just 14 to
18 ounces depending on the configuration.

Q: IF IM JUST GETTING INTO WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY, HOW CAN THE


BOOMERANG HELP ME?
A: Many photographers tell us the Boomerang makes them look like pros,
and its a great conversation starter.Accessorizing your camera can make
a world of difference in how people perceive you. Not to mention the fact
that using the Boomerang improves the quality of your images by lighting
well without adding annoying shadows. Even though todays cameras have
high ISOs, you still need to light subjects properly to eliminate raccoon eyes.
Q: YOU MENTION CUSTOM CAMERA PLATES. WHY ARE THEY BETTER THAN
TYPICAL MOUNTING OR QUICK-RELEASE PLATES?

PPM AG.COM

ADVERTISEMENT

A: Theyre specifically designed to fit the camera body, to be unobtrusive


while having anti-twist mechanisms or shapes. They offer the most secure
fit available on the market.

Portrait
with no
flash
bracket

Portrait
with flash
bracket

Q: WHAT DO I NEED FOR MY FLASH GUN TO WORK WITH THE BOOMERANG


FLASH BRACKET?
A: Your camera should be able to communicate with flash somehow.Its
easiest to use a flash cord to connect the camera with the flash, but more
advanced users can opt for a wireless flash trigger with TTL.
Q: WHERE CAN I LEARN MORE ABOUT BOOMERANG FLASH BRACKET?
A: Visit promediagear.comto watch videos and read reviews written by
many successful photographers.

PROMEDIAGEAR.COM
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

59

2014

WAS A BANNER YEAR


FOR PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS.
IN YEARS PAST, WEVE CONGRATULATED SEVEN OR EIGHT DIAMOND PHOTOGRAPHERS OF THE YEAR, PERHAPS
AS MANY AS A DOZEN IN A BIG YEAR.

This year, were looking at 24 Diamond Photographers: two dozen individuals who reached the highest distinction offered in PPAs International Photographic Competition (IPC), landing four images in
the prestigious Loan Collection. Two of them rated
double Diamond status, with eight images apiece
ranking as Loans.
Heres how it works. Photographers submit four
images to be judged in one or both of IPCs entry
categories: Photographic Open and Artist. A panel
of trained, vetted jurors judges the images for how
well they demonstrate 12 specific elements. In a
typical year, about 30 to 35 percent of images earn a
merit. Another panel of jurors then reviews the newly merited images to decide if they are worthy of an
even higher honor: inclusion in the Loan Collection.
Most years, the percentage of images going Loan
is 10 percent or less.
With so many Diamond Photographers in the current crop, one might infer that photographers are
getting better at their craft. Thats not a stretch,
considering 919 images out of 4,968 entries went
Loan. Thats a big numbermore than 18 percent.
Lets congratulate this years glittering cast
of Diamond Photographers of the Year. From Bennett
to Bryant, Shirk to Simone, its a class for the ages.

DIAMOND PHOTOGRAPHERS
OF THE YEAR

Brilliant
BY JEFF KENT

60

PPM AG.COM
MARK BRYANT

MARK BRYANT
BRYANT PHOTOGRAPHICS
MISSOULA, MONTANA
BRYANTPHOTOGRAPHICS.COM
Mark Bryant, M.Photog.Cr., made Joe
and Rocky to showcase his love of
architecture and motorcycles and to
portray the relationship between man
and dog.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D Mark
III camera, Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/15 second at f/8, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Photogenic PL1250, 5-foot
Chimera Octobox
OTHER GEAR: Induro tripod
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Lightroom
and Photoshop

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

61

Most IPC entries are made in the Photographic Open. It represents the more traditional competition in which images
are judged primarily by the final result. The judges evaluate using the 12 Elements of a Merit Image: impact,
technical excellence, creativity, style, composition, presentation, color balance, center of interest, lighting,
subject matter, technique, and storytelling. Merits go toward earning the PPA Master of Photography degree.

JENNIFER FROH
JENNIFER FROH PHOTOGRAPHY
FLOWER MOUND, TEXAS
JENNYFROH.COM
Jennifer Froh, CPP, was photographing a
litter of puppies for her local rescue group
when she plopped one of the dogs in her
newly acquired vintage scale. Absolutely
content, the puppy offered the perfect
expression for How You Measure Cute.
Froh placed the scale on a table with a brick
wall backdrop about four feet behind it. She
set up a main light to the left and a hair light
behind and to the right.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II
camera, Canon 50mm f/1.4 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/200 second at f/7.1, ISO 100
LIGHTING: AlienBees 800 and 400, Paul C.
Buff 30x40-inch soft box on the main light
and a strip box with a grid on the hair light
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Lightroom and
Photoshop, and Topaz Labs plug-in

LOUISE SIMONE
SIMONE PORTRAIT
QUEBEC, CANADA
SIMONEPORTRAIT.COM
Dreaming is a reflection of Louise Simones
passion for child portraiture. An M.Photog.
Cr., API, Simone finds that children project
deep and true feelings in their simplicity
and honesty. For this outdoor portrait set
in a doorway, Simone used natural lighting
and a reflector to light the scene.
CAMERA & LENS: Contax 645 mediumformat camera with a Kodak DCS Pro Back,
Contax Carl Zeiss 120 mm f/4 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/30 second at f/4, ISO 400
LIGHTING: Available light and reflector
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop and
Corel Painter

62
88

PPM AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

CARL CAYLOR
PHOTO IMAGES BY CARL
IRON MOUNTAIN, MICHIGAN
PHOTOIMAGESBYCARL.NET
Stormy is a self-portrait
of Carl Caylor, M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP. Caylor captured nine
images of a storm brewing
over the Rocky Mountains,
which he stitched together in
Photoshop. He drew in the
lightning with a brush tool from
Woody Walters. For the portrait, he rolled around on a
grimy garage floor to give himself the look of a rugged ranch
hand, smearing dirt and grease
on his unshaven face. Then
he sat in a sauna to generate
sweat. Sufficiently primed,
he ran to his camera and photographed himself in front of
a green screen using a cable
release. He combined the
images in post-production.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS
5D Mark II camera, Canon
70-200mm f/2.8 and Canon
16-35mm f/2.8 lenses
EXPOSURE: Mountain images,
1/200 second at f/11, ISO
400; self-portrait, 1/25
second at f/10, ISO 400
LIGHTING: Available
OTHER GEAR: Bogen 3251
tripod with cable release
POST-CAPTURE: Digital Photo
Profes-sional, Nik Color Efex
Pro, and Adobe Photoshop

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

ALLISON ENGLISH WATKINS


ENGLISH PHOTOGRAPHY, PARK CITY, UTAH
ENGLISHPHOTO.COM
Allison English Watkins, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, made Autumn
Family Symposium during a family portrait session. Wanting some blur in the moving water, she mounted her camera
on a tripod and slowed the shutter speed to 1/8 second,
which also helped capture more ambient light. In post-production Watkins loaded the raw images into Lightroom for
processing and then employed Photoshop to remove several
distracting elements, swap heads, and crop the image to
a panoramic. She flipped the final image horizontally for
better composition. I love how all the elements in nature
combine to frame this family, says Watkins.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D300 camera, Nikkor 17-55mm
f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/8 second at f/8, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Available
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop

63

BEN SHIRK
SHIRK PHOTOGRAPHY
WILTON, IOWA
SHIRKPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Ben Shirk, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., had been working
on a series of carnival images for a few years. While
exploring an abandoned
theme park, he found the
perfect carousel to add to
his collection and captured
it as the base image. The
animals are from photographs taken during a
family trip to the zoo. He
spent many hours toning
and blending in postproduction until The Lost
Menagerie was complete.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon
EOS-1D Mark III camera,
Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: Carousel 1/60
second at f/10, ISO 100
LIGHTING: Paul C. Buff
White Lightning 1600, 4x6foot Sweetlight soft box,
two strip lights, and a RadioPopper JrX triggering system
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe
Lightroom and Photoshop

TIFFANY BRILEY
CHARLESTON PHOTOGRAPHY TOURS
GOOSE CREEK, SOUTH CAROLINA
TIFFANYBRILEY.COM
Tiffany Briley created A Southern Morning to
depict a classic subject in Charleston, South
Carolina, the iconic East Battery Street. Its
rare to find the water from the harbor so serene
and peaceful and to have such beautiful complementary clouds to work with, says Briley. She captured
two images of the same exposure and stitched them
together in Photoshop.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D700 camera, Nikkor
85mm f/1.4 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/20 second at f/11, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Available
OTHER GEAR: Cable release and tripod
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop and Nik
Color Efex Pro, Viveza, and Sharpener Pro

64
88
90

PPM
PPMAG.COM
AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

JIM LASALA
JIM LASALA FINE
ART PHOTOGRAPHY
FLEMINGTON,
NEW JERSEY
JIMLASALA.COM

TOMAS MUOZ
MUOZ PHOTOGRAPHY
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
MUNOZPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
When Tomas Muoz, M.Photog.
Cr., CPP, made Enchanted,
the goal was to create a wedding image that was different
than anything hed done before
no easy task for someone
whos been shooting weddings
since he was 10. Muoz photographed this wedding scene
in IR (infrared) wireless, accentuating the backlit lighting situation. Later, he used
Photoshop to increase contrast and darken the edges.

While in Haiti after the


2010 earthquake that
rocked the country, Jim
LaSala, M.Photog.MEI.
Cr., CPP, came across
two curious boys who
were working inside
a corn mill. Shooting
quickly with natural
light, he captured
several frames, one of
which became Eyes
on Haiti.
CAMERA & LENS:
Nikon D300 camera,
Nikkor 24-70mm
f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/500
second at f/5, ISO 640
LIGHTING: Available
POST-CAPTURE:
Adobe Lightroom and
Photoshop and
Nik Silver Efex

CAMERA & LENS: Olympus


OM-D E-M5 camera converted to IR, Lumix 7-14mm f/4
lens
EXPOSURE: 1/200 second at
f/5.6, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Available
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop and Nik Silver Efex

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

65

KATE HIGDON
CAPTURED MOMENTS PHOTOGRAPHY
BY JASON AND KATE HIGDON
OWENSBORO, KENTUCKY
CAPTUREDMOMENTS-KY.COM
The Age of Happiness depicts a
former model who had just celebrated her 90th birthday. Thrilled
to be back in front of the camera,
she helped Kate Higdon, M.Photog.,
create an image that showcases a
face full of personality. Higdon did
post-processing in Adobe Creative
Cloud, using Nik Color Efex Pro for
tonal contrast, then channels and
curves adjustment layers to convert
the image to black-and-white.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D
Mark III camera, Canon EF 85mm
f/1.2L II USM lens
EXPOSURE: 1/160 second at f/8,
ISO 100
LIGHTING: Paul C. Buff Einstein
studio flash system, using a small
soft box to modify the light on the
subjects right, a reflector on her left,
a hair light, and a background light
POST-CAPTURE: Nik Color Efex Pro

DANIEL THORNTON
THORNTON PHOTOGRAPHY
GODFREY, ILLINOIS
THORNTONIMAGING.COM
Walking the coast of Oregon,
one cant help but ponder the
timeless and spiritual nature
of the large monolithic rocks
and ocean, says Daniel
Thornton, M.Photog.MEI.
Cr., CPP, F-ASP. Making an
exposure that would emotionally express our feelings
and move others to feel the
same way should always be
our goal. Thornton created
Four Seconds of Eternity
with a long exposure that
he stabilized by placing his
camera on a tripod, engaging
the mirror lock, and using a
cable release.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D3
camera, Nikkor 28-70mm
f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 4 seconds at
f/16, ISO 100
LIGHTING: Available
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe
Photoshop

66
88
92

PPM
PPMAG.COM
AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

Most Vibrant
Most Scratch Resistant
Harvested Sustainably
Natural Wood Grain

Introducing
Natural Wood Prints!
ChromaLuxe is very excited to introduce you to our newest product Natural Wood Prints!
ChromaLuxe Wood Prints use the same innovative technology as our metal prints, which
dye-infuse images into specially coated maple panels, to create the most vibrant and
durable product that will last a lifetime. Printing your photo onto wood creates character to
your image by allowing the wood grain to show through lighter areas of your image.
Ask your lab for ChromaLuxe Natural Wood Prints today.

Come visit us at

Imaging USA
Booth #523

ChromaLuxe is a registered trademark of Universal Woods, Inc. 2014

LUKE EDMONSON
EDMONSON PHOTOGRAPHY
PLANO, TEXAS
EDMONSONWEDDINGS.COM
Using available light from a single
window, Luke Edmonson, M.Photog.,
CPP, created this grooms portrait
during a 30-second mini session
on the wedding day. Edmonson
positioned the groom in the light
and allowed him to present himself
as he felt comfortable. He already
had a clear vision of himself, says
Edmonson. My job was simply
to capture him in a beautiful and
flattering manner. The final image
required very little post-production
work, just some Photoshopping to
straighten out a button on the jacket and fill in some dips in the back
of the grooms hair. Edmonson used
Nik Silver Efex Pro for the blackand-white conversion.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D4 camera,
Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/250 second at f/4,
ISO 640
LIGHTING: Available
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop
and Nik Color Efex Pro

JOE CAMPANELLIE
CAMPANELLIES PORTRAITS
PALM COAST, FLORIDA
CAMPANELLIES.COM
Joe Campanellie, M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, F-ASP, created Storm
Warning under Flagler Beach
Pier, near his studio during a
powerful noreaster. In 40-mph
winds and driving rain, he set up
for a long exposure to illustrate
the power behind the wind and
surf. Campanellie captured the
image in color and then converted
to black-and-white.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS
5D Mark II camera, Canon 24105mm f/4.0 lens
EXPOSURE: 4 seconds at
f/18, ISO 50
LIGHTING: Available
OTHER GEAR: Manfrotto
Carbon Fiber Tripod
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe
Photoshop, Nik Color Efex Pro
and Silver Efex Pro

68
88
92

PPM
PPMAG.COM
AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

PATRICIA TAKACS
KIVALO PHOTOGRAPHY
BIDDEFORD, MAINE
KIVALOPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Patricia Takacs, of Kivalo Photography in Biddeford, Maine, captured
Innocence in her living room in
an old mill building. I love this
little girls look, her red hair, and I
just wanted to create a portrait of
her young self before she entered
middle school. Takacs was going
for an 18th-century English
countryside look, she says. Kivalo
Photography specializes in
wedding and couples photography.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS
5D Mark III camera, Canon 85mm
f/1.2L lens
EXPOSURE: 1/2,500 second at
f/1.4, ISO 3200
LIGHTING: Natural light from two
windows
POST-CAPTURE: Basic edits,
including color adjustments were
done in Lightroom and textures
applied in Photoshop

RICHARD STURDEVANT
STURDEVANT STUDIO
GARLAND, TEXAS
STURDEVANTSTUDIO.COM
Richard Sturdevant, M.Photog.
M.Artist.Cr., made Devine Steam
as a personal project. He worked
with designer Rachel Frank on
the costume and then photographed the model against a
green screen. After capture, he
processed the images in Lightroom and then developed a new
process using Photoshop and
Corel Painter to create steampunk wings.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D4
camera, Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/250 second at f/8,
ISO 200
LIGHTING: Three 500-watt
strobesone suspended overhead on a boom with a 3x4-foot
soft box, and two on either side
of the subject at 45-degree
angles from the rear to create
edge lighting. These kickers
were modified by12x48-inch
strip boxes with egg crate grids.
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter

69

SUNG SOO LIM


SCARLETT STUDIO
BUSAN CITY, KOREA
When Sung Soo Lim, M.Photog., wanted to photograph a group of employees, he decided to create a
group portrait with a free-spirited look. To make We
Are Friends, he arranged the group along a linear
progression with an unusual configuration for Korean
culture: the senior member of the group is to the side,
not featured centrally. In post-production he used the
healing tool in Photoshop to correct some of the figures
and made adjustments in Adobe Bridge and Topaz.
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III camera,
Canon 85mm f/1.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/125 second at f/9
LIGHTING: Large soft boxes modify two key lights,
another soft box for fill light, hair light was bounced off
the ceiling
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Bridge and Photoshop, and
Topaz Detail

TERRI EDDINGTON
LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY
SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
LEGACYPHOTOGRAPHYLLC.COM
While working on a client portfolio, Terri Eddington, M.Photog.,
CPP, created The Cats Meow as a steampunk take on the
Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland. She edited the image
in Photoshop with a combination of filters.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D3S camera, 70-200mm f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/125 second at f/8, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Profoto studio lights in a four-light portrait setup
with a main light modified by a 5-foot Octabox, two 6-foot strip
lights with grids for rim lights, and a fill light
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop, Nik Filters, and Topaz

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

71

DAVID EDMONSON
EDMONSON PHOTOGRAPHY
PLANO, TEXAS
EDMONSONWEDDINGS.COM
Photographing at an historic mansion, David Edmonson, M.Photog., staged his subject in a small
room to craft the ideal portrait setup. There were
Renoirs hanging on the walls of the mansion, so he
took one down and placed it on the table to round out
the composition. The light was primarily ambient,
though Edmonson added some extra lighting on
the subjects face with two Ice Lights. In my mind,
she was getting ready to start another chapter of
her life by getting married, and the pretense of a
moment of reflection is her ending of one chapter before the next one begins, says Edmonson.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D4 camera, Nikkor
24-70mm f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1/80 second at f/5.6, ISO 400
LIGHTING: Westcott Ice Lights
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop, onOne
Perfect Photo Suite, and Nik filters

PETER YU
ONSIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS
Peter Yu, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, describes Chromatic
Contour as a study on the less intuitive aspects of
architecture, illustrating the power and dynamics
given by the flowing lines balanced by the analogous
color scheme. Intrigued by the form of the structure,
he was drawn in by the movement of the parallel and
intersecting lines as the light reflected off of the
metal plates. The capture was a straight availablelight shot, which he adjusted in post-production.
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D800 camera, Nikkor
24-70mm f/2.8 lens
EXPOSURE: 1.6 seconds at f/8, ISO 400
LIGHTING: Available
OTHER GEAR: Manfrotto tripod
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop

72
88
92

PPM
PPMAG.COM
AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

The Artist category showcases images that have been altered substantially in post-production digitally, with traditional enhancement
techniques, or by a combination of the techniques. The final result is a factor in the judging, but judges also consider technique
and the degree of difficulty of the post-capture work. Photographers are encouraged to submit guide images that illustrate the
step-by-step process applied to each image. Merits earned in this category go toward the PPA Master Artist degree.

MARK BRYANT
BRYANT PHOTOGRAPHICS
MISSOULA, MONTANA
BRYANTPHOTOGRAPHICS.COM
If Mark Bryants name seems familiar, its because you already read about him in the Photographic
Open section. Bryant is one of two photographers this year to earn Diamond status in both the
Open and Artist categories. An avid motorcyclist since his teenage years, Mark Bryant, M.Photog.Cr.,
crafted Cyclone Clyde to tell the story of his high school earth science teacher, who got a motorcycle at his retirement from teaching. To make the base images, Bryant photographed each
subject in the studio with a Canon EOS-1D X camera and a 24-70mm f/2.8 lens. He lit the scenes
with Photogenic PL 1250 flashes modified by Chimera Octa 30 Beauty Dish and Chimera strip boxes. He
captured raw format files, processed with Adobe Lightroom 5, and extracted with Photoshop CS6.

74
88
92

PPM
PPMAG.COM
AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

HEATHER CHINN
HEATHER THE PAINTER
FORT MILL, SOUTH CAROLINA
HEATHERTHEPAINTER.COM
Heather Chinn, M.Artist.Cr., wanted to create a formal
portrait of her furry muse, Jack, a Coton du Telear. But
she needed a bit of whimsy to match Jacks playful personality. Some of it came by combining a photograph of
John Singleton Copleys Portrait of Colonel George Watson, with stitched-together images of her dog. The dog
is cobbled together from different shots of his tail, head,
and paws. Chinn drew the rest of the elements by hand.
After compositing everything in Adobe Photoshop CS6,
she painted the portrait in Corel Painter X3 with custom
brushes. Chinn laid out the text of the letters in Photoshop and then broke it up with the smudge tool in Painter,
rewriting some areas using a calligraphy brush. The final
result is Letters to Penelope.

BOB COATES
BOB COATES PHOTOGRAPHY
SEDONA, ARIZONA
BCPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
For Musical Instruments Museum, Bob
Coates M.Photog.Cr., CPP, wanted to take
the shapes and colors of the instruments
to a different dimension. Coates started
off with a simple capture of the Mongolian
double-reed flute. Then he selected and
isolated the flute from its surroundings. He
layered multiple textures in various layer
blend modes to create the background.
After floating the image alone against the
background, Coates played with multiple
copies in various configurations, finally
settling on this composition.

PROFE
S SION A L L
PHOTOGR
A PHER
| JANUARY
20152014
PROFESSIONA
PHOTOGR
APHER
| NOVEMBER

7516

KAREN NAKAMURA
KAREN NAKAMURA PHOTOGRAPHY
GARDENA, CALIFORNIA
KARENNAKAMURAPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Inspired by the beauty of orchid blooms, Karen Nakamura,
M.Photog., created Pretty in Pink from an orchid she owns.
She photographed the orchid in natural light. She then photographed individual flowers at different angels in case she needed
to fill in gaps in the sprays. She photographed willow stems
in the same light. She assembled the final image as she went
along, adding images, playing with textures, and crafting a background out of textures. Nakamura did the artwork in Photoshop
using multiple layers of the floral stems and flowers. When I
create floral art, I try to think about the kind of art piece I would like
to enjoy looking at, on my wall, in my home, says Nakamura.

BEN SHIRK
BEN SHIRK PHOTOGRAPHY
WILTON, IOWA
SHIRKPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Ben Shirk, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., is the other photographer to earn Diamond
status in both the Open and Artist categories. He created Outwit,
Outlast, Outplay as a client project, doing a modern twist on Raft of
the Medusa by Theodore Gericault. After drawing a rough diagram
for the shot, Shirk photographed the individuals on a green screen. In
Photoshop, he extracted the images using a custom action he created.
He drew the pirate ship by hand. He captured images of sharks at an
aquarium and of ocean waves, which he added to the composition.

76

PPM
PPMAG.COM
AG.COM
PPM
AG.COM

MetalPrints

Images by (from left): apertureacademy.com | Matt Hofman | Steve Harrington | Annie K. Rowland | Suzette Allen

Stunning Prints on Aluminum

ie

n
An

R
K.

an

l
ow

NEW!

MetalPrints with Acrylic


MetalPrints in any surface can now be ordered
with Stainless Posts and optional 1/4" or 1/2"
Acrylic over the face of the print.
NEW!

Framing

Stainless Posts & Acrylic

Double Float

Exhibit Mount

Metal Easel Option

For Exceptional Image Stability


MetalPrints are made by infusing dyes directly into specially coated aluminum sheets. This creates an image with
a magical luminescence, vibrant colors, incredible detail, and exceptional archival qualities. The surface is easy to
clean, waterproof and scratch resistant. Choose from High Gloss, Mid Gloss, Satin, Sheer-Matte, or Sheer-Glossy
surfaces. Available in any/every size up to 4'x8' with contemporary mounting and framing options.
Learn more at bayphoto.com/metalprints

25%
OFF
Your First Order!

*Get 25% off your first order with Bay Photo Lab! For instructions
on how to redeem this special offer, fill out the New Customer
Account Request form at bayphoto.com.

IMAGES TIM FLACH

78

PPM AG.COM

Creature
comfort
THE ANIMAL
PORTRAITS OF
TIM FLACH
MAKE US QUESTION
WHAT IT MEANS
TO BE HUMAN
BY ERIC MINTON

It could be a portrait of
a corporate CEO in the
boardroom. Then, too,
it has something of a
Mona Lisa aura about
it, the piercing eyes and
enigmatically slight grin.
In fact, its a mandrill, a
primate with blond and
gray fur, a high forehead,
and multi-colored muzzle.

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

79

more than capturing furry, scaly, or creepy critters in photographic images; it influences the percipient in ways Flach only partially
understands but wants to explore more. I cant puppeteer and direct
the meaning, he says. It is you the viewer who makes something out
of it. Im just trying to create something that draws you into it.

APPLIED & FINE ARTS

The 56-year-old Flach, based in London, works in a Shoreditch


studio specifically designed for photographing animals, domestic and wild, though he utilizes zoos and locations in the wild,
too. He pursued painting as a boy and was studying communications design at North East London Polytechnic when, at age 18,
he was assigned a photo project andauspiciouslyused up his
roll of film at the London Zoo. He studied photography and painted structures at Saint Martins School of Art and began working
independently on commissions when he was 25. Working almost
solely in commercial photography, both corporate and advertising, he began specializing in animals.
He also gravitated toward fine arts photography, contributing to
National Geographic, Smithsonian, and New Scientist magazines,
selling prints, and staging exhibitions. In October 2014 after shooting a series of photographs for Purina in Minneapolis he flew to
Uzbekistan for an exhibition and master class at the National Art
Gallery of Uzbekistan. Im a commercial photographer one week,
artist and lecturer the next week, he says. Ive always occupied the

The bats look like commuters in rain slickers waiting for the bus.
Jambo is a hairless chimp who, his back to us, could be a linebacker in his final NFL season. The great gray owl is both valedictorian and fashion maven of her class; the panther licking its paw
has a trick up its sleeve; the tigers have eyes of leadership; the
cockroach gazes seductively. Meanwhile, the featherless chicken
dancing on the countertop looks strikingly like tonights dinner.
But of course these animals arent behaving like humans. The
mandrill is just being a mandrill; the bats are being bats; the
tigers, tigers. It is the viewers who engage in anthropomorphism,
transferring our own perspectives to the creatures in the images,
which means the photos say more about us than they do about the
animals. That is Tim Flachs intent.
To call Flach an animal photographer may be too pat. Yes, he
photographs animals. Hes published four books devoted to them
Equus in 2008, Dogs Gods in 2010, More Than Human in
2012, and Evolution in 2013and recently signed with a publisher to do a book on endangered animals. But he uses his skills primarily to advance human understanding of nature and wildlife.
My interest is how we acknowledge animals in our space, how we
shape nature and it shapes us, Flach says. Thus, his work entails

80

PPM AG.COM

COMMANDING.
A high performance, ultra telephoto zoom.
Portable, durable and performs to the
highest of photographic standards.
Powerful and commanding.

150-600mm F5-6.3
DG OS HSM

Case, Hood (LH1164-01), Shoulder strap included.


USA 4 Year Service Protection

SIGMA USB Dock


Update, adjust & personalize. Customization
never thought possible. Sold separately.

SIGMA Corporation of America | 15 Fleetwood Court | Ronkonkoma, NY 11779, U.S.A. | Tel: (631) 585-1144 | www.SigmaPhoto.com
Follow us Twitter @sigma_photo and Facebook.com/sigmacorporationofamerica

ANATOMY OF AN IMAGE: Penny Working the Braken


CIRCUMSTANCES: Setup for the working dogs section of Dogs Gods, published in 2010
LOCATION: Early morning at the Elveden Estate, Suffolk, U.K.
EQUIPMENT & SETTINGS: Hasselblad H3DII-39 camera, Hasselblad HC 50-100mm lens, shot at 1/800 second at f/9, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Existing ambient light with flash, using quarter blue gels to color-balance the flash. Three single flash heads plus a ring
flash (just off camera).
COMPOSITION: Inspired by traditional landscape painting, the composition is set up to lead the eye through the shot from the bottom
left of the frame to the dog and the flying pheasants and then around, ending up back at the dog. Thereafter, viewers tend to take a
more overall view, whereupon they might locate the pheasant in the bottom right corner for the first time.
POSING: Just out of shot, someone lying on the floor held the pheasant in the bottom right corner of the image. On my command,
the two flying pheasants were released from their cages and the gamekeeper called Penny, the English springer spaniel, who leaped
over a small jump made out of bracken.
POST-PRODUCTION: A few tonal changes to help the eye navigate through the image as intended

two spaces of applied and fine arts. Each informs the other. His
commercial work has honed his expertise and financed his arts
pursuits, including his books, which, in turn, has led to commissions from commercial clients wanting his particular aesthetic.
His earnings are now split almost evenly between both pursuits, and hes eager to expand his role as an artist. I recognize
that the future for me is to put my energy into doing something
relevant as far as the broader debate about nature and animals
and how we relate to them, he says.

PSYCHOLOGICAL RESONANCE

Flach doesnt want his images to preach; he seeks to strike a psychological chord that triggers debate among scientists, conservationists, and the public about humankinds relationship with wild

82

and domestic animals. For example, take the dancing featherless


chicken. First, the viewer wonders whether the image is real. (It
is. Selective breeding has created a chicken suitable to be raised
in hot climates.) Second, the viewer must contend with the dissonance of a chicken that looks plucked and ready to be picked up at
the supermarket, and yet is clearly alive.
Most of Flachs images resonate more subtly, relying on peoples
natural tendency to engage in anthropomorphism. Conservationists tend to focus on certain marquee species, he says. For example, the World Wildlife Funds logo features a panda, a natural
carnivore so passive that its become solely herbivore and impacts
its own habitat by subsisting on a diet of low-nutrient bamboo.
Humans love the cuddly-looking bear, but its extinction isnt likely to affect humans the way that extinction of certain fishes and

PPM AG.COM

ANATOMY OF AN IMAGE: Jambo


CIRCUMSTANCES: Taken for More Than Human published
in 2012. Jambo, born in 1982, has alopecia, a hair-loss condition humans can also suffer from, and has spent most of
his life almost completely bald. His alopecia doesnt seem to
lead to ostracism, as it does with humans, and he is still the
dominant male in his troop.
LOCATION: Shot through thick glass at Twycross Zoo,
Leicestershire, U.K.
EQUIPMENT & SETTINGS: Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera,
Canon 100mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM lens, 1/160 second at
f/18, ISO 100
LIGHTING: Broncolor Satellite Evolution
COMPOSITION: Left-to-right lighting to create luminance
contrast on the left side of the composition allows the
viewer to travel from the shoulder up to the ears and then
onto the scar on the top of his head
POSING: There was no option of posing Jambo. I waited and
chose the moment when he turned away from me, which
offered a more intriguing gesture.
POST-PRODUCTION: A few tonal changes to help balance
the image

insects would; still, its doubtful the WWF would offer an adopt-aspecies program for a cockroach.
As Flach begins work on his next book, The first thing I asked
myself is, What is endangered? he says. Is it what we consider of
value and want to save? We need to get to the root of the debate as
to what we see as important and what is not important, what actually is a threat to us or what isnt a threat to us. Or are we the endangered species? Flachs work already brings up some of these
questions. His image of the banana cockroach is fascinating in
its detail; the flower beetles look like brightly colored gemstones
with legs; and the axolotl is downright cute. Meanwhile, the
panda stares indifferently; in a companion image, it has turned
its back on us.
If theres any message in Flachs works, its left to the viewer to
decipher. And that cognitive process fascinates him. Hes had an
eye for composition since he was a young painter; he knew when
something worked, but he didnt know why. Now, I know more
consciously why, he says, and hes bringing that knowledge to
bear in his work, from setups in the studio to adjustments of tonal
qualities in post-production. But Flach wants to go beyond what
the eye sees to what the mind perceives. He is teaming up with
noted neurobiologist Sir Colin Blakemore to study the perception
of images, identifying why and how certain paintings and photographs achieve cultural significance, what structures and tendencies those images share, and how the mind navigates those
elements.
This is looking at the very structure of the cognitive side of
visual language and the way the cognitive and perceptual come
together to form a kind of context of the visual form, Flach says.
He stresses that hes in the early stages of this project and wants
to put his experience and theories through proper scientific rigor
before talking about it. A photographer espousing such characteristics without evidence is a bit dodgy, he says.
He acknowledges that many of his colleagues might see little use
in such a study. I suspect photographers want to concentrate on
the mystery and the poetic of the work, not the anatomy. Yet he
also sees composition as a process with potential to forge images
with techniques that allow you to fundamentally express things.
Mention the Mona Lisa and her enigmatic smile, and Flach
notes Margaret Livingstones study of the painting, which illustrates how Da Vinci used a range of spatial frequencies to alter
the smiles appearance depending on where the viewer focuses.
Look into her eyes, and in your peripheral vision, shes smiling.
Look directly at her mouth, and shes not. Did Da Vinci know what
he was achieving?
Now look at Flachs mandrill portrait. It does seem to be grinning when you look in its eyes but not when you look at its mouth.
Is Flach pulling a Da Vinci here or is it the mandrill thats the
mystery? Remember, the mandrill is just a mandrill. Its you who
are the enigma.

timflach.com
Eric Minton is a writer and editor in Washington, D.C.

84

PPM AG.COM

IMAGES MICHAEL GREENBERG

Easy

TAKE IT

BY WILL POLLOCK

86

PPM AG.COM

HEART AND SOUL ARE FRONT AND CENTER IN


MICHAEL GREENBERGS TECHNIQUE
Shedding light on a subject via camera flash can be an intensely methodical, mathematical practice, but Michael Greenberg, wedding photographer and founder of Montreal-based Phototerra Studio, urges photographers to think beyond the bounds of
settings and embrace the story they want to convey.
Lighting is not just about mechanics but about the message that you carry in your
photographs, he says. Its not rocket science.
Crafting a resonant message, he adds, begins with the photographers perception
and motivation. Are you shooting just for the money? You can make glamorous lighting and you can make a person look great. Are you shooting just to make it a beautiful,
pleasant picture? Thats another type of lighting. All that is easy to achieve because
the actual process, the technical know-how, is extremely simple.

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

87

Greenberg will expound on his theories


and techniques in Creative Lighting on the
Run, his presentation at Imaging USA
2015 in Nashville, Tennessee. And although he stresses how easy great lighting
can be, he does embrace one hard-and-fast
rule: If you want to shoot with flashes, the
camera has to have a hot shoe and be capable of syncing flash and high speed, he
says. Thats the only condition or rule for
the camera. High sync and hot shoe. The
rest is up to you.

BRIGHT FUTURE
With many adventures under his belt prior to
photographya medical degree, engineering
jobs, musical trainingGreenberg is looking
to push himself beyond wedding photography into new professional terrain by experimenting with fashion, editorial, and commercial work. Hell continue teaching and
being an evangelist for making lighting decisions with the heart rather than the head.

88

A TRUSTY
ASSISTANT
Much the same way a second shooter
helps ease job stress, a project assistant
can help sessions run smoothly, says
Greenberg. He urges photographers to
hire outside help for lifting heavy lighting
equipment, among other things. Weddings are stressful enough, he adds. An
assistant allows me to release the worry.
If I plan on shooting a certain type
of portrait with specialized light, it can
require extra help, he says. The assistant is key so that you dont ask your
second photographer to help bring
your bags, your props, or whatever you
plan on the wedding day. The second photographer will be completely immersed in those
stock shots for the bride and groom.
Greenberg pays an assistant $50 to $100 for a job that has perks. Overall, its a fun,
easy atmosphere, he says. Were not shooting underwater or in the Himalayas.

PPM AG.COM

FIND YOUR STYLE


Many of Greenbergs students ask how they can use lighting to reflect themselves. Its an interesting question because the topic has
evolved into a discussion on philosophical ideas of style, Greenberg
says. I teach lighting, which is what people have come to expect. But
then I explain that any type of lighting is correct. Direct flash, side flash,
bounce flash, you name it. Theres no such thing as bad or good lighting.
Its all about finding your own personal lighting style, which can be
done by following these three rules:
1. BE READY WITH TTL. For lighting on the run, its like a war
zone and you might not have time. You might not be able to adjust things. Theres a moment and then its gone if youre not
being quick. Put your flash in TTL mode so you dont have to
adjust power and the flash according to the distance. You dont

have to worry about the environment, like how bright and dark it is.
2. MUTE YOUR BACKGROUNDS. Underexposing the overall exposure between 0.5 to 1.5 stops and lighting the main subject with
flash in TTL mode creates the separation between underexposed
background and underexposed foreground and correctly exposes the main subject, which youve lit with the flash. This way all the
focus is on your main subject.
3. JUST SHOOT. Its as simple as that: Just shoot. Nothing else
you need. Just focus on the message and start tinkering with
your aperture. What do you want to tell viewers? Will the subject
be soft and pinky, or do you want it to be more like a fashion shoot
and sexy? You use different lights and different apertures and
try a bit of everything.

Dont be obsessed with how to light technically, he says. If youre constantly learning those things its just going to lead you
nowhere and youll end up being a robot. We
see many pictures out there of couples hugging with a backlight from nowhere. Everyone does that. Its like McDonalds: hamburger after hamburger. Dont do that. Concentrate on your message and on what you
want to project. Once you know that, the
lights going to come
very, very easily.
phototerra.com
Will Pollock is a writer,
photographer, and author
in Atlanta.

90

PPM AG.COM

OM-D E-M1 Mirrorless System Camera

Lumix DMC-GH4 4K Mirrorless System Camera

3.0" Tilting LCD Touchscreen


Micro Four Thirds System
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot
Full HD 1080p Video
Built-In Wireless Connectivity
Dust/Splash/Freezeproof
Magnesium Alloy Body

DCI 4K 4096x2160 at 24p


UHD 4K 3840x2160 at 30p/24p
3.0" LCD Live View Finder Full HD
up to 60p High-Speed 49-Point AF
Support for 59.94p, 23.98p, 50p, & 24p
4:2:2 8-Bit or 10-Bit HDMI Output
Magnesium Alloy, Weather-Sealed Body

16

#OLEM1*

The Professionals Source

www.BandH.com

Mega
Pixels

EOS-60D DSLR

Corner of 34th Street

New York, N.Y. 10001

18

Mega
Pixels

20

EOS-7D Mark II DSLR

Mega
Pixels

NEW

3" Clear View II LCD Native ISO 16000


Dual Pixel CMOS AF with Live View
Dual CF and SDHC/XC Card Slots
Built-In GPS Receiver & Digital Compass
Mega
Full HD 1080p/60 Video

Pixels

Body Only #CAE7D2 ............................ 1,799.00


EOS 7D Body Only #CAE7D..............................................................................1,499.00
EOS 7D Kit with 18-135mm IS #CAE7D18135 .................................................1,799.00
EOS 7D Kit with 28-135mm IS #CAE7D28135 .................................................1,699.00

Call for Available Rebates & Promotions


on Select Bodies, Lenses and Flashes!

Over 70,000 square feet


of the latest gear
The most knowledgeable
Sales Professionals
Hands-on demos
Convenient free parking
available

Subscribe to our
free Catalog
BandH.com/catalog
212-444-6633

Page 1

20

Mega
Pixels

22

Mega
Pixels

18

Mega
Pixels

3.2" Clear View High Resolution LCD


DIGIC 5+ Image Processor 61-Point
High Density AF Uses Canon EF Lenses
Dual CF, SD Card Slots Up to 6.0 FPS
Durable Magnesium-Alloy Construction
Full HD 1080/30p and 720/60p Formats
Built-In HDR and Multiple Exposure Modes

Body Only #CAE70D........................................ 1199.00


Kit with 18-55mm STM #CAE70D1855 ...........1349.00

EOS Flash System (USA)


270EX II .....169.99 430EX II .....299.99
320EX ...................
600 EX-RT..549.99
MR-14EX Ringlight......................... 549.99
MT-24EX Twin Flash....................... 829.99
EF-S Lenses for Digital Only (USA)
(Not compatible with full frame cameras)
60/2.8 USM Macro (52)................ 469.99
10-22/3.5-4.5 USM (77) .............. 649.99
15-85/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) .......... 799.99
17-55/2.8 IS USM (67)................. 879.99
17-85/4-5.6 IS USM (67) ............. 599.99
18-135/3.5-5.6 IS (67) ................ 499.99
18-200/3.5-5.6 IS (72) ................ 699.99
55-250/4.0-5.6 IS USM (58) ........ 249.99
EF Lenses (USA)
20/2.8 USM (72) .......................... 539.99
24/2.8 IS USM (58) ...................... 599.99
28/2.8 IS USM (58) ...................... 549.99
35/2 IS USM (67) ......................... 599.99
50/1.8 II (52) ............................... 125.99
50/1.4 USM (58) .......................... 399.99
50/2.5 Macro (52)........................ 299.99
85/1.8 USM (58) ............................ 419.99
100/2 USM (58) ........................... 499.99
100/2.8 USM Macro (58).............. 599.99
28-135/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) ........ 479.99
70-300/4-5.6 IS USM (58) ........... 649.99
70-300/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM (58) ....... 1399.00
75-300/4.0-5.6 III (58) ................. 199.99
75-300/4.0-5.6 III USM (58) ......... 234.99

Body Only #CAE6D .........................................1899.00


Kit with 24-105mm f/4 L #CAE6D24105 .........2499.00

EOS-5D Mark III D-SLR

Dual Pixel CMOS AF with Live View


DIGIC 5+ Image Processor
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot
Uses Canon EF & EF-S Lenses
3.0" Vari-Angle Touchscreen
7 fps Continuous Shooting
Full HD 1080p Video

20

Mega
Pixels

EOS-6D DSLR

EOS-70D DSLR

420 Ninth Ave.

16

Full-Frame CMOS Sensor 3.0" LCD


DIGIC 5+ Image Processor
Uses Canon EF Lenses
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot
Built-In Wi-Fi and GPS Connectivity
Full HD 1080p with Manual Controls
Built-In HDR and Multiple Exposure Modes

1920 x 1080 HD Video Capture


DIGIC 4 Image Processor
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot
Works with all Canon EF & EF-S Lenses
Vari-Angle Clear View 3.0" Flip-Out LCD
5.3 fps Continuous Shooting
ISO 6400 - Expandable to 12800
HDMI Output to HDTV
Body Only #CAE60D .........................................899.99

When in New York,


Visit our SuperStore

Body Only............................................ #PADMCGH4*

TS-E MF Lenses (USA)


17/4.0 L...2249.00 24/3.5 L II ..1999.00
45/2.8 .....1399.00 90/2.8 .....1399.00
EF L Lenses (USA)
14/2.8 USM II .............................. 2249.00
24/1.4 II (77) ............................. 1649.00
35/1.4 USM (72) ........................ 1479.00
50/1.2 USM (72) ........................ 1549.00
85/1.2 USM II (72) ..................... 2099.00
100/2.8 IS USM Macro (67) .......... 949.99
135/2.0 USM (72) ...................... 1049.00
180/3.5 USM Macro (72)............ 1499.00
200/2.0 IS USM (52) .................. 5999.00
300/4.0 IS USM (77) .................. 1449.00
300/2.8 IS USM II (52 rear)......... 6599.00
400/5.6 USM (77) ...................... 1339.00
8-15/4.0 Fish-eye USM................ 1349.00
16-35/2.8 USM II (82) ................ 1699.00
17-40/4.0 USM (77) .................... 839.99
24-70/4.0 IS USM (77)................. 999.99
24-70/2.8 USM II (82) ................ 2099.00
24-105/4 IS USM (77)................ 1149.00
28-300/3.5-5.6 IS USM (77) ...... 2549.00
70-200/4.0 IS USM (77)............. 1299.00
70-200/2.8 USM (77) ................ 1449.00
70-200/2.8 IS II USM (77) .......... 2299.00
70-300/4.0-5.6 IS USM (67) ...... 1449.00
100-400/4.5-5.6 IS USM (77) .... 1699.00
1.4x III Tele ..449.99 2x III Tele ....449.99

Body Only #CAE5D3* ......................................3399.00


Kit with 24-105mm L IS #CAE5D324105 .........3999.00

EOS-1Dx D-SLR
Dual DIGIC 5+ Image Processors
Magnesium Alloy Body
Eye-Level Pentaprism Viewfinder
3.2" LCD Monitor Uses Canon EF Lenses
Dual CF card slots
1920 x 1080 HD Video Capture
Live View Still and Video Recording
61-Point High Density Auto Focus
Body Only #CAE1DX*.......................................6799.00

Call for Available Rebates & Promotions


on Select Bodies, Lenses and Flashes!
AF Flashes
SB-300 ...... 146.95 SB-700 ...... 326.95
SB-500 ...... 246.95 SB-910 ...... 546.95
R1 Wireless Twin Flash ...............................
R1C1 Wireless Twin Flash System ...............
DX ED-IF Lenses for Digital Only
10.5/2.8 Fish-Eye ......................................
35/1.8 G AF-S (52) ....................... 196.95
40/2.8 G AF-S Micro (52) .............. 276.95
85/3.5 G ED VR Micro (52) ............ 526.95
10-24/3.5-4.5 G AF-S (77).......................
12-24/4 G AF-S (77) ................................
16-85/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (67) ..................
17-55/2.8 G AF-S (77) .............................
18-55/3.5-5.6 G AF-S II (52) ....................
18-55/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (52) ....... 196.95
18-105/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (67) ..... 396.95
18-200/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR II (72) .. 596.95
18-300/3.5-5.6 G AF-S ED VR (77) ....... 996.95
55-200/4-5.6 G AF-S (52)........................
55-200/4-5.6 G AF-S VR (52) ........ 246.95
55-300/4.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (58) ..... 396.95
D-Type AF Lenses
14/2.8 D ED ..........
24/2.8 D (52).......
16/2.8 D (39) with Hood ...........................
24/3.5 D ED PC-E (77) .............................
28/1.8 G AF-S (67) ....................... 696.95
28/2.8 D (52).......
35/2.0 D (52).......
45/2.8 D ED PC-E Micro (77) ....................

D-Type AF Lenses
50/1.8 D (52).......
50/1.4 D (52).......
50/1.8 G AF-S (58) ....................... 216.95
50/1.4 G AF-S (58) ..................................
60/2.8 D Micro (62) (1:1) .........................
60/2.8 G AF-S ED Micro (62) ....................
85/1.8 G AF-S (67) ....................... 496.95
85/1.4 D IF (77) .......................................
85/1.4 G AF-S (77) ..................................
105/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF VR Micro (62) .........
105/2.0 DC D with Hood (72) ...................
180/2.8 D ED-IF (72)................................
200/4 D ED-IF Micro w/Case (62) .............
200/2 G AF-S ED-IF VR II (52) ...................
300/4.0 D AF-S ED-IF (77) .......................
14-24/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF................ 1996.95
16-35/4.0 G AF-S ED VR (77) ...... 1256.95
17-35/2.8 D AF-S ED-IF (77) ....................
18-35/3.5-4.5 G ED (77)............... 746.95
24-70/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF (77) ....... 1886.95
24-85/2.8-4.0 D IF (72) ...........................
24-120/4.0 G AF-S ED VR (77) .......... 1296.95
28-300/3.5-5.6 G AF-S ED VR (77) ..... 1046.95
70-200/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF VR II (77)....... 2396.95
70-300/4.5-5.6 G-AFS VR (67)...... 586.95
80-200/2.8 D with Collar (77)...................
80-400/4.5-5.6 D VR (77) ........................
200-400/4 G AF-S ED VR II (52)................
TC-14E II (1.4x) Teleconverter .....................
TC-17E II (1.7x) .....
TC-20E III (2x)........

10-22/3.5-4.5
EF-S USM Digital Lens

600 EX-RT
Shoe Mount Flash

18-200/3.5-5.6 DX G
AF-S ED-IF VR II Digital Lens

SB-910 Speedlight
i-TTL Shoe Mount Flash

Exclusively designed for Digital SLRs


35mm equiv.
16-35mm
3 aspherical
lens elements
3.5-27 f/Stop Range
Minimum focus 9.5"
77mm filter diameter
Weight 13.6 oz

Dust and water resistance


Guide No. 197'
Wireless Radio
Multiple Flash System
Bounce and
Swivel Head
Zoom Head (20-200mm)
18 Custom Functions
Weight: 15 oz

Exclusively designed for Digital SLRs


35mm equiv.
27-300mm
VR II Vibration Reduction
SWM (Silent
Wave Motor)
3.5-22 f/Stop Range
Focus 1.6' to Infinity
Weight 19.8 oz

Tungsten & Fluorescent Filters Included


Guide No. 111.5'
Simplified Graphic
User Interface (GUI)
Bounce, Swivel
& Zoom Head
(17-200mm)
Wireless Controller
Weight 14.8 oz

Prices, specifications, and images are subject to change without notice. Manufacturer rebates are subject to the terms and conditions (including expiration dates) printed on the manufacturers rebate forms. Not responsible for typographical or illustrative errors. 2000-2014 B & H Foto & Electronics Corp.

Alpha A6000 Mirrorless System Camera

Alpha A7 DSLR
Full Frame Exmor CMOS Sensor
Direct Compatibility with E-mount Lenses
3.0" Tiltable TFT LCD Multi-Interface Shoe
SD/SDHC/SDXC, MS Pro Duo/
Pro HG-DuoCard Slots
Full 1080/60p with Uncompressed Output
Built-In Wi-Fi and NFC Direct Access Interface

Uses Sony E-mount Lenses


3.0" Tilting LCD SD, SDHC, SDXC,
MS Pro Duo, MS PRO HG Duo Card Slot
Full HD 1080i/p AVCHD Video at 24/60 fps
Up to 11 fps Shooting and ISO 25600
Built-In Wi-Fi Connectivity with NFC
Available in Black or Silver

24

Kit with 16-50mm OSS Lens #SOA6000*

Mega
Pixels

Body Only #SOA7B

D3300 DSLR

D750 DSLR

EXPEED 4 Image Processor Full HD 1080p


Video Recording 3.0" LCD 5 fps Shooting
Uses Nikon AF Lenses (1.5x factor)
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot
Available in Black, Grey or Red
Nikon Inc. limited warranty included
Kit with 18-55mm VR II #NID33001855*......................646.95
D3200 Kit Black w/18-55mm VR #NID32001855* ....529.95

Body Only #NID750 ................................2,296.95


Mega
Pixels
Kit with 24-120mm VR #NID75024120...3,596.95
D610 Body Only #NID610 ..............................................................................1,996.95
1,996.95
D610 Kit with 24-85mm VRt #NID6102485 ...................................................2,596.95

24

24

Mega
Pixels

D5300 DSLR

D810 D-SLR

Kit with 18-55mm VR II (B, G, R) #NID53001855* ........896.95


Kit with 18-140mm VR (Black) #NID530018140 .........1299.95
D5200 Kit with 18-55mm VR (B) #NID52001855*.....796.95

Mega
Pixels

NEW

FX-Format (Full-Frame) CMOS Sensor


Uses Nikon AF Lenses 3.2" Tilting LCD
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot Built-In Wi-Fi
Full HD 1080p Video Recording at 60 fps
Nikon Inc. limited warranty included

EXPEED 4 Image Processor


Full HD 1080p Video at 60 fps
3.2" Vari-Angle LCD ISO 100-25600
Uses Nikon AF Lenses (1.5x factor)
SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slot
Nikon Inc. limited warranty included

24

FX-Format CMOS Sensor Optical Low-Pass Filter


EXPEED 4 Image Processor CF & SD Dual Card
Slots Nikon F Mount Lens Mount 3.2" LCD
Full HD 1080p Video at 60/30/24 fps
External Mic and Headphone Inputs
Continuous Shooting to 5 fps in FX Mode
Multi-CAM 3500FX AF Sensor w/51 Points
Nikon Inc. limited warranty included
Mega
Pixels

Body Only............................ #NID810 ............................3296.95

D7100 DSLR

The Professionals Source

Over 300,000 products,


at your leisure

www.BandH.com

NEW

36

Mega
Pixels

16

Mega
Pixels

D4s DSLR

Magnesium Alloy Body Moisture Resistant


EXPEED 3 Image Processor 3.2" LCD
1080p Full HD Video Capture
Accepts Nikon AF Lenses (1.5x factor)
Dual SD/SDHC/SDXC Card Slots
Built-In Flash with Commander Function
Nikon Inc. limited warranty included
Body Only #NID7100 .................................................. 1199.95
Kit with 18-105mm VR #NID710018105 .....................1599.95

Flash System
FL-300R Flash .........136.00 FL-50R Flash ...........499.95
FL-600R Flash .........299.95 RF-11 Ring Flash .....249.95
Zuiko 4/3 System Digital Lenses
35/3.5 Macro ED (52) ............................................ 229.95
50/2.0 Macro ED (77) ............................................ 499.95
7-14/4.0 ED (72) ................................................. 1799.95
11-22/2.8-3.5 ED (72) ........................................... 799.95
12-60/2.8-4 ED SWD (72)...................................... 999.95
14-42/3.5-5.6 ED (58) ........................................... 249.95
18-180/3.5-6.3 ED (62) ......................................... 499.95
EC-14 1.4x Teleconverter ......................................... 439.95

Background System

FX-format (full-frame) CMOS Sensor


14-Bit RAW Files & 12-Bit RAW S Format
EXPEED 4 Image Processor ISO 50-409600
Full HD 1080p Video at 60 fps 3.2" LCD
Compatible with Most Nikkor Optics
11 fps Shooting for 200 Shots with AE/AF
CF Type 1 & XQD Compatible
Nikon Inc. limited warranty included

24

Mega
Pixels

* FREE!
Roll of
White Paper
w/ Purchase

Body Only...................... #NID4S .................6496.95

AF Flash System
AF-360FGZ ........................
AF-540FGZ II .....................
DA Digital AF Lenses
21/3.2 AL Limited Pancake (49) ......................................
40/2.8 Limited Pancake (49) ...........................................
70/2.4 Limited HD (49)......................................................
10-17/3.5-4.5 ED IF (77) ..................................................
16-50/2.8 ED AL IF SDM (77) ............................................
50-135/2.8 ED IF SDM (67)...............................................
50-200/4-5.6 ED WR (52) .................................................
55-300/4-5.8 ED (58)........................................................

Octacool-9
Back

Octacool Light Kit


with 29.5" Octobox
Octacool 6 or 9
Lamp Fixture
Removable
Aluminum
Reflector
28w Lamps
Internal Diffusion Baffle

Background Stands
Economy ..............................74.95
Port-A-Stand .................... 114.95*
Multi 3 Polevault ..............217.99
Paper Backgrounds
Available in 48 Colors
53" x 12 yds.........................24.95
107" x 12 yds w/Core ...........45.95

24

Kit with 28-70mm Lens #SOA7KB

Octacool-6
Front

Octacool-6 #IMOC6SB ........................................ 199.95


Octacool-9 #IMOC9SB ........................................ 259.00

Flash System
HVL-F20M............... 149.99 HVL-F20S ................ 149.99
HVL-F43M............... 398.99 HVL-F60M ............... 548.00
Digital Lenses
24/2 Carl Zeiss (72) ............................................. 1399.99
50/2.8 Macro (55).. 599.99 50/1.4 (55) ............ 449.99
100/2.8 Macro (55)................................................ 799.99
11-18/4.5-5.6 DT (77) ........................................... 799.99
16-80/3.5-4.5 DT Carl Zeiss (62) ........................... 999.99
16-105/3.5-5.6 DT (62) ......................................... 699.99
18-250/3.5-6.3 DT (62) ......................................... 649.99
70-200/2.8 G APO (77) ........................................ 1999.99

800-947-9964
212-444-6664
Fax:

212-239-7770

Store & Mail Order Hours:

Sunday 10-5 Mon.-Thurs. 9-7


Friday 9-1 EST/9-2 DST
Saturday Closed

59x82" Silver

Panel Frame Reflector Kits


Zebra Gold / Zebra Silver
Reversible Two Sided Fabric
Collapsible
Aluminum
Alloy Frame
Tool-Free Assembly
Padded Shoulder
Bag Included

When in New York,


Visit our SuperStore
43x67"
Gold

420 Ninth Ave.


Corner of 34th Street

New York, N.Y. 10001

43 x 67" #IMFPK436ZGZS ................................... 299.95


59 x 82" #IMFPK598ZGZS ................................... 464.95

58 AF-2 TTL
Shoe Mount Flash

622 Super Pro TTL


Handle Mount Flash

Qflash TRIO
Parabolic Reflector Flash

285HV Professional
Auto Shoe Mount Flash

Guide No. 58'


Full TTL Mode
Zoom Head (24-105)
Bounce & Swivel Head
Update via USB Port
Weight: 12.8 oz

Requires Head
TTL with appropriate module
Guide No. 200
Bounce & swivel
Auto f/Stops f/2.0, 2.8,
4.0, 8.0, 5.6, 11 & 16
Vari-Power

Guide No. 110'


Bounce and
Swivel Head
Built-In FreeXwire
Radio Wireless TTL
High Speed Sync
USB Port TTL compatible

Guide No. 120'


Automatic exposure
range to 70'
4 auto f/stop settings
Removable sensor
Bounce Head
Zoom Head (28-105) Weight 14.9 oz

#ME58AF2* .............................. 399.99

#SU622S* ..................................179.95

#QUQF8* ....................................875.00

#VI285HV .....................................84.95

NYC DCA Electronics Store Lic. #0906712; NYC DCA Electronics & Home Appliance Service Dealer Lic. #0907905; NYC DCA Secondhand Dealer General Lic. #0907906

We Buy, Sell, and Trade

Used Equipment

Page 2

12015

IMAGES RYAN BRENIZER

94

PPM AG.COM

Method Man
By Stephanie Boozer

hen you hear the name Ryan Brenizer, no doubt the well-known Brenizer method
comes to mind. The Brenizer method is a technique he stumbled upon in 2008 while vacationing in Ireland. Hed packed just a few lenses and was out and about with a 70-200mm.

95

THE BRENIZER
METHOD
Used mostly in portraiture, the
Brenizer method involves taking a
series of panoramic images of and
around the subject. The photographer stands close to the subject and
uses a fast lens thats wide open.
Brenizer photographs with 50mm
f/1.4 and 85mm f/1.4 lenses but notes
that other fast lenses (for example, a
35mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.8, 85mm f/1.8,
and 135mm f/2) can also give good
results. The images are then stitched
together horizontally and vertically.

96

I wanted to capture this combination


of old tombstones that ideally would have
required a wide-angle lens, he says. I
really wanted a shallow depth of field but
still with a wide angle. I looked at my 70200mm and thought, Wait a second. Why
cant I do a pano of telephoto shots to get
the depth of field at f/2.8, and see what
I get? I shot it a bunch of different ways,
processed it, and it looked amazing, like a
large-format effect. That discovery pretty
much claimed the rest of my vacation.
Brenizer posted the images on Flickr, thinking this technique surely had been discovered by someone else, and asked followers
if they could tell how he did it. No one could.
So I finally shared how I did it, but I
didnt name it, he says. It just became
known as the Brenizer method, which I
think is really funny because I grew up
with nobody being able to pronounce my

last name. So beyond helping my career,


its this great irony.

DOCUMENTARY MIND

Prior to setting photo blogs abuzz over his


namesake method and taking up wedding
photography, Brenizer spent years writing
and photographing for newspapers in upstate New York. An early assignment had
been to follow President Clinton and the
first family over the course of a weekend.
I spent the car ride over just trying to
figure out how to turn the camera on, he
laughs. I didnt have a lot of technical knowledge at the time, but I had the tenacity
of a reporter. I was also shooting with a
smaller camera, so I could get into a lot of
places that some of the other photographers
couldnt because I didnt look like a reporter.
That weekends work won Brenizer an
award from the New York Press Associ-

PPM AG.COM

ationnot a bad start for a kid fresh out


of college. Brenizer credits his newsy start
with sharpening his photographic eye, noting that when you have to make potentially
boring subjects, such as a person speaking
at a podium, look interesting and magazine
worthy, you develop a knack for narrative.
I had to learn to be resourceful and the
nitty-gritty of anticipating facial expressions, he says. Thats all you have when
youre shooting someone talking. Later I
became aware that there was a place
in wedding photography for people who had
that documentary soul in them. I very
quickly discovered the variety of craziness and insanity that you can get in the
world of weddings. Here were people filled
with real emotion, who look great and are
excited to see each other. From the start, I
loved telling those stories.

STAFF THE TASKS YOU DREAD

This year, Brenizer says hell shoot his 500th


wedding, which means hes booked an average of 65 weddings a year.
That works out to basically a wedding
every five days for the past five years, he
says. Its a very intense experience.
If it seems a little like break-neck speed,
it is. But heres the secret: New York-based
Brenizer learned quickly how to structure
his business so that he does only the part
he loves and outsources the rest. Thus, the

98

PPM AG.COM

ADORAMA
WANTS TO BUY
YO U R U S E D P H O T O & V I D E O G E A R

ITS WORTH MORE THAN YOU EXPECT!


Whether consumer level, professional gear or even vintage cameras, your used
equipment can easily be turned into cash or upgraded equipment.

Get a fast, free quote online at


Adorama.com/used or in our Manhattan, NY store.
< Scan Here to see how easy it is to sell and trade up!

SHOP

RENT

42 W 18TH ST NYC
800.223.2500
adorama.com

SAME DAY SHIPPING


on most orders till 8PM

PRINT

42 W 18TH ST NYC
800.223.2500
adorama.com

LEARN

TRADE

Brenizer method could


also reference his business approach.
Most studios reach a
certain point in their maturity when
they get help shooting, start hiring other
photographers as associates, he says.
But Im a photographer through and
through. I love shooting and basically dont
like anything thats not shooting. Thats true
for a lot of photographers, but they hire people to do the one thing they really like. They
get saddled with all the emails, processing, album design, and then wake up and
say, Wait, I thought I was a photographer.
One of the tasks that immediately
dragged him down was communications.
Brenizer loves talking to clients, loves meeting with them, but does not love email,
which he calls the No. 1 biggest time-suck
in the modern professional world. He
hired someone for five hours a week to manage email. As his business grew, his communications needs grew, and the job evolved
into a full-time customer service position.

100

Equally important is that Brenizer recognized immediately that his staff didnt
need to be aspiring photographers.
Its valuable that shes not sitting there
wishing she could do what I do, he says of
his customer service employee. You have
to hire the right people for the job. None
of my staff are photographers. Photoshop
and processing are not my primary passion, but there are people out there who do
have that primary passion. Your average
photo assistant isnt going to want to be an
assistant for the next five years.
If I did everything myself, I would be
miserable, he says. Ideally, in the business model I want to create for myself, I
want to be an associate photographer, the
only associate photographer in my own
studio. I want to be treated like that associate photographer you send out to shoot
and everything else is handled by the studio. Thats my dream. I think thats the
dream of a lot of photographers. To just be
paid to shoot and do the things they love.
Brenizer advises photographers to think

about all the tasks they do on a daily basis. What are the things you procrastinate?
What gets pushed from one day to the next
and the next? Those are the things you
dont love. Make a list of those things and
then figure out what you can outsource.
It may seem like an added expense, but
Brenizer rationalizes it this way: You can
make money if you pay someone to do the
things that are less profitable for you to
do. A simple example is paying someone to
clean my house, then I spend that time on
a shoot or meeting a client. I am defi nitely
paid better than my housekeeper. I actually make money by saving that four hours of
my life and investing it into the business.
You can do more work if you have more
time, so start doing things that open up
time for yourself.

ryanbrenizer.com
Stephanie Boozer is a writer in Charleston, South Carolina.

PPM AG.COM

SHOP

RENT

SAME DAY SHIPPING

on most orders till 8PM

PRINT

42 W 18TH ST NYC
800.223.2500
adorama.com

LEARN

TRADE

PERSPECTIVE

THROUGH THE LENS OF PPA

FRIENDS IVE MADE


ALONG THE WAY

Ive spent a lot of time with PPA CEO


David Trust in the past year. His passion for PPA and its members is inspiring. Since Ive been on this board,
PPA has grown from 12,000 members
to more than 27,000. Much of PPAs
success is thanks to Davids vision and
leadership. Were lucky to have someone in this position who cares so much
about photographers and the industry.
If you see him at Imaging USA next
month, say hi and tell him how much
you appreciate all he does for PPA.

JAMIE HAYES

PRESIDENTS MESSAGE

CHOOSE TO BE MORE IN 2015


by Susan Michal, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI
Its hard to believe I have just one more of
these messages to write. Time passes so fast,
and before you know it Ill turn over the office
of president to Michael Timmons, M.Photog.

102

M.Artist.Cr., CPP, F-ASP.


I traveled the country last year, and in
every state, I made a point to ask photographers an important question: Are you taking

advantage of PPAs merit and degree program and participating in the International
Photographic Competition?
The answers I heard were varied. Some
photographers werent sure what I was
talking about. Some choose to ignore competition completely. More understood what it
was but had no idea how to get started. And
then there were those who didnt grasp the
value. But one thing is for sure: You all want
to become better photographers and make
more money. In my opinion, the best path is
through the PPA merit and degree program
(ppa.com/degrees).
Photography is a popular career choice.
More of us than ever are vying for a slice
of the pie. How do you compete? By getting
better. By choosing to be more proficient.
Listening to the judging discussions at the
2014 International Photographic Competition
(IPC), a young photographer leaned over
to me and whispered, Wow, if I could talk
about my work like that to my clients I would
be rich. I looked at her and said, Bingo!
Entering competition and working toward
your master of photography degree isnt about
winning awards; its about winning dollars.
Its about learning to be more confident and
gaining the respect of peers and clients.
Its January, which means its time for a
New Years resolution. Lets make one together: I challenge every one of you to figure
out what it will take to make your business
more successful and to be a better photographer in 2015. Participating in PPAs merit and
degree program is a great place to start.

PPM AG.COM

COPYRIGHT UPDATE

HOT POLICIES

PPA continues to make waves on Capitol


Hill, most recently advocating for the commercial use of drones and a small claims
process for copyright cases.

would be a follow-up to the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, which instructed the FAA to safely introduce drones
into national air space.

DRONE EXEMPTIONS
PPAs stance: Exemptions should be made for
professional photographers who want to use
drones for certain commercial assignments.
At issue: Currently commercial drone
use is illegal; however, interested parties
can apply for exemptions, and the FAA has
received an influx of applications in recent
months. Tom Chapman, Counsel to the
Subcommittee on Aviation, Safety, and Security, foresees significant change in drone
policy very soon. This revision in policy

SMALL CLAIMS FOR COPYRIGHT


PPAs stance: There should be a small
claims remedial process for copyright cases.
At issue: Copyright cases are heard in
federal court. Because legal fees can be
cost prohibitive to small business owners,
many photographers do not file claims. PPA
argued that a federal small claims court
should be put in place to hear copyright
cases that could be filed without an attorney. While the idea was well received by
the Copyright Office, it remains to be seen

VEER

how legislators would implement the proposal as it would conflict with Article III of
the U.S. Constitution.
A longtime advocate for photographer copyrights, PPA provides a short version of its
Copyright Kit free to the public at ppa.com/
freecopyrightkit.

PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION

PREPARING YOURSELF AND YOUR IMAGES TO WIN


Each year, the winning images from PPAs
International Photographic Competition (IPC)
are exhibited at Imaging USA. Judging for
the annual competition takes place each
August, and the top images are entered into
the coveted Loan Collection. In 2014, just
18 percent of images submitted went Loan.
People with IPC experience suggest that
if youre new to competition, the best place
to start is a PPA district competition in your
area. Here are the dates for the 2015 district competitions:

LOAN COLLECTION / JOANNE LEE

Northeast District
Entries open: January 26
Entries close: March 6
Judging: March 13-14, Columbus, Ohio

Judging: March 26-28, Vancouver,


Washington

Northcentral District
Entries open: February 9
Entries close: March 11
Judging: March 20-21, Des Moines, Iowa

Southeast District
Entries open: March 23
Entries close: April 24
Judging: April 30-May 2, Charlotte,
North Carolina

Western District
Entries open: February 16
Entries close: March 18

Southwest District
Entries closed January 2
Judging: January 8-9, San Marcos, Texas

104

BENEFIT REMINDER

SQUARE ONE TOOL


Understand how your cost of sales and
business overhead expenses can work in
your favor to improve your profitability
with PPAs Square One tool. Enter your
desired net income, and Square One
calculates the number of sessions you
need to conduct, at what sales average,
to reach your goal. ppa.com/squareone

PPM AG.COM

successware

LABS

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

107

LABS
your #1 sports lab
If you havent tried us,
youre missing out

Image by Iconik

Leaders in the industry for forty-four years


Visit us at hhcolorlab.com/Sports

H&H Color Lab I www.hhcolorlab.com I 1-800-821-1305

Professional Photographer_2014_November SSE final-LAB ad.indd 1

108

9/19/2014 3:09:39 PM

PPM AG.COM

LABS

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

109

THE SHOP

110

PPM AG.COM

THE SHOP

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

111

THE SHOP

CLASSIFIED
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT

INSURANCE

PHOTO RESTORATION

EPSON PRINTERS AND SUPPLIES. Purchase your


Epson products from the nations leading valueadded dealer, PRO DIGITAL GEAR. Shipping from
23 different states. Free shipping incentives. BEST
PRICES. Sales@prodigitalgear.com 888.459.1482.

PACKAGE CHOICE Insurance Program for photographers by Hill & Usher. Available Nationwide.
Complete online questionaire, receive customized insurance proposal. Accidental Breakage, Theft, Rented
Gear, Full Replacement, Errors & Omissions, Free Certificates. www.PackageChoice.com; 866.977.4725.

1ST PHOTO RESTORATION FREE! Try us, youll


like us! Point & click easy. No sign up cost. 100%
guarantee. Online leader since 1993. Wholesale only
to professionals. www.hollywoodfotofix.com. Call
888-700-3686 or email along@hollywoodfotofix.com

FOR SALE
FOR SALECONFIGURABLE AND PORTABLE
PHOTOGRAPHY DISPLAY. Are you looking for a
professional display for showing off your photography? This display was used for bridal shows and always grabbed the attention of both potential clients
as well as photographers. This display is fully configurable from 4 to 28 in several modular sections to
provide the maximum impact in any situation. Available now for $2,000. Fore more information visit
www.dx-photography.com/display

INCORPORATION SERVICES
INCORPORATE OR FORM an LLC today! Your art is
a business. Treat it like one. The Company Corporation can help you incorporate or form a limited liability company in as little as ten minutes. We are fast,
accurate, and affordable. Provide additional credibility to your photography studio or business at the
fraction of the cost of using an attorney. Call
1-800-206-7276 or visit www.incorporate.com today!

112

LAB
ACADEMY PRODUCTIONS INC.
INNOVATIVE PRINTING SOLUTION
Complete Imaging Service for todays
professional photographer
ProcessingProofingFilmDigital Files
SOS
Self Ordering System powered by ROES
High Volume PackagesKodak Products
SchoolsDaycaresSportsPromsSeniors
StudiosStore PromotionsFundraisersWeddings
CompositesCollagesOther Unique Products
High Tech Printing EquipmentScanning Services
Free Marketing SeminarsExpert Product Designers
Superior Customer Service
Detailed Technical Support
Competitive PricingQuick Turn Around
CALL US TODAY: 800-421-3523
6100 ORR ROAD
CHARLOTTE, NC 28213
www.PicAcademy.com

STUDIO FOR SALE


PHOTOGRAPHERS DREAM. Located in the Beautiful NY Finger Lakes. AWARD WINNING STUDIO,
well respected, large client base with contracts.
Leaders in the area Embraced digital in 1997.
TURNKEY includes Prestiges Queen Anne Victorian Homein Histric District. Landscaping includes
Water Garden complete with Koi pond and Water
Falls. Many props and scenes. Owner will help in
transition. See www.wowimaging.com. Contact Owner
at 607-761-7273.

Classified rates: $1.50 per word $2 per


word for all caps or bold face $10 per issue
(optional) for confidential reply box
$30 minimum per ad CONTACT: PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER CLASSIFIED
ADS, 229 PEACHTREE NE, STE. 2200,
ATLANTA, GA 30303 800-339-5451

PPM AG.COM

ADVERTISEMENT

THE SOURCE

YOUR GUIDE TO THE PERFECT PRODUCTS AND SERVICES, FROM BEGINNING TO END

TAP BOUTIQUE

Tap Boutique makes it easy and affordable to package


photography products in a way that enhances the
perceived value and enriches the overall customer
experience. Choose from nine products, 12 colors, and
coordinating accessories.

TAP PACKAGING SOLUTIONS photo.tap-usa.com

NATURAL BAMBOO & BIRCH CANVAS

CUSTOM PHOTO CALENDARS

Complement the natural beauty of your image by printing it onto an


eco-friendly natural wood canvas. Choose from bamboo or birch for a
trendy, durable, and unique presentation that preserves the natural
wood grain.

Easily create beautiful and unique publisher-quality press-printed


photo calendars with Bay Photo Labs new design and ordering
software, Bay Designer. Date ranges, design elements, and layout
are fully customizable.

PHOTO FINISH photofinishus.com

BAY PHOTO LAB bayphoto.com/calendars

PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2015

113

FINAL FRAME

IRRESISTIBLE RESOLUTION

ORANGE ROSES, SUMMER GARDEN MARY KOCOL, COURTESY GALLERY NAGA

114

Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it,


all photographs testify to times relentless melt.
SUSAN SONTAG

PPM AG.COM

handcrafted albums
are our specialty

H&H Color Lab I www.hhcolorlab.com I 1-800-821-1305

Everybody needs
a colorful SideKick.
SideKick360 SmartPhone Adapter
Visit MeFOTO.com for the complete and incredibly colorful story.

914 347 3300 Distributed by MAC Group