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Libertarians have a convergent pattern on the Moral Identity Scale as on the Good- Self Scale

In the paper, we show that libertarians report moral traits as less essential to their self-concept, according to results on the Good-Self Scale. The Moral Identity Scale (Aquino & Reed, 2002) is similar to the Good-Self scale in that it also measures moral self-relevance or identity. In this measure, participants are asked to imagine a person who possesses certain traits (e.g. generous) and whether they would want to be similar to this person. The Moral Identity scale was completed by 774 participants (447 men; 446 liberals, 109 conservatives, and 127 libertarians). The figure below shows that libertarians also scored substantially lower than both liberals and conservatives on overall moral identity, as well as both the internal and symbolic subscales. The results essentially replicate the pattern found on the Modified Good-Self scale with libertarians expressing less interest in being characterized as having common moral traits.

Libertarians have a convergent pattern on the Moral Identity Scale as on the Good- Self Scale