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JOHN GLENN

‘LA LA LAND’ IS CORNY,
GORGEOUS, ROMANTIC

CHIEFS HOLD
OFF RAIDERS

FIRST AMERICAN TO ORBIT THE EARTH
HAS DIED AT 95
NATION PAGE 17

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016 • XVII, Edition 97

Sewage flood brings lawsuit
Millbrae homeowner alleges infrastructure failure resulted in human waste spill
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A Millbrae resident is suing the
city on claims she suffered significant property damage when raw
sewage backed up through her
plumbing and flooded her home.
Juliann Forcum, who lives on

Poplar Avenue, filed a lawsuit last
month in San Mateo County
Superior Court alleging human
waste came spewing into her home
last year from the sewage main
owned and operated by the city of
Millbrae.
Immediately following the accident last year, Forcum claims a

“This case is all about personal
responsibility. Why should a citizen of the city have to go hire a
lawyer to get their home repaired?
She is a longtime resident. It’s
kind of odd they treat their citizens this way, ” said Ara
Jabagchourian, an attorney representing Forcum.

Millbrae Public Works representative acknowledged the issue was
caused by a failing of the city’s
underground infrastructure. But an
attorney hired by Forcum said a
subsequent claim filed against the
city seeking damages was denied,
leaving his client no other option
than to take legal action.

Forcum paid about $16,000 to
have her home cleaned and repair
the damage to sheetrock and paint,
among other efforts. The lawsuit
does not seek a specific amount in
relief, but Jabagchourian said the
suffering his client experienced

See SEWAGE, Page 23

Artist’s rendering of Fieldwork Brewing’s new beer garden at Bay Meadows.

Fieldwork Brewery
to open a new San
Mateo beer garden
ANNA SCHUESSLER/DAILY JOURNAL

Dominick Chirichillo of Domenico Winery in his newly renovated tasting room. Below: Scott Townsend showcases
wine at Russian Ridge Winery.

San Carlos synergy
Local wineries and merchants win in holiday collaboration
By Anna Schuessler
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Popular Berkeley brewer joins
the Bay Meadows community
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Unique brews, bocce ball, fire
pits and communal seating will
enliven Bay Meadow’s budding
gathering space as Fieldwork
Brewing is slated to open a beer
garden at San Mateo’s newest community.

The massive transit-oriented
development touted as an urban
village in Silicon Valley has been
releasing the names of new artisan
tenants that will make up Bay
Meadow’s new “social street.”
The young Berkeley-based craft
brewery will join Blue Bottle

Dominick Chirichillo gazed
across the expansive tasting room
See BEER, Page 18
at his San Carlos winery,
Domenico Winery, as he explained
the renovations transforming a
space he has owned since he
Planning Commission votes to expand subdivision sizes
opened his doors in 2004.
Artfully decorated with strings By Anna Schuessler
ommending that development stanof warm holiday lights, reindeer DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
dards revert to before they were
figurines and evergreens, the room
changed in 2011.
The commission voted 5-0
was waiting for luncheon guests to
Responding to concerns about
certain residential lot splits increas- Tuesday to recommend that the City
fill the room with chatter.
“We’re going to have a catering ing neighborhood density without Council go back to pre-2011 devel-

Lot splits may stall in San Carlos

See WINE, Page 18

much community benefit, the San
Carlos Planning Commission is rec-

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Free Consultation with 3D CT Scan

Call 650-567-5915

1201 Saint Francis Way San Carlos CA 94070

Evening & Saturday Appointments Available

See LOTS, Page 23

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL
PETER MOOTZ/DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

A two-alarm fire left four
apartment units
uninhabitable at a building in
East Palo Alto Thursday
morning, the Menlo Park Fire
Protection District chief said.
The fire was reported at 11:01
a.m. at the Woodland Park
Apartments at 1928 Cooley
Ave., Fire Chief Harold
Schapelhouman said. Fire
crews responded and had
the blaze out in about 20
minutes, Schapelhouman
said. A third-floor unit was
destroyed in the fire, while
smoke damage left the unit
across from it uninhabitable.
First- and second-floor units
directly below the one that
caught fire had water
damage and residents were
displaced there too,
Schapelhouman said. He said
employees at the apartment
complex are coordinating
with a moving company to
relocate the residents to
vacant apartments elsewhere
in the complex so they won't
have to find other housing.
No injuries were reported.

“Give me the liberty to know, to
utter, and to argue freely according
to conscience, above all liberties.”
— John Milton, English poet

This Day in History
Actor, author, producer and director
Kirk Douglas, known for such
movies as “The Bad and the
Beautiful,” “Lust for Life,” “Gunfight
at the O.K. Corral” and “Spartacus,”
to name only a few, was born Issur Danielovitch in
Amsterdam, New York.

1916

In 1 8 5 4 , Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s famous poem, “The
Charge of the Light Brigade,” was published in England.
In 1 8 9 2 , “Widowers’ Houses,” Bernard Shaw’s first play,
opened at the Royalty Theater in London.
In 1 9 11 , an explosion inside the Cross Mountain coal
mine near Briceville, Tennessee, killed 84 workers. (Five
were rescued.)
In 1 9 3 5 , the Downtown Athletic Club of New York honored college football player Jay Berwanger of the
University of Chicago with the DAC Trophy, which later
became known as the Heisman Trophy.
In 1 9 4 0 , British troops opened their first major offensive
in North Africa during World War II.
In 1 9 5 8 , the anti-communist John Birch Society was
formed in Indianapolis.
In 1 9 6 2 , the Petrified Forest in Arizona was designated a
national park.
In 1 9 6 5 , Nikolai V. Podgorny replaced Anastas I. Mikoyan
as chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet, a job he
would hold for almost 12 years. “A Charlie Brown
Christmas,” the first animated TV special featuring characters from the “Peanuts” comic strip by Charles M. Schulz,
was first broadcast on CBS.

Birthdays

Rock musician
Actor Kirk Douglas
Actress Dame Judi
Brian Bell is 48.
is 100.
Dench is 82.
Actor-writer Buck Henry is 86. Actor Beau Bridges is 75.
Football Hall-of-Famer Dick Butkus is 74. Comedian-songwriter Neil Innes is 72. Actor Michael Nouri is 71. Former
Sen. Thomas Daschle, D-S.D., is 69. World Golf Hall of Famer
Tom Kite is 67. Singer Joan Armatrading is 66. Actor Michael
Dorn is 64. Actor John Malkovich is 63. Country singer
Sylvia is 60. Singer Donny Osmond is 59. Rock musician
Nick Seymour (Crowded House) is 58. Comedian Mario
Cantone is 57. Actor David Anthony Higgins is 55. Actor Joe
Lando is 55. Actress Felicity Huffman is 54. Crown Princess
Masako of Japan is 53.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

NUDMO
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

SIPEO

DOLUME

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

In other news ...
Extreme Wyoming cold
frosts even Moscow Ballet
CASPER, Wyo. — It got so cold in
Wyoming, even the Moscow Ballet
couldn’t move.
The traveling ballet group famous for
performing “The Nutcracker” this time
of year couldn’t start their buses
Thursday morning in Casper.
The temperature in the central
Wyoming city plunged to 31 degrees
below zero overnight.
Moscow Ballet spokeswoman Sally
Michael Keyes says the group’s bus and
equipment trucks had to be defrosted
over several hours.
The delay and worries about driving
over snowy passes in Colorado prompted the troupe to cancel a performance
Thursday night in Grand Junction,
Colorado.
The ballet’s home town of Moscow is
no stranger to cold and snow, but even
Moscow’s recent low of 18 degrees wasn’t nearly as cold as Casper.
The Moscow Ballet still plans to perform Friday and Saturday in Denver.

‘Seeing eye camel’ acts as
guide for blind horse at zoo
WINSLOW, Maine — A horse and a
camel at a Maine petting zoo have
formed an unlikely friendship.
The 5-year-old camel, Caesar, at the
Pony X-Press Zoo in Winslow has
become a guide for Dolly the horse,

Dec. 7 Powerball
41

48

49

64

53

20
Powerball

Dec. 6 Mega Millions
13

RIRTEW
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

-

-

Yesterday’s

WHITE TOWNSHIP, N.J. — A
Christmas tree farmer has found and
returned a wedding ring that slipped off a
New Jersey man’s finger roughly 15
years ago.
David Penner lost the ring during a
visit with his wife to Wyckoff’s Tree
Farm in White Township. He returned
and searched, but the ring was nowhere
to be found.
“I thought it was a miracle,” Penner
said of the farmer’s find.
John Wyckoff, a third-generation
tree farmer, told NJ.com he was riding
on the back of a tractor sticking trees
in the ground in April when he spotted
something shiny in the soil. He sifted
the dirt and found the wedding band. An
NJ.com report on the discovery last
week spurred a call from Penner’s sister-in-law, who connected the two
men.

34

48

63

53

12

2

10

11

15

2

13

26

28

35

9

8

9

Daily Four
4

Daily three midday
6

38

19

3

6

Daily three evening

Mega number

4

6

9

The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place;
and Big Ben, No. 4, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:40.37.

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: CROAK
YUCKY
BROKEN
UPDATE
Answer: He asked if he could join their poker game,
and they said — YOU BET YOU CAN

The San Mateo Daily Journal
1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com
twitter.com/smdailyjournal

California conjoined twins
separated in successful surgery
PALO ALTO — Conjoined California
twins Eva and Erika Sandoval have
become two separate toddlers following
a 17-hour marathon surgery at the Lucile
Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford
that began on Tuesday, officials said.
The Sacramento Bee reported the 2year-old Sacramento area girls were born
conjoined from the chest down and
shared a bladder, liver, parts of their
digestive system and a third leg.
Their parents said each girl has
retained portions of the organs they
shared. Each girl still has one leg and
surgeons told the newspaper both would
likely need a prosthetic leg. The third
limb was used for skin grafts to cover
surgical wounds.
Their parents were overjoyed with the
success of the separation, which father
Arturo Sandoval called a “major success.” “They look amazing. They’re
amazing. They have their hair done, and
they’re resting,” said mother Aida
Sandoval. “We’re just going to take it
one day at a time and let them catch up on
their rest.”
The twins and are expected to remain
in intensive care for up to two weeks,
hospital officials said.
Following such surgeries, the first 72
hours are typically the most critical, said
Dr. James Goodrich, director of pediatric
neurosurgery at Children’s Hospital at
Montefiore in New York.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

Mega number

Christmas tree farmer returns
wedding band lost 15 years ago

Lotto

Dec. 7 Super Lotto Plus

Ans.
here:

who is blind.
The zoo’s Ed Papsis tells WGME-TV
Dolly’s probably the only horse with “a
seeing eye camel.”
He says Caesar needed the company of
another animal and Dolly needed a guide,
so the two were put together and they
bonded. Dolly relies on the camel and
follows him around. She whinnys for
him if he’s not nearby and he bellows
back for her.

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Fri day : Showers likely in the morning...Then rain in the afternoon. Highs
around 60. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Fri day ni g ht: Rain. Lows in the lower
50s. South winds 10 to 20 mph with gusts
to around 35 mph.
Saturday : Mostly cloudy. A chance of
rain. Highs in the upper 50s. Southwest
winds 10 to 20 mph...Becoming west 10 to 15 mph in the
afternoon. Chance of rain 50 percent.
Saturday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows in
the upper 40s.
Sunday : Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain. Highs in
the mid 50s.
Sunday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s.
Mo nday and Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

GGNRA access rules
limit off-leash areas
Dog owners disappointed, plan to sue
By Sara Gaiser
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

A final proposal from the National Park
Service released Thursday for dog management rules in the Golden Gate National
Recreation Area was met with disappointment from dog owners who have been pushing to maintain access to on- and off-leash
areas.
The Final Environmental Impact Statement
adds new on- and off-leash areas in San Mateo
County in response to public comments, but
still cuts 90 percent of the areas where dog
owners are currently allowed to walk their
dogs off of a leash, according to Andrea
Buffa, a member of the group Save Our
Recreation.
“I’m sure the park service wants to make
this sound like a compromise but the impact
that it’s going to have on people who get
their exercise outdoors by walking their dogs
is going to be severe,” Buffa said.
Buffa said it appeared likely that her group
will need to sue the park service to challenge
the rules in court once they are finalized.
The agency and dog owners have been battling for years over proposed restrictions on
dog walking within the 80,000-acre national
recreation area, which spans Marin, San
Francisco and San Mateo counties and

Police reports
What a grinch
Christmas lights and spotlights were
taken on Port Royal Avenue in Belmont
before 10:03 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 4.

MILLBRAE
Arres t. A 41-year-old Daly City man was
arrested after groping people and refusing to
pay his bill at a business on the first block
of Old Bayshore Highway before 11:10
p.m. Monday, Dec. 5.
Burg l ary . A business was broken into and
$300 was taken from a cash drawer on the

includes popular dog walking areas such as
Ocean Beach, Fort Funston, Crissy Field,
Muir Beach and Rancho Corral de Tierra.
The park service has said the plan includes
22 locations for dog walking within the
GGNRA, including six where off-leash dogs
are allowed. The areas include nearly onethird of the mileage on the park’s beaches and
more than one-third of the mileage on trails,
according to the park service.
The proposed rules also allow groups of up
to 4-6 dogs to be walked with a permit.
Park service officials have said the rules are
needed to protect environmental resources
and wildlife and provide a safe experience for
park users.
“The Dog Management Plan seeks to balance recreation and preservation at Golden
Gate National Recreation Area, increase visitor safety by providing space for all types of
recreational users, and protect park resources
for future generations,” said Jim Milestone,
acting general superintendent.
“We will proudly remain the most dogfriendly park in the National Park Service and
the only one to offer off-leash dog recreation,” Milestone said.
The move to restrict dogs has been met
with opposition not only from dog owners

See RULES, Page 23
200 block of Broadway before 7:50 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 5.
Fo und pro perty . A bicycle was found near
Anita Drive and Magnolia Avenue before
3:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 5.
Burg l ary . An unknown person broke into
a residence and stole jewelry valued at
approximately $3,100 on the 200 block of
Castaneda Drive before 12:28 p. m.
Monday, Dec. 5.
Theft. A vehicle was stolen on the first
block of Victoria Avenue before 8 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 5.
Burg l ary . An unknown person broke into
a residence and stole a large safe on the 300
block of Vallejo Drive before 10:43 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 4.

CITY GOVERNMENT
• The So uth San Franci s co Ci ty Co unci l named Pradeep Gupta
mayor during the annual council rotation Wednesday, Dec. 7. Li za
No rmandy was named vice mayor and former mayor Mark Addi eg o
was again appointed to a seat on the council.

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

3

4

LOCAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

Man accused of killing dog
not allowed to live with pets
A dog groomer accused of killing a dog at
a San Mateo PetSmart was allowed to post
bond under the condition
he not live anywhere
with a pet, according to
San
Mateo
County
District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Juan Zarate, 39, of
Hayward, requested an
exemption to the addiJuan Zarate tional condition so he
could live with his girlfriend, who has a cat. Prosecutors argued
that Zarate is a danger to animals based on
the allegations against him and the judge
agreed, according to Wagstaffe.
Terrie Peacock and Stefan Zier brought
their 1-year-old dachshund Henry to the
PetSmart at 3520 S. El Camino Real on May
15 for a nail trim. About three minutes later,
the groomer appeared holding an unresponsive Henry, as the dog bled from his mouth.
A veterinarian at the store was unable to

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local briefs
revive the dog and he was pronounced dead,
according to police.
The groomer, later identified as then 38year-old Zarate, was arrested that same day
on suspicion of felony animal cruelty.
The owners filed a lawsuit in November,
alleging the company had received several
complaints of pet injuries during grooming
appointments before but failed to take
action to correct the problem, it was previously reported by Bay City News Service.
Zarate is out of custody on the $50,000
bail bond.

Chicken spill on 101 in San Mateo
A big-rig carrying what appeared to be a
massive amount of chicken guts or slurry
spilled a portion of its load Thursday afternoon and closed three lanes of northbound
Highway 101 in San Mateo, according to
the California Highway Patrol.
The truck apparently stopped short in
heavy traffic just south of Kehoe Avenue
shortly before 4 p.m.

Unpleasant odors, tastes
in drinking water traced to
harmless algae byproduct

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CHP

Spilled chicken guts or slurry closed three
lanes of northbound Highway 101 Thursday.
The unidentified chicken material sloshed
out of the top of the open trailer, which was
covered by a tarp, according to photos posted on the Redwood City area CHP Twitter
account.
A CalTrans crew was called in to scoop up
the fleshy mess using a front loader and a
pickup truck. The lanes were opened up to
traffic after roughly half an hour.
No injuries or vehicle damage were
reported as a result of the spill.

GENEVE JEWELERS

IS BACK & NOW OPEN!

We have opened a beautiful new store at 291 Primrose Road after closing
our previous location at 1465 Burlingame Avenue. Please come and see
our stunning new inventory of jewelry for your holiday shopping needs.

Business Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

650-348-4983
Newly Designed Web Site: www.GeneveJewelers.com

Unpleasant odors and flavors reported in
drinking water this week are caused by a
harmless algae byproduct, San Francisco
water officials said Thursday.
San
Francisco
Public
Utilities
Commission officials have found evidence
of the substance, known as geosmin, at the
Sunol Valley Water Treatment Plant and
have taken steps to take the plant and the
San Antonio Reservoir that feeds into it
offline while they work to flush the system.
However, it could be as much as a week in
some areas before the water returns to normal.
SFPUC Assistant General Manager Steve
Ritchie said the water department began
receiving customer complaints of earthy,
musty flavors and odors on Friday, shortly
after employees began taking steps to
lower the water levels in local reservoirs in
anticipation of rain.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

5

Massive toy drive aids service organizations
Wonderland of Christmas Holiday Festival this weekend in Menlo Park
By Aimee Lewis Strain
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

More than 35 Bay Area children’s service
charities will be able to give more toys to
their clients this holiday season, thanks to
a Belmont mother-daughter duo that spends
each year collecting toys and planning
unique holiday decorations for their seasonal, pop-up toy “workshop.”
Now in its 22nd year, the Bob Hoskins
Toy Drive provides each of the organizations with at least five enormous boxes of
toys, Carolyn Hoskins and daughter Kate
Hoskins estimate. But as for a total — there
hasn’t ever been much time to count them
all, Carolyn Hoskins said.
“We are just so happy to be able to gather
the toys or match toys with wish lists,”
Carolyn Hoskins said. “One year we did
bicycles for one organization and then had
to race to get all the toys on a list for another. But it is so well worth it — knowing that
a child will be so happy on Christmas
morning.”
Making kids happy has become Carolyn
Hoskins’ passion. And why she does it is
simple to her. “I love the idea of the smiles
on the faces of the kids. To be able to give
back and make someone else’s holiday special really means a lot to me.”
With some corporate sponsors and a lot
of friendly supporters, the Hoskinses aim
to help as many organization as they can.
And qualifying isn’t tough.
“We try to focus on smaller organizations
that kind of get lost in the shuffle during the
holidays,” Carolyn Hoskins said. “We give
toys to any small organization or even a
family that might not have enough in their
budget to purchase toys for their kids this
Christmas.”
Carolyn Hoskins said that the method of
matching toys with people is very simple,
in the form of a faxed request to the organization and most likely the wish is granted.
For the past four years, Kate Hoskins, a
Safeway manager with a region of 20 stores
that spans parts of Alameda and Contra
Costa counties, has introduced a new way of

toy drive as vacant space is hard to come by
these days. She said she started looking for
a spot in early October and wasn’t offered a
Menlo Park location until about three
weeks ago.
And with just three weeks, the motherdaughter team was able to pull off the toy
drive and much more.
Carolyn Hoskins has decorated more than
30 artificial trees she collects throughout
the year to provide the ultimate winter wonderland for the kids to see during an annual
holiday festival. This year’s event takes
place Saturday at noon. Families are invited
to the Wonderland of Christmas Holiday
Festival from noon until 7 p. m. The
Celebrity Legends portion of the event will
take place at 2 p.m. — a feature that brings
former NFL football players to the workshop to sign autographs for kids who bring
in new, unwrapped toys to donate. There
will also be free gifts for the kids, a raffle,
silent auction and an appearance by Santa
Claus.
Visitors to the toy workshop at 115
Constitution Drive in Menlo Park will be
greeted with festive shrub ribbons and garAIMEE LEWIS STRAIN/DAILY JOURNAL land. Once the gift-wrapped front door
Kate Hoskins, left, and mom Carolyn Hoskins pose in front of one of 35 themed Christmas opens, the Christmas magic will truly
trees on display at a toy drive workshop in Menlo Park.
comes alive with more than 30 Santa Claus
reaching more people by providing 500 beginning in 1969, is also a distant cousin dolls of all sizes there to welcome visitors.
families that work for Safeway stores with of NFL Hall of Famer Jerry Rice. She Weaving throughout the workshop into difadditional toys to give their children for remembers when Rice would come to her ferent cubicle offices, there are 35 themed
artificial Christmas Trees — with a favorite
Belmont home each Christmas.
Christmas.
“All the neighborhood kids would come for everyone. Tree themes range from two
“A few years ago, I just started to see that
it gets tight for families around the holidays over and want his autograph. I started ask- Raiders team trees, a Warriors tree, Hello
and offered a few families in my Safeway ing people then to bring a toy and then they Kitty, Michelle Obama, Looney Tunes and
district some toys for their kids,” Kate could get an autograph,” Carolyn Hoskins Mickey Mouse. There’s a Halloween tree, a
Ninja Turtle Tree and even one dedicated to
said.
Hoskins said.
In 1994, it grew into a block party on Rosa Parks. The Minions flock one tree,
Today, she said, she has many requests for
help in providing toys for her Safeway fam- Marine View Avenue with the Rice auto- while the 49ers dot another.
The themes are just another magical part
ily. She takes wish lists and works to have graph allure. But a few years into the block
them completed. The toys are delivered well party, the Belmont Police Department kind- of this kind-hearted collection.
before Christmas to the stores where the ly nudged Carolyn Hoskins to move her
“I love this time of the year, I love to decgrowing philanthropic operation to a larger orate. And kids love themes so I thought,
employees pick them up.
What is now a massive toy drive didn’t location. Since then, Carolyn Hoskins said why not create it into a tree? That’s where
start out as one, however. Carolyn Hoskins, she has been generously offered vacant the idea came from,” Carolyn Hoskins said.
a mother of four and widow of former 49ers spaces each year from friendly donors.
For more information on Saturday’s event
This year proved to be the most challeng- or to make a monetary or toy donation condefensive tackle Bob Hoskins who played
football for San Francisco for five years ing time to find a space to headquarter the tact Carolyn Hoskins at (650) 921-4191.

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Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Oakland artists fear crackdown after Ghost Ship fire
By Jocelyn Gecker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The Ghost Ship is now
gone. But there’s The Salt Lick, the ominously named Deathtrap and other converted warehouses where artists are holding
emergency meetings behind locked metal
doors.
Oakland has long been hospitable to an
underground art scene that flourished in its
abandoned industrial warehouses and helped
put this gritty city on the world’s art map.
But now its art and music underground is
panicking and bracing for a crackdown.
Painters, musicians and struggling artists
of all types came to live and work, to perform and dance late into the night and to be
surrounded by creativity.
They tolerated the exposed wiring, spotty
electricity and other dangers or inconveniences of often unregulated warehouses, as a
trade-off for affordable housing and studio
space in one of the country’s priciest housing markets.
Those now living in buildings with
numerous code violations fear their

“Everyone is really worried right now.
This has ignited a lot of fear,” said Mara
Barenbaum, 32, a singer and musician who
spent seven years in an artist collective.
She has held strategy sessions with other
artists and helped write an open letter urging the city to protect “the vital artistic fabric of Oakland” by making buildings safe
and not throwing artists out on the street.
The tragedy is the latest upheaval for
artists in the Bay Area, who flocked to
Oakland after the tech boom made San
Francisco unaffordable only to have the
housing crisis follow them. Oakland rents
are skyrocketing, and developers are converting old warehouses into flashy apartments.
Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf has sought
to ease the artists’ concerns but also says
the status quo is unacceptable. The Ghost
REUTERS Ship, an old warehouse carved into artist
Nahui Tochtli, 24, blows a shell at a sidewalk memorial near the burned warehouse following studios and illegal living spaces, had no
the fatal fire in the Fruitvale district of Oakland.
sprinklers, no fire alarms and was ultimatelifestyles and ultimately the San Francisco the warehouse known as the Ghost Ship. ly ignored by city inspectors. Its eclectic,
Bay Area’s vibrant art scene are endangered Authorities are investigating whether a bohemian decor of old furniture combined
because of the safety issues exposed by the refrigerator or other appliances caused the with piles of wood and snaking electrical
cords turned into a death trap.
fire that killed 36 people at a dance party in fire.

Colleges pushed to note sexual misconduct on transcripts
By Bill Draper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Colleges that
expel students whom they suspect of having committed sexual assault are being
asked to go further by specifying the reason
for expulsion on their transcripts.
Victims’ advocates say it’s critical to
ensuring that such students don’t end up on
other campuses without their new schools
knowing the potential risk and to holding
them accountable, long term, so they can’t
just move on with a clean slate.
Virginia and New York already have such a
requirement and a California congress-

woman, Rep. Jackie
Speier, introduced a bill
Thursday that would
expand it nationwide
while allowing such
notations to eventually
be expunged. Speier, a
Democrat from the Bay
Area, said most schools
Jackie Speier already note incidents of
cheating on students’
records, so it makes sense to note if someone was expelled for sexual misconduct.
“Sexual assault is a far more serious
offense that deserves at least as much, if not
greater, scrutiny, ” Speier told the

Associated Press in an email last month.
Opponents, though, say such transcript
notations would be unfair. They point out
that these sexual misconduct findings are
made by the schools, not the courts, and
that in many cases, prosecutors have
opted not to press charges due to a lack of
evidence. Furthermore, schools have a
lower bar for determining culpability
than the justice system’s standard of
beyond a reasonable doubt. Title IX, the
federal law prohibiting gender-based discrimination in education, including sexual h aras s men t an d s ex ual v i o l en ce,
requires schools to find an accused student responsible if there’s a better than

50-50 chance a sexual assault occurred.
“It is an uneven playing field from the
start,” said Justin Dillon, a Washingtonbased lawyer who has defended dozens of
students accused of sexual misconduct.
“Regardless of what colleges want to say,
the burden is always on the accused student
to prove his innocence, not the other way
around.”
The Title IX requirements can expose
schools to lawsuits. That’s the case at the
University of Kansas, which is being sued
by two former members of the women’s
rowing team who accuse the school of mishandling their claims against a football
player.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

7

Chief of staff Priebus?
Some Donald Trump
loyalists still dubious
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Donald Trump speaks with the media after meeting with families of the victims of the Nov. 28 attacks at Ohio State University.

Trump meets with Ohio State
victims, taking on somber duty
By Jonathan Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DES MOINES, Iowa — In the midst of
his Cabinet deliberations, Presidentelect Donald Trump flew to Ohio
Thursday to meet with victims and families after the latest U.S. outbreak of violence, a somber duty that became all too
familiar to his predecessor.
In Columbus, Trump met with those
who had been attacked by a knife-wielding Ohio State University student and
had words of tribute for astronaut and
senator John Glenn of Ohio — “indeed
an American hero” — who died Thursday
at 95. Then he was off to Des Moines,
Iowa, for the latest stop on his victory
tour of states that helped him win the
presidency.
“The script is not yet written. We do
not know what the page will read tomorrow. But for the first time in a long time
we know the pages will be authored by
each and every one of you,” said Trump,
who mixed in promises to heal a divided
nation with boasts about the size of his
victories, from the early primaries to
last month’s defeat of Hillary Clinton.
Trump also brought Iowa Gov. Terry
Branstad onstage and praised his pick
to be the next ambassador to China,

saying Branstad “knew how to get
things done” and would improve “one
of the most important relationships we
have.”
In the middle of it all, Trump also
made his latest Cabinet announcement,
picking fast-food executive Andrew
Puzder to lead the Labor Department.
Puzder heads CKE Restaurants Holdings,
the parent of Carl’s Jr., Hardee’s and
other chains. The Californian was one
of Trump’s earliest campaign financiers,
and his selection brings yet another
wealthy business person and elite donor
into his administration-in-the-making.
Trump flew to Columbus to meet with
several people who were slashed by
Ohio State student Abdul Razak Ali
Artan. Artan, 18, first rammed a campus
crowd with his car before getting out
with a knife and stabbing students
before being fatally shot by police. The
president-elect spent about 30 minutes
with some of the victims and their families.
“These are great people, amazing people,” said Trump, who also paid tribute
to the first responders who tended to the
victims and shot the attacker. “The families have come through this so well.”
Trump met with the families privately
and aides did not immediately provide an

Second officer shot in Georgia
dies after suspect found dead
A second Georgia police officer died
Thursday, a day after being shot alongside a
fellow officer who was a lifelong friend, and
the hunt for the suspected gunman ended
when a SWAT team found the fugitive dead —
apparently by his own hand — inside a
home where he was hiding.
Officer Jody Smith initially clung to life
after being gravely wounded Wednesday
when the university officer went to help his
friend, Americus Officer Nicholas Smarr,
respond to a domestic dispute call at an
apartment in rural Americus, about 130
miles south of Atlanta.
Both men were shot. Smarr was killed and
Smith was airlifted in critical condition to a
hospital in Macon. The university that
employed Smith announced Thursday
evening that he had died.
“Officer Smith showed extreme bravery in
the line of duty as he responded to a call for
backup,” Georgia Southwestern University
President Charles Patterson said in a statement.
News of Smith’s death came a few hours
after the hunt for the suspected gunman
ended.
Police offered a $70,000 reward for information leading to the capture of 32-year-old
Minquell Lembrick. A telephone tip
Thursday morning sent them to a home
where the suspect was said to be hiding,
Georgia Bureau of Investigation spokes-

accounting of what was discussed. But,
in his brief statement to reporters, he
took on the role of comforter-in-chief,
avoiding the inflammatory rhetoric that
has marked his response to other
attacks.
Immediately following the Ohio incident, Trump had tweeted that Artan, a
legal Somali immigrant, should not
have been in the country. And last week,
in nearby Cincinnati, Trump said lax
immigration policies enacted by “stupid
politicians” led to the “violent atrocity.”
Later in Iowa, he did not mention the
attacker but declared: “This horrific
assault is just one more tragic reminder
that immigration security is national
security. A Trump administration will
always put the safety and security of
American people first.”
It was also revealed Thursday that
even after Trump moves into the Oval
Office, he will retain an executive producer credit on the reality show
“Celebrity Apprentice.” The news,
which was first reported by Variety,
raised questions about a conflict of
interest since Trump will have an interest in a show broadcast on NBC while he
is being covered by the network’s news
division.

Around the nation
woman Nelly Miles said.

Pizza shop gunman says he
regrets how he handled situation
SALISBURY, N. C. — The man accused
of firing an assault rifle inside a
Washington restaurant said he regrets how
he handled the situation but refused to
completely dismiss the false online
claims involving a child sex ring that
brought him there.
“I just wanted to do some good and went
about it the wrong way,” Edgar Maddison
Welch, who’s been jailed since his Sunday
arrest, told The New York Times in a
Wednesday videoconference.
Welch, 28, told the newspaper he started
driving to Washington from his Salisbury,
North Carolina, home intending only to
give the Comet Ping Pong pizza restaurant a
“closer look.” But while on the way, he said
he felt his “heart breaking over the thought
of innocent people suffering.”
Welch would not say why he brought an
AR-15 into the pizza shop and fired it, the
newspaper reported.
Asked what he thought when he found
there were no children in the restaurant,
Welch said: “The intel on this wasn’t 100
percent.” But he would not completely dismiss the online claims while talking to the
newspaper, conceding only that there were
no children “inside that dwelling.”

WASHINGTON — When President-elect Donald Trump
tapped Reince Priebus as his chief of staff, Republican leaders cheered the prospect of a close ally
having a top White House job.
But as Priebus tries to wield his influence and bring more structure to the president-elect’s freewheeling political
organization, he’s frustrating some
longtime Trump allies who see him as
too conventional a pick for an unconventional president. Others fear being
Reince Priebus left behind as Priebus fills out West
Wing jobs.
The dismay over Priebus stems in part from a belief
among some Trump loyalists that the outgoing Republican
National Committee chairman expected Trump to lose the
election. They resent the president-elect “rewarding people
who thought he wasn’t going to win,” according to one top
adviser.
Still, Priebus appears to have Trump’s trust. He’s been
given wide authority to name senior White House staff,
according to people involved in the transition, and in shaping the decision on who will succeed him at the RNC,
though deliberations over that post continue.

Stay or go? Tribe gives
conflicting messages to
North Dakota protesters
By Blake Nicholson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BISMARCK, N.D. — For protesters fighting the Dakota
Access pipeline, the messages from the Standing Rock
Sioux reservation are confusing: The tribal chairman tells
demonstrators that it’s time to leave their camp and go
home. Another leader implores them to stay through the
bitter North Dakota winter.
The conflicting requests show how the camp’s purpose
has widened beyond the original intent of protecting the
tribe’s drinking water and cultural sites into a broader stand
for Native American rights.
Camp occupants are working through the confusion, said
Jade Begay, an organizer with the Indigenous
Environmental Network. “The rest of the world just needs to
hold tight and be patient,” she said.
Since August, the camp on federal land near the reservation and the pipeline route has been home to thousands of people protesting the four-state $3. 8 billion
pipeline designed to carry oil to a shipping point in
Illinois.

8

LOCAL/NATION

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

U.S. life expectancy falls as
many kinds of death increase T
By Mike Stobbe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — A decadeslong trend of rising life expectancy in the U.S. could be ending: It declined last year and it is no better
than it was four years ago.
In most of the years since World War II,
life expectancy in the U.S. has inched up,
thanks to medical advances, public health
campaigns and better nutrition and education.
But last year it slipped, an exceedingly
rare event in a year that did not include a
major disease outbreak. Other one-year
declines occurred in 1993, when the nation
was in the throes of the AIDS epidemic, and
1980, the result of an especially nasty flu
season.
In 2015, rates for 8 of the 10 leading causes of death rose. Even more troubling to

health experts: the U.S. seems to be settling
into a trend of no improvement at all.
“With four years, you’re starting to see
some indication of something a little more
ominous, ” said S. Jay Olshansky, a
University of Illinois-Chicago public
health researcher.
An American born in 2015 is expected to
live 78 years and 9 1/2 months, on average,
according to preliminary data released
Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention. An American born in 2014
could expect to live about month longer,
and even an American born in 2012 would
have been expected to live slightly longer.
In 1950, life expectancy was just over 68
years.
The United States ranks below dozens of
other high-income countries in life
expectancy, according to the World Bank. It
is highest in Japan, at nearly 84 years.

Surgeon General sounds alarm
on teens’ use of e-cigarettes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. surgeon general is calling e-cigarettes an emerging public
health threat to the nation’s youth.
In a report released Thursday, Surgeon
General Vivek Murthy acknowledged a need
for more research into the health effects of
“vaping,” but said e-cigarettes aren’t harmless and too many teens are using them.
“My concern is e-cigarettes have the
potential to create a whole new generation
of kids who are addicted to nicotine, ”

Murthy told the Associated Press. “If that
leads to the use of other tobacco-related
products, then we are going to be moving
backward instead of forward.”
Battery-powered e-cigarettes turn liquid
nicotine into an inhalable vapor without
the harmful tar generated by regular cigarettes. Vaping was first pushed as safer for
current smokers. There’s no scientific consensus on the risks or advantages of vaping,
including how it affects the likelihood of
someone either picking up regular tobacco
products or kicking the habit.

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Reporters’ notebook

he Av enue o f Fl ag s
Co mmi ttee in support of
Go l den Gate Nati o nal
Cemetery is presenting its annual
Wreaths Acro s s Ameri ca program, featuring keynote speaker Lt. Co l .
Chri s to pher Starl i ng , U.S. Marine
Corps (retired), director of military and
veterans affairs at the Mari nes
Memo ri al Cl ub in San Francisco, starting at 8:45 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 17. 
After the brief ceremony at the cemetery
located at 1300 Sneath Lane (Veterans
Way) in San Bruno, volunteers are needed
to place 8,500 wreaths (Walmart
Foundation donated 5,800 of the wreaths)
on each gravesite. Volunteers must receive
instructions about how and where to place
the wreaths when they attend the ceremony near Section G on Nimitz Drive.
Volunteers are also needed to remove the
wreaths for discard at 8 a.m. Saturday, Jan.
7. 
Wear layers in case of inclement weather
and comfortable shoes. 
***
Civil rights activist Ang el a Dav i s
will offer the keynote address to students
and local educators during the Sky l i ne
Co l l eg e equity summit Friday, Dec. 9.
More than 500 members of the local
education community are expected to
attend the event focusing on promoting
social and cultural diversity as well as
equal educational opportunity in San
Bruno.
Visit skylinecollege.edu/studentequitydivision/summit.php for more information.
***
Finding a place to park on Friday and
Saturday nights in downtown Redwood
City just got a little bit easier. The
Redwo o d Ci ty Impro v ement
As s o ci ati o n is offering free valet service from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. on those
nights at the corner of Broadway and

Middlefield Road, outside of Sakura
Res taurant, and at the Box parking
garage entrance at 900 Jefferson Ave.,
known as Crossing 900. 
Go to visitRWC.org to learn more.
***
The holidays will be a little brighter
this season for thousands of children
because of the generosity of people who
donated toys during this year’s annual
Cal trai n Ho l i day Trai n, presented by
Si l i co n Val l ey Co mmuni ty
Fo undati o n. Last weekend, approximately 25,000 people converged on
Peninsula train stations to see the glittering show train, hear holiday tunes, see
Santa and his friends and donate toys to
children in need. Nearly 2,500 toys and
almost $2,500 collected during Holiday
Train weekend benefit The Sal v ati o n
Army Seas o n o f Shari ng Pro g ram. A
$15,000 donation made to the U. S.
Mari ne Co rps Res erv e’s To y s fo r
To ts program by the Holiday Train was
able to purchase approximately 1,500
toys for the nonprofit organization.
***
Burlingame native Adam Kl ei n has
survived long enough to become a finalist
competing against five others for a $1
million grand prize on the hit CBS reality
television show.
Klein will appear in the final “Survivor”
two-hour episode Wednesday, Dec. 14, airing at 8 p.m.
Klein, who works fighting homelessness as an official for Li feMo v es , started
the first episode competing against 11
others on the season filmed in Fiji. Fellow
Burlingame native Mari Takahas hi was
also a contestant, but she was eliminated
shortly into the season.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

Guest perspective

Tom Price and Health and Human Services
Other voices

The Wall Street Journal

T

he belief among Democrats
that a Republican could
never win another presidential election was apparently so firm
that they’re still in a state of shock.
They’re even more stunned that
Donald Trump has dared to name an
Obamacare critic as his health-care
point man — which makes for an
instructive moment.
Tom Price, a six-term Georgia congressman and mild-mannered orthopedic surgeon, is an unlikely villain. But liberals are already saying
the Health and Human Services nominee will shred the social contract,
leave poor people and cancer
patients panhandling for care, and
jail women for their reproductive
decisions. Cecile Richards of
Planned Parenthood claims that Mr.
Price “poses a grave threat to
women’s health in this country.”
Earth to the abortion lobby:
Declining to mandate and federally
subsidize birth control coverage is
not the same as “banning” it.
Meanwhile, the American Medical
Association is facing an internal and
social-media revolt over an anodyne
statement that called Mr. Price “a
leader in the development of health
policies to advance patient choice
and market-based solutions as well
as reduce excessive regulatory burdens.” Supposedly this was a betrayal of doctors and patients, or something, but the big health-care societies always cater to power. They do
so because so much of medicine is
decided by government.
Mr. Price’s nomination is a
refreshing signal that such state
control isn’t an inevitability or

necessity, starting with replacing
Obamacare. Most liberals are getting the bends coming up from their
false triumphalism. They’ve spent
years claiming the center-right
vision for health care isn’t worth
serious study while mocking
Republicans for supposedly futile
repeal votes. Maybe Republicans
meant what they said.
You’d think that the people who
designed and enforced a failed program might show more humility, or
at least stop lecturing others. Even
Hillary Clinton’s staff recognized
the law is imploding. In a private
Nov. 23, 2015, memo published by
WikiLeaks, Chris Jennings, a former
Obama aide who joined the campaign, wrote that the law’s performance is “at best, disconcerting” and
identified other “troubling” signs.
One of them is that only about 8
million people have paid the tax
penalty for violating the individual
mandate to buy insurance, and
another 12 million have received
regulatory exemptions. In other
words, more people who were supposed to benefit from Obamacare
have opted out than have enrolled.
Now Democrats are assailing Mr.
Price for proposing alternatives to
the mess they created. The
Republican, who took over the
House Budget Committee from Paul
Ryan, is a thoughtful and wellinformed problem solver. Unlike
many of his colleagues, Mr. Price
hasn’t dodged details and specifics.
He proposed an alternative to
Obamacare during the 2009-10
debate and in the years since he’s put
flesh on the bones, including with

legislative language.
Mr. Price’s Empowering Patients
First Act relies on fixed-value tax
credits to stabilize the insurance
markets outside of employer-sponsored coverage. The switch to a
defined contribution from a definedbenefit model is based on the transition to 401(k)s from pensions.
The American Medical Association
is also right about Mr. Price’s opposition to central health-care planning. Obamacare says the HHS
Secretary “shall” write more than
1,800 regulations, and HHS has put
out tens of thousands of pages of
rule-makings. The Bureau of Labor
Statistics notes that employment
among “medical and health services
managers” has increased by 31.5
percent since 2011. These are administrative workers who don’t treat
patients but merely ensure compliance with federal and state mandates,
and they help explain why U.S.
health care is so expensive.
On that score, Mr. Trump also
excelled by making Seema Verma his
director of the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services, with its trillion-dollar budget. She’s an architect
of the Health Indiana Plan under former governor Mitch Daniels and
then Mike Pence that makes
Medicaid more like private insurance
and encourages beneficiaries to contribute to their own care. Ms. Verma
even got a waiver from the Obama
HHS, which in general has tried to
suppress state innovation.
Republicans will have challenges
as they attempt to transcend their
own divisions and take responsibility for health care policy for the first
time in a decade. But sending Mr.
Price over to HHS is one of Mr.
Trump’s better personnel decisions.

Letter to the editor
What a spin
Editor,
I must go way back in my memory
to the USSR’s Party Daily Pravda
and Minister Goebbels’ propaganda
machine to match any comparable
spin Jorg Aadahl (“Electile dysfunction” letter in the Nov. 16 edition of
the Daily Journal) is treating us to.
No, I am not comparing the persons,
only their methods of unsupported
claims and twisted facts. I cannot
deal with all his points, just a few.
“Tampering with voting
machines,” he said. If the alleged
tampering happened in the dominantly Democratic areas, as he
claims, then they were in control

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Samantha Weigel, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Anna Schuessler, Austin Walsh
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

and they are responsible.
Interestingly, the main argument
against voter IDs was a claim there
are almost no cases of voter fraud.
And if there are, IDs would take care
of most of them. Electoral College
is now blamed for Secretary
Clinton’s loss.
Have you noticed that whenever
some rule gets in the way of
Democrats, they want to get rid of
it? Maybe you remember the
“nuclear option” that Harry Reid was
against and then for. Now, the
Electoral College is the villain. It is
an opinion based on, maybe deliberate, misunderstanding of the reasons
why we do not vote for president by
a direct vote; just a few largest states

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Paul Moisio
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Dave Newlands

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Gary Whitman
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Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
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• Please include a city of residence and phone
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would then decide the elections. It
would make sense if we did not have
50 somewhat independent states. Of
course, if that were the case, candidates would campaign in a different
way, not ignoring states where they
do not have a chance, and the final
tally would be different. The same
reason is behind the Senate having
two senators from each state, regardless of its size.
Scoring tennis matches are also
on the base of sets, not a number of
points won. You can lose more
points and win the match.

Dennis Vernak
San Mateo

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9

Caring for Mother Earth
By Georgi LaBerge

I

am grateful for the many wonders provided to us by
nature. Each day as I poke about in my garden, I feel
joy in the greening plants, chirping birds and
buzzing bees. Add to that blue skies, warm sun and the
purring of our cat, Silver, and I am in seventh heaven. How
fortunate we are to live where we still can enjoy the beauty
of nature.
I am saddened, however, by accounts I
hear of major companies and individuals
who place profit ahead of care for our
planet. And with the recent election, I
fear a reversal of President Obama’s
executive orders on climate change. I am
worried. How long will it be before it is
too late to repair the damage humans are
doing to the Earth?
My early years were spent in Southern
Colorado where I grew to appreciate the wisdom of Native
Americans who inhabit this area and the nearby states of
New Mexico and Arizona. As a child, it was clear to me that
my neighbors revere the Earth and all of its creatures.
One of my favorite Native American sayings is: “Treat
the Earth well. It was not given to you by your parents. It
was loaned to you by your children.”
I fear that the Earth we return to our children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren will be sadly degraded, and
may eventually lead to the end of our civilization.
These thoughts sat with me since my attendance at a
three-day National Convention sponsored by Conscious
Elders Network. The goal of the gathering was to explore
how seniors can work together to create a better world for
current and future generations. Among the topics discussed
were environmental and climate action, social and economic justice and regenerative living.
Environmental actions taken by individuals, no matter
how small, is a step toward saving the planet. I take this to
heart by recycling religiously, growing vegetables and
herbs and reducing water usage by removing a lawn and
installing native plants. In addition, many of my garments
are purchased from shops that sell used clothing.
As a family, both my husband and I drive hybrid cars and
we have installed solar panels on our garage. Our meals
mostly consist of vegetables, fruit and grains, which
require much less feed and water to produce than animal
meats. I enjoy eating the leftovers from these plant-based
meals. My husband, not so much.
Outside the home, among my charitable work is serving
on the board of CityTrees, a group of volunteers who plant
trees in public spaces in Redwood City and prune them as
the trees mature. Since the group was formed in 2000, nearly 3,000 trees have been planted and nearly a third have
been pruned. It pleases me to check on trees in neighborhoods where I helped plant. I also make financial donations
to environmental nonprofits.
I learned from attending the Conscious Elders Network
Conference that my activities fall into the category of modeling or “setting a good example.”
My efforts to reduce damage to the Earth can help send a
message, but only to those who actually see me doing these
things. I doubt many people know I seriously recycle, that
I become ecstatic over planting succulents and cactus, that I
wear secondhand clothes and that I really love leftovers.
So, I think I need to take my activism to the next level —
making it public. Is this scary to me? Yes!
Can I put myself out there? What would I do? Here are
some ideas:
1). I could work with an environmental group, in addition
to CityTrees, on a project;
2). I could write letters to the editor; or maybe an op-ed
piece;
3). I could lobby local officials to support environmentally sustainable projects;
4). I could lobby legislators to pass pro-environmental
legislation; and
5). I could take part in a march to the state Capitol, perhaps speak on the steps of the Capitol.
It’s a good list. I plan to do at least several of these activities. To inspire me to do more, I will think about the children yet to be born who deserve a sustainable place to live.
I recall hearing a quote from the Conscious Elders
Network Conference that touched me deeply. I don’t remember the author’s name, and I don’t recall the precise wording, but this is my paraphrase:
“The voices of my great-great-grandchildren won’t let me
sleep. I hear them crying and calling to me, “If you knew
our Earth was in great danger, why didn’t you do something?”
Think about it. What more can you do to save Mother
Earth?

Correction Policy

The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

Georgi LaBerge is the former may or of Redwood City, former
ex ecutiv e director of the Redwood City Library Foundation
and current board member of City Trees, a Redwood City nonprofit.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stock indexes again set all-time highs
By Marley Jay

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — After a quiet
start, major U.S. stock indexes
again set all-time highs Thursday
as the market built on a surge the
previous day. Banks continued to
lead the way as bond yields
jumped, and small-company
stocks soared again.
Bond yields in the U. S. and
Europe, particularly in heavily
indebted countries, jumped after
the European Central Bank surprised investors by saying it will
reduce the size of its monthly
bond purchases. That sent interest
rates higher, which makes it more
profitable for banks to lend
money.
“Bond yields are creeping higher as these central banks are easing off the pedal a bit,” said John
Canally, an investment strategist
for LPL Financial.
Energy companies rose with the
price of oil and companies that
make chemicals and other basic
materials also climbed. Industrial
companies and makers of household goods slipped, which held
stocks back from even larger
gains.
The Dow Jones industrial aver-

High:
Low:
Close:
Change:

19,664.97
19,527.83
19,614.81
+65.19

OTHER INDEXES

age climbed 65.19 points, or 0.3
percent, to 19,614.81. It rose as
much as 115 points around 2 p.m.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
picked up 4.84 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,246.19.
The Nasdaq composite had
lagged behind the other major
indexes over the last two weeks,
but it rebounded along with technology companies and rose 23.59
points, or 0. 4 percent, to
5,417.36.
The Russell 2000 index of
small-company stocks jumped
21.87 points, or 1.6 percent, to

S&P 500:
NYSE Index:
Nasdaq:
NYSE MKT:
Russell 2000:
Wilshire 5000:

2246.19
11,149.96
5417.36
2284.79
1386.37
23,553.71

+4.84
+35.35
+23.60
-1.76
+21.86
+67.41

10-Yr Bond:
Oil (per barrel):
Gold :

2.39
52.05
1,170.60

+0.04
+0.17
-4.40

1,386.37.
The European Central extended
its bond-buying economic stimulus program, as investors expected. It will spend about $579 billion through the end of 2017. But
starting in March it will begin
spending less on bonds.
While the bank said it’s not getting ready to phase out its stimulus program, Canally, of LPL
Financial, said investors are starting to think about the time when
the ECB will gradually stop buying bonds and will start raising
interest rates in response to a

healthier economy.
“(It’s) a big 180 from where we
were a couple of months ago,
where the market was pricing in
negative rates for a long period of
time,” he said. Government bond
prices in Spain, Italy and
Portugal fell, and yields rose
sharply.
U.S. government bond prices
also fell. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to 2.41 percent
from 2. 34 percent. That drove
banks stocks up since higher
interest rates will allow banks to
charge more for lending money.

Goldman Sachs, which has surged
33 percent since the presidential
election and is trading near its alltime high, rose $5.89, or 2.5 percent, to $241. 45 and Bank of
America picked up 38 cents, or
1.7 percent, to $22.95.
European stocks climbed for the
second day in a row. Germany’s
DAX jumped 1. 8 percent and
French CAC 40 added 0.9 percent.
The FTSE 100 in Britain rose 0.4
percent.
Specialty chemicals maker
DuPont helped lead materials
companies higher as it added 86
cents, or 1.2 percent, to $74.68.
Competitor Albemarle gained $3,
or 3.4 percent, to $91.80.
Benchmark U. S. crude rose
$1.07, or 2.1 percent, to $50.84
per barrel in New York. Brent
crude, the international standard,
added 89 cents, or 1.7 percent, to
$53.89 a barrel in London.
CVS Health, a drugstore operator and pharmacy benefits manager, dropped $2.42, or 3 percent, to
$78.11 as retailers of household
goods weakened. Church &
Dwight fell $1.09, or 2.4 percent,
to $43. 79 and Mondelez, the
maker of Oreos and other snack
foods, fell 61 cents, or 1.5 percent, to $41.33.

Banking on change: Tech startups target financial services
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — It may not
be much longer before bank
branches join video-rental stores
and record shops as relics of a
bygone era.
Silicon Valley is pressuring
banks to change their ways or risk
becoming the latest industry overtaken by technology. Hundreds of
startups are offering easier and
cheaper ways to save, borrow,
spend and invest. They are doing it

by shifting the battleground to
smartphone apps and websites,
which function as digital offices
that are accessible around the
clock with minimal staffing, and
by lowering fees.
Given how much customers dislike it, the financial services
industry seems ripe for “disruption,” as Silicon Valley likes to
call industry upheaval. These
financial technology, or “fintech,” startups may also soon get
further validation from a key banking regulator. Comptroller of the

Currency Thomas Curry last week
announced plans for a special
national bank charter that would
allow fintechs to offer their products without having to get regulatory approval state to state. Part of
Curry’s motivation lies in his
belief that fintech can help consumers who either don’t want or
can’t afford to establish accounts
with traditional banks.
At this point, the fintech sector
hasn’t proven it can be a viable or
trustworthy alternative to traditional banks and stock broker-

ages. Few of the startups have ever
posted a profit, and one of the
biggest, the Lending Club, is trying to recover from a breakdown
that triggered the resignation of
CEO Renaud Laplanche earlier this
year. The Justice Department is
investigating the events that led
to Laplanche’s abrupt departure.
“The disruption in banking is
coming later than other areas
because of the complexity of the
regulations and the amount of trust
required,” Laplanche said in an
interview earlier this year, while

he was still CEO. “Trusting you
with my savings is not like booking a trip online.”
Banks, meanwhile, have demonstrated their resiliency and
resourcefulness. With the help of
taxpayer-backed bailouts, the
industry has survived a financial
crisis of its own making, and now
appears to be tackling the fintech
threat. They are closing branches,
laying off workers, pouring
money into their own technology
departments and even buying or
teaming up with fintech startups.

Business briefs
Government proposes letting
airline passengers make phone calls
WASHINGTON — The government is proposing that airlines be allowed to permit their passengers to make phone
calls during flights using Wi-Fi despite complaints from
flight attendants and others that the calls could be disruptive.
The Department of Transportation’s proposal leaves it up
to airlines whether to allow the calls. But carriers would be
required to inform passengers at the time they purchase a
ticket if the calls are allowed. That would give passengers
the opportunity to make other travel arrangements if they
don’t want to risk the possibility of sitting near passengers
making phone calls.

Sandberg: False stories on
Facebook didn’t sway election
NEW YORK — Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg says
she doesn’t think misinformation spread on the social
media platform swayed the election in favor of Presidentelect Donald Trump.
But she said Thursday during an interview on NBC’s
“Today” show that the company is looking at ways to label
fake news and “doing the things we can do to make it clearer what’s a hoax on Facebook.”
Sandberg says Facebook takes misinformation seriously,
“but there’s a lot more work to do.”

Official: Bristol-Myers
Squibb to pay to settle allegations
SAN DIEGO — A California official says Bristol-Myers
Squibb Co. will pay $19.5 million to settle allegations that
it promoted the anti-psychotic drug Abilify for unapproved
uses and misled doctors about its dangers.
State Attorney General Kamala Harris announced the settlement of a state lawsuit on Thursday, the same day the
final agreement was received by a San Diego court.

DETAILS, DETAILS: THE NHL’S VEGAS GOLDEN KNIGHTS FAIL TO OBTAIN TRADEMARK FOR NICKNAME >> PAGE 14

<<< Page 12, Stanford men’s soccer in
Houston looking for another NCAA title
Friday • Dec. 9 , 2016

M-A, Serra still chasing state titles
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

M-A quarterback Aajon Johnson is averaging 220 yards of offense per
game and has accounted for 32 touchdowns as he was named the PAL Bay
Division’s Offensive Player of the Year.

While most high school athletic
programs have turned their attention to the winter sports of basketball, soccer and wrestling, there
are still a pair of schools and their
fans riding out a thrilling football
season.
Both Menlo-Atherton and Serra
are still in the mix for state titles
and, after winning Central Coast
Section crowns two weeks ago,
will play in Northern California
regional championship games
this weekend with a spot in a state
bowl game on the line. M-A (11-2)
will host Manteca (12-1) at 7:30
p.m. tonight in a 3-AA matchup.
Serra (9-4), on the other hand, will
make about a four-hour drive
southeast of Fresno to take on an
undefeated Sanger (13-0) squad at
7:30 p.m. Saturday.
There’s not a whole more to talk
about for the Bears and Padres.
Both are riding incredible winning
streaks —  M-A has won 11 in a
row, Serra nine — and both will be
facing unfamiliar opponents.
And in that regard, the deeper a
team gets in the playoffs, the more
important the fundamentals are.
Taking care of the ball, wrapping
up on tackles, being disciplined,
limiting penalties — all coaching
cliches, sure, but there is reason a
cliche becomes one because it’s
true. The teams that make the
fewest mistakes will be the one to
playing in a state bowl game next
weekend.

See FOOTBALL, Page 14

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

Serra running back Isiah Kendrick has rushed for more than 1,000 yards this
season and has rushed for more than 120 in three of his last four games.
He is just one of several offensive weapons at the Padres’ disposal.

Chiefs hold off Raiders to Curry and Durant help
take control of AFC West Warriors outlast Jazz
By Kareem Copeland

By Dave Skretta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Tyreek Hill had
touchdowns receiving and on a punt return,
Kansas City’s defense made life miserable
for Oakland quarterback Derek Carr, and the
Chiefs beat the Raiders 21-13 on a frigid
Thursday night to take control of the AFC
West.
Charcandrick West also had a touchdown
run for the Chiefs (10-3). They moved into a
first-place tie with Oakland (10-3) but holds
the tiebreaker with two wins over their
longtime divisional rival.
Carr was 17 of 41 for 117 yards passing,
though the ugly stat line wasn’t entirely his
fault.
Seth Roberts dropped just about everything thrown at him, Amari Cooper couldn’t

Chiefs 21, Raiders 13
adjust to a long throw for a would-be touchdown early in the fourth quarter, and several
more passes were dropped to the rock-hard
turf of Arrowhead Stadium on a night when
wind chills approached single digits.
Alex Smith threw for 261 yards with a
touchdown and an interception to help the
Chiefs, returning home after back-to-back
road wins, beat Oakland for the seventh
time in their last eight meetings.
Hill didn’t seem bothered by the cold,
scorching the Raiders for a 36-yard TD
reception before bringing a punt back 78
yards for another score. It made him the first
rookie since Gale Sayers in 1965 with
touchdowns on the ground, through the air

See RAIDERS, Page 16

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SALT LAKE CITY — The Golden State
Warriors needed less than nine minutes to
open a 24-point lead over the short-handed
Utah Jazz on Thursday night.
Stephen Curry scored 26 points and the
Warriors controlled the Jazz from start to
finish in a 106-99 victory.
Curry had 14 points during a 29-1 run that
made it 29-5. The Jazz’s only lead of the
game was 4-2.
“Loss of focus,” Warriors coach Steve
Kerr said about the second half. “Our first
quarter was great, we pushed the ball and our
defensive intensity was fantastic. I think we
let down. We started turning it over some
careless, purposeless plays.
“We didn’t really have an idea of what we
were trying to accomplish. Some defensive
mistakes not getting out on shooters and

Warriors 106, Jazz 99

they took advantage.”
Kevin Durant added 21 points and 11
rebounds for Golden State.
Jazz center Rudy Gobert had 20 points and
17 rebounds, Joe Ingles scored a career-high
21 points, and Shelvin Mack added a season-high 19.
The Jazz have four starters sidelined by
injuries, including their top three scorers.
“I didn’t do a good job of attacking
throughout the game and I thought that was
a good opportunity for me to attack, ”
Durant said about the fourth quarter.
Golden State led 65-46 at halftime as the
second unit allowed the Jazz to hang around
and, technically, remain within striking
distance. The urgency from the first quarter
disappeared in the second half and the Jazz

See WARRIORS, Page 16

12

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stanford looking for second straight soccer title
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — Stanford got off to
a rough start this year, but
rebounded in a season where
everyone wanted to take the
Cardinal down to make it back to
the College Cup.
After winning the first national
championship in program history
last season, No. 5 Stanford continues its title defense in the second semifinal on Friday night
against No. 9 North Carolinas. In
the first semifinal, No. 2 Wake
Forest faces undefeated No. 6
Denver.
Stanford had with three ties and
a loss in its first six games before
winning 13 of its next 16 games
to win a third straight Pac-12
championship and return to the
College Cup.
“I think it was kind of a wakeup
call seeing how hard we were
going to get played and I think we
adapted to that as the season progressed, ” said defender Tomas
Hilliard-Arce, who was named Pac12 Defensive Player of the Year
last month.
Stanford hopes to become the
first team since Indiana in 200304 to win consecutive national
championships. Coach Jeremy
Gunn’s team is the first to return to
the College Cup the season after
winning the national championship since Wake Forest returned
in 2008 after winning it all in
2007.
Stanford lost some key players
from last season, including MLS
Rookie of the Year and the reign-

ing Hermann
Trophy winner
Jordan Morris.
But it returns
six
starters
from last season’s
team.
Five of those
players were
named to the
Foster
Al l - P a c - 1 2
Langsdorf
first team last
month, and one was on the second
team.
“We had some great players
leave after last year and I think
some people wanted to write us off
this year,” Gunn said.
Stanford is led by Co-Pac-12
player of the year Foster
Langsdorf. The junior forward has
led the team’s attack this season,
scoring 15 goals, including one
in each of Stanford’s three tournament games. In their 10 Pac-12
games, Langsdorf scored 12
goals.
North Carolina comes to
Houston for its first College Cup
appearance since winning a
national championship in 2011.
The Tar Heels also reached the
national semifinals in 2009-10.
Some things to know about the
College Cup.

H-town connection
The Tar Heels come to Houston
with many connections to the
area. Three Houston Dynamo
players, defenders Jalil Anibaba
and Sheanon Williams and goalkeeper Tyler Deric, played at
North Carolina, while head coach

Carlos Somoano is from nearby
Seabrook, Texas. The Tar Heels
leading scorer, Tucker Hume, said
players from the Dynamo have
reached out to them and that
they’ll be at Friday’s game.
“My formative soccer years and
experiences were done right here
in Houston,” Somoano said. “So
for me it’s very special to be back
here.”

Youth movement
After losing key players from
last season, including three who
were selected in the top 12 of the
MLS SuperDraft, North Carolina
has had to rely on its youth in
2016. The Tar Heels have 12 players who have appeared in all 20
games this season, six of whom
are either freshmen or sophomores. Sophomore forward Nils
Bruening leads the team in goals
with eight, while redshirt sophomore goalkeeper James Pyle has
allowed just 10 goals this season.
“They’ve been a bit of a revelation for us,” Somoano said. “It’s
just fascinating to see how they
evolve through the year. They’re
not the same players now than
they were in August.”

Familiar faces
Denver head coach Jamie Franks
and Wake Forest’s Bobby Muuss
have plenty of history. Muuss was
an assistant coach for the Demon
Deacons during Franks’ freshman
season in Winston-Salem and was
the coach at Denver from 200714, with Franks serving as his

assistant for three seasons. When
Muuss took over at Wake Forest
before the 2015 season, Franks
took his place at Denver.
“I love Wake Forest . but at the
end of the day, these are my boys,”
Franks said. “These are my kids,
and Wake Forest is standing in our
way.

Wake Forest
eyes redemption
Last season, Wake Forest was
the No. 1 team in the country with
a 17-2-2 record before falling in
the quarterfinals to the eventual
national champions Stanford in
overtime. This season, the Demon
Deacons enter the College Cup
with an 18-2-3 mark with a pair of
shutouts in wins over Coastal
Carolina and Virginia Tech.

Dominance rewarded
Since Franks took over as the
Denver head coach, the Pioneers
have lost just one game, a defeat
to SMU that ended the 2015 season. The team feels its 35-1-6
record under Franks it has not
received enough credit, mostly
because the Pioneers play in the
Summit League. This is Denver’s
first appearance in the College
Cup and the players are embracing
their underdog role.
“It’s more a historical thing
than an actual thing because no
one in our locker room is surprised
to be here, we expected to be
here,” sophomore forward Andre
Shinyashiki said.

Sports brief
School district sues turf
maker after report of defects
NEWARK, N.J. — The state’s
largest school district has sued the
country’s leading maker of artificial
turf after a report that executives
knew fields might not live up to
lofty marketing claims.
The lawsuit filed Wednesday by
Newark public schools comes after
a review of insider company
records, emails and interviews by
NJ.com (http://bit.ly/2h0oh9l )
found that Montreal-based FieldTurf
sold more than 1,000 fields to
towns, schools and teams across
the U.S. when its executives knew
they were falling apart faster than
expected.
The company said in a statement
that it disagrees with the conclusions reached by NJ.com and says it
has lived up to its warranties and
hasn’t hurt taxpayers.
FieldTurf said that the turf it
began selling in 2005 was revolutionary for its “unmatched durability” and that it would last a decade or
more. But records obtained by NJ
Advance Media show that as early
as 2006, key FieldTurf executives
became aware that the turf, known
as Duraspine, was cracking, splitting and breaking apart long before
it should and long before the public
had been promised.
Most of the fields, which fetched
$300,000 to $500,000 or more,
were paid for with tax dollars.
FieldTurf sold 1,428 of those fields
in the U.S. to towns and even NFL
teams for an estimated $570 million from 2005 until the product
was discontinued in 2012.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

13

Winners, losers and trends at baseball’s winter meetings
By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OXON HILL, Md. — All-Star closers
Aroldis Chapman, Mark Melancon and
Wade Davis moved to different bullpens.
Chris Sale boosted a big rotation in
Boston. And the Washington Nationals got
their fans talking — a lot.
As teams packed up along the Potomac
River and headed home Thursday, a look at
what did and didn’t happen this week at the
winter meetings:

Who’s left?
Major league home run leader Mark Trumbo,
fellow sluggers Edwin Encarnacion and Jose
Bautista, and center fielder Dexter Fowler are
available free agents. So is closer Kenley
Jansen, who’s attracting serious interest from
the Marlins. But Miami has a policy of not
giving no-trade clauses, and that’s troubling
to some players and agents.
Marlins president of baseball operations
Michael Hill said there’s no reason to worry.

“The belief when you
enter into these deals is
that you’re going to be
together for the length of
the contract,” he said.
Try telling that to Jose
Reyes — he signed a sixyear deal with Miami
before 2012, then got
Mark Trumbo traded onto the artificial
turf in Toronto after just
one season.

Holiday shopping
Pittsburgh outfielder
Andrew McCutchen was
all-but-gone at these
meetings. That’s what
most everyone thought,
anyway.
But the former MVP is
Andrew
going to PirateFest this
McCuthen
weekend, still on the
team. General manager Neal Huntington
says he plans to talk things over with
McCutchen before the festivities.

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“We took calls, we listened, we engaged,”
Huntington said. “We felt the right move
was to hold the player.”

Open for business
The White Sox got quite a haul of
prospects by trading Sale and Adam Eaton,
and they’re far from done. Closer David
Robertson, starter Jose Quintana or third
baseman Todd Frazier could be next.
“We embrace the challenge that lies ahead
of us,” GM Rick Hahn said. “We have for the
last several months ... but it’s nowhere near
completed.”
A year removed from winning the World
Series, the Royals are in a different spot.
Several of their stars are eligible for free
agency after this season — first baseman
Eric Hosmer, outfielder Lorenzo Cain and
pitcher Danny Duffy, among them — and
KC doesn’t want to lose them with nothing
in return. They began revamping the roster
by trading Davis to the champion Cubs for
young, powerful Jorge Soler.

Field day

Extra emphasis is being put these days on
guys who can handle more than one spot.
With David Ortiz retiring, Boston wants
someone who could DH and also play first
base — Mitch Moreland is set to be that person. The Royals like Soler as a right fielder
and DH. The Nationals are looking at Trea
Turner in the outfield and at shortstop.
Houston might see whether Carlos
Beltran can play first base. And Colorado
might turn newly signed Ian Desmond into a
first baseman — he was a shortstop in
Washington and an outfielder in Texas.

Winners and losers
Who did the best and who did the worst at
these meetings? Fact is, the answer might
not come for a few years.
The AL East champion Red Sox looked
good getting Sale from the White Sox for a
hefty package. The White Sox looked smart
getting a trio of young, talented pitchers for
outfielder Adam Eaton.
But until fans see how the prospects turn
out, well, everyone will just have to wait.

14

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NHL’s Vegas Golden Knights denied trademark for nickname
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — The U. S. Patent and
Trademark Office has denied the Vegas
Golden Knights’ trademark application a little more than two weeks after the new NHL
franchise unveiled its name and logo.
The office cites potential confusion with
the team name for the College of Saint Rose
in New York, which is also the Golden
Knights. The Las Vegas franchise is set to
take the ice next season.
NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly said
the league will formally respond by a June 7
deadline outlining why it believes the name

FOOTBALL
Continued from page 11

Division 3-AA
Manteca (12-1) at
Menlo-Atherton (11-2), 7 p.m. Friday
This is a matchup of teams who appear to
be copies of each other. Both teams feature
a dual-threat quarterback, a workhorse running back capable of busting off the big
play and stingy defenses.
Both teams won league titles and section
crowns, with M-A winning the Peninsula
Athletic League’s Bay Division and the
Central Coast Section Open Division I
crown, while Manteca finished in a threeway tie for the Valley Oak League and won
the Sac-Joaquin Division IV championship.
The Buffaloes, which average 39.6 points
per game this season, are led by junior quarterback Gino Campiotti, who is completing
61 percent of his passes, with 21 touchdowns and just three interceptions. He is
also the team’s second-leading rusher. He
only averages 29 yards per game rushing,
but is second on the team in rushing scores
with eight.

should be registered “in co-existence” with
that of Saint Rose “just as a number of other
nicknames currently co-exist in professional and college sports (particularly where
there is no overlap as to the sport for which
the nickname is being used).”
“We consider this a routine matter and it is
not our intention to reconsider the name or
logo of this franchise, ” Daly said
Wednesday. “We fully intend to proceed as
originally planned, relying on our common
law trademark rights as well as our state
trademark registrations while we work
through the process of addressing the question raised in the federal applications.”
M-A, which comes into the game averaging 41 points per game, will counter with
Bay Division Offensive Player of the Year
Aajon Johnson. The senior quarterback has
thrown for 1,901 yards this season, with 18
touchdowns and five picks. He, too, is second on the team in rushing, but he averages
73 yards per game and has scored 14 times
on the ground.
The Bears should have the advantage at
the running back spot where Jordan Mims,
barring a catastrophe, will go over the
2,000-yard mark and has the propensity for
the big play. In the Central Coast Section
Open Division I championship game
against Milpitas, Mims popped scoring
runs of 72 and 76 yards in the Bears’ 17-0
win.
Tasked with trying to slow Mims will be
Manteca
junior
linebacker
Ferrin
Manuleleua, who averages eight tackles a
game. Manuleleua anchors a defense that
allows 10.6 points per game this season.

Division 2-A
Serra (9-4) at Sanger (13-0),
7:30 p.m. Saturday
The Padres are used to playing in big
games, but nothing will have prepared them
for what they will experience when they

David Alexander, assistant athletic director for communications at the College of
Saint Rose, said the school’s trademark was
registered in 2004. He declined to say how
the college would react if the NHL franchise
continued to pursue its application to use
the nickname.
“It’s only the first period, I don’t want to
get too far ahead,” Alexander said.
Saint Rose does not have a hockey team.
“We have a registered trademark. We
love the name, ” Alexander said. “Fifteen
years ago we redesigned the logo and
wanted a trademark to specifically protect our brand. The logo represents the

spirit of the school. ”
The patent office said the similarities were
too many to overlook.
“In this case, the marks are identical in
part, sharing the same dominant wording
and overall commercial impression,” it said
in denying the application. “The nature of
the applicant’s and registrant’s services is
similar; both offer sports entertainment of a
kind available in the same venues, broadcast
on television, and are generally available to
the same class of consumers. Accordingly,
the examining attorney concludes that there
is a likelihood of confusion between the
applicant’s and registrant’s marks.”

head to the Central Valley to take on a team
that is having perhaps the greatest season
in the school’s 117-year history.
A crowd of 6,000-plus is expected to greet
Serra at Tom Flores Stadium in Sanger,
about a half-hour southeast of Fresno, and
the Padres could be entering a perfect storm.
Not only is Sanger experiencing its first
section championship since 2003, the
Apaches completed their first-ever undefeated Central Section season. In addition,
Sanger’s coach, after having won his 200th
game with the school in the Central Section
title game, is expected to retire at the end of
the season. The Apaches will be looking to
cap a storybook ending.
Don’t expect Serra to be daunted, however, because at this point, the Padres are playing with house money after starting the season 0-4.
Both these teams utilize strong, misdirection styles of offense, with plenty of offensive firepower spread across each team’s
offense. Serra will have to account for
Sanger’s sophomore running back Jalen
Cropper. Actually, running back may be a
misnomer since Cropper, who is drawing
interest from Pac-12 schools, lines up at
virtually every skilled position on offense,
including quarterback. He has been the driving force for an offense that is averaging 41

points per game.
Serra, however, knows exactly what that’s
like. The Padres, who have scored 30 points
or more in nine straight games, feature one
of the most dynamic dual-threat players in
CCS in senior quarterback Sitaleki Nunn,
who was named the West Catholic Athletic
League’s Co-Quarterback MVP. Nunn is
averaging 221 yards of offense per game
this season.
But Nunn is hardly a one-man show.
Running back Isiah Kendrick is averaging
9.3 yards a carry and has rushed for over
1,000 yards. Receiver Shane Villaroman is
averaging four catches a game for 17.1
yards and has scored 13 touchdowns.
And the Padres’ secret weapon? It could be
backup quarterback Luke Bottari, who has
thrown for 1,078 yards and 13 touchdowns
this season.
Defensively, neither team yields much.
Sanger allows 12.7 points a game, while
Serra, after getting gouged in its first four
games, has given up more than 14 points
only twice over the last seven games.
Serra is led defensively by linebacker TC
Lavulo, who was named WCAL Linebacker
MVP and is the heart and soul for the Padres.
Sanger counters with a player of the year
candidate in linebacker Miguel Garcia.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local sports roundup
Boys’ basketball
Serra coach still on
shelf following surgery
Chuck Rapp, Serra boys’ basketball coach, will miss the first portion of the non-league season as
he recovers from surgery said a
press release from the school.
Sean Dugoni, who has been an
assistant on Rapp’s staff for the
last 12 season, will serve as the
team’s interim coach. The press
release said Rapp hopes to return
after the Christmas holiday, but
that is just an estimated. There is
no timeline for his return.

Girls’ soccer
Crystal Springs 3, Castilleja 0
The Gryphons stayed undefeated
on the season with the shutout
over the Gators in a non-league
game Thursday.
Tess Bosley scored what turned
out to be the game winner in the
first half for Crystal Springs (5-0
overall), off an assist from Peyton
Hulsey.
Then, it was Megan Duncanson
time. The junior winger added to
her early-season goal total scoring her fifth and sixth of the season in the win.

WEDNESDAY
Girls’ basketball
Menlo-Atherton 52,
Eastside College Prep 45
The Bears continue their brutal
non-league schedule and they are
acquitting
themselves
well,
knocking of the defending
Division V state champion
Panthers.
M-A (3-1 overall) led 28-22 at
halftime, but ECP (3-2) rallied for
18 points in the third to take a 4039 lead into the final eight minutes. But the Bears outscored the
Panthers 13-5 in the fourth to pull
out the win.
M-A’s junior forward Greer
Hoyem continues to put up big
numbers early in the season, dropping 20 on the Panthers, which
included 10 of 13 from the line.
Senior forward Ofa Sili added 10 in
the win.
Mina Tameilau led ECP with 17
points.
It was the second loss in as many
days for the Panthers, who were

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

NFL GLANCE

knocked off by South City 58-55
Tuesday. Brittney Cedeno scored
19 points for the Warriors in that
game, while Jerlene Miller had 15
points and 11 rebounds as South
City improved to 3-0.

Mills 58, Wilcox 26
The Vikings used a 19-8 advantage in the second quarter to rout
the Chargers in a non-league
game.
Leading just 8-6 after the first
quarter, Mills (4-1 overall)
outscored Wilcox 50-20 the rest of
the way.
The Vikings defense did not
allow a double-digit quarter by the
Chargers, who scored 6, 8, 7 and 5
in each quarter.
Four Mills players scored in double figures, led by Aubrie
Businger’s 13 points. Kaela
Stonebarger and Lauryn Shek each
scored 12 for the Vikings, while
Zelie Zshornack finished with 11.

Boys’ basketball
San Mateo 54, Saratoga 48
The Bearcats kept a Falcons
team that came in averaging 77
points in check in a non-league
victory in the first round of the
Los Gatos tournament.
Da’Hareeha Allen led San Mateo
(2-0 overall) with 12 points. Jake
Jeffries and Viraj Chadha each
scored 9, while Josh Cobillas
chipped in with 8.

Girls’ soccer
Menlo-Atherton 1,
Mountain View 1
After a defensive miscue resulted
in a Spartans’ first-half goal, the
Bears earned the tie with a strike
midway through the second half to
preserve the draw.
Diana Morales earned the gametying goal for M-A, converting an
assist from Yara Gomez Zavala.

Notre Dame-Belmont 1, Soquel 0
The Tigers improved to 2-0 on
the young season with the nonleague win over the Knights.
Luca Deza, a senior who played
club soccer the last two years, has
returned this season and notched
the game’s only goal. She has
three goals in the Tigers’ first two
games.
Notre Dame goalkeeper Bianca
Baldini recorded the shutout.

PF
319
255
305
206

PA
207
278
274
307

South
Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

6
6
6
2

6 0
6 0
6 0
10 0

.500
.500
.500
.167

207
311
308
224

257
311
296
313

North
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

7
7
4
0

5 0
5 0
7 1
12 0

.583
.583
.375
.000

256
290
245
197

207
236
259
352

West
Kansas City
Oakland
Denver
San Diego

10 3
10 3
8 4
5 7

.769
.769
.667
.417

302
358
286
334

255
320
229
319

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
x-Dallas
11 1 0 .917
N.Y. Giants
8 4 0 .667
Washington
6 5 1 .542
Philadelphia 5 7 0 .417

333
245
303
268

228
237
295
245

South
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

7
7
5
4

5
5
7
8

0
0
0
0

.583
.583
.417
.333

386
277
347
283

331
285
335
321

North
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago

8
6
6
3

4
6
6
9

0
0
0
0

.667
.500
.500
.250

275
295
233
204

251
302
209
270

West
Seattle
Arizona
Los Angeles
49ers

8
5
4
1

3 1
6 1
8 0
11 0

.708
.458
.333
.083

264
276
180
234

194
251
262
370

0
0
0
0

NHL GLANCE

NBA GLANCE

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
New England 10 2 0 .833
Miami
7 5 0 .583
Buffalo
6 6 0 .500
N.Y. Jets
3 9 0 .250

x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday’s Game
Kansas City 21, Oakland 13
Sunday’s Games
Denver at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Arizona at Miami, 10 a.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1:25 p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m.
Atlanta at Los Angeles, 1:25 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 5:30 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Baltimore at New England, 5:30 p.m.

Sports brief
NASCAR’s Earnhardt cleared
to race after concussion
CONCORD, N.C. — NASCAR
star Dale Earnhardt Jr. , who
missed the final 18 races of last
season because of a concussion,
has been medically cleared to
return next year.
Hendrick
Motorsports
announced
Thursday
that

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Toronto
15
7
Boston
13
9
New York
12
10
Brooklyn
6
15
Philadelphia
5
18
Southeast Division
Charlotte
13
9
Atlanta
11
12
Orlando
10
13
Washington
8
13
Miami
7
15
Central Division
Cleveland
15
5
Milwaukee
11
9
Chicago
12
10
Detroit
12
12
Indiana
11
11
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
San Antonio
18
5
Houston
15
7
Memphis
16
8
New Orleans
7
16
Dallas
4
17
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City
14
8
Utah
14
10
Portland
12
12
Denver
8
15
Minnesota
6
16
Pacific Division
Golden State
20
3
L.A. Clippers
16
7
L.A. Lakers
10
14
Sacramento
8
13
Phoenix
6
16

Pct
.682
.591
.545
.286
.217

GB

2
3
8 1/2
10 1/2

.591
.478
.435
.381
.318


2 1/2
3 1/2
4 1/2
6

.750
.550
.545
.500
.500


4
4
5
5

.783
.682
.667
.304
.190


2 1/2
2 1/2
11
13

.636
.583
.500
.348
.273


1
3
6 1/2
8

.870
.696
.417
.381
.273


4
10 1/2
11
13 1/2

Thursday’s Games
Toronto 124, Minnesota 110
Washington 92, Denver 85
Memphis 88, Portland 86
Philadelphia 99, New Orleans 88
Golden State 106, Utah 99
Chicago 95, San Antonio 91
Friday’s Games
Orlando at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
Indiana at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
New York at Sacramento, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Denver at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington, 4 p.m.
Portland at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Charlotte at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 5 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Brooklyn at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

Earnhardt will take part in the season-opening Daytona 500 on Feb.
26.
Dr. Micky Collins, medical
director of the UPMC Sports
Medicine Concussion Program in
Pittsburgh, in consultation with
Charlotte neurosurgeon Dr. Jerry
Petty, cleared the 42-year-old driver Wednesday following a test session at Darlington Raceway in
South Carolina. Petty attended the
session.

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EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Montreal
27 18
Ottawa
27 16
Boston
28 15
Tampa Bay
28 14
Detroit
27 13
Florida
28 12
Buffalo
26 10
Toronto
25 10

L
6
9
11
12
11
12
10
10

OT
3
2
2
2
3
4
6
5

Pts
39
34
32
30
29
28
26
25

GF
81
68
68
78
69
66
55
74

GA
61
69
66
77
72
75
68
80

Metropolitan Division
Pittsburgh
27 17
N.Y. Rangers 28 18
Philadelphia 29 16
Columbus
24 15
Washington 25 15
New Jersey
26 12
N.Y. Islanders 26 11
Carolina
26 10

7
9
10
5
7
8
10
10

3
1
3
4
3
6
5
6

37
37
35
34
33
30
27
26

93
99
96
77
65
68
69
63

81
70
92
53
58
73
75
71

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Chicago
28 17 8
St. Louis
27 15 8
Minnesota
25 13 8
Winnipeg
30 13 14
Nashville
26 12 10
Dallas
28 11 11
Colorado
25 10 14

3
4
4
3
4
6
1

37
34
30
29
28
28
21

78
74
69
78
77
72
56

68
75
53
87
74
89
75

Pacific Division
Edmonton
29
Calgary
30
San Jose
26
Anaheim
27
Los Angeles 25
Vancouver
27
Arizona
26

4
2
1
5
2
2
5

32
32
31
31
28
26
21

88
75
62
73
66
65
58

80
84
55
72
66
79
82

14
15
15
13
13
12
8

11
13
10
9
10
13
13

Thursday’s Games
N.Y. Islanders 3, St. Louis 2
Philadelphia 6, Edmonton 5
Colorado 4, Boston 2
Montreal 5, New Jersey 2
Vancouver 5, Tampa Bay 1
Pittsburgh 5, Florida 1
N.Y. Rangers 2, Winnipeg 1
Dallas 5, Nashville 2
Calgary 2, Arizona 1, OT
Carolina at Los Angeles, late
Friday’s Games
Washington at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
St. Louis at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Dallas at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Ottawa at Los Angeles, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Florida, 4 p.m.
Colorado at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Arizona, 5 p.m.
Winnipeg at Calgary, 7 p.m.
Carolina at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

Earnhardt completed 185 laps
during a nearly five-hour session
at Darlington under the guidance
of his Hendrick Motorsports crew
chief, Greg Ives. In addition to the
on-track test, which was observed
by NASCAR, the driver has logged
more than 15 hours in a racing
simulator during his recovery.
Earnhardt said he would do more
testing in January “to help knock
the rust off” ahead of the seasonopening race he has won twice.

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

Sports brief
Retroactive: Ring Magazine
names Ali 1966 fighter of year
The Ring Magazine is making Muhammad Ali its 1966
Fighter of the Year, a half century after refusing to give him
the award because of his disapproval of the draft for the
Vietnam War and connection with the Nation of Islam.
The boxing magazine said it was righting a wrong by
retroactively naming the late heavyweight great as the best
fighter of 1966.
“The editors at that time obviously felt strongly that Ali,
while succeeding in the ring, didn’t meet other criteria they
deemed important,” said Michael Rosenthal, the magazine’s
editor-in-chief. “But we can see the injustice by today’s
standards even if we take issue with some of things Ali said
and did.”
Ali won all five of his fights in 1966, and did so in
impressive fashion. He was at the peak of his career, which
was soon to be interrupted for three years while he fought
courts over his refusal to be drafted.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

RAIDERS
Continued from page 11
and on punt and kickoff returns in a
single season.
It was still 21-3 when the Chiefs lost
linebacker Derrick Johnson to an
Achilles injury, and that seemed to
briefly deflate them. Oakland proceeded to march 92 yards for a touchdown
just before halftime.
But the Raiders kept coming up
empty with their chances in the second
half.
Smith threw a pick on the second
play of the third quarter, but Oakland
had to settle for a field goal. And when
Smith was strip-sacked by Khalil
Mack on the next play, the Raiders
again had to try a field goal — only
this time, holder Marquette King
couldn’t get the snap down.
The Raiders’ last chance came with
about two minutes left, when a questionable pass interference penalty and
a fourth-and-4 conversion got them
deep into Kansas City territory. But
after a false start on fourth-and-1,
Carr’s pass toward the end zone was
batted incomplete.
The Chiefs went on to pick up the
first down they needed to put the game
away.

DENNY MEDLEY-USA TODAY SPORTS

Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Tyreek Hill runs in for a touchdown as Oakland
Raiders cornerback David Amerson attempts the tackle.
Mack had a strip-sack for the third
straight game, and a sack in his eighth
straight dating to the Raiders’ loss to
Kansas City in October. That matches
Lance Johnstone for the longest streak
in franchise history since sacks
became official in 1982.

Defensive tackle Rakeem NunezRoches left with back spasms and did
not return.
Raiders offensive lineman Kelechi
Osemele was a late scratch with an illness. Safety Karl Joseph was inactive
with a toe injury and defensive tackle
Stacy McGee was sidelined by an ankle
injury.

CATCHING KELCE

INJURIES

UP NEXT

Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce had
five catches for 101 yards, his fourth
consecutive game with at least 100
yards receiving. That matches the franchise record set by former tight end
Tony Gonzalez.

Johnson went down untouched late
in the first half, and it appeared the
veteran linebacker knew right away
his Achilles was injured. He ruptured
his right Achilles two years ago and
missed the rest of the season. . . .

Oakland remains in the AFC West
when it heads to slumping San Diego
on Dec. 18.
Kansas City continues its threegame homestand Dec. 18 against
Tennessee.

WARRIORS

scored a career-high 10 points, all in
the first half. ... Shaun Livingston
took the night off to rest. . . .
Draymond Green was two assists shy
of his 15th career triple-double. ...
Green tweaked his ankle, but he and
Kerr didn’t seem overly concerned.
Jazz: Utah started the combination
of Joe Johnson, Mack, Dante Exum,
Gobert and Boris Diaw for the first
time this season. ... Ingles hit a careerhigh five 3-pointers.

lineup to date.
“It’s easy to be frustrated,” Snyder
said. “That’s something you have to
just fight against and make a decision
to do the best with where we are.
“It’s a credit to our guys really.
We’ve got a group that has character.
Over a longer period of time it
becomes more challenging. . . .
Hopefully, there’s a silver lining.
We’ve got some guys that are getting
minutes that may not be getting otherwise.”

Continued from page 11
crept within five in the fourth quarter
thanks to buckets from Mack and
Ingles, but Durant closed the game
with 11 in the final period.
“What we’ve discussed is just roles,”
Jazz coach Quin Snyder said about surviving the injuries. “They can morph.
They widen, they can narrow, they can
do anything. Hopefully, on a team,
guys are willing to evolve and adjust to
what the team needs. That’s really all
we emphasized.”

TIP-INS
Warriors: Rookie Patrick McCaw

MACK DADDY

INJURED JAZZ
The Jazz were without four starters —
Gordon Hayward (finger), Rodney
Hood (hamstring), George Hill (toe)
and Derrick Favors (knee). Utah has
been dealing with injuries all season,
but Thursday was their most depleted

QUOTABLE
“This team, my first year was kind of
a surprise and everybody seemed to
love us. Now maybe it’s changed a little bit. It honestly makes no difference
to us.” — Kerr.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

17

House passes stopgap measure
as senators raise objections
By Andrew Taylor
and Richard Lardner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. poses for a photo with the Mercury
‘Friendship 7’ spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape
Canaveral, Fla., Feb. 20, 1962.

John Glenn, the first
American to orbit the
Earth, has died at 95
By Seth Borenstein
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — John Glenn, whose 1962 flight as the
first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth made him an allAmerican hero and propelled him to a long career in the
U.S. Senate, died Thursday. The last survivor of the original
Mercury 7 astronauts was 95.
Glenn died at the James Cancer Hospital in Columbus,
Ohio, where he was hospitalized for more than a week, said
Hank Wilson, communications director for the John Glenn
School of Public Affairs.
John Herschel Glenn Jr. had two major career paths that
often intersected: flying and politics, and he soared in both
of them.
Before he gained fame orbiting the world, he was a fighter pilot in two wars, and as a test pilot, he set a transcontinental speed record. He later served 24 years in the Senate
from Ohio. A rare setback was a failed 1984 run for the
Democratic presidential nomination.
His long political career enabled him to return to space in
the shuttle Discovery at age 77 in 1998, a cosmic victory
lap that he relished and turned into a teachable moment
about growing old. He holds the record for the oldest person
in space.
More than anything, Glenn was the ultimate and uniquely
American space hero: a combat veteran with an easy smile,
a strong marriage of 70 years and nerves of steel. Schools,
a space center and the Columbus airport were named after
him. So were children.
The Soviet Union leaped ahead in space exploration by
putting the Sputnik 1 satellite in orbit in 1957, and then
launched the first man in space, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin,
in a 108-minute orbital flight on April 12, 1961. After
two suborbital flights by Alan Shepard Jr. and Gus
Grissom, it was up to Glenn to be the first American to
orbit the Earth.

WASHINGTON — The House on
Thursday cleared bills to keep the government running through April and
authorize hundreds of water projects,
but a Senate fight over benefits for
retired coal miners threatened to lead to
a government shutdown this weekend.
House members promptly bolted
home for the holidays and will return
next month to a capital city in which
Republicans will fully control all
levers of power, with Donald Trump
inaugurated as the nation’s 45th president.
The stopgap spending bill passed on
a 326-96 vote; the massive water projects measure passed 360-61.
In the Senate, however, Democrats
made a last-ditch effort to add two provisions to the bills: Aa one-year
respite for retired coal miners scheduled
to lose their health benefits at year’s
end and a permanent extension of “Buy
America” mandates for steel used in the
construction of water projects.
“They totally gave the back of their
hand to miners,” said Sen. Claire
McCaskill, D-Mo. “Who’s for the
working people? Where’s Donald
Trump on miners?”
Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia
and Sherrod Brown of Ohio, both of
whom face re-election in 2018, argued

that a provision in the spending bill to
temporarily extend health care benefits
for about 16,500 retired union coal
miners is insufficient.
The measure does not protect pension benefits despite President Harry S.
Truman’s 1946 guarantee to miners of
lifetime health and retirement benefits.
“Republicans are bragging about the
kind of support they have from workers
in coal country, particularly retirees in
coal country, and now are prepared to
just extend their health care for five
months,” said White House Press
Secretary Josh Earnest.
GOP leaders insisted the deal was the
best the Democrats could get, heightening the possibility the government
could close at midnight Friday. Before
the election, vulnerable GOP incumbents Rob Portman of Ohio and Pat
Toomey of Pennsylvania had supported
a broader bill to protect health care and
pension benefits for about 120,000
retired coal miners.
After winning re-election, neither
Portman nor Toomey was part of the
Democratic fight for the miners.
“They’re not going to get what they
want. They ought to actually be grateful for what they got,” said Sen. John
Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2
Republican.
“They gave us a bill and said ‘take it
or leave it,”’ Manchin said.
Democrats’ options were limited,
especially since the House has closed
up shop and won’t consider changes to

either bill.
“We can’t predict the exact path, but
we’re going to win this fight because
we’re right,” vowed Sen. Charles
Schumer of New York, the incoming
Democratic leader.
And delaying the separate water projects measure would kill $170 million
long sought by Democrats to help the
impoverished city of Flint, Michigan,
repair its aging infrastructure to rid its
water of poisonous lead.
Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.,
nonetheless promised to filibuster the
massive water projects bill over a provision allowing more of California’s
limited water resources to flow to
Central Valley farmers hurt by the
state’s lengthy drought.
Boxer and environmentalists complain that the provision favors corporate farmers over fishermen and endangered species. It appeared to be an
uphill struggle, in part because her
California colleague, Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, favors the changes for the
distribution of the state’s water
resources.
The Senate did, however, clear the
annual defense policy bill, which
authorizes $611 billion to run the military in 2017, provides a 2.1 percent
pay hike for the military and again
blocks President Barack Obama from
delivering on his longstanding campaign pledge to close the prison at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
The vote was 92-7.

Effort to stem homegrown U.S. extremism launches
By Philip Marcelo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — A federally backed
effort to stem the rise of homegrown
extremists
is
underway
in
Massachusetts, nearly three years
after the White House announced the
initiative on the first anniversary of
the Boston Marathon bombings that
killed three people and injured hundreds.
The state last week selected three
organizations to use $210,000 in federal money earmarked for the pilot
effort, the Associated Press learned
through a request of public records.
The organizations propose initiatives meant to keep youths from

being drawn to the violent messages
of extremist groups.
United Somali Youth, which operates out of New England’s largest
mosque, the Islamic Society of
Boston Cultural Center, was awarded
$105,000 to help Somali, African and
Middle Eastern youths build critical
life skills through afterschool programs, counseling, college readiness
assistance and other efforts.
Empower Peace, which was founded
by a communications and marketing
executive, was given $42, 000 to
teach high schoolers statewide how to
develop social media campaigns promoting tolerance and combating bigotry so that they can produce them at
their schools.

And the 20-year-old Somali
Development Center has been given
$63,000 to better integrate Somali
immigrants and refugees into the
broader community.
Abdirahman Yusuf, the center’s
executive director, said the Bostonarea Somali community hasn’t had to
grapple with terrorist recruitment like
those in other parts of the country but
needs to take preventative steps.
“With events like Columbus, Ohio,
it’s important for our community to
have a dialogue,” he said, referring to
last month’s car and knife attack at
Ohio State University by a Somaliborn student that is being investigated as possible terrorism. “This is a
relevant issue.”

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LOCAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

WINE
Continued from page 1
kitchen back there, an exterior renovation,
and eventually an outdoor cafe with pizza,
pasta and salad,” he said.
For Chirichillo, creating spaces where
communities can gather is at the heart of his
work, and one his focuses as president of
the San Carlos Chamber of Commerce. This
weekend, Chirichillo will see his passion
for the San Carlos and winemaking communities come to life in the first annual
Downtown San Carlos Holiday Wine Stroll.
On Sunday, Dec. 11, 20 merchants in
downtown San Carlos will act as pouring
stations for 19 wineries, offering visitors
an opportunity to taste local wines while
crossing items off their holiday gift lists.
Participants can also stroll to nearby tasting rooms along or near Industrial Road.
David Bouchard, CEO of the San Carlos
Chamber of Commerce, said the chamber
has been searching for an opportunity to
pair San Carlos’ burgeoning winemaking
scene with the local flair downtown merchants have to offer.
“We always thought about doing some-

BEER
Continued from page 1
Coffee and Tin Pot Creamery in serving
thousands of residents, workers and visitors at the 83-acre renovation of the former
Bay Meadows race track.
Bay Meadows will become Fieldwork’s
first Peninsula taproom with the brewer
operating a 4, 500-square-foot outdoor
venue with communal seating, activities
and growlers to go. Nestled next to
SurveyMonkey’s new headquarters and
other large office space developments, the
venue is expected to attract a variety of
local employees and residents.
The brewery, now in operation for just
over 18 months, has set up taprooms in
Napa, Sacramento and also has one in the
works for Monterey, said Fieldwork coowner Barry Braden. As a fan of the
European beer garden culture, opening

THE DAILY JOURNAL

thing to help downtown merchants and
bring activity to them particularly around
the holidays,” he said. “This is the kind of
activity that brings everyone together.”
Merchants along Laurel Street and San
Carlos Avenue look forward to showcasing
their products in a unique light. Grace Lau,
owner of Expedia CruiseShipCenters, hopes
wine lovers stopping by her location on
Laurel Street will be inspired to book winerelated travel.
“Hopefully, they will learn about something that we offer as well,” she said. “We
sell a number of cruises that appeal to wine
lovers, in particular river cruises in Europe
where they have wine experts on board and
people get to tour historic vineyards.”
Carol Basch, owner of San Carlos’
Nothing Bundt Cakes bakery, shared Lau’s
enthusiasm for the event in drawing shoppers who might not have otherwise stopped
by during the holidays.
“I think it will be good, and I’m hoping it
will introduce more people to the downtown
stores and restaurants,” she said.
Scott Townsend of Russian Ridge Winery
knows the benefits of a collaborative community well. He has collaborated with
Chirichillo several times over the years,
most recently on the development of the
MidPeninsula Wine Trail. The trail’s map

details a concentration of 10 local wineries,
two breweries, one distillery and one cider
producer featured in Sunday’s stroll.
Townsend hopes the event will build on the
momentum generated by a growing number
of wine and beer enthusiasts who frequent
the trail.
“We’re looking to have the local people
from San Mateo down to Menlo Park to Palo
Alto,” he said. “What we’re finding is that
people were coming into the tasting room
and would say, ‘I didn’t know you were
here!’”

Though their community is growing, San
Carlos winemakers welcome foot traffic in
their corner of San Carlos, which is considered off the beaten path by many.
Chirichillo, one of the first vinters to put
roots down in San Carlos, has been instrumental in incubating smaller wineries. He is
known for letting other wineries use his
crush pads and other winemaking equipment. For Chirichillo, the benefits of fostering growth in this community are many.
“We like to encourage a group wine event,
as there’s a lot of synergy in the wine business. You can attract more wine tasters to an
event if you have more than one location
involved,” he said.
Given the variety of wines produced in
California, there is less competition
between winemakers than one might
expect.
“Winemakers are easy-going,” he said.
“There is not a competitive edge because
everyone’s success is shared.”
Visitors should start at the event check-in
at the intersection of Cherry and Laurel
streets, between Diddams and Rangoon
Ruby restaurant. Participants must be over
21 with valid ID to participate, and day-of
tickets are $40.
Visit sancarloschamber. org/winestroll
for more information.

unique spaces for people to connect has
been a part of their business model since
Fieldwork’s inception. With that in mind,
Bay Meadows offers an excellent locale for
their newest spot slated to open around
April 2017, Braden said.
“Every one of these we want to be neighborhood gathering places,” Braden said.
“They’re family-oriented places where
people come together and there’s community. And I think that’s what the developers
of Bay Meadows did a nice job of thinking
about. It’s how do these spaces become
integral in the community. So I love the
development, I love the location; it’s perfect for us and what we’re all about.”
The entire 160-acre site running between
the Caltrain line and Highway 101 has
been completely revamped from its former
days of betting on the horse races. Master
Developer Wilson Meany and owner
Stockbridge Capital are well into constructing Phase II.
When complete, the site will host 1,150
housing units, 780, 000 square feet of

office space, 40,000 square feet of retail
and 18 acres of parks or open space. Phase
I included the new Kaiser Permanente
Medical Center, Whole Foods Market,
other retail, the Franklin Templeton
Headquarters, San Mateo’s police headquarters and a variety of housing.
The entire development has been decades
in the making with extensive planning for
how to create a mixed-use, walkable community centered around transit.
The community-oriented Delaware
Street; where people can go for a beer, coffee or ice cream; will be the neighborhood’s latest gathering hub.
“We’re very excited to welcome
Fieldwork Brewing to our roster of neighborhood-serving retail at Bay Meadows —
not only do they have an exceptional product with a huge following, Fieldwork also
has a team of beer crafters that really care
about nurturing a sense of community,
which aligns perfectly with our own objectives, ” Wilson Meany Partner Janice
Thacher said in a statement.

Fieldwork will offer a rotation of nearly a
dozen beers and small bites at the outdoor
venue designed by prominent architects,
including the group responsible for the
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s
sculpture garden, according to Bay
Meadows.
Braden said he’s looking forward to
entertaining families walking over from
the train, people taking their dogs for a
stroll, those looking to play bocce or anyone wanting to enjoy some sunshine and
good beers. Having already built a significant following in a short period of time,
Braden said he’s thrilled to be working
with the Bay Meadows developers interested in an upstart company like Fieldwork.
“I think the passion is in the craft. It’s in
always trying new things and we’re a very
esoteric, eccentric brewery in that way.
We’ve brewed 125 plus beers since we’ve
been open in the last 19 months,” Braden
said. “For us, it’s always about trying
something new and we’re happy that people are enjoying what we’re doing.”

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‘La La’ something to sing about
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Musical lovers, take a bow.
Your favorite art form is having quite the cultural moment.
On Broadway, of course,
we’ve got the “Hamilton”
phenomenon, making the
stage musical feel more vital
and relevant than it has in

years. And we have popular
live TV revivals like “Grease”
and “Hairspray.”
Now, in time for Christmas,
there’s the eye-popping, heartlifting “La La Land,” which
both honors and modernizes
the screen musical to such joyful effect that you might find
yourself pirouetting home
from the multiplex.

OK, perhaps we exaggerate.
“La La Land,” created by the
copiously
talented
writer/director
Damien
Chazelle and featuring the
dream pairing of Emma Stone
and Ryan Gosling, is not for
everyone.
Perhaps you don’t like
music, or singing, or dancing.
Or romance, or love, or beau-

tiful people falling in love. Or
sunsets, or primary colors, or
pastels. Or stories. Or, heck,
the movies themselves. If you
don’t like any of those things,
maybe stay home.
Otherwise, be prepared: By
the end, something will surely
have activated those tear
ducts. The one complaint I
See LA LA, Page 22

20

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Coke targets ‘foodies’ as more people move away from sodas
By Candice Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coca-Cola, the world’s biggest beverage maker, is trying to update the drink’s image among
people in their 20s and 30s who may associate soda mainly with places like McDonald’s and
Domino’s.

NEW YORK — What beverage goes best
with lobster rolls, a bagel sandwich stuffed
with whitefish, or a bowl of ramen? Coke
wants you to think of soda.
Coca-Cola is trying to sell more of its
flagship beverage by suggesting the cola
can accompany a wide range of meals, rather
than just the fast food and pizza with which
it’s a mainstay. It’s why a recent TV ad featured a young couple grabbling mini-Cokes
while making paella, and why food bloggers were paid to post photos on Instagram
of various dishes, paired specifically with
glass bottles of Coke that might appeal to
the aesthetic of “foodie” culture. One photo
showed a bowl of chicken chili with the
soda.
“The ultimate combination of two of my
very favorites!” wrote the blogger, who has
more than 53,000 followers. The caption
disclosed that the post, which got about 430
“likes,” was a sponsored ad.

Although Coke has often been marketed
as a good companion for food, the company
is trying to make sure it isn’t left behind as
American tastes evolve and people move
away from traditional sodas. The world’s
biggest beverage maker is particularly trying to update the drink’s image among people in their 20s and 30s who may associate
soda mainly with places like McDonald’s
and Domino’s.
“It’s an Amateur Move to Limit Coca-Cola
to Fast-Food,” stated an online ad paid for
by Coke on Vox Media sites. The post,
which was designed to read like a news
story, talked about famous food pairings and
how tastes like Coca-Cola “go with everything. ” A digital video series with
Univision also showed people enjoying
Cokes with a variety of meals, including
sushi.
An internal briefing about the campaign
with Vox Media’s creative division,
obtained by the Associated Press, said Coke

See COKE, Page 22

December 11: Youth Rock Showcase
Meet Mayor Cameron Johnson
Wine Stroll 1-5pm
Tickets: sancarloschamber.org
Rain or Shine

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

21

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

Talking boards have their roots in spiritualism, a belief in the ability of the dead to
communicate with the living. Spiritualism
began to spread in the United States after
1848 when the Fox sisters, aged 11 and 14,
claimed to have communed with a spirit
through mysterious raps they heard in their
Hydesville, New York, home. Over the ensuing decades, a number of interesting methods were devised to communicate with spirits. In 1886, the press reported on a device
used by some spiritualists in Ohio — a talking board with letters, numbers and a
planchette-like device that pointed to the
letters. Spirits could spell out their communications with the living, while the living
simply held their hands on the planchette as
it moved toward various letters. The
“Mysterious Talking Board: Ouija and
Beyond, ” at the San Francisco Airport
Museum, features Ouija boards and a host of
other talking boards from the 1890s to the
present.
In 1890, Charles Kennard of Baltimore,
Maryland, formed the Kennard Novelty
Company with the help of several other
investors, including Elijah Bond and
William Fuld, to produce talking boards
using the name Ouija board. Allegedly, they
sought guidance from the board in naming
it, and it replied “Ouija,” which, the board
explained, meant good luck. As the story
goes, in 1891, Bond, accompanied by his
sister-in-law Helen Peters, an acclaimed
medium, brought the device to the patent
office in Washington, D.C. The chief patent
officer required him to prove that it worked

by spelling out his name — supposedly
unknown to Bond and Peters — in order to
grant the patent. The two communed with
the spirit realm, and to the shock of the
patent officer, the Ouija board successfully
spelled out his name. The wildly successful
Ouija board was then marketed as both an
oracle device and amusing parlor game.
Shortly after, the business was reorganized and became the Ouija Novelty
Company, largely run by William Fuld.
Fuld’s brother Isaac joined him in 1897. But
for various reasons, Isaac was expelled from
the company in 1901, creating a family feud
that would continue for decades. William
then re-established his business as the
William Fuld Manufacturing Company.
Isaac went on to create his own talking
board, nearly identical to his brother’s,
which he named the Oriole board. Dozens of
others offered interesting versions of talking boards over the decades, using a variety
of names, although none surpassed William
Fuld’s Ouija board in popularity. Many of
these knockoffs featured an array of colorful
imagery, from Egyptian sphinxes to
swamis, fortune-tellers and witches.
The public turned to talking boards for a
variety of reasons. Some claimed that spirits dictated entire books to them via the
Ouija board, such as Jap Herron (1917), purportedly penned by a posthumous Mark
Twain through the medium of Emily Grant
Hutchings. World Wars I and II caused a
surge in sales of talking boards as many
civilians hoped to get in touch with loved
ones who had lost their lives during the
wars. Others turned to talking boards to
seek advice about their love lives or for
guidance during troubled times. The Ouija

An 1891 Ouija board is among the objects on display as part of ‘Mysterious Talking Board:
Ouija and Beyond,’ at the San Francisco Airport Museum through May 2017.
board permeated popular culture — a
Norman Rockwell painting of a man and
woman using a Ouija board appeared on the
cover of a 1920 Saturday Evening Post.
Even sheet music incorporated the Ouija
board, such as “Weegee, Weegee, Tell Me
Do” (1920).
Long after William Fuld began making
Ouija boards commercially in the 1890s,
talking boards remained a favored pastime.
Parker Brothers purchased the rights to the
Ouija board from the Fuld family in 1967.
Ouija board sales soon surpassed those of
Monopoly. For more than 125, the talking
board has intrigued the public. This exhibition traces the device’s history and features
boards from the 1890s to the present.

This exhibition was made possible by
generous loans from Eugene Orlando of the
Museum of Talking Boards and Robert
Murch of the Talking Board Historical
Society. Special thanks to Eugene Orlando
and Robert Murch for contributing their
extensive research on the history of talking
boards.
“Mysterious Talking Board: Ouija and
Beyond” may be viewed at the San
Francisco Airport Museum, Terminal 2,
Departures — Level 3 — post-security
through May 7, 2017.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

Katie Holmes probes mom-daughter bond in directorial debut
By Ryan Pearson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Katie Holmes is a single
mom raising a daughter and that’s the subject of her feature film directorial debut, “All
We Had.”
The 37-year-old actress stars alongside
18-year-old Stefania Owen in the film about
a mother who finds herself living in a car
with her daughter and looking for a new
start. Holmes said it’s a specific story but
one she can relate to.
“I think the universal theme of that love
you have for your daughter and that love you
have for your mother is so powerful. And I
think that is very relatable wherever you fit
in economically,” Holmes said.
“And definitely being a daughter and

being a mother, I understand that love and that
bond. And I think it
something that should be
highlighted and celebrated in film.”
Holmes, who in real
life is raising her daughter Suri, said her work for
Katie Holmes directors like Curtis
Hanson and Ang Lee over
the years taught her how to lead actors on a
set. She also said she found inspiration in
such films as “Alice Doesn’t Live Here
Anymore,” “My Own Private Idaho” and
“Thelma and Louise.”
“I have figured out how I like a set to run
and what makes me feel good as an actor.
And that’s what I try to do for my actors.

Then you just kind of go for it. It’s like the
starting gun goes off and you’re just running,” she said.
The movie, based on Annie Weatherwax’s
novel, is set during the 2007 economic crisis and features Holmes teetering on the
edge of poverty. It co-stars Luke Wilson,
Richard Kind and Mark Consuelos, and
comes out on Friday.
“It was important to me to inhabit this
role because there are so many people who
struggle so much on a daily basis,” Holmes
said. “She never loses hope. There’s so
many people that work so hard and they
aren’t celebrated.”
Owen plays the daughter, Ruthie, and said
she was inspired by Holmes’ transition from
movie star to the person behind the camera.
“I learned a lot,” she said. “It never felt

like a big deal transitioning from being an
actor to a director. And I really do want to
direct my own film and also act in it. She
added: “That’s definitely on my bucket list.”
Holmes was promoting her movie a few
days after Lucasfilm head Kathleen Kennedy
implied in an interview that there weren’t
women directors with enough experience to
helm an upcoming “Star Wars” movie.
“I was inspired by people like Kathleen,
by people like Jane Rosenthal, Jodie Foster
— to take on this role as a director and to
find this material in particular,” Holmes
said. “Because I do feel as a woman, you
have to be proactive and you have to find the
roles, you have to create the roles for yourself. At least, I want to do that for myself,
because I want to play certain kinds of roles.
I don’t want to wait.”

22

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

COKE
Continued from page 20
“has long been associated with hamburgers,
hot dogs and other classic American dishes,”
but that the focus of the push was “sharing
Coca-Cola with family over a healthy homecooked meal.”
The briefing said the paid “influencers”
who posted on social media should show
dishes that are not “grossly unhealthy or
over-indulgent. ” Influencers submitted

WEEKEND JOURNAL
ideas for recipes and photos for approval.
Among the pictures with Coke that made the
cut: a poppyseed and chicken salad, steak
with salsa verde and an herb-roasted chicken.
The push comes as Coke faces growing
competition in the beverage aisle, as well as
criticism over its marketing of sugary
drinks. U.S. sales volume for regular Coke is
down 14 percent over the past decade,
according to the industry tracker Beverage
Digest, while Diet Coke’s volume is down
29 percent.
To Wall Street, Atlanta-based Coca-Cola
emphasizes its array of beverages and

investments in options like bottled teas that
have bigger growth potential. And to public
health advocates, the company has pledged
it will market alternatives that would help
reduce the number of calories people drink.
At the same time, Coca-Cola is trying to
shore up its flagship brand in the U.S. The
strategy has been to reposition Coke as a
more premium drink with packaging like
mini-cans and glass bottles. That dovetails
with the company’s efforts to hitch the cola
to a foodie culture that prizes photogenic
qualities.
Stuart Kronauge, senior vice president of
marketing for Coca-Cola North America,
said the association between Coke and hamburgers and pizza is largely a result of where
the drinks have traditionally been sold. She
said the recent campaign is a way to update
the company’s marketing, specifically
among millennials, that says Coke goes
well with food.
“We just want to make sure that we expand
the sense of it,” she said.

Kronauge also noted that the ad campaign
incorporated Coke Zero, which is made with
artificial sweeteners, and Coke Life, which
is made with stevia. Although Coca-Cola is
shifting into marketing for the holidays,
Kronauge said the company plans to return
to the theme of Coke pairing well with different foods.
Ali Dibadj, a Bernstein analyst, said
Coke’s association with foods like burgers
and fries contributes to the drink’s
unhealthy image.
“If they can break those bounds down and
match it up with a Caesar salad or quinoa
salad, maybe it breaks down the mental barrier,” Dibadj said.
People associate Coke with pizza and
burgers because those pairings are now part
of U.S. culture, but also because they actually go well together, said John Fischer, a professor of wine, beverage and hospitality at
the Culinary Institute of America. He disagrees with the premise that Coke goes well
“with everything,” as the Coke ad contends.

LA LA

and no. Stone and Gosling are charming
musical performers, but way less polished
and ethereal than their cinematic forbears.
This human quality in their first duet makes
us root for them.
And we keep on rooting. It’s hard to imagine more perfect casting here. Gosling’s
Sebastian is suave and sexy but also ornery
and unsure of himself; Stone’s Mia is warm
and ebullient but also fretful and self-doubting. They need each other to chase their
respective dreams.
But what will success mean, and can they
possibly achieve it together? It’s this pillar
of the story that lends it a very modern,
melancholy bite.
Chazelle, 31, shows his love for cinema
with references both sly and overt to classics like “Singin’ In the Rain” and Jacques
Demy’s “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg.” And
then there’s the nod to “Rebel Without a
Cause, ” with a scene at LA’s Griffith
Observatory.
There, at a place built to watch the stars,
the two dancing lovers actually lift up into
them.
It’s corny, sure, and gorgeous and romantic. As Sebastian says to his sister earlier in
the film, “You say ‘romantic’ like it’s a bad
word!” In a musical, romantic is NEVER a
bad word.
Some people resist musicals because in
real life, people never break out into song;
they just speak their feelings. To which
musical lovers say: “Exactly! And this is
why we need musicals.”
Long live the musical. Bring enough
Kleenex.
“La La Land,” a Lionsgate release, is rated
PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of
America for “some language. ” Running
time: 128 minutes. Four stars out of four.

Continued from page 19
overheard upon leaving the film was: “I didn’t have enough Kleenex.”
The first obvious gift of “La La Land” is
its sheer originality. Let’s start with the
music. Unlike in so many other films,
nobody else’s hits are used here. The affecting score is by Justin Hurwitz, with lyrics
by Benji Pasek and Justin Paul (also getting
kudos for Broadway’s “Dear Evan Hansen.”)
Our setting is Los Angeles, and so it
begins — as it must — on a jammed freeway.
But unlike Michael Douglas in “Falling
Down,” the drivers here simply brush off
their frustrations, exit their cars, and break
into song and dance.
This virtuoso number, “Another Day of
Sun,” which was filmed on a freeway interchange with some 100 dancers toiling in
sizzling
temperatures,
establishes
Chazelle’s high-flying ambitions. It also
tells us we’d darned well better be ready for
people to break out into song — because
that happens in musicals. And it introduces
our main characters.
Sebastian (Gosling) is a struggling jazz
pianist, with stubborn dreams of opening
his own club. Mia (Stone) is an aspiring
actress, working as a barista while auditioning for TV parts. They clash on the freeway.
She gives him the finger.
They have a second bad meeting at a piano
bar. Finally they meet a third time, at a
party. Suddenly, they find themselves on a
bench overlooking the Hollywood Hills at
dusk. And then ... they dance.
Is it Astaire and Rogers (or Charisse)? Yes

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WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
FRIDAY, DEC. 9
Estate Planning. 7:30 a.m. 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame. $15
with breakfast. For more information contact 787-5595.
Equity Summit. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. 3300 College Drive, San Bruno.
The purpose of the summit is to
immerse the educational community into the conversation about equity, race and student success through
the scholarship of experts, and will
include presentations by multiple
speakers. For more information
email colinc@smccd.edu.
Re-inventing You and Your Career:
Assessment. 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sobrato Center for Nonprofits, 350
Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood
Shores.
Register
at
www.phase2careers.org/index.html
. For more information email
phase2careers.org@gmail.com.
‘A Christmas Carol.’ 9:30 a.m. and
7:30 p.m. 500 Castro St., Mountain
View. Peninsula Youth Theater presents ‘A Christmas Carol.’ $10 general
admission. For more information
visit pytnet.org.
Online Holiday Shopping. 11 a.m.
South San Francisco Main Library,
840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. For more information
email valle@plsinfo.org.
Know Your Sewing Machine. 3:30
p.m. South San Francisco Main
Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South
San Francisco. For more information
email valle@plsinfo.org.
Movie Time: Home Alone 1 and 2.
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Grand Avenue
Library, 306 Walnut St., South San
Francisco. For more information
email valle@plsinfo.org.
Society of Western Artists Art Sale
and Boutique. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. 527
San Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Silent
auction and reception for art from
14 different local artists. The sale
takes place Dec. 10-11 from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. For more information visit
societyofwesternartists.com.
Broadway Cheer. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
1241 Broadway, Burlingame. Come
to Burlingame for fun involving
Burlingame merchants and the
Chamber of Commerce. Bring a toy
for the Central County Fire
Department’s annual toy drive. For
more information call 343-8758.
S.T.E.A.M. at CuriOdyssey. 6 p.m. to
9 p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Drive in
San Mateo. General admission $17
CuriOdyssey members $12. Explore
science, technology, engineering,
arts and mathematics. For more
information contact akhode@curiodyssey.org.
SATURDAY, DEC. 10
AARP San Bruno Chapter 2895
Meeting. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Coffee and
doughnuts. For more information
call 583-4499.
Look mobile Grand Opening. 10
a.m. to 11 a.m. East Palo Alto Library,
2415 University Ave., East Palo Alto.
For
more
information
visit
www.smcl.org/lookmobile.
Dewey Decimal System Day. 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. For more information email valle@plsinfo.org.
LGBTQ+ Document Drop In Clinic.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 643 Bair Island
Road, Suite 301, Redwood City. This
clinic is for transgender, non-binary,
intersex people of any age interested in name and gender change document assistance. For more information call 424-0852 ext. 107.
Holiday Toy Run. 10:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. 222 W. 39th Ave., San Mateo.
Come for holiday treats and surprises as Santa brings toys for children
who receive care at the San Mateo
Medical Center. Bring an unwrapped
toy to donate and help put a smile
on a child’s face this holiday season.
For more information call 573-3731.
Holiday Family Craft: Patrol
Making Star Lantern. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
For more information email
valle@plsinfo.org.
DIY Maker. 11 a.m. South San
Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Learn to crochet and make poms
poms to assemble cozy winter
scarfs. For more information email
valle@plsinfo.org.
‘A Christmas Carol.’ 11:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. 500 Castro St., Mountain
View. Peninsula Youth Theater presents ‘A Christmas Carol.’ $10 general
admission. For more information
visit pytnet.org.
AARP San Bruno Chapter 2895
Meeting. Noon to 3 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Luncheon ticket on
sale for $25 per person. For more

information call 583-4499.
Wine and Port Tasting and Toys
for Tots. Noon to 4 p.m. 2645 Fair
Oaks Ave., Redwood City. Taste some
wine and port and donate to the
Toys for Tots drive. It’s optional to
bring a toy. Any new, unwrapped
toys, gifts for kids up to 12 are welcome. $10 for entry and six local
wines. Free for Wine Club Members.
For more information visit lahondawinery.com.
Meet the Doula. Noon to 2 p.m. 150
San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Meet Coastside experts in women’s
health, fertility, maternity, birth, midwifery, yoga, massage and acupuncture. Free. For more information
contact patti@bondmarcom.com.
Healthy Food/Healthy You. 12:30
p.m. Grand Avenue Library, 306
Walnut St., South San Francisco.
Attendees will receive a $5 voucher
to use at the farmers’ market. For
more information email valle@plsinfo.org.
Origami Time. 1 p.m. 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Get the holidays
started with some new origami
tricks. All ages welcome. For more
information
email
craig@reachandteach.com.
‘Twas the Night Before Christmas.
1 p.m. and 4 p.m.199 Churchill Ave.,
Woodside. This creative and colorful
show includes Santa and his magical sleigh, prancing reindeer, dancing mice and twirling toys, brought
to life by a cast of over 80 children
and adults. Ticket prices are $15
child/senior and $25 for adults. For
more
information
visit
twasthenight.org.
Christmas Boutique. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. 519 Grana Ave., South San
Francisco. Come to see furniture,
antiques, china and more items that
have been donated to the Plymire
Museum. The museum has been
decorated in the Christmas spirit.
For more information go to
w w w. s s f. n e t / 1 2 9 7 / Pl y m i re Schwarz-Center.
Carols, Colors and Cookies. 2 p.m.
and 4 p.m. Transfiguration Episcopal
Church, 3900 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Bring the family for a
sing-along of favorite carols, visits
with cartoon characters, fun activities and cookie buffet. For tickets or
more information visit masterworks.org.
Music Concert: A Curious Blend. 2
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
Free Scottish Holiday Concert. 3
p.m. Trinity Presbyterian Church,
1106 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Carlos. Featuring bagpipes, drums,
the Peninsula Scottish Fiddlers and
more. For more information email
phil@lenihan.org.
Global Gathering. 3 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. 600 Elm St., San Carlos. Learn
about travelling with a purpose that
emphasizes connection with people
rather than a place. For more information call (530) 906-0986.
44th Annual Holiday Festival of
Dance. 5:30 p.m. San Mateo High
School Gym, 506 N. Delaware St.,
San Mateo. $12 in advance and $13
at the door for ages 13 and older. $2
for those 2 to 12 years old. For more
information call 522-7448.
Ragazzi Continuo presents:
Christmas Time Is Here. 7:30 p.m.
St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 178
Clinton St., Redwood City. Ragazzi
Continuo is a men’s a cappella
group. Familiar Christmas carols are
joined by popular favorites such as
the Perry Como classic ‘Home For
The Holidays.’ Tickets are $15-$20 in
advance and $15-$25 at the door.
For more information call 327-1200.
SUNDAY, DEC. 11
Christmas Music Sunday. 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. 2145 Bunker Hill Dr., San
Mateo. Crystal Springs United
Methodist Church presents the
annual Christmas Music Sunday. For
more information visit csumchurch.com.
‘Twas the Night Before Christmas.
1 p.m. 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside.
This creative and colorful show
includes Santa and his magical
sleigh, prancing reindeer, dancing
mice and twirling toys, brought to
life by a cast of over 80 children and
adults. Ticket prices are $15
child/senior and $25 for adults. For
more
information
visit
twasthenight.org.
Latkepalooza! 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
PJCC, 800 Foster City Blvd., Foster
City. The community is invited to
this free Hanukkah celebration.
There will be live music with
Shamati Acoustic Trio, a marketplace for holiday shopping, Israeli
kosher wine-tasting with Harken
Spirits, and more. For more information
visit
www.pjcc.org/latkepalooza.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

LOTS
Continued from page 1
opment standards addressing lot size, lot
width and flag lots in residential neighborhoods. This change would increase
the minimum lot size for subdivisions to
10,000 square feet from 5,000 square
feet and minimum lot width to 65 feet
from 40 feet. The recommended change
would also restrict flag lot configurations, which a staff report deemed as
having the potential to disrupt the general pattern of the neighborhood. Flag lots
are at the end of a long driveway and are
typically behind another parcel and not
visible from the road.
The 2011 zoning changes have
allowed for the construction of larger
homes in San Carlos and for large lots to
be split to increase the city’s housing
stock. They recently came under fire by
some residents, prompting the City
Council to impose a moratorium in June.
The hold set zoning rules back prior to
2011 and prohibited some residential
property owners from splitting their lots
to build additional homes.
Tuesday’s meeting offered staff an

SEWAGE
Continued from page 1
should be considered.
“Imagine you can’t use half of your
house because you have raw sewage
flooding it,” he said.
Millbrae officials did not provide a
comment on this article, citing a policy
disallowing publicly discussing pending litigation.
The flooding was started when a manhole overflowed, according to the lawsuit claiming it continued for more than
three hours.
Though the damage was severe,
Jabagchourian said it is not as bad as
the incident which occurred almost six
months later when a similar flood in
March flowed into three homes on El
Bonito Way.
Jabagchourian also represents the
homeowners who suffered the accident brought on by intense rainstorms backing up into an open construction site and clogging an underground sewer lateral being worked on

RULES
Continued from page 3
but from elected officials in the affected
counties at both the local and national
level.
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo, who has advocated for more
access in San Mateo County, said she
was pleased to see an off-leash area
added at Rancho Corral de Tierra and on-

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

23

opportunity to respond to resident complaints, which have ranged from concerns about homes being too big on lots
that are too small to dislike for the property owners ability to demolish an existing home and build two new ones on lots
of 10,000 square feet or more.
Raymond DeMattei owns a property
on White Oak Way, next to which two
two-story houses have been built on a lot
where one ranch house previously stood.
“The two new houses will be now
known as the ‘twin towers’ of my neighborhood,” he said.
Ron Granville, a lifelong resident of
San Carlos, was disappointed the current
zoning rules seemed to make room for a
few property owners to benefit financially, instead of expanding housing options
for the greater population.
“The subdivision rules should preserve
the quality of life for the larger number
of citizens in an area, not just provide a
financial windfall for a select few property owners,” he said.
Since
2011,
the
Planning
Commission has approved six subdivisions including a 41,637-square-foot
lot at 1336 Arroyo Ave. that allowed
for the construction of three new
homes. In total, the six split lots have
generated nine new homes in the city

since 2011, according to staff reports.
Commissioners agreed that the 2011
changes may not have accounted for the
housing demand that followed their
inception. Community Development
Director Al Savay confirmed that the
number of houses did not change as
much in the years preceding the changes.
Commissioner
Angela
HarperPedersen reminded the group of the housing shortage that San Carlos faces regardless of the group’s vote on these rules.
“I understand we don’t want anything
to change [in San Carlos], but I want us
to be realistic about the fact that we’re
growing,” she said. “I’m sure we’ll be
hearing about other changes later.”
Concerns about the 2011 changes are
nothing new for Mayor Cameron
Johnson. He noted he is looking forward
to the City Council’s discussion of the
rules, set tentatively for the Jan. 9 council meeting.
“We’ve heard a lot from the residents
that [the current zoning rules] are changing the character of the neighborhoods.
I’ve taken that feedback to heart. That’s
why I voted for the temporary moratorium,” he said. “We want to give people a
sense that we’re putting a priority on
maintaining that neighborhood feel that
attracted so many of them to this area.”

by a city contractor.
Forcum has been able to stay in her
home throughout the duration of the
work to fix the flooding damage, while
many of the other residents on El
Bonito Way are still displaced and have
limited options for addressing the devastating damage to their property, said
Jabagchourian.
“These families are in tough situations, there should be some kind of
help,” said Jabagchourian. “There
should be some kind of aid for them
because the families are taking a direct
shot and it is a hard one.”
The insurance companies for the residents on El Bonito Way declined to
cover the damages citing holes in their
policies, and the city also denied their
damages claim, so Jabagchourian filed
separate lawsuits representing them as
well.
He said some of the flooding from the
March incident was so severe that residents needed to strip contaminated portions of their homes down to the studs
and rebuild sizable portions of their
properties that were irreparably damaged. He added many of the homeowners’ personal belongings were ruined

and needed to be thrown out, compounding the economic demands placed
on their shoulders.
“They are double whammied, and all
the damage and all the repair is coming
out of their pockets,” he said.
Jabagchourian was reticent to draw
parallels between the El Bonito Way
incident and the earlier flooding at
Forcum’s home, citing different contributing circumstances.
But he did suggest the city examine
its underground sewage systems to
assure there is not a structural issue
causing the floods.
“If there is a fundamental problem
with the infrastructure, I hope they fix
it sooner than later so it’s not wiping
people’s stuff out,” he said.
But with the flooding being a reoccurring issue, Jabagchourian said he is
hopeful the lawsuits offer a form of
accountability which has been difficult
for all his clients to find so far.
“These families — none of them did
anything wrong, and nobody is stepping up,” he said. “So it’s my job to get
someone to step up sooner than later, I
hope.”

leash areas at Mori Point and Milagra
Ridge, but was still disappointed that
most of the GGNRA remained inaccessible to dogs and their owners.

County, they added or expanded onleash areas at Muir Beach, Crissy Field
and Baker Beach and expanded the offleash area at Crissy Field in response to
public comment.
However, Buffa noted that in Marin
County, for example, the only off-leash
area is at the remote Rodeo Beach, and
accessible trail areas have been cut from
24 miles to 8.
The National Park Service will publish a record of decision in January and
release a final rule later in 2017. An
effective date has yet to be set.

“I appreciate the Park Service’s compromise, but it does not go far enough
to address the full scope of what dog
walkers reasonably requested,” Speier
said. “However, after 14 years of gridlock, I am relieved to see some movement in the right direction.”
Park service officials said that in
addition to the new areas in San Mateo

24

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLs BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 30-day mo.
4 Rum-soaked cake
8 Khan of note
11 Tee-hee cousin (hyph.)
12 Above
13 Favorite —
14 Hertz rival
15 Response
17 Gymnastics garb
19 Salon tint
20 Deli units
21 Jazz style
22 Upholstery choice
25 Tempting
28 Summer, in France
29 Wool sources
31 Fencing match
33 Smooth-tongued
35 Is, to Pedro
37 Actress Arthur
38 Andes ruminants
40 Dogie stopper
42 Chinese pan
43 After taxes

GET FUZZY®

44 Grownup
47 Broom’s partner
51 Think about
53 German import
54 Lemon
55 Enemies
56 Grump
57 — -Magnon
58 Shriveled from heat
59 Finish a dress
DOWN
1 Pew locale
2 Michigan neighbor
3 Enormously
4 Scottish accents
5 Copied
6 Jungle crusher
7 Popeye’s tattoo
8 Z — — zebra
9 Thug
10 Governess in Siam
11 “2001” computer
16 Half-hearted
18 Having the skill

21 Small statue
22 — out (relax)
23 — cost you
24 Diamond or Simon
25 Minus
26 Worn-down pencils
27 The Bee —
30 Lacking muscle
32 Philosopher — -tzu
34 Cows’ bellows
36 Pub pints
39 Themes
41 Fasten
43 Clinic staffer
44 “Back in Black” group
45 Morose
46 Take apart
47 Shy creature
48 Full-strength
49 Singer Levine
50 Pen point
52 Mother rabbit

12-9-16

Previous
Sudoku
answers



FRIDAY, December 9, 2016
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Personal change
will bring about positive results. Address the things
you don’t like and adjust your life in order to fulfill your
dreams. Romance will brighten your day.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ll be taken by
surprise if you aren’t careful. Don’t rule out anything or
commit to something until you have all the facts. Your
intuitive intelligence will pay off.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Appeal to the hearts
of the people involved in an unsavory situation you
are facing. Getting to the bottom of things will put you
in a key position that will lead to advancement and

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

thursday PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

recognition.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You’ll gain insight into
your profession and what measures you have to take
in order to bring about positive change. An unusual
source will surprise you with secret information.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You may come under
pressure if you aren’t prepared. Do your research
and be ready to match anyone who wants to face off
with you. Victory and new opportunities are heading
your way.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Use your mind in
order to get your way. Putting physical demands on
someone will not help you come out on top. Learn from
experience and avoid stubborn tendencies.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Put your time and

12-9-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

energy into doing a great job. Lending a helping hand
is commendable, but being taken advantage of isn’t
fair. Set a limit as well as boundaries.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You may want to bring
about change, but having a legitimate plan that is
realistic and easy to implement will determine whether
you will be successful.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — A change will do you good.
Making travel plans, attending a conference or visiting
places that spark memories will help you bring about
new beginnings.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Get involved in activities
that will help you put your troubles on the back burner.
The break will do you good and help you put domestic
situations in perspective.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Relationships may need a
little encouragement, but once you start to share and
compromise, you will find common ground. Change is
favored, as long as you avoid overspending.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Give more thought to
the future and stop dwelling on the past. Mistakes
should help you learn and push you forward with more
knowledge and experience.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

105 Education/Instruction

110 Employment

110 Employment

GROUP BASKETBALL
LESSONS

CAREGIVERS

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Housekeeping &
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Please stop by or call 650-560-9323
For Front desk position
experience required.

GOT JOBS?

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650-771-1127
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
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The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED

Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
90 Glenn Way #2, SAN CARLOS
HOUSEKEEPER/JANITOR For a skilled nursing facility. Experience
preferred, but we will provide training!
$12.00 an hour with health, vacation/sick
leave, and additional benefits. References and work eligibility documentation required. Carlmont Gardens is located at
2140 Carlmont Drive. Drop by between
9:00 and 4:00 M-F to complete an application.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

FAX RESUME TO:
(650) 367-7341 OR EMAIL:
JOBS@PIAZZASFINEFOODS.COM
San Mateo / Palo Alto Store Locations
Part Time / Full Time

Job Title:
Data Integration Manager
Job Location:Belmont, CA
Job Title:
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Requirements: Master’s degree or
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Project Mgmt,
Humanities, Finance, etc.
+ 2 yrs. mgmt. or IT
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Bachelor’s + 5 yrs. mgmt.
or IT-related exp.).

Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS,
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yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5)
.Exp. w/ Web Services,
PL/SQL, XML, JavaScript,
Java, Apache Tomcat,
SOAP UI, Putty, SQL
Developer & MS project
reqd.

Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept.
20 Davis Drive,
Belmont, CA 94002

Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
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20 Davis Drive,
Belmont, CA 94002

Experience with print advertising and online
marketing a plus. But we will consider a
candidate with little or no sales experience as
long as you have these traits:

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Join us, if you check off on these qualities and also believe in the future of newspapers.
Please email your resume to ads@smdailyjournal.com
A cover letter with your views on the newspaper industry would also be helpful.

ATTENTION CAREGIVERS!
Immediate need for Full Time/Part Time
Home Care Providers
$250 Sign on Bonus*
Paid Training & Benefits
Must have valid DL and reliable transportation
Call or stop by TODAY!

Don’t wait, call or stop by TODAY! – Ask for Carol

(650) 458-2200

We offer union benefits and union-scale wage
progression. We have advancement opportunities.

You will be offering a wide variety of
marketing solutions including print advertising,
inserts, graphic design, niche publications,
online advertising, event marketing, social media
and whatever else we come up with if as the
industry continues its evolution and our paper
continues its upward trajectory.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Apply in Person or call
Chef 1 541 848 0038
Sean 1 650 592 7258
1696 Laurel Street,
San Carlos

LOOKING FOR ENERGETIC PEOPLE WITH
A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE
DELI CLERKS – CHECKERS – MEAT CLERKS

is actually right here in the present, as it has been for centuries – The local community
newspaper. We ignore the naysayers and shun the "experts" when it comes to the "demise" of
the newspaper industry.

You must be community-minded, actionoriented, customer-focused, and without fail, a
self starter. You will be responsible for sales
and account management activities associated
with either a territory or vertical category.

110 Employment

PIAZZA’S FINE FOODS

The
Future
of local news content
The leading local daily news resource for the
SF Peninsula seeks an entreprenuerial
Advertising Account Exec to sell advertising
and marketing solutions to local businesses.
We are looking for a special person to join our
team for an immediate opening.

110 Employment

25

www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #115 in San Mateo

Exciting Opportunities at

Candy Maker Training Program
Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence
welcome to apply.
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If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016
110 Employment

KITCHEN HELP -

AIRLINE CATERING COMPANY,
YAMATO, Work hours: 5am to 2pm
Part Time or Full Time, Good benefits.
Call (650)692-2315 or email
office@yamatokitchen.com

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales
Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, please call
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com

203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271450
The following person is doing business
as: Luxury Events, 73 Mahogany Dr,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: Mahtab Ali, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Mahtab Ali/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271495
The following person is doing business
as: Allergy and Asthma Consultants,
369 Main Street Ste 200, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94063. Registered Owner:
Brian Steven Lipson MD, 20 LaBarthe
Lane, San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Brian S. Lipson MD/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/17/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

CASE# 16CIV02051
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nancy Ann Miyanaga aka Nancy Ann
Masunaga
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Nancy Ann Miyanaga aka
Nancy Ann Masunaga filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Nancy Ann Miyanaga aka
Nancy Ann Masunaga
Proposed Name: Nancy Ann Stoll
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A hearing on the
petition shall be held on 12/14/16 at 9
a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation:
San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 10/28/16
/s/ Susan Irene Etezadi/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/27/2016
(Published 11/18/16, 11/25/16, 12/2/16,
12/9/16).

NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Carmelita Finkelstein
Case Number: 16PRO00552
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Carmelita Finkelstein. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Frederick Clarke in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Frederick Clarke be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of
the decedent. The petition requests the
decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be
admitted to probate. The will and any
codicils are available for examination in
the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate
under the Independent Administration of
Estates Act. (This authority will allow the
personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval.
Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an
interested person files an objection to the
petition and shows good cause why the
court should not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: December 20, 2016
at 9:00 a.m., Department 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the
Calilfornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under sectioin
9052 of the Callifornia Probate
Code.Other California statutes and legal
authority may affect your rights as a
creditor. You may want to consult with an
attorney knowledgable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
James M. Draeger
Attorney at Law
1100 Mar West Street, Suite A
TIBURON, CA 94920
(415) 889-5506
FILED: 11/29/16
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal on 12/02, 12/09, 12/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271608
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Angels Maid Services & Marinas, 2001 Whitman Way, Apt 1, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner:
Joara Elisabeth Faria Guedes, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
12/1/16.
/s/Joara Guedes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/01/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271516
The following person is doing business
as: Therapeutic Development, 161 W.
25th Avenue, Suite 101, SAN MATEO,
CA 94403. Registered Owner: Zorina
Galvez, 6021 Shawcroft Dr., San Jose,
CA 95123 The business is conducted by
an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on Aug 2009.
/s/Zorina Galvez/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/18/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16, 12/30/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271674
The following person is doing business
as: JetInsight, 11A N Ellsworth Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner:
JetSlash, Inc., DE. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/01/2016.
/s/David Benjamin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/08/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16, 12/30/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271445
The following person is doing business
as: Beauty Century, 1419 Burlingame
Ave, Suite B, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Nguyen Vuu, 124
Dwight Rd., Burlingame, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Nguyen Vuu/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271457
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Legal Discovery Services,
104 Elm Street #39, SAN MATEO, CA
94401.
Registered Owner: Michael
Croaro, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Michael Croaro/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271498
The following person is doing business
as: After School Hoops, 820 Magellan
Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404. Registered Owner: Joseph Paul Kaiser, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/Joseph Paul Kaiser/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/17/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271435
The following person is doing business
as: Carnivorous Gardens, 720 Madison
Ave. #11, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061.
Registered Owner: Mary A. Wuydts,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/Mary Ann Wuydts/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16, 12/30/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271373
The following person is doing business
as: KS Solutions, 1350 Bayshore Highway Suite 200, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: Kanden Systems Solutions Co., Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Junichiro Kitamura/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/7/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271593
The following person is doing business
as: Touch of Beauty, 13 WEST 41ST
AVE, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 Registered Owner: My Ngoc Tra Truong, 1387
Xavier Ave., Hayward, CA 94545. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 12/1/16.
/s/My Truong/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/30/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271675
The following person is doing business
as: Nor-Cal Cycles LLC, 1587 El Camino
Real, MILLBRAE, CA 94030. Registered
Owner: NOR-CAL Cycles, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/2008.
/s/Wilton Mau/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/08/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16, 12/30/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271553
The following person is doing business
as: 1) San Mateo Vape, 2) Koko’s Vape
Shop, 2323 El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Jekelian Enterprises, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Krikor Jekelian/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/23/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/25/16, 12/2/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271601
The following person is doing business
as: My Aegean Innovations, 363 Waverley St, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owners: 1) Bahadir Bolukbasi 2)
Hande Bolukbasi, same address. The
business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Bahadir Bolukbasi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/30/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271678
The following person is doing business
as: Rai Enterprises, 205 De Anza Blvd.
#139, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner: Kenyon Lee, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/24/2005.
/s/Kenyon Lee/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/08/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16, 12/30/16).

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

NEWSPAPER
DELIVERY
ROUTE

IMMEDIATE OPENING
San Mateo
Burlingame
Seeking Delivery drivers to manage newspaper routes on the
Peninsula.
Requires early morning work six days per week Mon-Sat.
Papers are picked up early morning between 3am and 4:30am
Call 650-344-5200

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271606
The following person is doing business
as: VH Home Renovation & Preservation, 1309 Sierra St., REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94061. Registered Owner: Victor
Hugo Amaya, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 11/14/11.
/s/Victor Hugo Amaya/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/01/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271596
The following person is doing business
as: VSL Systems, 1375 Tartan Trail
Road, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered Owner: Carl Limsico, 1009 S. Idaho St., San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 11/3/16.
/s/Carl Limsico/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/30/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

Growing
your business
could be

69% of Daily
Journal readers have
children. If you want
to reach affluent
Peninsula families
through advertising,
please phone

650.344.5200
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

RETAIL -

JEWELRY SALES +
SEASONAL FT/PT +
MGMT / JEWELER

Entry up to $16
Diamond Exp up to $25
Mgmt $DOE$ (Please include salary history)

Benefits-Bonus-No Nights
650-367-6500
FX: 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF SUMMARY
OF PROPOSED
ORDINANCE
The San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors has introduced
an
ordinance,
which will be the subject of a
second reading and proposed adoption on December 13, 2016, that:
Adopts the 2016 California
Building Standards Code including updates to the Residential, Building, Mechanical, Plumbing, Electric, Energy, Green, Fire, Historical,
and Existing Building Codes
enacted by the California
Building Standards Commission; and that rescinds and
replaces the County's existing Building and Fire Regulations in a manner that,
among other things, incorporates the above Code Updates, consolidates the Fire
Code within the Building
Regulations, adds and revises local definitions, eliminates building permit requirements for portable storage units, deletes the County prohibition on the use of
plastic plumbing outside of
structures and within single
family and duplex residences of two stories or less, revises local requirements for
the installation of fire sprinklers in existing buildings
based on a building safety
score rather than a fifty percent valuation calculation,
formally adopts the 2015 International Property Maintenance Code, modifies recycling provisions of the CALGreen code, incorporates
excavation and grading requirements, and includes
state requirements for permit expediting of solar installations and electric vehicle
charging stations in new development.
The full text of the Ordinance can be viewed online
by visiting the following website:
https://planning.smcgov.org/
building-regulations-update
The full text is also available
with the office of the Clerk of
the Board of Supervisors.
This notice is prepared and
posted in accordance with
Government Code § 25124.
December 7, 2016
12/9/16
CNS-2954840#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

210 Lost & Found

300 Toys

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City

COMPUTER TABLE, adjustable height,
chrome legs, 29”x48” like new $30 (650)
697-8481

FREE: TWO full-size featherbeds. Excellent
condition.
Redwood City
location. 650-503-4170.

NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City

COUCH, CREAM IKEA, great condition,
$89, light-weight, compact, sturdy loveseat (415)775-0141

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516

Books
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502

294 Baby Stuff
BASSINET $25 (Musical, Rocks, vibrates, has 4 wheels, includes sheets &
mattress) (650)348-2306
FISHER-PRICE HEALTHY Care booster
seat - $5 (650)592-5864.
HIGH CHAIR (wooden) excellent condition $35.00 (650)348-2306

296 Appliances
1960'S AVOCADO Osterizer blender
excellent condition $20.00 (650)5960513
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898
AIR CONDITIONER, Portable, 14,000
BTU,
Commercial
Cool
model
CPN14XC9, almost like new! All accessories plus remote included.
20” x 16-5/8” x 33-1/2” $345.
(650)345-1835
CHARCOAL GRILL with cover, 24”, almost new $25. (650)368-0748
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487
COLEMAN LXE Roadtrip Grill Red Brand New! (still in box) $100
(650)918-9847
JACK LALANE'S power juicer. $40.
Call 650 364-1243. Leave message.
REFRIGERATOR WHITE Full sized 2
door Whirlpool Perfect condition .$98.
650 583-9901 650 678-0221
TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500

FOUND: KEYS at Westwood Park in
Redwood City, off of Fernside. Call to
claim (650)714-8893
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT. Black and White. Black
patch on right eye. REWARD.
Call (323) 439-7713.
LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

THOMAS THE TRAIN; trains, crossing
gate, bridge, track; good condition;
$25/OBO. 650-345-1347.
THOMAS TRAINS; Cranky the Crane
$15/OBO; Tidmouth Shed w/turntable
$50/OBO. 650-345-1347.

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE BUFFET Cabinet, with 2 large
drawers w/skeleton key, needs refinishing. $700/obo.. ANTIQUE CHINA cabinet, with doors and legs, dark wood..
$500/obo. (650)952-5049
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

STORE FRONT display cabinet, From
1930, marble base. 72” long x 40” tallx
21” deep. Asking $500. (650)341-1306

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
60 GIG Ipod, Does not work.
Battery/hard drive not working. $25.
(650)208-5758
BAZOOKA SPEAKER 20, +10W, never
used $95. (650)992-4544
BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking
$100. (650)593-4490
BULOVA WINDUP Travel clocks.Vintage. Set of eight. $99. gene (650)4215469
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
IPHONE 5 Morphie Juice Pack with
charger, Originally $100, now $85.
(650)766-2679
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

297 Bicycles

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
BILLY DEE Williams autographed Star
Wars action figure: Lando Calrissian,
space smuggler. $35 Steve 650-5186614

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324
ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198
SAMSUNG FLAT TV 20" ex.co.incl.
VCR ,set up $70. (650)992-4544
SAMSUNG FLAT TV 20" ex.co.incl.
VCR ,set up $70. (650)992-4544

LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good
$59 call 650-218-6528

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

POSTERS TRAVEL, airline, art from
1970’s and 1980’s; about 50+; $30 for all
(650)595-2494

TOMTOM GPS U.S. + Canada $25 650595-3933

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

299 Computers
KOGI 15 inch computer monitor. Model
L5QX. $25. PH(650)592-5864.
RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
LARGE STUFFED ANIMALS - $3 each
Great for Kids (650) 952-3500

DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER for $50.
Good shape, blonde, about 5' high.
(650)726-4102

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

DINETTE TABLE, 3 adjustable leaf.$30.
(650) 756-9516.Daly City.

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

WHIRLPOOL WASHER DRYER, GE
Refrigerator all working and in good condition all for $99.00 650-315-3240.

298 Collectibles

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 5'x4' glass
door / shell / drawers / roller ex $25/BO
(650)992-4544

MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855

ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $500. (650)766-3024

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

210 Lost & Found

27

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
5 FOOT resin folding table, still in the
box $20.00 (650)368-0748
ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529
BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319

PUZZLES, 20 available, 1000 pcs.
$3.00 each,. (650)596-0513

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614

COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your
mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)5207045

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LEATHER SOFA, black, excellent condition. $100 obo. (650)878-5533
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
NEW DELUXE Twin Folding Bed, Linens, cover, Cost $618. Sale $250. Must
Sell! (650) 875-8159.
NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame
$30.00 (650) 347-2356

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OFFICE TABLE, 24"x48" HD. folding
legs each end. 500# capacity. Cost
$130. Sell $60, 650-591-4141
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
QUEEN-SIZED SOFA-BED, beige colored, excellent condition, $99.99 or best
offer. Must Go! (650) 952-3063.
RECLINER CHAIR blue tweed clean
good $75 Call 650 583-3515
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Photoshop maker
6 Late __
9 Average Joes,
e.g.
14 Fishing needs
15 Bill’s future,
maybe
16 Troy story
17 Dutch vodka
brand
19 Coin receivers
20 Round orders
21 Extraction target
22 Hide in a crowd
23 Piano part
24 End of an Ernie
Banks
catchphrase
about
doubleheaders
27 State bordering
six others and
the Canadian
mainland
29 Beam
30 Beats Electronics
co-founder
31 Rebuke
35 Checks out
36 Powerful Detroit
group
38 Powerful pair
40 Parliament of
Israel
41 Former Texas
Rangers
manager
Washington
42 Grafton’s “__ for
Alibi”
43 2014 Olympics
city
47 NCAA hockey
semifinal group
52 Chuckle online
53 Borneo swinger
54 Jessica Rabbit
feature
55 Composer __
Maria von Weber
56 Mascot once
awarded a
Doctor of Bovinity
degree
57 Traditional golf
pants, and a hint
to why certain
puzzle answers
are wrong
59 Santa __
60 Charged particle
61 Bhopal locale
62 Burdens
63 Sitter’s charge
64 In dire straits

33 Word before
44 First name in
DOWN
repeat
impressionism
1 Caustic potash,
34 Sensitive subject 45 Plain awful
e.g.
for some
46 “Amen to that!”
2 Fought, in a way
35 Reject
48 Rumble in the
3 Company with a
36 Clinton’s
Jungle setting
Taco Club
instrument
49 Inuit home
4 Contests whose
37 A tie may be
50 More than
competitors
partly under one
skinny
stand in place
51 Bounty title
5 Course for some 38 Pound sound
39 Toyota model
55 Pine __
U.S. arrivals
42 Trojan who
56 Outside: Pref.
6 Tease
survived the sack 57 Casino area
7 Gutter sites
of Troy
58 Shark feature
8 Woolly mama
9 Lose
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
10 Way behind
buildings
11 Hostile place
12 Swallow one’s
pride
13 Campus org.
revived in 2006
18 Un-friend?
22 Grass
components
24 Bound
25 Finicky sort
26 Marks with two
intersecting
lines
28 Confused
sounds
32 Blues singer in
the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame
since 1987
12/09/16
xwordeditor@aol.com

By Tony Caruso and C.C. Burnikel
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

12/09/16

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

304 Furniture

308 Tools

311 Musical Instruments

RECLINING SWIVEL & high-back chair
(Hampton) exc condition $30 (650) 7569516 Daly City.

SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461

FITNESS STEPPER compact
(12"x16") Hardly used! $50. Call
650-766-3024

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

VINTAGE SHOPSMITH and BAND
SAW, good shape. $1,000/obo. Call
(650)342-6993

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

GOLF CLUBS, new, Warrior woods
3/15 degree 5/21 degree 7/24 degree
$15 ea (650)349-0430

HARMONICA.
HOHNER Pocket Pal.
Key of C. Original box. Never used.
$10. (650)588-0842

Golf Clubs, used set with Cart for $50.
(650)593-4490

MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

IGLOO BLUE 38-Quart Wheelie Cool
Cooler/Ice Chest $14 650-952-3500

PIANO, UPRIGHT, in excellent condition. Asking $345. (650)366-4769

LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104

ROCKING CHAIRS solid wood, great
shape asking 30 dollars each. Call
(650)574-4582 Lily
RUMMY ROYAL poker table top $30.00
(650)573-5269

309 Office Equipment

new $20.00

FILE
CABINET
metal
2-drawer
18”Dx15”Wx28”H $10 650-595-2494

SOFA & Love seat perfect condition $99
Edie 650 345 8981

NEAT RECEIPTS Mobile Scanner new
in box $79, call 650-324-8416

TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

NEW MS Wireless keyboard, $13, 650595-3933

SHELF RUBBER maid
contract joe 650-573-5269

THOMASVILLE BEVELED mirror 22" x
12" $50. Call 650-834-4833
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

306 Housewares
10 TULIP CHAMPAGNE
FOR $12 (415)990-6134

GLASSES

CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield
Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026
COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor
Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630
GARBAGE CANS: brute 44 gal. Excellent condition $15. 650 504-6057
NEW
ELECTRIC
$19 650-595-3933

Waxer/Polisher,

PORCELAIN JAPANESE Tea set, Unopened, in wood box, great gift $30.
(650)578-9208.
PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

308 Tools
ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,
Call (650)481-5296
BENCH SAW - 8 INCH includes attached table and accessories $35 (650)3680748
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

310 Misc. For Sale
"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.
500-600 BIG Band-era 78's--most mint,
no sleeves--$99.00 for all--650-574-5459
8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908
CHRISTMAS TREE, 7.5’ Oregon pine,
1225 tips, hooked construction with
stand. Used once. $49. (415)650-6407
CIAO SMALL Black Duffel Carry-on,
Overnight or Tote bag with shoulder
strap, $15 650-952-3500
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER,
condition $50 (650)878-9542

good

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.
CANARY BIRD cage 24 x 16 for sale.
$40.00 firm. Used, good condition. Call
650-766-3024
ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084
PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

316 Clothes

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537

BOY SCOUT canvas belt with Boy Scout
Buckle. Vintage. Fair condition. $5.
(650)588-0842

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537

FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi
color
in
excellent
condition
3/4
length $50 650-692-8012

LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537
RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
SILK SAREE 6 yards new nice color.for
$35 only. C all(650)515-2605 for more information.
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)8511045

WATER STORAGE TANK, brand new,
275 gallons. 48" x 46" x 39" $250. 650771-6324

CRAFTSMEN 3 saw blades $20. new.
(650)573-5269

311 Musical Instruments

DELTA CABINET SAW with overrun table. $1,500/obo. ((650)342-6993

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

PAINTING TOOLS - hooks, stirrups 110’
ropes, poles, 20’ plank, 440 Graco Spary
Machine, $500, Asking (650)-483-8048

312 Pets & Animals

BLACK DOUBLE breasted suit size 38
excellent condition $25 650-322-9598

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

$40.00

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133

WAGON WHEEL Wooden, original from
Colorado farm. 34”x34”
Very good
“aged” condition $200 San Bruno
(650)588-1946

DYNAGLOPRO
HEATER.
Phone: 650-591-8062

UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

EXCELLENT VIOLIN, previously owned,
first violinist SF Symphony, Mellow
sound. Dated 1894. $5,500/best offer.
(415)751-2416

ROUTER TABLE ryobi $ 99. like new
650-573-5269

FENDER BASS amp 25 watt. electrical
issue box and speaker very good
$45. (650)367-8146

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

LEXICON LAMBDA cubase LE $60.00
call Patter (650)367-8146

FREE SIZE 38 tan gabardine navy officers uniform great condition Perfect for
that costume party.322-9598”
LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648
LADIES SEQUIN dress, blue, size XL,
pure silk lining, $40.00, (650) 578-9208
LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708
MAN'S BLACK leather jacket, size 40,
like new. $85.00 (650)593-1780
MEN'S STETSON hat, size large, new,
rim, solid black, large, great gift. $40
(650) 578-9208
NEW JOCKEY Men's Classic Crew
white tshirts (L) 3pk $15/each (5 available) 650.952.3466
NEW WITH tags Wool or cotton Men's
pullover
sweaters
(XL)
$15/each
(650)952-3466
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648
PRADA DAYPACK / Purse, Sturdy black
nylon canvas, like new, made in Italy,
$35 (650)591-6596
SNUG BOOTS, lambskin,
$10, 650-595-3933

size

M,

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WILSON'S LG Green Suede Jacket
$50.00 (650)367-1508

318 Sports Equipment

MEN'S ROSSIGNOL Skis.
good condition, 650-341-0282.

sized

$95.00,

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
PRINCE TENNIS 2 section nylon black
Bag with Prince Pro Graphite Racket$55.(650)341-8342
PURSUIT SCOOTER. $99. 650-3482235
SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347

BACK PACK TENT $20 (650)595-2494
BACKPACK THERM-A-REST sleeping
pad $20 (650)595-2494
BUSHNELL NEO XS Golf Watch with
charger. Mint condition. 30,000+ golf
courses. $50. Jeff 650-208-5758
CHILDS KICK scooter by razor with helmet $25 obo (650)591-6842
GOLF CLUBS {13}, Bag, & Pull Cart all-$90.00 (650)341-8342

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

ALPINE STAR motocross boots Tech 8s
size 14 good cond. $75. (650)345-5642

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $45
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 83,450 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

ATV MOTORCYCLE Lift $50.00
Patter (650)367-8146

call

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

645 Boats
16 FT SEA RAY. I/B. $1,200. Needs Upholstery. Call 650-898-5732.
2003 P-15 West Wight Potter sailboat,
excellend
condition.
$7,200.
Call
(650)347-2559

650 RVs

670 Auto Service

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

CADILLAC ‘02 Deville, 8 cylinder, perfect condition, like new, cashmere outside white inside 4787 miles $13,000.
(415)850-2370

VINTAGE NASH Cruisers Mens/ Womens Roller Skates Blue indoor/outdoor sz
6-8. $60 B/O. (650)574-4439
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8
1/2. $50 650-592-2047
YAMAHA ROOF RACK, 58 inches $75.
(650)458-3255

335 Garden Equipment
LAWN SPIKE with five foot handle
(650)368-0748

$2.

345 Medical Equipment
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming
garage sale,
moving sale,
estate sale,
yard sale,
rummage sale,
clearance sale, or
whatever sale you
have...

Call (650)344-5200

BACK PACK “Camp Trails-Oasis” $20
(650)595-2494

‘89 GOLD WING. 1500 CC. 39K miles.
Call Joe 650-578-8357

BMW ‘07 X-5, One Owner, Excel. Condition Sports package 3rd row seats reduced $19,995 obo Call (650)520-4650

SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891

15 SF Giants Posters -- Barry Bonds,
Jeff Kent, JT Snow. 6' x 2.5' Unused. $4
each. $35 all. (650)588-1946 San Bruno

620 Automobiles

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

TOTAL GYM XLS, excellent condition.
Paid $2,500. Yours for $900. Call
(650)588-0828

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.

318 Sports Equipment

CHEVROLET ‘06 Mini VAN, new radiator, tires and brakes. Needs head gasket.
$1,200. (650)481-5296

RV - 2013 WINNEBAGO ITASCA Navion, 25’ with sideout. 4000 miles. Mercedes Benz Sprinter chassis,. diesel,
loaded, like new! $85,500.
Call (650)726-8623 or (650)619-9672.

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

635 Vans

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

Reach over 83,450 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

317 Building Materials

470 Rooms

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 83,450
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

LUXURATI AUTO REPAIR
Smog Check
Repair Services
Collision and Body Work

CADILLAC ‘99 DeVille Concours,
98,500 miles, $3,500 or best offer.
(650)270-6637

Burlingame & San Mateo Locations

CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

SEE OUR AD FOR DISCOUNTS!

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$5,500, child’s play three, call
(650)481-5296

GOT AN OLDER
CAR, BOAT, OR RV?
Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the
Humane Society.
Call 1- 800-943-8412

JAGUAR ‘94 XJ6, very clean, 110K
miles, $4,500. (650)302-5523
LEXUS ‘94 GS300 148K miles, very
clean. $2,700. (650)302-5523

MAZDA ‘12 CX-7 SUV Excellent condition One owner Fully loaded Low
miles reduced $18,995 obo (650)5204650
TOYOTA ‘06 Prius, 149K, clean. $6,500
(650)302-5523

625 Classic Cars
1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $22,000
obo. (650)952-4036.
CORVETTE ‘69 STINGRAY 327, Horsespeed SPS, 50.000 miles. $18,500.
(650)481-5296.
FORD ‘64 Falcon. 4DR Sedan. 6 cyl.
auto/trans $3,500.00. (650) 570-5780.

630 Trucks & SUV’s
LINCOLN ‘02 Navigator, excellent condition. Runs great! Must sell! $4,500/obo.
(650)342-4227.

(650) 340-0026
670 Auto Parts

BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
FIRESTONE TIRES 215/70/R16 good
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cabinetry

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

Construction

Gardening
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Call Robert
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Lic #751832

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Free estimates

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Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
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Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
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(650)207-6592

(650)219-4066
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PLUMBING
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to get 10% off
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Call Luis (650) 704-9635
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Magda Perez
650.533.8063

License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

(650) 591-8291
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

Since 1985

Repairs* Remodeling* Painting
Carpentry* Plumbing* Electrical

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

(650) 453-3002
Lic: #468963

THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

Licensed General and
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• Int/Ext Painting • Carpentry
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Lic#979435
CALL FOR GREAT RATES!

(650)701-6072

T.M. CONCRETE

Pruning

AAA HANDYMAN & MORE

by Greenstarr

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• Large

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Works

Licensed Bonded & Insured

Plumbing

1-800-344-7771

Lic# 947476

LOCALLY OWNED
• Shaping

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

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lic#628633

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Call for free estimate
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& PLUMBING
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29

wow!
Surprise! Newspapers are not dead. They’re not
dying. They’re not going anywhere for a long, long
time. So-called experts have been predicting the
death of print newspapers for decades.
A few papers have bit the dust, but not for lack of
readers … or advertisers. Many newspapers are
increasing readership.

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

In 2012, 62 percent of adults in the United States read
a newspaper each week. It’s 67 percent when you
include online newspapers.*
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

* Scarborough USA+ Newspaper Audience 2012 study, for Newspaper Association
of America. Results and comparisons available at www.naa.org.

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

Caregiver

Computer

Food

Health & Medical

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CALIFORNIA
MENTOR

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PROBLEMS?

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seeks individuals to support
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Receive up to $3,000/month
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software issues? Contact Geeks
On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly
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Call for FREE diagnosis.
1-800-715-9068

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365 B Street
San Mateo
(650) 343-4123
www.smpanchovilla.com

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Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

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HEALTH INSURANCE
OPEN ENROLLMENT

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
ericlawrencebarrett@gmail.com
(650)619-0370
CA. Insurance License #0737226

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy
BEST ASIAN
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$45/hr
Call (650) 787-9969
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INVESTMENTS, INC.

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legaldocumentsplus.com
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ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
Since 1979

WACHTER

348-7191
Real Estate Broker
CA BRE#746683
NMLS #348288

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info@peninsulaprimerealty.com

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

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Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

31

Russia says Syrian army suspending
combat, residents say there’s no let-up
By Sarah El Deeb
and Vladimir Isachenkov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Russia said the
Syrian army was suspending combat operations in Aleppo late
Thursday to allow for the evacuation of civilians from besieged
rebel-held neighborhoods, but
residents and fighters reported no
let-up in the bombing and
shelling campaign on the opposition’s ever-shrinking enclave.
Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov, speaking in
Germany after talks with U. S.
Secretary of State John Kerry, said
military experts and diplomats
would meet Saturday in Geneva to
work out details of the rebels’ exit
from Aleppo’s eastern neighborhoods, along with civilians who
were willing to leave the city.
Lavrov said the Syrian army suspended combat action late
Thursday to allow some 8, 000
civilians to leave the city in a
convoy spreading across a fivekilometer (three-mile) route.
However, opposition activists
said there was no halt to the government offensive.
“Battles are intense, ” said a
message from a rebel operation
room shared with the Associated
Press. Other residents reported
warplanes firing from machine
guns at rebel positions and
artillery shells falling in the
remaining rebel-controlled districts.
In
Washington,
State
Department
spokeswoman
Elizabeth Trudeau said the U.S.
was focused on de-escalating the
violence in Aleppo to allow aid
into the city and enable people
wishing to stay in their homes to
do so.
She said Kerry and Lavrov continued talks on Thursday with the
goal of securing a cease-fire and
the “safe departure of those who
wish to leave the city.” She said
details of Saturday’s U.S.-Russian
technical discussions in Geneva
were still being worked out.
Earlier, in Geneva, U.N. special
adviser Jan Egeland said efforts to
evacuate hundreds of wounded people from eastern Aleppo had
stalled following a deadly attack
this week on a Russian military

REUTERS

Residents walk near damaged buildings in the Old City of Aleppo, Syria.

U.N. Syria envoy expects to meet with Trump team
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

UNITED NATIONS — The U.N.
envoy for Syria says he expects
to meet with someone Presidentelect Donald Trump’s team in the
coming days.
Staffan de Mistura made his

remarks on his way to brief the
Security Council on the situation
in Syria.
“The plan is to meet some people around the team of President
Trump, ”
de
Mistura
told
reporters, without offering more
details.

It was unclear if any action
would result from de Mistura’s
briefing after Russia and China
vetoed a resolution earlier this
year calling for a 7-day truce in
the Syrian city of Aleppo. It was
the sixth time Russia used its
veto to block action on Syria.

hospital that left two Russian
nurses dead and a doctor seriously
wounded.
“It is with bitterness and frustration that we have to report that we
have not been able even to evacuate the wounded,” Egeland said.
“The member states that are supposed to help us get access to
civilians in the cross-fire are
poles apart in how they regard
what is happening in Syria.”
He said Syrian President
Bashar Assad’s government had
authorized U. N. -organized aid
shipments into eastern Aleppo
for the first time. However, he
provided no details about how
the aid might get in or where it
would go, and past agreements
have fallen through before any

aid could be delivered.
Medical officials in the enclave
issued a passionate plea for a
cease-fire.
“Aleppo is finished. There is
nothing left except a few residents
and bricks, ” Mohammed Abu
Jaafar, the head of the eastern
Aleppo forensic authority, said in
a recorded message shared with
reporters. “This may be my last
call.”
By early afternoon, Abu Jaafar
said 14 bodies had arrived at his
facility from all over eastern
Aleppo, although a comprehensive death toll for the day was not
possible because of the intense
fighting. Residents described
streets littered with bodies as
ambulances and rescue workers

struggled to keep up.
The rebel defenses have buckled
amid the wide-ranging government offensive, which opened a
number of fronts at once and was
preceded by an intensive aerial
campaign. More than three-quarters of the rebel sector has now
fallen, including the symbolically
important ancient Aleppo quarters. More than 30,000 of the estimated 275,000 residents of the
besieged eastern enclave have fled
to western Aleppo.
The Syrian government has dismissed a proposal for a cease-fire
put forward by the rebels
Wednesday.
In
comments
published
Thursday in the state-owned alWatan newspaper, Assad in said he

would no longer consider truce
offers, adding that such proposals, particularly by the Americans,
often come when the rebels are in
a “difficult spot.”
“That is why we hear wailing
and screaming and pleas for truces
as the only political discourse
now,” Assad said.
He said that while a victory by
Syrian government forces in the
battle for Aleppo would be a “big
gain,” it will not end the country’s
civil war.
“Liberating Aleppo from the terrorists deals a blow to the whole
foundation of this project,” he
said. But he added, “to be realistic,
it doesn’t mean the end of the
war.”
On
Thursday,
opposition
activists reported intensive
bombing in the al-Sukkari and
Kallaseh neighborhoods still
under rebel control.
Al-Sukkari is in the southern
part of eastern Aleppo, an area
that has become home to the
majority of the displaced civilians
who stayed behind; Kallaseh is
near the Old City. Footage by the
Syrian military showed intensive
shelling of Bustan al-Qasr, a
frontline neighborhood that links
the rebel-held eastern and government-controlled western parts of
the divided city.
The International Committee
for the Red Cross said that it had
evacuated 148 disabled civilians
and others in need of urgent care
from a facility in Aleppo’s Old
City after fighting calmed down
there.
The evacuation, undertaken
jointly with the Syrian Arab Red
Crescent, was completed late
Wednesday, the Red Cross said in a
statement. The people had been
trapped in a facility that was originally a home for the elderly and
included mentally and physically
disabled patients, as well as
injured civilians who had sought
refuge there.
“They were forgotten, ” said
Pawel Krzysiek, the agency’s
communication coordinator in
Damascus. The evacuees were
taken to a hospital and shelters in
the western, government-held part
of Aleppo.

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32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 9, 2016

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