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MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I: SUMMARY OF DAILY MESSAGES II: RESUME OF THE SITUATION III: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1244

31 Aug 1945

TABLE QF CONTENTS Ij SUMMARY OF DAILY MESS.AGtS
vog"I~s

Para Conditions in Japanese PW Camps iFbod Drops to PWs Aircraft for Display of Force Intelligence Report on Okinawa Progress of Surrender in Ryukyus Nansei Is Report on PWs in Ryukyus China Progress of Surrender in China 8. China Internal Situation in China 9 Philippines Progress of Surrender in Philippines 10 Philippines AYWESPAC Intelligence Data Intelligence Report on Borneo 11, Borneo
"I. REOME OF SITUATIONt

I. Honshht 2, Japan 31 Hoisha Nansei i Nazrsei Is

Para
1. Surrender Progrest a, Philippines b. Ryukyus

ENCLOSURES: 1. Orientation Map of Daily Messages

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Honshu: COM 3rd (1) Flash report shows Aomori Number 8 and Shinagawa completFLEET ely evacuated during past 24 hours by 3rd Fleet Units with 707 X 221 PWIs regaining their freedom, except for a few very recent PW's; 100 percent are suffering from malnutrition, of which 80 percent serious, Many are medical and surgical cases. Conditions bestial and treatment brutal in extreme. Medical care and evacuation of most critical cases to Kawasaki is now going on and investigation of other nearby camps is being made. Recommend CTG 30.6 continue efforts along waterfront until Army authorities present and ready to take over. COM 3rd FLEET RA 33 COMGEN AF RA ll COMGEN 10 ZOA 143 COM GENIO ZOA 141 Japan (2) 30 Aug: PWts are tremendously appreciative of food drops. Pilots are urged to select nearby areas for drops, as some packages without parachutes have been plummeting through roofs,

Honshu:
(3) 31 Aug: This command will dispatch approximately 100 B-29 aircraft and 60 P-51 aircraft to the Tokyo area in a display of force operation. Time in area will be from 0800 K to 1030 K. Nansei Is: (4) 30 Aug: Continued routine patrols. 3 Jap EM surrendered. Delayed report: Afternoon 29 Aug., 342 Jap EM, 55 Jap officers including 1 Col, 1 Lt Col, and 165 civilians surrendered in one group on Southern Okinawa. (5) 30 Aug: The following message was received from Miyake Shima: "To Commanding Officer, 10th Army, 29 Aug 45. I am given authority of concluding peace treaty of all arn and naval forces in the Okinawa Islands including Daito Islands and Saki Shima Gunto.. I am ready to open negotiations with you at place and time defined by you. Signed Tashiro Nomi, Lt Gen, Senior Commander." The following message was sent to Miyako Shima in reply to above: "From Commanding General, 10th United States Army, to Senior Commander, Japanese forces in Saki Shima Gunto. This is my message No. 3. Prepare to send representative immediately by airplane to Headquarters, 10th United States Army, at Okinawa with authority to make arrangements for surrender of all Japanese forces in area 26 north 122 east - 24 north 122 east 24 north 132 east - 26 north 132 east. Reply promptly." In answer the following message was received: "To Commanding Officer, 10th Army, Okinawa. Will open communication with you tomorrow."

HQ 10th (6) 30 Aug: The following message was transmitted to Saki ARMY Shima Gunto and Amami Gunto: "Give me name, rank, serial number ZOA 16 and other means of identification and the location of Allied prisoners of war and civilian internees in your designated area." Message from Myako Jima in reply was as follows: "From Highest Commander Japanese Forces, Saki Shima, to Commanding General, 10th Army. There are no Allied civilian internees in the designated areas. All airmen made prisoners of war have been occasionally sent to Okinawa and Formosa; therefore, none exist at present in these areas," No reply as yet has been received from Amami Gunto. ASIA COMGEN CHINA YB 48 Chinai: (7) 30 Aug: North China Report states that 600 Japanese troops at Weihsien prison camp are now cooperating fully with American Rescue Team; that they are acting as guards and truck drivers, and are handling the loading and transportation of supplies for the camp efficiently. South China Report indicates that Japanese Commander in Laokay area began surrender negotiations 26 i : .. r '

Daily Summary of Messages - Cont t d

Summary 1144

- Cont'd

Msg No. August with the Commander Chinese 16th Army, at Hukou. COMGEN
CHINA YE 31

(8) 29 Aug:Chin.

istuation report number 12.

An 0SS retort

dated 27 August states that an attempt made by 2000 COP to enter Canton was repulsed by the KMT. (Commenti Theie have been increasing reports of increased doimunist strength and activity in this area capable of contesting dispited areas.) Weihsien was further threatened yesterday with the 'diroundihg 60000 OCP by in the neighboring towns of Anchiu, Chang Lo, and Kaomi. General Li Wen Li, KMT Military Commander in the Weihsien area, is qubted by OSS in an appeal to his Government: "Unless Central Government immediately flies troops, arms, and ammunition, Central Shantung will be completely lost," (Comment: Estimate of CCP strength in this area still considered high. Pattern of information, however, conforms with a genrally true report, Unconfirmed OSS report indicates that several thousand Japanese, still in possession of their arms, have asked General Li Weh Li to be allowed to defend Weihsien and its airfield from the CCP.) SWPA Philippines: (9) 30 Aug: Negotiations with General Tomoyuki Yamashita are rapidly being brought to a close. The Japanese general has already agreed to a meeting of staffs at Baguio as soon as possible, but declined to attend the meeting himself, choosing instead to remain in his isolated mountain headquarters until the final signing of the surrender in Tokyo. Yamashita expressed a willingness to complete the surrender of his troops in the Philippines, offering his abundant thanks to American Commanders for their "sincere efforts and deep concern" since the cessation of hostilities. The general also announced with some regret that he could not contact his forces in the Cagayan Valley, Balete Pass and Clark Field areas, due to the severing of communications by American operations. Meanwhile, negotiations with the groups unable to contact their commander continue, and are rapidly drawing to a close. In the Cagayan Valley district, small groups of Japanese are already beginning to surrender without waiting for the final word from their commanding officer. Major General Yuguchi, commanding a branch of the 103 Division, and highest ranking officer in the Cagayan Valley, has agreed to all arrangements for surrender, but continues to stand by for an order from Yamashita before turning his troops over to the American 37th Division. (10) A. Luzon Area Command: 1. 32nd Inf Div: (a) 126th Inf: 7 Japs were captured in Yangiran area; 2 were killed near Dupax; (b) 127th RCT: 2 Japs were captured in the Baguio area in the vicinity of Camp 30. 2. 37th Inf Div: (a) 129th Inf: Jap Lt Col reported that approximately 3000 Japs will commence to surrender on 2 Sept; (b) 145th Inf: Jap officer reported that troops in Tuguegarao River Valley will surrender on order from Col Sakamaki; (c) 148th Inf: 13 Jap soldiers and 1 Jap newspaperman surrendered at San Mariano. 2 of the Japs enroute to contact and bring in 43 Japs. 3. 38th Inf Div: Surrender negotiations are completed with remaining Jap troops on Bataan. Formal capitulations will come between 1 and 2 Sept. Conference is still continuing with Shimba Group Hq and Infanta Hq. (a) 152nd Inf: Co H killed 4 Japs resisting capture in the vicinity of Candelevia; (b) 151st Inf: Surrender negotiations are continuing with enemy force at Infanta; (c)US AFIPNL, 121st Inf: 3 Japs were sighted
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PRO LUZON AREA COMMAND ZU CII & PAC 34

CG, AFWES PAC 2020

Daily Summary of Messages - Contd Msg No.

Summary 1244 - 0 ontI

' digging foxholes. Attitude of enemy described as :~un4 ndly, 2 Koreans surrendered to Co F and

1 Jap to Co L.
Casualties: Own trps: Nil, Enemy: 6 Japs killed, 13 Japs, 2 Koreans, 1 civilian newspaperman captd. Cumulative: Own trps: 1 KIA, 4 WIA. Enemy: 148 Japs, 2 Filipinos KIA, 326 Japs, 91 Formosans, 6 Koreans, 1 civilian PW. B. Southern Islands Area Command: 24th Inf: 15 Japs surrendered at Valencia and 2 1. at Managok. 2. Casualties: Own trps: None. Enemy: approximately 36,700 PW's, Cumulative: Own trps: None. Enemy: 4.

1 KIA, 316 PW plus 36,700.
CTU 93,6.15 X-41/31 Borneo: (11) 30 Aug: Brunei Summary 61. SRD report Japs refused to believe surrender report and ambushed SRD party, 3 Jap casualties reported in 24 hour contact. II RESUME OF THE SITUATION: 1. Surrender Progress: a. PhiliDpines: Contact has been established with General Yamashita, Tomoyuki, CG Fourteenth Area Army, who states that he is without authority to conclude final surrender in the Philippines until after he has been officially notified of the signing of the general surrender at Tokyo. His proposal to send representatives to Baguio in about 5 days for preliminary negotiations has been rejected due to the excessive delay it will cause before final terms can be agreed upon, and General Yamashita is being requested to proceed to Baguio not later than 2 September to complete surrender there immediately upon notification of the signing of the general surrender at Tokyo. According to Yamashita, there are an estimated 40,000 Japanese in Northwestern Luzon, more than one-third of whom are either sick or wounded. Meanwhile negotiations with the groups on Luzon unable to contact General Yamashita are drawing to a close. Surrender negotiations were completed with the remaining troops on Bataan, and their formal capitulation will take place on either 1 or 2 September. Small groups of Japanese in the Cagayan Valley are continuing to surrender without waiting for the final word from their commanding officer, Maj Gon Yuguchi, commanding the 80th Brigade of the 103rd Division and highest ranking officer in the Cagayan Valley, has agreed to all arrangements for surrender, but continues to stand by for an order from Yamashita before turning his troops over to our forces. s: The senior officer in the Sakishima 1. Ryuk1 Gunto, Lt Gen Nomi, Toshiro with headquarters on Miyako Shima, has answered the messages of CG 10th Army stating that he has been given authority to conclude a peace treaty for all Army and Navy forces in the Sakishima Gunto, Daito Islands, and the islands in the Okinawa Gunto not already completely under our control. Estimated strength of Japanese forces in these areas is 45,000. Final details for the surrender negotiations to take place at Okinawa on 2 September are being arranged. Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document, Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I: SELECTED INCOMING MESSAGES II: RESUME OF THE SITUATION III: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No.

1243

30 Aug

4195

DATE

TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY OF MESSAGES: 1 - Japanese Submarines 2 - Japanese Information on PWIs and Internees 3 - Report on Plans for Atsugi Landing 4 - Report on Status of Atsugi Airdrome 5 - Air Sightings over Kyushu, Western Honshu and Shikoku 6 - Rescue of POWls at Amori 7 - Report of B-29 Crash in North Honshu 8 - Use of Atsugi Airdrome By Air Couriers 9 - Directive on Use of Atsugi Airdrome 10 - Escort for Captured Japanese Submarine 11 - Eighth Army Landing Information 12 - Report on Surrender of Japanese Submarine 13 - Accidents as a Result of Supply Droppings 14 - Designation of Port in Eastern Japan 15 - Air Sightings of PW Camps 16 - 10th Army Intelligence Data 17 - Instructions for Japanese Surrender in Ryukyus 18 - Report on Su r render Status in Ryukyus 19 - Report on Status of Surrender in Ryukyus 20 - Instructions for Japanese Surrender in Ryukyus 21 - Japanese Report on Korean Situation 22 - Air Sightings in China Theater 23 -China Theater Intelligence Data 24 - Report on PFT Supply Mission 25 - Surrender of Japanese Forces in South China 26 - India-Burma Intelligence Report 27 - AFVESPAC Intelligence Report 28 - Air Sightings in Kuching Area

I, DAILY Par. Par, Par. Par.

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RESUME OF SITUATION: 1 - Surrender Progress Par a, Moluccas b. Philippines c. China

d. Ryukyus
III. ENCLOSURES' - Location No, 1 .p of Sources of Daily Messages

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Daily Summary of Messages - Cont'd Msg No. EMPIRE (1) X 29 Honshu:, 29 Aug: Submarine roundup:

Summary 1243-on~

2 Nip subs were sighted on surface

UNKNOWN by our air patrols on morning of 27.

Destroyers Murray and Dashiell dis-

JAP GOVT X 324

COMGEN 10 ZO 147 COMDR ADV PARTY SCAP X 445

ADVON FEAF X 343

patched to intercept one, and Blue and Mansfield the other, with orders to board and investigate. Prize crew from Murray went aboard, then commenced escorting toward Sagami. Blue and Mansfield had 7 hour chase at high speed before sub was intercepted. Interception would not have been made before dark if our sub had not induced sub to turn around and steam South toward intercepting destroyers. Prize crew from Blue went aboard just before sunset and commenced escort toward Sagami, Both these subs were sighted and enrolled in TG 38.1 -on 27 Aug. No hostile acts on either side. On morning of 28th, after escorting subs during the night, Murray was relieved by Bangust, and Blue was relieved by Weaver. (2) 29 Aug: Referring to information concerning Allied Prisoners of War and Civilian Internees mentioned in General Order Number 1, we are oxercising our best efforts to collect the required data. But it is practically impossible to complete in a short time such comprehensive investigations, including the latest changes, becuase the communications with various places has been either severed or rendered extremely difficult, Investigations in the Main Islands of Japan will shortly be completed, On the other hand, no reply to our inquiries has been received from the other areas. We will continue to endeavor to collect information as accurate and comprehensive as possible, and report to you as it is received. Under existing circumstances, however, it is hoped that the required information on Prisoners and Internees outside of the Main Islands of Japan will be obtained on the spot by the Allied authorites from the local Japanese authorities concerned when Prisoners and Internees are delivered, (3) 29 Aug: General Alexander ATC reports that Atsugi is in good shape and that there is no question operation can proceed, weather permitting. 8th Army is ready to start movement tonight with H hour 300600. GHQ planes satisfactorily integrated in flight plan, (4) 29 Aug: Airdrome area is secured as follows: Airdrome proper by unarmed naval service troops. Inner perimeter by armed gendarmes. Outer perimeter by armed CC civil police. Attitude of Japanese Liaison Committee has been cooperative. Our word has so far been carried out without untoward incident of any kind. Adequate guards have been placed on main roads and critical'points. Japanese authorities reported all combat troops withdrawn from area of initial evacuation. On earnest request of Japanese we have limited our reconnaissance to immediate area of Atsugi Airdrome, Following matters of general interest: Maps and charts have been obtained showing harbor facilities, road conditions, covered stbrage, and water supply, Reports indicate usable berths in Yokohama, some capable of berthing ships of 30,000 tons. Adequate POL storage available. Adequate treated water supply available in all principal communities with water mains generally intact. Road passable but will require heavy maintenance under Army traffic. Japanese report best road Atsugi Airdrome to Yokohama is via Chogo-Tutsuka. All transportation requirements have been met. The Japanese have stated 227 telephones will be available for quarters and offices in Yokohama, all central offices dial lines, (5) 29 Aug: Sightings and incidents reported by Recon and Surveillance missions over Kyushu, Western Honshu and Western Shikoku as follows: Troop laden SC at Nobeoka headed north, troop laden train to Nobeoka heading north, number of trucks on road south of Nobeoka with troops and civilians, 1 surfaced-anchored sub in harbor on southeast coast Okuno Shima, PI7 camp sighted at Niihama on north coast Shikoku, marked with large letters on roof and approximately 200 personnel. Considerable small shipping off shore in Hiuchi Bay. Authorized transport properly marked with green crosses sighted about 1000I north of Kuga. At Kikaiga Shima workmen filling craters in small dirt runway; AA guns nearby tracked plane but did not fire. On Ashiya Airfield huge planes similar to Junkers Eight 88. Karasiharr, Goita, Beppu, Kokura and Asmiya towers all gave planes green light as they buzzed strips. Most serviceable fields in Kyushu have planes lined up along runways and pilots report that all the surface strips look suitable for P-51 landings. Approximately 20 fighters

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Daily Summary of Messages - Cont'd

Suranary 1243 - Cont Id

Msg No. reported on Maysuyama west (Shikoku), Recon of Hiroshima at 200 feet of reinforced concrete buildings. Rescue B-17 landed on Saishu Island and picked up P-51 pilot forced down on 28 Aug, Pilot reported excellent treatment by Nips. B-17 landing at Nittegahara to rescue another P-51 pilot was told by interpreter for Nip Colonel not to land there again as he would not be allowed to depart,
COM 3d FLT RA 116 showed that the only standing things were twisted steel columns and corners

(6) 29 Aug: POl's at Amori successfully contacted and first patients being taken aboard Benevolence. (7) 29 Aug: 1 B-29 crashed and burned at 0823 hours 29 August at Toga Village, Akita Prefecture. The Police and Civilian Defense Corps JAP GOV were rushed to the scene to give aid. It is reported that 10 members of X 212 the crow wrc killed and 1 slightly injured. COMAF 7 (8) 30 Aug: Original courier schedule in effect 30 Aug utilizing _ 143O B-24 type aircraft at Atsugi Airdrome Tokyo Terminal. COM 3d (9) 30 Aug: SCAP reports numerous carrier planes landing at Atsugi. FLT All space needed for Airborne Army Air Movements. Direct no planes land X 43, Atsugi except in emergency or on specifically authorized mission, CINCPAC (10) 30 Aug: Information available here indicates that all proper ADV precautions have been taken and that Jap submarine escorted by US SubRA 10 marine will arrive in Sagami Bay today 30 August. CG 8th (11) 30 Aug: Dates of landing as follows: 1 Cav Div, Yokohama, 2 Army AdvSept; 112 Cav RCT, Tateyama, 3 Sept. Reconnaissance elements, Fleet RA 119 Landing Force, will reconnoiter Tateyama on 1 Sept and remain till landing of 112 RCT4 JAP GHQ (12) The Japanese Submarine No. 1401 reports that she met an American X 196 submarine at latitude 40 10 North and longitude 143 32 East at 0400 hours 29 August and was ordered by the Captain of the American Submarine to move direct into the Tokyo Bay. Taking into consideration the circumstances that the position of the Japanese submarine is at the moment near Ominato and also that it is not unlikely the entry of the submarine might cause unfortunate incidents in the Tokyo Bay, where the American Forces are to land on 30 August, we consider it advisable that she be ordered to move direct to Ominato. Urgent reply is desired. Please inform the Commander of the 3rd Fleet of the above, if request is accepted. JAP GOV (13) Referring to information on civilian internee camps number 25, it was learned that the following additional accidents happened as a X 345 result of the dropping of the supplies to the camps by Allied aircraft on 27 and 28 Aug. 1. A child was injured about 1620 hours 27 Aug when the supplies were dropped on the internees camp at Urawa. 9 Japanese were killed and 8 others were injured past 1600 2. hours 28 Aug when the supplies in drums were dropped on the prisoners and internees in the Hokkaido area, but missed the mark. 3 Japanese were killed instantaneously, 5 others were in3. jured seriously or slightly and 5 dwelling houses were damaged about 1600 hours 28 Aug when 8 drums and 2 packages were dropped on the internees camp at Shimo-Ochiai Yodosashi Ward Tokyo, 4. In addition to the above some casualties were caused, alunavailable within Tokyo prisoners camp No. 4 though details are still at Naoetsu and prisoners camp No. 7 at Hanoka and other places. A drum was dropped at 3 places in the central area of Tokyo in the vicinity of which no prisoners or internees camps are located. It seems that these accidents were mostly due to the faulty attachment of the dropped material to the parachute causing the former to come off from the latter ,hen dropped or to the failure of the parachute to open because of the extremely low altitude from which the material was dropped. There are some among the internees who would like to see the dropping of supplies discontinued if it entailed such dangers. ,It is earnestly desired that every precaution be taken in future regarding the dropping of supplies. (14) Yokosuka is designated as Port in Eastern Japan for assembly COM 3d

FLT

Japanese submarines.
-2. ...

X 168

Daily Summary of Messa Msg No. V

Contd

aily Summary 1243 - Cont d

COM 3d FL (15) Further POW camp information from 3rd Fleet Carrier Photo, X 43/30 Numbers follow index list CINCPAC Bulletin 113-45 from 1 through 260. Number 51 Naruni: (?) bearing 270 distance 2 miles just west of Graving dock; 2 long barracks in compound; 150 persons. Number 55
Himeri Divisional Hq: Possible camp with high fence surrounding just northeast of Castle; no personnel or panels seen. Number 128 Mukai Shima: Over 100 men seen, 6 properly marked buildings around court-

yard. Number 140 Naruni: Displays signs "SOS". Number 189 Shibaura: Sign states 566 men, 267 located in bend of Sumida.Gawa at east end railroad yard, ..Number 275: Very large camp 840 by 700 feet located east of mine at end of railroad at Kamiyama; main building is made of wood
with many wings; ground signal states 460 prisoners. Number 276: Total of 5 buildings, 100 prisoners seen. Number 279: New information shows 2 camps, each with 150 men. Unlisted camps assigned numbers as follows: 254 at 35-49 north 139-42 east; landmark is tall radio tower 2 miles west; small barracks, 200 persons; No, 285 at 36-57 north 140-54 east; barracks type buil9ing, 563 men according to sign, Nansei Is: Period 281800I G-3 Operations report No- 25, 9 Aug; ( 6-- 21 4 ap officers and 55 E Routine security patrol, 2918001 Aug 45, No casualties period ending. 292.4,QCOIl surrenderedd, Mes ssage number 2 to Sen.ir Jaoanese Commander, (17) 29 Aug :(1) Having been desigMiyako Jima, being dropped today as follows; nated as the Representative of the Supreme Allied Commander for the acceptance of the Japanese surrender in the Ryukyus, and acting under the authority conferred upon me, I have instructions for you to communicate with me by radio dropped at Hirara Town and at Hirara air(2) Since you have not complied with my instructions, field on 28 Aug. I repeat them. Establish radio communication with me on one of the following frequencies without delay, in English clear text using maxi(3) My mum power: 3310 KC, 5090 KC, 6018 KC, 3686 KC and 3394 KC. J, W. Stilwell You will use 22 P as a call sign. call sign is SPV. General US Army". Message number 2 to senior Japanese Commander, Ishigaki Jima, also being dropped, is identical in text to above with substitution of Shika Town and Ohama as points where message number 1 was dropped and prescribing E7L, as call sign to be used. 29 Aug: Following message received from Tokuno Shima: (18) "To Joseph W. Stilwell, General US Army, Commanding, from Toshisada Takada, General, Japanese Army Commander, Tokuno Shima: At 8 p.m. on 28 August I had the honor to receive your message number 1 about esI will use tablishment of radio communications dated the same day. kilocycles.!' 5090 (19) Following message received from Toshisada Takada, Maj, Gen., Am re"Will answer your message. Senior Army Cmdr,..Tokuno Shima; ceiving orders from Lt. Gen. Isamu Yokoyama who is in command of Kyushu area.. I alone cannot anser you immediately. Will get in contact with The Lt. Gen. Isamu Yokoyama and ans.;,r you. So please understand. Navy around Amami Gunto is not under my command so I will get in contact with these, too, and get ready to anser you.. There is no airplane Very respectfully. here.. There are no ships, except small motor boats. Signed Toshide Takada." 29 Aug: Message number 2 to General Toshisada Takada, (20) "For Senior Commander Japanese Army, Tokuno Shima, follows: Japanese Gunto from Commanding General 10th Army: Prepare to Forces in Amami send representative immediately by airplane to Headquarters 10th Army at Okinawa with authority to make arrangements for surrender of all Japanese Forces in the area 30 North 128 East, 27 North 128 East, 27 Representatives bring information North 131 East, 30 North 131 East. as follows:. Location of all Japanese Forces and numerical strength of each in personnel and weapons; number and type of aircraft, ships and submarines; condition of runways; data for approach of ships and Mark airplane carrying representative landing craft to each island. Give me estimated with green crosses and red streamers 4 meters long, Will notify you of I will furnish escort. time of departure now. route later, Reply promptly," '

CG 10 ZOA 165 CG 10 ZOA 139

CG 10 ZOA 64

CG 10 ZOA 200

CG 10 ZOA 175

Daily Sununary of Messag~s -,C~nt', Msg No. JAP GOVT X 238

Summar~y 1243 - Cont I

JAP GOVT X 344

Advon FEAF X 353

COMGEN CHINA YE 70

YE 47

(21) According to reliable information from Korea: 1. The Representatives of the Allied Forces occupying Northern Korea cancelled on 25 August the arrangement which they had agreed upon with the Provisional Governors, and ordered the executive committee of the Korean people on 25 August to take overall administrative powers of the Government general. Moreover, it is reported all agencies under the Government general, all financial and monetary institutions, broadcasting stations, and privately ov.ned factories and workshops, are also to be turned over to the said committee in a few days. 2. Representatives of the Soviet Army are awaiting on the streets that all Japanese property in Korea should belong to the Koreans in the Gensan and Joshin areas there have been cases of looting, kidnapping, murder and other acts of violence. Thus, the situation in Northern Korea is in a state of confusion, and the safety of lives and property of the Japanese residents cannot be guaranteed6 The Japanese Government entertains serious apprehensions 3. regarding the above state of affairs and eagerly hopes for improvement 4 29 Aug: According to latest information from reliable sources in Korea, the Soviet Army on 1000 hours, 28 Aug, took into custody at Genzan the Governor of Kannan Province together with all department directors and section chiefs; and also disarmed the gendarmerie and arrested the chief police and important police officers of head (?) Province. It is earnestly hoped that you will use your good offices to cause the Soviet Army to cease such illegitimate acts of violence against civil authorities, who are exclusively assigned to the task of local administrations, and to release those who are held in detention and send them to whatever places they desire. (22) 29 Aug: China recon and surveillance reports rdceived 4 trains sighted between Hangchow and Shanghai bound through 21001: for Shanghai; 2 passenger of 13 cars each and 2 freight of 28 cars each, 9 locos and assorted cars in Hangchow railway yard. Chinese infantry with rifles and machine guns 8 miles southwest Sung Kiang Escort vessel towing barge with 250 men aboard 2 marching northeast. Nip gunboat miles south of Hengsha Island headed northwest up Yangtze. junks. Nip trucks on Vhangpoo east of Shanghai; also several Chinese Estimated 200 SD's and and civilian vehicles moving freely on roads. 75 to 100 20 SC's and 3 small patrol craft in V1hangpoo at Shanghai. horse-drawn carts loaded with boxes parked in large open spaces southern 12 car passenger train overflowing with civilians part Shanghai city. On Tashau airdrome, headed for Chinkiang 10 miles outside Shanghai. in addition to approximately 50 Nip fighters and 1 Sally, were 1 B-17 and 1 P-51 with group of unidentified soldiers. 29 Aug: Central China report shows no Japanese south of (23) From Chenhsien and Yuhsien, Japanese were Unganhsien and Lingling. Lingling airfield has been mined by retreating Leiyan. moving north to Japanese, states a Chinese 2nd Department report. South China reports Japanese withdrawing eastward from Takhing From Yumqu, Japanand Shuikoughu dumped their weapons into the river. munitions and weapons to Whampoa to dump in river. ese were trucking Japanese Force at Chuchiant have moved south, leaving a request that Chinese troops quickly occupy that city to prevent plunder. Correction for Intellsum number 104 for 25 August: Chinese 131st Divisi6n Commander wjent to Kwanchoswan to discuss surrender, and These negotiations were connot Japanese 131st Division commander, tinuing 27 and 28 August. Indo China report stated Japanese by error attempted to move fighting which tlroug Chinese held Caosang from Soc Giang causing Theater Intellsum subsided into negotiations to surrender. China number 108 for 29 August. have not received East China report stated Japanese at Ningpo surrender order from their Senior Officer. 29 Army: Chinese report On ground in Central China 28 Aug: Now Clauhsien to Lingling meeting no Japs, (?) regiment moved from Army Headquart94 Army: 121 and 43 Divisions and returning Chuanhsi. Army ready 30 Aug. ers closed Liuchow; 5 Division scheduled to close 13 Army came under 2nd ATSW Group Command to Shanghai. for air lift

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Daily Summary of. Messages -Cont'd

Summary 1243 -. Contc'd

and 71 Army under 4th Army Group Command 26 Aug. Nanning airfield is again operational. New Falot Army: Leading serial 38 Division reached Notung with last serial at Paklow. 52 Army:, 2nd Division enroute Bac Quang via Ha Giang; 25 Division starting move to.Ha Giang via Quan Ba,, 62 Army: 451 Regiment 151 Division engaged Japs retreating from Cao Bang area; 452 Regiment arranging surrender terms with Jap Commander in area,. 64 Army: 156 Division concentrating in Yanshien for move to Yangshun, COMGEN (24) 29 Aug: 'Psupply mission No. 1, target Peking; Area No.,6, USATAF Weigsien were successful with no aircraft, no enemy reaction. Dropped X 20 _ 3 days supply for 1550 men.-, CTG 111.2 (25) Report states: "I am now in communication with Japanese X 261/29 Commander at Hong Kong by W/T in plain language. I have no authority to deal with Allied Officers; I should deal with Lieutenant General Tanaka at Canton, which I am trying to do. Japanese Forces in South China have as yet received no instructions from their home government. Aircraft which flew over Hong Kong this morning, and which dropped messages, met no opposition.. Have received warnings from Japanese that Channels are fouled by American magnetic mines. Am informing General Tanaka that I intend to enter Hong Kong and occupy Naval dockyard tomorrow or Fiday. Bad weather is restricting flying. COMGENIB (26) 26 Aug: 4th Corps to 1800 hours (Operation Summary 26 Aug): ZUB 146 Situation quiet throughout area., No leaflets dropped. AFWESPAC (2.7) 28/29 Aug: Daily operations report Number 10. Period 2008 281800 to 291800 Aug 45. Results of Operations: A, Luzon Area Command 1) 32nd Inf Div a) 128th Inf: 7 Japs, 1 Formosan captured KianganTubalo Area.. b) 127th RCT: 4 Japs captured Atok. Area., 2) Casualties: Own TRS: nil; Enemy: 11 Japs, 1 Formosan POW. Cumulative: Own TRS: 1 KIA, 4 WIA; enemy, 142 Japs, 2 Filipinos KIA; 33 Japs, 91 Formosans, 4 Koreans POW, B. Southern Islands Area Command 1) No contacts Zamboanga and Mindanao. 2) 95 POI received at Valencia. 3) Panay: Preliminary negotiations to be completed on 2 Sept for formal surrender of 1200 Japs on 3 Sept and 500 on 16 Sept. 4) Casualties: Own TRS: Nil; Enemy:. Approx 36,750 POW. Cumulative: Own TRS Nil; Enemy, 1 KIA, 299 POW (exact) plus 36,700 POW (approx)., AOR lstAF (28) 29 Aug: Labuan operations 29 Aug, all times I. TAF 993 ZYA 133 Squadron. Light meagre inaccurate fire from barge at 0352 north 11302 east. Sightings: 12 flags plain and colored, Batu Lintang., Approximately 200 possible white men same area, TAF 513 Sqdn: 1 Ventura, message bags and leaflets dropped on and around Lintang barracks Krokong and Trombol strip. Population target area appeared unconcerned at sight of airplane.. Working parties Kuching airdrome waved and picked up leaflets. 2 possible powered SDs sighted 0243 North 11110 East, course 020 degrees. T 111 Squadron:, 2 Mosquitoes sighted, 2 circular discs flat on ground with letters P and W superimposed. Between buildings barracks area letter L formed with white cloth., Later removed into open and full message LX 111 displayed. Kuching airdrome reveals nil obstructions, but across center appeared soggy. TAF 124 Squadron: 2 Boomerangs. Dropped leaflets on Riam Poad, No enemy movements or activity..

II RESUME OF THE SITUATION:
(1) Surrender Progress: Continued evidence of the Japanese willingness to negotiate surrender terms and to surrender to the Allies is reported in the following sectors: . ^ w ,^ ' ^ . ^ ' *
i

-

Resume of the Situation - Cont t d

Sumiary 1243 - Conttd

a. Moluccas: All Japanese on Halmahera and Morotai under the command of Lt Gen Ishi, Yoshiho, approximating 31,700 Army and 5,000 Naval troops surrendered on 27 August. The strength of these troops was previously reported in initial dispatches as 3,170 Army and 5,000 Naval troops (see Daily Summary No. 1242). b. Philippines: On Luzon several of the local commanders are negotiating surrender, A Japanese emissary is discussing surrender of the 30th Airfield Battalion to take place on 1 September. A local commander stated that he would surrender troops under his command only when directed by Maj Gen Yuguchi, CG 103rd Division. Negotiations are in progress with Admiral Furuke for surrender of approximately 1,500 Japanese in the Infanta area east of Manila. c. China: The commanding officer of British Forces planning to occupy Hong Kong is in communication with the Japanese commander there who states that he has no authority to deal with the Allies and that contact should be made with Lt Gen Tanaka, Hisakazu, CG 23rd Army (Corps), at Canton. He states further that Japanese forces in South China have not as yet received instructions from their home government. It is planned that British Forces will enter Hong Kong and occupy the Naval dockyard on 30 or 31 August. d. Ryukyus: The commanding officer Tokuno Shima, Maj Gen Takada, Toshisada, CG 64th IMB, has answered the message of Commanding General, Tenth Army, in regard to making necessary arrangements for surrender of forces under his command. Gen Takada stated that he must contact both Lt Gen Yokayama, Isamu, CG 16th Area Army at Fukuoka, Kyushu, and the commander of Naval Forces in the Amami Gen Takada was Gunto before he can fully answer our demands. instructed to send representatives to Okinawa immediately with authority to make arrangements for surrender of all Japanese forces in the Amami and Tokara Guntos and to bring information relative to location and strength of personnel, number and type of aircraft, ship and submarines, condition of runways and data for approach of ships and landing craft to each island. Japanese commanders on Miyako Jima and Ishigaki Jima in the Southern Ryukyus did not answer our initial message; a second message has been transmitted to these commanders ordering them to establish communication without delay using the radios dropped to them and frequencies assigned,

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer, See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

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GENERAL* HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I., SELECTED INCOMING MESSAGES II: RESUME OF THE SITUATION III: MISCELLANE-OUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

2422

28/29 Aug

194.5

I: SELECTED fICOING IIESSAGES PABA
20

M~boAGE TITES Honshu Honshu Honshu Honshu Honshu Kytushu-Honshu Nansei Is Nansei Is Carolines Naru Id China China China China China China China China Fr Indo-China Philippines So..PhiL-ippines PI"Halmahera Borneo Borneo Borneo Borneo Borneo moluccas moveiment Notice on Japanese Relief. Vessel, Air Sightings of' POUT Camps. Japanese.Sub Surrenders Pf'f Honshu* Report on Oerational Status of' Atsugi Airdrome. Japanepe Request U.S. Disc~ipline ?WAs and Internees. Air Sightings over_,K ushu and Western Honshu. Tenth Armyr G--3 Operations Report. Tenth Army,G-3 Operations .Report. Status of' Japanese Surrender. Report on Occupation of' POA Islands. Air Sightings in Shanghai AreA, Recco Reports nil. Japanese Actiivity Tsingtao Area* Report on Situation in China Theater. Report on Pfs in China Theat er# Air Sightings -over Formosa anid China Coast, Report on Situation in China Theatere. China Theater Operations Rep6rt. Japanese ActiLv:ties' in the China-Theatezr. Air Sightings over French'Indo-Chinao AFTESAC operational.Replort. .Sound Contact. AFWESPAC Operation Report. First Australian, Corps Operations Report. Japanese Activities. First Austr'alianl Corps Operations Repobrt. Air Sightings. Air Sightings in Kuching Area. Status of' Japanese Surrender.

6. 7.
8.

9.
101.

13-6 * 16. 17. * 18. 20. '22. 234,

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TECYT OPF- ElS
Msg No. CINCPAC ADV RA 51 i EL IRE , ;, '

GES

COM3RD FLT X 81

USS WE VER PA 134

COADV SCAP X 466

JAP GOVT X 473

(1) Japanese relief vessel will leave Yokosuka for .Mrcus 16001 25 August. Course direct to M1arcus. ETA 06001 28 August. Depart Marcus 16001 29 August. -ETA Tokyo 0800 1 September, Vessel is destroyer type transport, number 16, displacement 1200 tons, 2 masts, 1 funnel, green crosses on both sides of bridge, Japanese flag hoisted, prescribed navigational lights showing at night. All explosives removed; remaining guns rendered inoperative. Action addressees take all necessary steps to insure safe passage this vessel. 28 Aug: Additional accurate locations POW camps spotted by (2) 3rd Fleet carrier planes. Numbers for identification assigned 1 CINCPAC Bulletin 103-4 5 All properly marked. through 260 index list Number 54:Himiji Camp bearing 300 distance 3600 feet center Hirohita Village; 3 barracks, 11 small associated buildings, 100 prisoners observed in compound. Number 78: Kawasaki Sub Camp No. 25, 2 long barracks. Number 140: Narumi, large rectangular building, 2nd building with FP markings and 15 smaller buildings, 40 yelling, waving men. Number 223: Tokyo Camp No. 31, 1 double story building, no prisoners observed. Number 146: Ofuna bears 310 degrees 1.5 miles from Yamanouchi town, U-shaped buildings, 100 persons. Number 183: Sekiguchi, large 3 story L shaped building, 250 prisoners showing. United States flag, Number 212: Takatanobaba, 6 story hotel, 12 persons on roof. Number 224: Tokyo Camp No. 5, large 6 story building, 100 prisoners seen; Unlisted camps assigned numbers follows: Number 278: At 36-37 N, 140-28 E, 15 hut-type buildings, 400 persons. Number 279: At 36-36.5 N, 140-38 E across river from Hitachi Refinery, 1 large building, 500 men. Number 280: At 43-38 N, 41l-Sh E on west side of river on railroad south of mining village, 2 story frame building, 300 men waving 'arms and Dutch flag. Number 281: At 41-42.5 N, 1i0-50 E, located in valley surrounded by wooded hills, bearing 125 degrees 35 miles from Aomort. Number 282: At 40-16 N, 140-56 E, 6 barracks on hill, O0people waving. Number 283: At h0-15 N, lh0-57 E, 6 to 8 barracks in 2 rows in ravine, 100 prisoners waving. Note number 138 Narashino not marked but building in woods with US flag; several prisoners observed. 29 August 1945: Commander Hiram Cassidy USN assumed co.imand (3) of Japanese Submarine number 400 (I 15 Class) a t 10301 28 August with prize crew from subdiv ENU 6 on board. Position Lat 37-30 Flying American North, Long 142-30 East. Fuel on board 450 tons. itxEnsign above Jap colors in addition to large black pennant. 20 Jap officers imum speed 15 knots. 1 main motor inoperative. Intend leaving crew on and 170 men on board. Seem cooperative. board until reaching Sagami Wan unless otherwise- directed. No ammunition small arms or torpedoes aboard. Short on drinking water, request permission to tie up alongside USS Proteus (AS 19) upon arrival, ETA Point X 03301 29 August. (4) .28 Aug: Report on Atsugi Airdrome, Tokyo Area: a) East runway suitable for all types aircraft. b) West runway not suitable for landing of any type aircraft for B-60. c) Subject to further check, -temporary strip to northwest not suitable for landings any type aircraft, nor is it accessable or suitable for parking on field; cleared areas are unimproved. Any type aircraft including B2hts can park during dry weather easy on Z day; any type aircraft can be accomodated at maximum rate of 20 per hour during daylight hours. If connecting taxiway leading from south end of concrete runway .to south end of east concrete aprons is completed by Z day, aircraft can be received at rate of 30 per hour if majority of aircraft are mobile troop loaded. (5) 29 Aug: The question of maintaining order after the release of prisoners of war and internees. In effectuating the stipulations of para 7 of the instrument of the surrender and the General Order
. .. 1

Texte of Hssages !- Cont'd~

Sunmary 1242 - Contldr

number 1 regarding the treatment of Allied prisoners of war and internees, it isquite necessary to pay particularly careful attention in order to maintain perfect order by continuing the satisfactory cooperative relations between the camp authorities on the one hand and the prisoners and internees on the other when the latter are placed under the direction of a senior officer or a designated representative. Otherwise it is feared that some unfortunate incidents may occur. As a matter of fact, the prisoners held in the Kobe prisoners of war camp (the second branch of the Osaka prisoner of war camp) have since the night of Aug 19 begun to refuse to listen to the order of the camp authorities; they ran away from the camp in small groups, broke into store houses in the neighborhood (canned foods, beer, etc.), entered civilian homes and annoyed women and girls. On Aug 22 several men of the said camp went to the Osaka prisoner of war camp (the first branch) and instigated the prisoners held in the latter place. As a result the latter camp has also fallen into a similar state of confusion. In the light of these circumstances, it is readily seen what sort of disturbances and untoward incident might happen, in case such prisoners come into possession of arms and munitions of the camps as provided for under the stipulations of order number 1, para 9. Therefore, in order to preclude such possibilities, we earnestly desire that the military authorities of the Allied powers very speedily issue such necessary orders as will make prisoners of war and internees to obey orders of their leaders and maintain complete order, and to restrain themselves after their release, We wish to state that our views in this regard are shared by the representatives of the protecting powers for the Allied Powers and International Red Cross committee representative in Japan. Kyushu-Honshu: (6)-2 Aug: Rheconnaissance-surveillance flights Kyushu and ADV : Western Honshu restricted by poor visibility and rain squalls. FEAF Following observations reported: 5 troop laden barges and 1 SC X 395 headed for Kyushu from Tsushina 1100, also 6 barges and 1 tug vicinity Okishima; numerous barges and 1 tug vicinity Okishima; numerous serviceable vessels in Kurelarbor included DD, CVE, TA and FTA. About 300 prisoners waving American flags seen in well-marked POW camp on small island off Nagasaki; approximately 19 naval vessels DE, TD, CL in Nagasaki Harbor. Approximately 200 airplanes total of which 50 serviceable sighted on East Kyushu fields in orderly rows, 2 strips each about 4,000 feet long sighted on Saishu Island, with 9 airplanes on either. 2 SD's sighted within 10 miles of Kyushu. south tip; stationary SB at 3515 North 12656 East; trucks moving south on roads South Korea; trucks and rollers seen working on Kenoyo airfield, approximately 40 aircraft lined up on field. Nansei Is: (7) G-3 Op report nr 22, period 2618001 - 2718001 Aug 45: 1. No COIDEN change; 2. Sky 1/3 to 2/3'covered with scattered clouds, scatteredTEN showers, winds NE 5-8 IMH, temperature 75-86, flying conditions X 88 satisfactory; 3. Routine security patrols killed 3 Japs and 11 Japs surrendered; 4, No casualties period ending 2624001; 5. Omitted. (8) G-2 Op Report No, 24 Period 27180011 - 2818001 Aug 45; l.. No COMEN change; 2. Scattered showers 1/3rd cloud cover,,wind 3-4 from RP,. TEN ZO A 10 Temp 76-86; 3. Routine patrols, 18 Japs surrendered;-4,. No casualties; 5. FEAF planes dropped msgs on Amami, Kikaiy, Tockuno. Miyako,. Ishigaki Iriomote directing Jap Commanders establish radio contact with this Hq, POA ISCOM PELELIU RA 212 Carolines: (9) 28 August 1945: Preliminary conference with Jap representatives of Lt Gen Inoue on board DE 168.indicates they are anxious to surrender as soon as officially authorized by Emperor. Gave assurance of intention fully abide by Emperors orders but unwilling to proceed in advance of them. Inoue Command includes Palaus and Yap but not Merir and Sonsorol,

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Text of Messages - Contt d Mg No. CINCPAC ADV X 28

Si S;u

122 - Contd

Naru Id: (10' 26 Aug: Have concurred in the occupation of Ocean and.Nauru by British Commonwealth forces under the direction of CINCBPF. It should be understood that such forces are subject to coordination by CINCPAC CINCPOA since these islands are within the Pacific Ocean areas. ASIA

ADV FEAF X 392

COMAF 5 X 270

COMNEN CHINA ZUA 159

CONGEN CHINA YA 72

China: (117 2 Aug: Search up river to Hangchow and back to near Shanghai nil sightings of activity. On Shanghai area airdromes from mininum alt following sightings: Tashang parked B-17 iwth crew waving to our plane 1 Tony and 60 Tojos lined up on taxiway; Woosung 1 Helen and 1 Nick; Kiangwan 8 trainers so disposed on 3 runways as to prevent landing on any; City of Shanghai festooned with Chinese Nationalist flags and streets thronged with celebrating crowds, (12) 28 Aug: Recco and surveillance flight of 8 B-24s to Tsingtao area reports nil enemy activity observed en route or in target area, 5/10 cumulus tops 5000 on route out, 7/10 at 8000 at target and 7/10 at 5000 on route back, Japanese Commander (13) 28 Aug: Daily China situation Number 11. on French Indo China stated he has received order on 25 Aug to start armistice negotiations with Chungking. He suggested preliminary meeting before negotiations'in Hanoi in order that representatives ight see actual conditions. Stated public order poor and expressed fear that negotiations would not run smoothly and outbreaks would result. 10000 CCP reported southwest-of Ningpo waiting for Japs to leave cr surrender, Comment: Communists have been present in force in this area for over 1 year and in position between Japs and KIeT Report states 60000 I WTbeing brought up to occupy Ningpo Area. 3000 CCP south of Lung Chai Tang. 2000 12 miles north of Jucheng, KT 9th Div engaged Reds 23 miles east Jucheng vith main body of Reds Comment: escaping to mountains near Chungi. 300 at Pengchung Niao, These forces are possibly those carried in the Leiyang-Anjen Area. They are probably guerrilla units. This movement would indicate that they have retired to a mountainous area, away from the general Hengyang Area toward which they were reported moving. 20000 CCP reported 15 miles east of Kweiteh, Comment: Estimate believed high, Forces in this area are in position to block 10th War Zone advance north to Lunghai railroad or in support of garrison at Kaifeng. Chiuhsien in hands of Reds. Following report from Yenan observer group: Reds nowfeel United States will not support Gimo in civil war, that support of KI.T was a var measure. They state that without United States help, Gimo feels he cannot wage successful large scale war. They feel United States is backing out because: a) War would be long; b) Communists cannot be annihilated quickly; c) International intervmation would result; d) United States does not wish Russia involved in international problems in China. (14) 28 Aug: China Theater Prisoner of War Sitrep Number 9 as of 1100 hours, Chungking: .Mu1den Area: Details concerning evacuation of General Wainwright covered in ourad number 6152, this date. Peking area; a) 306 internees, mostly residents of the Shanghai Area, remain in the Pedang Area. Plans are being formulated to move these people back to Shanghai as soon as facilities permit. In addition there are many hundreds of European and American priests and sisters who want to be relocated in China, b) Internees in all places in the Peking Area stated that they had been well treated. They are in good condition and have nothing tut praise for the Japs. c) In Shanghai Camp (at Fengtai) the record book, lists of prisoners of war formerly in the Shanghai area and locations of the burial place of prisoner of war dead in Shanghai have been received and locked in the Swiss Legation, Weihsien Area: Information from Weihsien states that between 0730 and 1030 on 27 Aug 12 bombers were in the area, B-29s

Text of Messages -Conttdu
Mg -Now

Svimmny 122

- Cont' d

CTG

73.4
X 307-

COMGEN CHINA ZUC-2

from Okinawa dropped supplies, which the report said would ,take all day to collect, One B-24 from China Theater also dropped supplies. 1 plane landed with additional personnel. Message stated "Wjhat an air showl Was wonderfull" In the Fort-Bayard Area, one of the team members has visited the French internees, whom as yet the Japs have refused to liberate., Food has been supplied by the team to the internees, but baby food is required for a baby born on 25 Aug. The internees total 79, including $1 men, 18 women, 10 children and the baby. Homes of the internees have been stblet to all comers, A daily visit is being made to the internees, and an attempt is being made to liberate them, It is unlikely though that the liberation will be possible until the arrival of responsible Allied officials. A food drop has already been requested from the Pacific for Fort Bayard. Saigon Area: The following message from the Headquarters Army, Southern Regions, and addressed to Headquarters SEAC Japanese and Headquarters USA in China Theater was intercepted: "This is our suggestion to your plan of dropping supplies in the Saigon area There are numerous swamps and rivers in this for prisoners of war area and therefor we suggest that you drop them on our airfields and we will convey to prisoners of war." All other areas: No further reports have been received. (15) 28 Aug: Fleet Airwing 17 search summary: 9 planes from Clark times sighting I. All sectors full distance4 Average coverage 90%. 1035: Tug and Barge anchored Swatow. 1130: 1 SCS 1 SD 2 luggers anchored Amoy. 1230: 6 luggers anchored Takao. 1030: 3 SD anchored 4 luggers underway Kiirun Harbor. 1310: 1 converted PC 1 SD 6 luggers anchored Hoi How Bay, 1200: 4 luggers underway 23-05 N, 119-53 E. Course 180, speed 8. Sightings yesterday by plane late returning 1745# 1 tug 2 SD's anchored 2 launches underway Yulin Bay. (16) 26 Aug: Tension in Tientsin increasing as Japs enforce Martial Law. OSS reports that on 22 August Japs sent Emissary to Soviet at Ku-Pei-Kou, Soviets refused cessation of fighting stating Army they would continue attack. Cormment and source is US Officer being accommodated by Japs in Peiping. Follows Puppets situation in Canton: Puppets received news of surrender 10 August. Puppets organized on 11 August as policing Ordered unit and to preserve-peace, Puppets could join IKMT Puppet rest in present garrisons. Unconfirmed report stated KMI has appointed Puppet Chao Kpwi Chang Commander "advance troops" pending arrival Chinese"Regulars. Some Communists have entered city and are becoming active, Later reports indicate situation becoming serious. Puppet Government losing control of city, Jap concerned mainly with protection of residents. Comment: Organized CCP Military Forces in Canton are not considered a threat. However, CCP has maintained party organization and prospect of their creating local disturbance is likely. Following towns reported occupied by CCP. Source: Yenan broadcast. Rated C-3, Wuchuan and 3 towns East of Lueisui on Peiping-Suiyuan railroad, Yang Lin Ching 10 miles West of Tientsin on railroad, CCP also occupied Jap airfield 2 miles North of Yangtsun.

Lines of communication: CCP is reported to have cut the following lines of communications: Peiping-Hankow railroad at Hsinyang, 10 miles North of Sinsiang. Tsingpu railroad at point 50 miles North of Nanking, Peiping-Tientsin railroad at many points. Comment: 'Railroad lines of coimunication have been particularly vulnerable to attack by CCP, In a press reported speech before the joint meeting of the Supreme National Defense Council and the General Executive Committee of the Kuimintang on 24 August, the Generalissimo stated that China's National independence and freedom would never be restored without the reestablishment of China's territorial and administrative integrity in the 3 Northeastern Provinces, and the recovery of

MML.Q AW

Text of lessages - Contid

Surtu-ary 122 - Cont t
He said that outer Mongolia should be

Msg No.
Formosa and the Pescadores.

granted independance and Tibet should be granted autonomy in view of its seclusion and the fact that it has been an independent entity since the days of the Peiping Government. Generalissimo also stated that, Chinese must give every possible assistance to other nations which possess the Self Governing Power and the spirit of independence sustaining their ends, mentioning Burma, Thailand, and Indo China, and that they should be helped. He said that the status of Hongkong, leased territories, concessions which are based on treaties will be "China will resort to diplomatic determined through diplomatic means, means to restore concessions and leased territories including Hongkong from ether powers." According to a Domei broadcast item from Peiping on 22 August, the Japanese Army authorities in North China have sent a note to Yenan Army authorities advising them to control their lawless activities for an early unification of China. It was pointed out that some Yenan Army elements are contemplating unlawful occupation of the VHG cities in North China, thereby causing extreme confusion among the Chinese population, Japanese Army authorities in North China the last state that they have to assume full responsibility till maintenance of peace and order. The note added that moment for the destruction of communications and occupation of towns should immediately cease. The Japanese Army it stated, will take appropriate In consteps to check' any such activities or lawless elements. for an early unification clusion it urged all Yenan Armies to strive of China and thus save China from the danger of a Civil War. Three Chinese columns from Laokay, Hagiang, and Caobang are reported at Indo China frontier, Jap authorities feel that entry of Sino troops prior to surrender may prejudice political situation and stir possible trouble ANNAMITES and French population. (17) 28 Aug: Central Cina: l Army: 11 Division began move to C03VEN Taohuchiang 26 Aug, Army Headquarters and 18 Division enroute iatCHINA sihtang, 118 Division enroute Hengshih; 100 Army, Army Headquarters YFB 56 romaio, thence to enroute Tsohuoping, 19 Division moving to Kwangk moving 29 Aug to Nanyoj on 4 September Hengyank; 73 Army: 77 -Division 15 Division to move to Chukoupu. South China: 29 Army, 169 Division arrived Kweilin, Reserve 11 Division enroute Kweilin from Kwanyang, Army Headquarters leaving Kungcheng; $2 Army, Elements 58h Regiment 195 Division occupied Hoang Su Phi after Japs withdrew, enemy not pursued; 62 Army, 95 Division arrived Dong Dang; 64 Army,'Army to move overland to Toishang Area via Hopu-Limkong-Yeungkongi A Division to occupy Hainan Island, (18) 29 Aug: China Theater intelsum number 107 for 28 Aug. East COL'DEN China report stated Japanese at Hangchow were preparing to move heavy CHINA Central China reports indicated Japanese equipment to Nanking, ZUC 38 supplies were being moved north from Changsha. At.Nanchang the senior Japanese Officer informed Commander Chinese 58th Army that Chinese should not attack Nanchang as Japanese troops were being concentrated in the area to surrender.. Recent reports from the Paoching area that Japanese troops there were rioting and slaughtering Chinese was positively denied by Chinese General Ho Ying China. South China report showed Japanese troops at Chuchinag moving south 200 Japanese were reported reinforcing Samshui by boat to Canton, where they told Allied personnel any further advance eastward on west river would be fired on. At Kongmoon the Japanese stated they will not move out as they have no orders to do so from higher authority, The Luichow peninsula Japanese stated they have not been informed officially of surrender, Indo China reports stated Japanese senior officer in Tonkin has ordered all Japanese troops in the province to concentrate at Hanoi. French Indo-China: Sectors 1 thru (19) 28- Aug: Palawan FAW 10 searches, all times I. COFAW averaging 95 percent. All negative. Sectors 5 thru h 850 miles 10 9 full distances to coast: All 100 percent. Found Cape St Jacques X 368
6 -

Text of Messages - Conttd

Surnm~ry

122

-

Cont I

Misg No. . emp
Que

a
apt al

8 excpt for numng
1030 Tourane at

boats.. No sightings at
miles south of

1.0 or.iue at 1200.

bout 200people marching single file down road waving Tour ~a red flag with yellow center in friendly fashion. SWPA AFWES PAC Philippines: (20) . Results of Operations: A. Luzon Area Command

ZU B 17/
28

(1) 37th Div.
(a) 129th Inf: 2 Japs captured vic Aguszao 26 August not previously reportedo (b) 125th Inf: 1 Jap Officer met vic Dalaya representing Colonel Sakamoto to arrange surrender, (c) 48th Inf: 1 Formosan captured vic Oscariz 26 Aug not previously reported.

(2) 32ndInf Di%.
(a) 128th Inf. 5 Jap civilians surr vic TVMUT.

(3) USAFIP

(a) 2 Rummaging Japs KIA one Jap captured. (b) Surr negotiations in progress.

(a) 152nd Inf: 3 Japs captured vic Angeles, 3 Japs surr vic Paniqui, 2 Japs surr vic Fort Stotsenburg 26 August not previously reported. (b) 149th Inf:'3 Japs captured vic San Jose Del Monte, 1 Jap captured vie Amgat, 7 Japs and 2 Filipino pro-Japs killed resisting capture vie Balaog. (c) 151st inf: 10 Japs kia vic .ountalban: 1 Jap captured same area, 2 Japs captured vic Wawaca 1 Jap captured vic Batangan, 1 Jap killed vic Calauag. - (5) Casualties: Own troops: Nil; Enemy: 20 Japs and 2 Filipino killed; 24 Japs, 1 Formosan POW. Cumulative: Own troops: 1 killed, 4 wounded; Enemy: 42 Japs, 2 Filipinos killed; 230 Japs, 86 Formosans, 4 Koreans ]i. B. Southern Islands Area Command (1) Mindanao, 124th Inf received surr of 203 Japs vic
Valencia.

(4) 38th Inf Div,

CTF 93 X 480

(2) Palawan. Delayed report 15 Aug: Pat Co M 51st Inf (PA) 'made minor contact vic Tarulpato. (3) Zamboanga, Delayed report 21 to 23 Aug: Pats Co E, 368th Infattacked by Vic Tungaukl, Pats Co G, 368th Inf attached by enemy group vic Sibucob (h) Casualties: Own troops: Nil; Enemy: 203 Pi. Cumulative: Own troops: Nil; Enemy: 1 killed, 205 Pv, liscellaneous No change. Southern Philippines: (21) 29 Aug: Doubtful sound contact reported at 10-36 North 129-37 East at 2902301. One full pattern dropped 30 minute search negative. VPB 53 send plane daylight to assist. Philippines-Halmahera; (22) A. Luzon Area Command: (1) 32nd n-f Div: (a) 128th Inf: 19 Jap soldiers, 5 Jap civilians, and 4 Formosans captured in Kiangan-Lamut-Bablap Area, (2) 37th Inf Div. (a) 129th Inf: 2 Jap surr at Gonzaga. (b) 14Sth Inf: 1 Jap surr. Jap emissary negotiating surr of 30th Airfield Bn on 1 Sept, l148th Inf: 2 Japs surr. Message from Matsui (c) states he will surr when directed by Gen Yugchi. Sickly Japs will surrender before main force, (3) 38th Inf Div* (a) 152nd Inf: 1 Jap captured by civilians 1000 yds N' Naniqui, 1 Jap captured 8 miles S Angeles and 2 Japusyr .ar
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Text of 1HMessages - Contt ilMg No,

,

Summar

122 - ContId

I AUST CORPS X 7) I AUST CORPS X 149

I AUST CORPS X 34 ADRC X 98

I AUST CORPS X 124 AFWES PAC X 41

(b) 149th Inf: Contacted officer of Ikeda Force and discussed surr terms. Next meeting will occur 7000 yds hNW Montalban 5 Sep. 16 Japs surr NW ontalban, (c) l5lst Inf: 18 Japs surr Novaliches Water Shed Area. 3 Japs surr Wawa, 1 Jap surr Tanay and 1 Jap surr to PA Unit. Awaiting surr of Jap Force Inner Boso Boso-Montalban River junction area. Negotiations in progress vwith Japanese Admiral in Infanta Area for surr of 1500 Japs, (h) USA FIP, NL, No change. (5) Casualties: Own Troops: Nil. Enemy: 72 Japs, j Formosans PW. Cumulative Onm troops: 1 killed; h wounded, Enemy: 142 Japs, 2 Filipinos killed, 302 Japs, 90 Formosans, 4 Koreans PW. B. Southern Islands Area Command: (1) Morotai: Maj Gen Johnson, 93rd Inf Div accepted surr of approx 31700 (?) Army and 5000 Navy from Lt Gen Ishi Army and Capt Fumita Navy. This surr of all Jap troops under Lt Gen Ishils command on Halmahera and Ibrotai took place at 2710, 30 Aug 45, Turning over of arms and conc of Jap troops in billeting area is now in progress. Data on personnel and material will be forwarded soon, Australians advised. (2) Other Areas: No contact. (3) Casualties: Own troops: Nil. Enemy: Approx 36700 (?) PW. Cumulative: Own troops: Nil. Enemy: 1 killed, 204 POW (Exact) plus 36700 POW (Approx), (4) Miscellaneous: No Change* Borneo: (237 216 27 Aug: Daily operational report 142: Balikpapan-Brunei Bay: protective patrolling all areas. Air rcn Kuching airfield sighted Jap aircraft displaying red pennant, Tarakan: No report, (24) 27 Aug: Confirmed is Chinese report movement PW Kuching to Singapore 6 months ago. States HQ 71 INB Kuching, Civilian administrator Kuching Province Senga Tomojiro formerly hajor General. Comd Kuching garrison Lt Col Seki CO IND lachine Gun Bn. Natives report 50 enemy burnt 10 native huts Kunarut as reprisal for killing of 1 Jap by native. Sighting Kuching town of several hundred white men and over 100 white women in PW compounds, signs observed welcome and all well here. Jap parties and vehicles on roads did not disperse on approach of aircraft, Tarakan. 10 PW brought in by Jap army patrols. (25) 28 Aug: Daily operational report 143 period 2724001 to 282400I. Balikpapan 7 Div: No report; Brunei Bay-Tarakan: Protective patrolling all areas; enemy casualties Tarakan: PW 8. (26) 28 Aug: NEI 17: 3 'itchells searched areas CDE with no enemy sightings; 2 Venturas searched areas F and G with no enemy sightings. TAF 34:4 Spitfires from 27012, to 270225 completed recce Jesselton Kiora-Balikpapan-Keningau areas reporting nothing of importance, TAF 97:6 Mosquitoes completed recce Kuching area sighting soe Japs but little activity, 1 Catalina search area A with no sightings. 1 Catalina searched area B with no sightings. (27) 28 Aug: TAC uching saw 1 Topsy on airfield flying red pennant also staff car with red pennant which drove from Kuching to Number of loaded trucks moved from south to Lintang barracks. Kuching. Moluccas: (28) 27 August 45: Signal from CG 93 Div to CG AFWESPAC received by this Hq 27 August indicates that all Japanese troops on Halmahera and Morotai under command of Lt Gen Ishi approximating 3170 Army and 5000 Navy have surrendered 1030, 27 August 45 to Ihjor Gen Johnson CG 93 Div. Lt Gen Ishi, Army Commander, and Captain Fujita, Navy Turning Commander, present on Morotai where surrender was effected. in of arms and troop concentration in billeting areas in progress with further information on material and personnel to be forwarded at an early date. The Australians have been advised by the CG, 93 Div. By radio this Hq to CG Southern Islands Area Command dated 27 August the latter has been instructed to limit his negotiations
S8 .

Text of Messages
Msg No ,:

Cont tld

Sum m-y 122

-

Conttd

for surrehder terms to that part of his area comrand within the Philippine Island Group, excluding all other areas of his command which for purposes of Japanese surrender negotiations have been placed under the jurisdiction of the Supreme Allied Commander Southeast Asia Commander the CG Australian Forces. II: RESUI". OF THE SITUATION:

,1 Surrender of Japanese in Bypassed Areas: Further evidence of Japanese willingness to comply wivth the ErTperor's rescript and to surrender to the Allies is furnished by the recent surrender of troops on Halmahera and Morotai and by the stated intention to surr of trpf on the.Pa aus & Yap, On 27 August all Japanese troops on Halmahera and lforotai reported under command of Lt Gen Ishi, Yoshiho, approximating 3170 Army and 5000 Naval troops, surrendered to the CG 93rd Division. Lt Gen Ishi, CG 32nd Division on Halmahera, was present on Morotai where the surrender was effected. Turning in of arms, and troops concentration in billeting areas is presently in progress. MJain combat units in this area are 32nd Division and 128th Independent Ixed Brigade. The total of 8170 Japanese on the two islands appear low, when compared with the last official estimate of approximately 23,000. *Pending further details it is difficult to explain this discrepancy unless, as appears uplikely, Lt Gen Ishi is not the overall commander in the area. Japanese troops in the Palau group and on Yap had not surrendered by 24 Augusta but representatives of Lt Gen Inoue, Sadae, CG 1~th Division, have indicated their willingness to surrender as soon as officially authorized by the Emperor. 2. Disposition of Naval Personnel: Information concerning the strength of Japanese Naval personnel and dispositions was furnished by the Japanese emissaries at anila on 19 August 1945. The information given was an estimate which can be classified as accurate except for the Philippine Islands and those southeastern and southwestern islands which have been partially occupied or by-passed by Allied forces. From a total strength of an estimated 809,115 personnel we can probably eliminate twenty percent of the listed strength given for the Philippines, the southwestern islands, and the southeastern islands reducing the grand total to 768,164, (See End No. 2), III: LISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION: RECENT POLITICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN JAPAN.An extraordinarily frank statement, revealing deep-seated differences and even confusion in high places, was made by Admiral Suzuki on 16 August 1945 when announcing the resignation of the Cabinet. He stated "there were many cases where the Emperorts decision was asked because decisions could not be reached in the cabinet meetings, which I deeply regret".. The normal procedure is for decisions to be submitted to the Emperor in a most formal session for his approval. This system appears to have failed because of the insuperable difficulties of arriving at a decision on surrender. The army was large, well-equipped and fully prepared to fight, however hopelessly. The natural unwillingness to surrender may be deduced from the promptness wi.th rhich the iinister of ar, General ANAl.I Korechika, committed suicide. At that time. Ary suicide units seriously threatened the maintenance of order. The best, if not the only, way was for the Emperor to act on his own (at least outwardly), This would probably prevent a clash between the feelings of the people (including reactionaries, political parties and all those eager to fish in troubled waters) and those in authority. This was the situation in which Prince HIGASHIKUNI was commanded to form a cabinet. A Domei news agency report of 17 August contains three points of vital significance with regard to this appointment. a, "It is inprecedented in the history of the Japanese, Cabinet system that an Imperial Prince receives a mandate to form a cabinet". Comment: The fact that the Premier is an Imperial Prince creates a sense of stability and continuity among the Japanese people which will sof'en the shock of defeat. For the same reason he is less liable to assassination".,

I

Miscellaneous Ifo

ation-

Conct

Summary 1242 - Cont1 d

b. "The event is particularly exceptional because the Emperor has granted the Imperial Mandate to Prince HIGASHIKUNI on his own august decision,. Comment: After the passing of the original Elder Statesmen, it became customary for the Emperor to consult a "committee" of the ex-Prime Ministers and the Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal. In this case the Imperor allegedly made the appointment personally and without consulting this "committee", c. "The SUZUKI Government will be fully responsible for all negotiations to be conducted with America, Britain, the Soviet Union and China in carrying out the (provisions) of the Potsdam Declaration", Comment: This provision is designed to give the new Cabinet a clean start, *without any legacy from the immediate past. It is clear that the people realize something of the above confusion and are demanding clarification as to the responsibility. The mperor is above all blame, but the people want some scapegoats. As soon as any groups are publicly stated to be responsible, they will become suicide or assassination targets. This can easily develop into widespread unrest and even chaos. Since the Emperor appears to be shielding the culprits, a wave of "hara-kiri" has resulted, as the people can find no other outlet for their emotions. The edicts issued by the Emperor have to be implemented by. ahinistraThe surrnoning of the extraordinary session of the tive and political power. Diet on 2 and 3 September may be in order to find out what parties and leaders are strong enough to assist the Emperor in this task. Analysis by ATIS, GHQ.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will hot be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed, When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer, See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 1I, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

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EXPLANATORY NOTES; ,OFCESENIIE 'J 2,9084 3,1 334 1 17,9229 1,817 7,t906 1,077 7,218 1,*372 1,320 33j883 28,893 162,9129 26,9904 98,039 10,399 T ~OTAL

LOCATION 1. Ominato GuardDistrict. 2. 3. Maizuru Naval District Yokosuka Naval District Osaka Guard District Kure Naval District

35,9967
432.027: 179,358 28,721 105,945 114476

46.
5. 6.

Inland Sea 6th & 7th Fl1eets, Sasebo Naval District-

87,535
14o4O7 32,o454 8,783

94.9753. 15,t77.9
33)77/+ 9,*322 46,694 3,P404 11~,688

8.

Chinkal Guard District

9, Formosa 10,v Hainan 110 12. 13, Philippine Islands French Indo-China Borneo

539
2,409. 424 468.

44,285
2,980 11,22.0 3,261 11,9004 15,100 8,t772

14. Celebes Java 16. Malay Grand Surface Escort Force Other Southwestern Islands Total Southoabhtern Area GRAND TOTAL

254,
908

3-,1,5
11,s912 16,403

1,303 1,543

10,315
118 0'62 769$115

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52,346716,7 69 52,346

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A41

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-l: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES iuIV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION
Sii V:
No.

MISCELLANEOUS

INFORMATION
DATE

12h1

27/28 Aug 1949

I GROUND: BORNEO: 1,Tarakan: 25/26 Aug: 10 PWitaken.
CHINA: 2,North China: 25/27 Aug: Japs at Shangchiu (80 mi E Kaifeng) surrendered to Central Govt Chinese; Japs at Sunghsien (135 mi ,TWSKaifeng) rptd to have killed Chinese peace enissaries on 18 Aug; 101 Japs at Loyang (110 mi IW Kaifeng) waiting for Chungking Forces to take over before surrendering; estimated 50,000 Communists (probably high) surrounded at Kaifeng on 20 Aug; trp concentrations indicated that Communist forces rill attack Weihsien (90 mi VTWNWT Tsingtao), 3oEast China: 26 Aug: Japs moving into Hangchow from SE dumped large quantities arms and some field guns into river; Japs at Nanking garrison burning documents on 18 and 19 Aug. h.Central China: 26 Aug: Commander Jap forces at Hankow posted notices to cease fighting, protect Chinese property, use arms for defense only, and in withdrawal not to destroy railroad property; Japs at Changsha say they vwill not surrender. 5,South China: 26 Aug: Some Japanese Luichow Peninsula opposed to surrender; new defenses being constructed Ft Bayard where Japs intend to destroy town and fight to the end. RYUITYUS: 60okinawa: 26/27 Aug: 3 Japs killed, 11 surrendered. II Nil Air Activity AIR:

III NAVY: JAVA: l,Bawsean Id: 28 Aug: 1 destroyer, 1 freighter (150/300T), crs E, h0 mi N of Bawean Id, FRENCH IDO-CHINA: 2.C St Jacques: 27 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T), 1 freighter-tpt (700/1300T),
crs E,. spd 8. 3.Cape Padaran: 27 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) anchored

HAINAN: h.Hoi How: 27 Aug: 1 tug, 1 freighter (150/300T),

6 luggers anchored.

i,

FORM}SA: 5.Takao: 27 Aug: 7 luggers anchored inner hbr. 6.Keelung: 27 Aug: 3 freighters (1L0/300T), 6 motor launches underway, CHINA COAST: 7*Ft Bayard: 27 Aug: 2 luggers anchored. 8.Amoy: 27 Aug: 3 freighters (10/300T), 1 freighter-tpt (700/1300T), 1 freighter (300/100T), 1 frigate, 1 barge, h luggers anchored, inner hbr. CENTRAL PACIFIC: 9,Palau: 21 Aug: 1 drifting horned mine exploded, SE Peleliu.
1,

.. ummary 121l - Cont'd IV RESUMv A. GROUND: l.
t OF THE SITUA I ON:

Southern Areas: a) Battle Order: The most noteworthy fact in Japanese dispositions of major combat units in the Pacific, Southwest Pacific and West Pacific areas furnished by the Japanese emissaries to Ltnila on 19 August is the weakness in the southwestern position of the perimeter. In the area of the Greater and Lesser Sundas from Sumatra through Java to Timor, there are shown only 2 divisions and 3 brigades,- However, the movement westward from this area is shown by the withdrawal of the 46th Division from the Lesser Sundas to Malaya and 48th Division west from Timor. The build-up in strength at

Malaya evidences the apprehension of an Allied threat to that area. The 616th Division is shown here but the 37th Division shown in Siam and previously reported from Chinese sources in South China, might have been enroute to Malaya. Evacuation from Burma is indicated by the eastward movement of the 15th Division which the Japanese place in Siam (38th Division shown in Burma is an error for 33rd Division). Only two brigades are allotted for the defense of Borneo. The 71st Brigade, which the Japanese show at Balikpapan,
has not been identified by Allied troops in that area, but is currently carried at Kuching.- In the Philippines, the Japanese still show 13 divisions and 6 brigades, the majority of which now exist in war history files only.. The 44th and ~$th' Brigades shown in Sulu-Zamboanga are in error for the 5th and 55th. Of interest to note is the large and inexpensive concentration

camp embraced by the area from the Halmaheras to the Solomons where 10 divisions and 5 brigades have been cut off by Allied moves and confined by a relatively small number of our troops. The area army boundry symbol shown between 2nd Army and 18th Army is in error for an army (corps) boundary. In conclusion, it must be pointed out that while on paper or map, the listing of Japanese major combat units presents a formidable array of strength, in effect this strength does not exist, for in the Philippines, Burma, New Guinea, Bismarcks and Solomons the bulk of the major combat units constitute more than ineffective remnants of their original strength. The Japanese list the total Pacific strength by major combat units as follows: Strength of 10th Area Army Strength of 7th Area Army 6 Divs. 3 Divs.
10 Brigs. 11 Brigs..

Total Strength of Southern Army Strength of 2nd Army 39 Divs.-Flying Forces - 3 4 Divs..

26 Brigs.
Strength of French Indo-China Garrison Army 2 Divs.

2 Brigs.
Strength of l1th Area Army 13 Divs 5 Brigs

1 Brig.
Strength of Siam Garrison Army 5 Divs. Strength of 8th Area Army 2 Divs.

2 Brigs

.

3 Brigs.
Strength of 17th Army 1 Div.

Strength of Burma Area Army 8 Divs.

3 Brigs. (See Enclosures Nos 1 and 2).
B. AIR;:

1 Brig.

1. Empire and Japanese Occupied Regions: a) Status of Army Air: The following information on the status of the Japanese Air Forces was contained in the documents submitted to the Supreme Commander for the Allied Forces by the Japanese mission to Manila.

-

2

-

I'dr

-

Contld

Sumary 12141 - Contd

18 Aug 1945 Japnes I myAir, 2treng.th .................. - ............. ......... .......... .................. ......... ................ ......... . ................ ................. .......... ... ........... ..................................................... Sub Totals' Othe-rs oibers Stts±ihe ............... Area 143 1161 27 lan761 7i4. 79 531 131 Operational: Japan Proper ... ... ... .. ... ...... .. ... ... .. ... .. ... .......... ..... ... ... .... .......... ..... ... ... .. ... ....... ... ......... .... .... ..... ... ... ........ ... ... ... .. i............ .................. .. ........ ....... ...... ... ..... On Hand 12. 82 43 246 Korea Operational . 46 6 --- 98
On Hand Operational On Hand China Operational On Hand Operational On Hand operational On Hand Operational

Imperial GHQ Army.Dept

............ ..... .. ........ ..... .... ...... I..... ............. .............. ....................... ......... ...... .. . ........... ........... ............. .
76 51 109
22290 12

88
51

Manchuria

............ 54
26 154

4
72

Formlosa

136
192

53
40 37

188 52 ... -.... ............ ~_.... .... .... 516 243 232

Southern Area

...... 6 ................ ................... I............................... .............

37

714
----.. . -- -I... -- .. .. 2431. . .
1262

'149
826

547
257 nti al

335179 h

...... ...... ............. .............. .................................. ................ ............................................ .... ...................................................... I.......................... ................. .......................

GRAlNnD TOTALS

...............

Notes:

1.I

diintItearlnsson
In addition to the air-olanes

1.

sho-Lvn~ in'tis

table the

following

numbers of airplanes are hold for use by training forces, Southern Area - about 300 Japan Proper - about 393
- about - about - about
-about

K'orea
IManchuria China Total

1914

41
16

91414
Some changes since

. This table is a compilation as of about 20 July. that time can be expected.

The following table outlines the plan for the employment of the suicide air units. Plan For Organization of Japanese Army Air Special Attack Strength
Imperial GH1Q,

Army

Dept.

17 Aug 1945
No. of Airplanes

Area
Tohuk-u, anto, Chubu Chugokcu, Shikoku, Kyushu

Korea, 1.1anchuria China Formosa Total Notes:

About 600 About 1000 About 550 About 150 "bout 150; About 2450

1. About half the number of airplanes shovi i- this table w:ill be intermediate trainers. 2, Since tactical organization is still in progress, some are completely ready but others are not. 3.. Some changes from the dispositions shown in this tabi can be 3..2 expected.

3

Air - Cont'd
YStats

'
of Na Air: Carr

Summary 1241 - Conttd
1 Aug 1945

Unit

Status iFtr

N .IFtr- Med Rcn Rcn Ftr BmbriAtk (Lan$iS/P

Fly Bt

Tng A/C 1152 631

Anti Sub

Totals

Air 1 ir

Fleet le

On HandI482
27 On Hand 42

30
I 131

184 101
79$ 289 81

42 1574(1) 1303
1 63 1l

e .....Serv

T()

0
0 0

116

2284
1752

3 Air Fleet

0

u.....u........ 0 0 0 0 669 1235 0 0 0t C 0 .. .................................................................... ............................................ ..................... .................. ....... ....................................... ........... ......................... 163 ll. 13
Escort Force
Serv

........-.... ........................ 0 10 .ir. et On Hland 289 r Flt e serv tI 0

|

17

231 T 10 12 3

6172

0
0

1
13

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2597 72 180

Serv Othersu On Hand Serv

43
42

3 0

0o 0

0 0

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3

0

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47-703 131u0 303 1

60

TOTALS
Note:

On Hand 136 1661

642j328

107

8

0(1) i2699

886

Presumably a few airplanes have been expended in operations and training after this table was compiled. V fLSCELUNEOUS INFORhiTION:

Notes on Relations With the Japanese, No. 1

U

To of the qualities demanded in dealings with the Japanese are firmness and self-control. Japanese society is a caste society. It is organized on different levels someTat like ranks in the army. On the highest level the Japanese Government has shov a readiness to comply fully with the explicit orders given. They know the score. It is in the implementation of these orders on the lower levels that hitches and delays will possibly occur. A crystal ball, in excellent working order, would be needed to discover haether these hitches and delays are intentional or not. Be firm and courteous, but quietly insist that the letter of the order be fulfilled. Look for a justified reason, but accept no excuses. The Japanese make excuses very pleasantly. They don't care whether they are lying or not, the idea is to soothe the authority into acceptance. If, for example, they say that a typhoon has blown down the houses allotted for quarters, how do you know that those particular houses really had been allotted? Certain houses may be lying flat, and that's too bad, but it is their job to provide suitable quarters. It will save trouble, temper and hours of interpreting if Allied authority in question quickly comes to a wise decision, insists on its being carried out, and makes arrangements to see that it is carried out. The Japanese do not like personal responsibility and will often try to dodge it. Give them an inch and they will take a "ri (2 miles). You are not dealing with reasonable, mature people. It is more like dealing with a bunch of kids with touchy ideas of honor, privilege and position, Politness and firnness will gain respect and get better results than angry bluster. It is common sense, not weakness, to treat Japanese holding official positions with the degree of respect due to their position. Remem.ber that the man acting as Mayor of Tokyo has administrative power over some 6 million people. If he is treated disrespectfully he loses some of his control over those people. Similarly, in dealing with the headman of a village. Granted, he's nothing to worry about, but if the Allied official

"A .

J

iiscellaneous Information - Contd

;

ay r

1241 - Contd

gains and maintains h e; secb and treats' im a little better than the others in public, it ill p bnhis vanity, bolster his authority and get results. If the headman is treated badly in public, he loses face before the villagers, won't be able to control them and wonft wvant to control them. In the early stages guard against the American tendency to relax and be friendly. They are a proud people beaten for the first time in their history., Their smiling faces are no indication of their feelings* Offical correctness of behavior -will carry you through, -This item is prepared by T.I.S., GHQ Japanese Language Agency.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein vill not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. Vhen not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a sade and is chargeable to the custody of an Officers., See AR 38Q-5, 1i March 19!1.,and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No, 14, l4 Irch 1944I regarding security Classifications.

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140

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1240

26/27 Aug 1945

I GROUND:

PHILIPPINES:
l.Luzoni: :224 Aug: 500 Japs rptd desire to surrender N Mayoyao; negotiations in progress with 3 Jap officers; 16 en surrendered; 7 of 12 Japs killed raiding barrio vicin Batangas. 25/26 Aug: Negotiations for surrender of M1aj Gen Noguchi (formerly CG 81st Brig, 103rd Div) force poss strength 8500 progressing satisfactorily. 20 Japs surrendered or : captd "during period. :?.txind.anao: 23/24 Aug: Casualties inflicted on en group vicin Malaybalay.

ASIA:

..hina: 25 Aug: Communists rptd to have 18,000 underground workers ShonC shia area; 20,000 (prob high) between Kwangte and Esuancheng; 50,000 (prob high) W of Chekiang; 50,000 (doubtful) Tsingtao area; 20,000 along banks of Yangtze fr Wuhu to Kueichih; 20,000 have reinforced 50,000 already in Tin Hopie (e'sts prob high) but rpt Communists intend to take Tientsin and Peiping prob true. 26 Aug: Rumor E China approx 8000 Japs .incl 1100 AC personnel to form resistance movement; civil strife rptd Shanghai area; unconfirmed rpt Jap troops rioting Paoching region, RYUKYUS: 4.0kinawa: 24 Aug: Additional 36 Japs surrendered Tokaskiki Id. II AIR: Nil Air Activty III NAVY: FRENCHl INDO-Cf IINA: 1.Saigon: 26 Aug: 1 freighter (300/1000T), crs E, spd 12. 2.Tuy Hoa: 26 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T), crs N, spd 3, 3 mi E. 3,Cape Varella: 26 Aug: 1 freighter (1500/2500T). PHILIPPINES: 4.Panay Gulf: 25 Aug: Mine sighted. HAINAN: 5.Yulin Bay: 26 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T), 2 luggers anchored. 6.Hoi How: 26 Aug: 1 tug, 6 luggers anchored. FORMOSA: 7.Takao: 26 Aug: 15 luggers anchored. 8.Shinchiku: 26 Aug: 4 luggers, crs W, spd 5; 1 subchaser. 9.Keelung: a) 26 Aug: 4 freighters (150/300T) anchored, b) 26 Aug: 2 freighters (150/300T), 1 lugger anchored 10 mi N. 10. Coast: 26 Aug: 3 freighters (150/300T) anchored, 60 mi off NW Coast. CHINA COAST: 11.HongKong:.26 Aug: 4 freighters, 4 riverboats, 6 luggers anchored, 12.Hunghai Bay: 26 Aug: 1 freighter, 1 minelayer, anchored, 10 mi E.

-1-

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--

Summary 1240 - Cont'd IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION A. GROUND:

1, Asia: a) Battle Order - Manchuria and Korea: Japanese disposition of major combat units of the Kwantung Army as furnished by the Japanese emissaries to Manila on 19 August, shows a concentration of the bulk of their troops of this force in Southeastern and Southern Manchuria. Korea was garrisoned by the relatively strong force of 6 divisions and 2 brigades. The Japanese in Manchuria evidently realized the futility of defending all of the vast expanse of Manchuria and concentrated their forces along the border area near VladiBefore the vostok and the communication centers of Southern Manchuria. cessation of hostilities, it was only in the Vladivostok zone, where Soviet forces were driving westward towards Harbin, and in Northern Korea that the Japanese were able to offer any appreciable resistance to the rapid advances of the Russian troops, (See End No. 1). B. NAVY:

1. General Western Pacific Area: a) Disposition of Japanese Submarines: Information furnished on 19 August 1945 by Japanese emissaries at Manila relative to disposition of submarines as follows: Jap submarines: Yokosuka Maisuru Kure Kure-Western Inland Sea Saeki Sasebo *At Sea: Between Okinawa and Philippines In vicinity Marianas In vicinity Truk Total 4 9 9 13 2 1

3 3 2 46

German submarines manned by Jap crews: Kobe Singapore Batavia Sourabaya Total GRAND TOTAL 2 2 1 6 52

*The eight submarines at sea have with them 18 Kaitens (human torpedoes). Submarines at sea on 16 August were issued orders to stop hostilities and return to base; on the 18th, the order was repeated. (See Enclosure No. 2). V MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION: The Japanese Attitude to Defeat: Two episodes, in Tokyo, and on Guam, illustrate the emotional Japanese reaction to the news of defeat. In Tokyo the Domei News Agency describes how on 14 August 1945 the crowd "of loyal people are bowed to the very ground in front of the Double Bridge Alas! in their iear flow unchecked. (entrance to the Imperial Palace). With the words, 'Forgive us, shame, how can the people raise their heads? Oh Emperor, our efforts were not enough', the heads bow lower and lower as . the tears run unchecked." 2 * **~~ .. S IW ^ s '*'' **
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Miscellaneous Information,-

Coot' d

Summary 140

Coht'd

The Japanese felt shame for having lost the war, not for having started They had committed the unpardonable sin of failure. The Associated Press describes the highly emotional way in which the Japanese PsW on Guam received the news of defeat. "When the announcement was mnde that their Emperor would speak on the radio, the all rose solemnly and bowed in the direction of Tokyo. When they learned that Japan ;had conceded defeat, they broke into crying and moaning. Since the Restoration of the Emperor Meiji in 1868 the Japanese people have been encouraged to parade on the broad plaza in front of the Imperial Palace and mutely to express their loyalty in bowing. Since 1931, however, the custom of bowing towards the Imperial Palace, from a distance has been instilled by indoctrination. A further stop was taken in 1938. The Japanese public passing the Imperial Palace in streetcars, and buses were warned by the conductresses. They were expected to rise, doff their hats and bow. The awkwardness of movement involved for those sitting with their backs to the august precincts was the subject of comment in the Press. Soon the public was encouraged to bow when passing the Yasukuni Shrine, where dwelt the deified spirits of those who had given their lives for the Emperor. This development of the Imperial Palace into the religious Mecca of the Japanese race is of very recent date, has been made a part of the "spiritual training" of the armed forces since 1937. These episodes illustrate the malleability of the Japanese character. This malleability, in the hands of the Japanese militarists, was a permanent thereat to any democratic world order. But in the fact that this emotionalism has been diverted into certain channels by intense propaganda also lies the hope of restoring the Japanese people to a more healthy, human point of view. Analysis by ATIS, GHQ. it.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document,Information containted herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

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I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1239

25/26 Aug 194

I GROUND: BORNEO: 1.Northeast Sector: 24/25 Aug: Natives claim en Keningau moved to Tambunan; en Kinarut dest bridges, burned villages, carried off natives as porters. PHILIPPINES: 2.Mindanao: 25 Aug: Sm nbrs PWs rcvd in Wangal-Unapan-Biao area. MARSHALL ISLANDS: 3.Mille Atoll: 22 Aug: Strength of surrendered Atoll garrison rptd as 2400.

RYUKYUS:
4.0kinawa: 25 Aug: 6 Japs killed, 34 surrendered. 23 Aug: En garrison 21 of 221 EM Tokaskiki Id (W of Okinawa) surrendered. JAPAN: 5.Kyushu: 25 Aug: Much rail activity all parts of island, considerable motor truck movement on Hvwys; 1000 bathing Fukuoka beaches, waved to planes; troops in parade formation Kurums, II AIR: JAPAN: 1.Kyushu: 25 Aug: a) Lone Tpt a/c sighted over Mlyakanojo a/d by surveillance fighter patrol; tpt landed when approached by Fs. b) Approx 40 Fs & 6 Bs parked on grd at Myakanojo; AA guns in area all manned & tracked U.S. a/c over area; nil fire. c) 30 Fs, 15 biplanes & 21 Bs parked at Tomitaka a/d. d) 20 Fs & 30 trainers parked at Karasehara a/d. III NAVY: HAINAN: 1.Yulin Bay: 25 Aug: 2 freighters, 1 tug anchored. 2.Hainan Straits: 25 Aug: 1 tug, 6 luggers, anchored. FORMOSA: 3.Takao: a) 25 Aug: 8 luggers anchored, b) 25 Aug: 2 luggers, on crsNNW, spd 5, 3 mi NW Takao. c) 25 Aug: 1 lugger, 2 barges, anchored, 10 mi W of Takao. 4.Keelung: 25 Aug: 2 freighters, 2 launches anchored. 5.NW Coast: 1 lugger, 5 mi N of Taien, crs NE, spd 7. CHINA COAST: 6.Ft. Bayard: 25 Aug: 2 luggers anchored. 7.St. John Id:.a) 25 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) anchored, 15 mi NE. b) 25 Aug: 1 tug anchored, 15 mi NE. 8.Amoy: 25 Aug: 1 freighter (300/1000T), 1 freighter (150/300T) & 1 lugger anchored.

Summary 1239 - Conttd

IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION A. GROUND:

1. Asia: Battle Order - China: The tactical disposition of troops in China as of 18 August and as obtained from the Japanese emissaries to Manila on 19 August presents a picture of troop concentrations along the main lines of communication in the Shanghai-Nanking-Hangchow triangle of Eastern China and in the Hankow-Kaifeng area of North China. This disposition confirms the trend of enemy movement northward and eastward noted during recent months and as reported by various sources in China, The enemy had been withdrawing many of his veteran combat divisions northward from Central and Southern China, and garrisoning the areas vacated by these divisions and his lines of communications with many brigades recently formed in China mainly from puppet and Japanese -ivilian sources. The Japanese, then, were in the process of realigning their troops and preparing defensive installations in Northern and Eastern China, a reaction attributable to the recognized possibilities of Allied landings, at the time of the order to cease hostilities. (See Encls Nos. 1 and 2) V AISCELLANEOUS INFORvMTION According to a Domei dispatch, General Sadamu Shimomura has been appointed Minister of War in the cabinet of H.IH. Prince Higashi-Kuni. General Shimomura is a staff officer with a broad knowledge of world affairs, and recognized ability as an organizer. He is 58 years of age, and the fact that he was born in Kochi, Shikoku: indicates that he comes from the Tosa clan. He was graduated from the Military Academy in Artillery in 1908 and from the General Staff College in 1917. In 1919 he took a course at St. Cyr, the French Staff College. He was promoted Colonel in 1931 and in 1933 was a member of various diplomatic missions to Europe, after which he was appointed a member of the Geneva Disarmament Conference. He became Chief of the 4th Section of the General Staff (War History and Military Geography) in 1937 when he was a Major General. In 1939 he was promoted Lieutenant General and became Commander of the Tokyo Bay Fortresses. The following year he was Commandant of the Artillery and Engineer School and just before the outbreak
of war he became Commandant of the General Staff College. In 1942 he was

given the 13th Army, with HQs in Shanghai. He returned from the Chinese front to become Commander of the _esternDistrict Army early in 1944. At that time, and Honshu, west of and including Hirothis army occupied Kyushu, Shikokul shima Prefecture. In Nov, 19lA, he returned to China to become Commanding General of Japanese forces in North China, a post which he has hold until the present time.
He was promoted General in May 1945.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document.

Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. Wjhen not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of
an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 Lhrch 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure

Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

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I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1238

24/25 Aug 1945

I GROUND: SOLOMONS: 1,Bougainville: 22 Aug: Many trps obsvd throughout area and supplies being stacked Buin Beach. MARSHALL ISLANDS: 2.Mille Atoll: 22 Aug: USj Navy unit received surrender of en garrison. PHILIPPINES: 3.Mindanao: 24 Aug: PW collecting points rcvd 15 Japs in Bisco area. RYUKYUS: 4.Okinawa: 24 Aug: 29 en surrendered; 29 killed refusing to surrender, II Nil Air Activity III NAVY: AIR:

HAINAN:
1.Hoi How: 24 Aug: 3 landing craft, 1 tug, 1 freighter (150/300T), & 1 subchaser anchored. 2.Yulin Bay: 24 Aug: 4 freighters (150/300T), 4 luggers anchored. FORMOSA: 3.Keelung: 24 Aug: 2 freighters (150/300T), 1 subchaser underway. 4.Takao: 24 Aug: 4 freighters (150/300T) anchored. CHINA:COAST: 5.Amoy: 24 Aug: 2 luggers anchored. 6.Swatow: 24 Aug:'2 luggers anchored. 7,Ft. Bayard: 24 Aug: 3 luggers anchored. 5 lugger

IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION: A. GROUND:
1.

Empire: a) Battle Order - Western Japan: Disposition of major combat units as furnished by the Japanese emissaries to Manila on 19 August, reflect the enemy's appreciation of the vulnerability of the home islands. This was particularly true in the case of the Tokyo Plain area (see Daily Summary No. 1237). Vith respect to Western Japan, the bulk of the divisions, by 18 August, were deployed in Kyushu (16th Area Army) with particular emphasis logically placed on the Island's southern regions. Vestern Honshu appears to be lightly held but the defense of Shikoku, despite its natural characteristic restricting maneuver and its seemingly low priority as an assault target, has been given considerable attention. Dispositions as| by the Japanese may not depict an entirely accurate picture of actuS ~ ense emporpatterns; major units shown on their naps perhaps were in transi o~ arily deployed. Further information ei ed ba.ebore;. a poitive situation
1 -

Ground - Contld

Summary 1238 - Cont'd

can be developed showing the method and means which were to be employed to meet homeland invasion. (See Enclosure No. 1). Asia: a) China: The military situation in China continues to be vague. The Japanese Government in a message to the Supreme Allied Commander on 22 August states that in spite of their utmost efforts, the Chinese regular forces, bandits and the disturbances of mobs are causing serious difficulties in their attempt to cease hostilities. The forces of the Communist Government and the Central Government are still at odds although late, unoffical reports state that the Communist Party is sending a representative to the Chungking Government for a conference. Reports emanating from the China Theater indicate that not only the Chinese Forces under the two separate commands, but also the Japanese demonstrate an extensive lack of combat control. Japanese Forces have given up Yuncheng, Linfen, Chaocheng and Kiehsu in North China to forces of the Central Government. Details are lacking but it is reported that Communist Forces have occupied the following North and East China cities: Wuhu, Pukow (across the river fron Nanking), I: foig Tsingto , Tientsin and 'eihaiwei (on the S;a.ntung Peninsula). There are indications from increased troop strengths that the Communists will make a strong effort to seize Peiping. At Hofei (95 miles west of Kaifong) the Japanese surrendered to puppet forces under command of the Central Government and north of Hofci Japanese puppets are reported engaging Communist troops. The Japanese are reported to have repulsed a Communist attempt to enter Suchow (170 miles northwest Nanking). In t.o North China coastal cities, in the Tientsin vicinity, the Japanese were said to be massing material and personnel for shipment to Japan; all rail-lines into Nanking are busy transporting Japanese troops into the city., In Central China 30,000 Japanese reportedly reached Changsha from Hengyang. In both Changsha and Hengyang the strong enemy garrisons are prepared to defend these cities, stating that they have received no order to surrender. Reports from South China state that the Japanese in Lochang (140 miles north of Canton) are prepared to surrender upon receipt of proper orders from higher authority, and at Waichow (60 miles north of Hong Kong) Japanese elements in anticipation of surrendering, were selling their supplies. Central Government forces now report Hoang Su Phi in Norther Indo-China surrounded instead of captured as previously reported. The Japanese here refused to surrender, saying they must wait for orders from higher headquarters. Thus, with all three forces shuffling their troops and with the Japanese surrendering on one hand and resisting on the other, apparently depending on whether or not the local command has received the official declaration ordering cessation of hostilities, the military situation in China presents a picture of confusion. (See Enclosure No. 2). 2.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Soction to which it is addressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.,'

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GENERAL, HEA DQUARTERS SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA Military Intelligence Section General Staff k, Cof 1.10 ut I91i5

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To Accomnpany Encl- Nos, 2 Daily Sumraaz, No, 1238 EXPANTORY NOTESt Japanese forces have surrendered the, N China towns of Yunchengp Linfenp Chaocheng-and Kiehzi, to Central Government Foreez, while &ending omissarics to the 2nd.'War Zone mcrinandor for surrender negotiations* 2. Comunist formos have 'seized Weihaiwei on the Shantung Peninsulas, Kioisui (260. nil s.- w of aqlping) previously reported under Central Government control is now reported still hold bythe Zapanese with Communist party troops surrounding the city,* 3,w The Japanese are said to be massing material and personnel fo shipment to Japan in two ports in thea Tientsin vicinity* 4. Tientsin is practically c6pletely occupied by the Communists,, although sdmo fighting is continuingw Troop movementa indicato that ccmmmuist forces will make a strong effort to seize Peipings 3.

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8w -The XJpmese are concentrating a large numbar of troops in Nanking by utilizifig all avmilable rail transportation leading
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recently occupied by Chungking forcet is now surrounded by Communist troops who may move into tht, city.- The is otilin Central Government hands* troops have driven back Corminst troops who had attempted to enter Suchows, in Hofei surrezda.rd to the Central Govermento N of Iofei, puppet forces were engaging Communist party troops.

9s. The Japanese garrison at Changsha, previously ntubering 149000, has beon bolstered by an additional 30*000 troops from
Hengryangs, 10q, The enemy garri~son in the Hengyang area is prepared to fight$ stating they have received no sirrender orders 114 The Japaneso at Lochang are prepared to surrender imiediately upon receipt of proper orders from higher, authority* At Wapchow, Japanese' elements An preparation for surrender are selling their supplies. 12. ConAral Government f orces have surrounded Hoang Su Phi in Ibrthern Indo..China, but the Tapm eec there state they must receivo orders from higher headquarters before aurrendering.

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MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-ITI: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1237

23/24 Aug 1945

I GROUND: SOLOMONS: 1.Bougainville: 23 Aug: Approx 60 en moving fr Hari area to Buin. NEW GUINEA: 2.Wewak Area: 23 Aug: Lrg fires obsvd Keravaf, Wafom, and N Borpop. PHILIPPINES: 3.Mindanao: 23 Aug: Minor contact 4200 yds S Tiaong, 2 en killed, 27 captd during period. RYUKYUS: 4.Okinawa: 23 Aug: En trps on Asa Shima surrendered 22 Aug. CHINA: 5.Central China: 23 Aug: Puppet strength Nanking area est 20/30,000; puppet 3rd Div surrendered to Communist troops near Huaiyii on 14 Aug. 6.Indo-China: 23 Aug: Hoang Suphi surrounded, but Japs refuse to surrender without instructions fr higher headquarters. II AIR: CHINA SEA: 1.Hainan Id: 23 Aug: En tpt a/c approached PB4Y; when collision appeared prob, friendly a/c fired 75 round warning; en plane pulled away waggling wings; 13401. III NAVY: FRENCH INDO CHINA: .1C. St Jacques Area: 23 Aug: 1 freighter, crs N, spd 12 in Mekong R. 2.Camranh Bay: 23 Aug: Oil slick 85 miles E, extending 10 mi NExSW, HAINAN: 3.Yulin Bay: 23 Aug: 6 freighters (150/300T), 2 luggers anchored. 4.Hoi How Bay: 23 Aug: 1 tug, 1 subchaser, 6 luggers anchored. FORMOSA: 5.Takao: 23 Aug: 8 sm speed boats maneuvering at high spd in Bay,2 mi N. CHINA COAST: 6 oFt Bayard: 23 Aug: 3 luggers. 7.Swatow: 23 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T), 2 luggers anchored. 8.HongKong: 23 Aug: 1 freighter (300/1000T), crs E, 60 mi NExE. 9.Amoy: 23 Aug: 2 luggers, 2 freighters (3/850T) anchored inner hbr. IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION: A. GROUND - NAVY: 1.

Empire: a) Battle Order - Northern Japan: A map furnished by the Japanese Emissaries to Manila on 19 August gives a picture of the Japanese disposition of major units to meet the threat of Allied invasion. They obviusly
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Cont'd

Summary 1237 - Cont ',d

considered the Tokyo Plain area to be the vital defensive sector of Northern Japan, for here were concentrated a total of 16 divisions and 4 independent mixed brigades. In the Sendai Plain area of Northern Honshu, considered vulnerable to attack by virtue of its excellent landing beaches and fairly easily transversable terrain inland, the Japanese had deployed only two divisions. Once again, the Japanese clearly indicate that their deployment of troops is primarily based on enemy intentions instead of capabilities, for here they concentrated nearly all of their troops in one vital area and apparently were content to "write-off" the Northern Honshu and Hokkaido (See End No. 1) sectors where only numerically small forces were disposed° b) Strengths - Naval and Guard Districts: The Japanese emissaries to Manila furnished data concerning their naval forces, including information regarding bases and strength of Naval Districts and Guard Districts, which appears in this issue of the Daily Summary. (See Enclosure No. 2). Further data as to Naval Order of Battle, suicide weapons, etc., supplied by the Japanese, will appear in subsequent issues, V MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION: Control of the Japanese People: The directive on the behavior of the Japanese people, issued by It the Home Ministry, is unusually specific for a Japanese proclamation. a desire to make the best of a bad business. Amazing rumors concerning shows the Allies have already been reported. The Home Ministry takes it for granted that the system of neighborhood associations will be maintained. (For detailed account of this system see ATIS Research Report No.. 126 Parts I and II of 26 April 1945). The provision that "English-speaking persons must be distributed in all neighborhood associations" cuts both ways, it reduces the number of Allied interpreters required but the Home Ministry now has a communication net of observation posts on Allied behavior throughout the country. No action could be more authoritarian, less democratic, than this arbitrary assignment of English-speaking people throughout the country. The amazing degree of official control reveals: a. The tremendous gulf between the authoritarian Japanese outlook and the democratic respect for human rights. b. That there is a real possibility of maintenance of peace and order. The task of civil control by the Japanese has been enormously aided by the appointment of Prince Higashikuni as Premier. The fact that he is both an Army man and an Imperial Prince makes obedience easier. It is in such intangible ways that the Imperial Family influences the people. United Press reports that the instructions issued by the Japanese Home Ministry included: People must strictly refrain from causing any unnecessary "l. confusion. "2. People residing in occupation zones must remain calm and cool, "3. People must disregard rumors. People when approached by any &ember of the occupation troops 4. However, the people should should display courtesy and proper attitude. refrain from individually approaching occupation troops, 5. English-speaking persons must be distributed in all neighborhood associations and villages in order to avoid difficulties arising out of misunderstanding and misinterpretation of languages. The governor of Kanagawa prefecture, which is the first to be occupied by the Allies, asked his people to receive the incoming "forces "with manner and attitude befitting the Japanese people"." (Analysis by ATIS, GHQ). Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this.document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is.addressed, When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeableto' the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No, 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1236

22/23 Aug 1945

I GROUND; BORNEO: 1.Brunei Bay-Miri Area: 22 Aug: Newly cut trail marked with- luminous paint found near Miri possibly indicates en contemplated night attack; 2 en killed during period. 2.Tarakan: 22 Aug: 2 en captd during period. PHILIPPINES: 3Mindanao: 22 Aug: Est 4000 en airforce personnel 50 km E Valencia sent envoys to arrange surrender, and were instructed to proceed to Valencia via Pulangi R. 4.Luzon: 22 Aug . Scattered contacts Bambang area; L4 en contacted vic Hwy 11 and attempts are being made to induce them to surrender; est 50 en near Carranglan refused to'surrender, and 21 were killed in the ensuing engagement; 21 en killed, 13 captd during period, RYUIYUS i 5.Okinawa: 22 Aug: 20 en killed, 81 captd during period. CHINA: 6.S China: 22 Aug: En at MyongHuong surrounded but refuse to surrender. II AIR: Nil air activity. III NAVY: FRENCH INDO CHINA: 1.Haiphong: 22 Aug: 2 freighters (1l0/300T), 3 luggers, 2 barges, anchored. HAINAN: 2.Yulin Bay: 22 Aug: 1 subchaser, 2 tugs, 1 dredge anchored. 3.Hoi How Bay: 22 Aug: 1 tug, 10 luggers anchored. FORMOSA: U.Keelung: 22 Aug: 5 freighters (150/300T) anchored, 1 ferry underway. CHINA COAST: 5.Taichow: 14 Aug: Enemy sub 1-373 rptd to be at Sasebo 1 Aug now rptd by prisoner to be sunk on 14 Aug enroute to Takao. 6.Ft. Bayard: 22 Aug: 2 freighters (150/300T), 2 luggers. 7.HongKong: 22 Aug: 3 freighters (150/300T), 1 riverboat, 1 subchaser anchored. 8.Swatow: 22 Aug: 2 luggers anchored, 9.Amoy: 22 Aug: 3 luggers, 2 poss freighters (3/850T), 1 barge anchored, IV RESUE OF THE SITUATION:. .

A,

GROUND:
-I
-

Ground - Contid 1. Philippines:

Sumary 1 1236 - Conttd

a) MINDANAO: Another Japanese surrender party, a 1st Lt. and 4 enlisted men, arrived at our 31st Division on 22 August to arrange the surrender -of approximately 4,000 air force personnel presently living in the mountains 31 miles east of Valencia in Central Bukidnon. These surviving troops have hidden there since Sayre Highway was cleared in May, and in strength approximate nearly half of estimated remaining Japanese on Mindanao. A 3-day voyage on homemade rafts down the Pulangi River was necessary for the Japanese party to reach our units; the 1st Lt.ls personal message to his CO, advising the latter to conduct the entire troop body into our lines by similar means, will be transmitted by scheduled airdrops of mimeographed copies thereof. V MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION: Jap Emissaryls impressions of Americans in Manila: The following is a Domei broadcast of 21 August in English from Tokyo: The American forces are very modest and they are not displaying the haughty air of a victorious army, declared one of the Japanese military emissaries who returned today from Manila where he attended the conference In a press interview, he continued that the on the occupation of Japan. journey to and from Manila went on smoothly, mainly because of the efforts of the American military authorities, Commenting on the conference proceedings, he said that during the meeting, attending American military leaders were tolerant and understanding, About the city of Manila, the emissary said that although destruction has been very heavy, the city itself is lively with the activity of the American forces. At night the city is bright with lights and there is a very brisk movement of materials being transported about by American automobiles,

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document* Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond not actually in uses the Staff Section to which it is addressed .Mhen this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an officer, See AR 380-s, l March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure lnstructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classi||pations. ..

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1235

21/22 Aug 1945

I GROUND.: BORNEO: 1,Brunei Bay: 21 Aug: Minor contacts vie Padas R; 2 en kd; 2 captd during period. PHILIPPINES: 2.Luzon: 21 Aug: Aggressive en grps contacted Agno R Valley; minor contacts vie Angeles, Infanta; 12 en kd, 18 captd during period. RYUKYUS: 3.0kinawa: 21 Aug: 28 en kd, 69 captd during period, CHINA: 4.Peking: 20 Aug: Nil Japs in Peking area, 5.Shanghai: 20 Aug: Japs request Americans not enter occupied areas in Shanghai, Nanking, and other areas until formal signing of surrender, lest "accidents" occur. 6,Central China: 21 Aug: En at Changsha storing arms and looting civilian homes; en burying arms and ammo at Paoching, 7.South China: 21 Aug: Est 15,000 en trps located Canton area; Hq Jap S China Expeditionary Force burning files since 17 Aug; en at Chuchiang declare surrender is Anglo-American rumor; en at Waichow show no incline ation to surrender, but are conscripting coolies to move supplies W. 8.Indo China: 21 Aug: Minor contacts Maluntsi, Phobang, Thanthuy, and Laotchay; Chinese attempt to obtain Jap surrender at Hoangsuphi failed, with fighting resulting, II AIR: Nil air activity III NAVY; PHILIPPINES: l.Samar: 21 Aug: Periscope rptd sighted, 60 mi NxE of Bulan, IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION: A. GROUND: Asia: a) CHINA: i) Reports throughout the country continue to reflect a chaotic uncontrolled Japanese reaactionto the Imperial surrender, Even within the same localities are found contradictory combinations of voluntary self-disarmament and persistent defensive resistance. In North China active Japanese resistance was still reported on 16 August; at Shanhsien they allegedly opened fire withrifles and mortars, and with artillery at Lingpao. Japanese elements in Central China are storing their arms at Changsha, but looting of civilian homes is still prevalent and additional barbed wire defenses have been erected in the same area, In other CentfrlChina sectors the Japanese have been reportedly burning ammunition and supplies, Since 17 1.

- 1

Grcm~Qd

-I Cont Id.

Summary 1235 - Cont'd

August, Headquarters of the South China Expeditionary Force has been burning files but in South China generally the Japanese show little indication of surrender intentions,. For example, at Chuchiang they maintain strict discipline and order but have declared that any Imperial surrender is merely an "AngloAmerican fabricated rumor", ii) Various teams dropped by parachute or landed by transport in areas near Prisoner of War camps for the purpose of locating and ministering aid to Allied internees of these camps reported they were afforded treatment varying from "very cooperative" at Peking to "cold" at Canton, Below are listed excerpts from some of the reports made by, or as a result of the landing, of these teams: Mukden Area: A report from the Mukden team on 20 August stated that until permission was received by the Japanese from the Russians for the Americans to land, all American personnel landing would probably be interned, Peking Area: A 20 August message from Lieutenant General Takahashi, Chief of Staff of the Japanese North China Garrison, addressed to General Wedemeyer stated: "Major Ray A. Nichols and his suite who came down at the Peking Airdrome on the evening of the 17th are staying at the Wagons Lit Hotel in the City under the courteous protection of the Imperial Japanese Army Headquarters authorities in North China. For the successful and perfect execution of their mission the said Japanese Army authorities consulting with the Superior Headquarters are giving them every possible assistance and they are also very satisfied with the above". A message from Major Nichols states that no Japanese have been located in the Peking area and thtsthe 317 internees now reported to be located at 10 different places in Peking are all comfortably quartered and except for minor inconveniences are in good condition, Law and order is being maintained by Japanese troops, but because of feeling of troops all internees have been strongly advised to remain in thier camp area, It is reported that there are obstacles on the Lanuienchi Airport on the west side of Peking. Shanghai Area: The team arrived safely in Shanghai on either the 19th or 20th of August, the exact time was not given. It was reported that until the Peace Terms are signed direct radio contact will be limited. The team is staying with the Swiss Consul until further arrangements are made. The camp leaders were to be contacted the day the team landed and the camps were to be visited the following day. There are only a few Prisoners of War, all reported to be in good condition. Until Peace Terms have been formally signed the Japanese have requested that "Americans poised to enter occupied SChina in Shanghai, Nanking, and other areas wait for further instructions as accidents may occur." Canton Area: A team landed at White Cloud airdrome, Canton on 19 August. After two hours of discussion with Major General Tomita, Naoaki Chief of Staff to General Tanaka, Hisakazu a decision was made to leave, Reception was cold at first but ended on a cooperative and friendly basis. Troops were hostile. Since General Tomita had not received any official notice that the war was over he could not assure the safety of the team and requested that they return to freindly territory. He stated that when official word was received from Nanking the utmost cooperation would be given, and that Allied assistance would then be welcomed. The team was assured that the prisoners were being given the best of care possible under existing conditions. They also stated that other airfields were mined as is the perimeter of White Cloud. The team was at the field for a total of three hours. Swatow Area: An unconfirmed report states that the American Prisoners of War in Swatow have been released and are enjoying the freedom of the city. B., NAVY: 2, Empire: a) FLEET UNITS: The Japanese representatives at Manila furnished the following information regarding the conditions and location of fleet units as of 1 August 1945: Battleships: Nagato Carriers: Katsuragi Hayataka Damaged Moderately damaged Heavily damaged Yokosuka Kure Sasebo

Navy - Cont't d

Summary 1235 - Cont d Slightly damaged Slightly damaged Heavily damaged Heavily damaged Moderately damaged Undamaged Heavily damaged Unmanned Undamaged Unmanned Damaged Undamaged Unmanned Undamaged Heavily damaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged Undamaged
Kure

Light Carriers: Ryuho
Hosho Heavy Cruisers Takao

Kure Singapore Singapore Kure kMizuru Yokosuka Yokosuka Yokosuka Kure Kure Kure Maizuru Cminato Singapore Tsingtao Moji Area Kanayama Osaba Niigata Inland Sea At Sea Yokosuka Kure Kure or W Inland Sea Sasebo Maizuru Saeki Singapore Kobe Sourabaya Batavia

Myoko
Light Cruisers: Kitagami Sakawa Destroyers: 1 1I

1

3 4 4

6

1
10

Submarine s

4
1 7 2 2 2 1 1

Photographs taken subsequent to 1 August 1945 indicate that this list is not complete and that there are other heavy units still afloat..

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No, 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications,

- 3

__ _ ... . r .. . _,'

. .

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1234

20/21 Aug 1945

I GROUND: SOLOMONS: 1.Bougainville: 20 Aug: 104 en surrendered Mobiai R area and will proceed to Buin via Mobiai and Mivo; no other contacts. NEW GUINEA: 2.Wewak Area: 19/20 Aug: Minor contacts inland sector; loud explosions heard vic Marir (2); en believed moving N from Sepik R to TaraibisWonginara area; 5 en killed during period. 3.Balikpapan: 20 Aug: Minor contacts only; 1 en killed, 1 captd during period. 4.Tarakan: 20 Aug: 90 Japs surrendered. PHILIPPINES: 5.Mindanao: 20 Aug: Minor contacts NW Davao and vic Waloe; civilians rpt 100 Japs near Waloe; 107 civilians, 14 en trps surrendered along Kibawe-Talomo Trail; PW stated 19th Shipping Regt in jungle S Waloe; 4 en killed, 23 captd during period. RYUKYUS: 6.0kinawa: 20 Aug: 5 en killed, 217 captd during period. CHINA: 7.South China: 19/20 Aug: No indications of surrender, but intensity Chaunshien reoccupied of en fire diminishing Luichow Peninsula area. resisting En still ,as Japs withdraw; en contacted Maotao Ling area. in N Indo-China; resistance met at Cao Bang. 8.North China: 20 Aug: 4-5000 en at Spehwan indicate they will fight to last man; others waiting for surrender orders from Loyang. II AIR: SOUTH CHINA SEA: 1.Hainan Id: 20 Aug: 2 en Fs fr Samah a/d attempted intcptn of PB4Y-2; nil action as search a/c used cloud cover; 11301. III NAVY: FRENCH INDO CHINA: 1.Phan Thiet Area: 20 Aug: Numerous junks between Phan Thiet & Phan Ring; 3 junks, 4 schooners anchored. 2.Nha Trang: 20 Jul: 30 junks anchored. 3.Coi Bay:. 20 Aug: 10 junks anchored. 4.Quinhon: 20 Aug: Empty. 5.Haiphong: 20 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) anchored. HAINAN: 6.Hoi How Bay: 20 Aug: 1 tug, 2 freighters (150/300T), 5 luggers anchored. 7.Yulin Bay: 20 Aug: 1 poss subchaser, 4 freighters (150/300T), 1 barge, 1 dredge anchored. FORMOSA:

8 Suo: 20 Aug: 1 tug, 3 sm craft anchored.

Navy - Cont'd

1

,

Summary 1234-

Cont'd

CHINA COAST: 9.Ft Bayard: 20 Aug: 4 luggers anchored. 10.HongKong: 20 Aug: 3 freighters (150/300T), 4 riverboats anchored. ll.Amoy: 20 Aug: 1 poss freighter (3/850T), 12.Yellow Sea: 19 Aug: 5 freighters (150/300T) crs E, spd 7. JAPAN: 13.Tsu Is Area: 19 Aug: Convoy of 3 freighters (300/1000T), 2 freightertpts (700/1300T), 5 freighters (150/300T), 1 destroyer on crs SE, spd 6. IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION: A. GROUND: 1.

Asia: a) CHINA: Despite previous declarations by Domei that the supreme Japanese commander in China had ordered cessation of hostilities In (see Daily Summary No, 1232), widespread local resistance continues. South China there still are no indications of surrender on Luichow Peninsula, although the intensity of Japanese fire is diminishing. U.S. teams landing at Canton were advised by the Japanese to withdraw to friendly territory until peace terms were actually signed. Japanese in Northern Indo China are still fighting and, in the opinion of local 'observers, will continue to resist. In North China scattered Japanese groups evince intentions of suicidal defense, while others still interpose the alleged necessity of waiting for orders from higher headquarters before surrendering. Probably to justify, in some measure, this chaotic situation the Japanese Government has radioed the Supreme Allied Commander that Japanese troops in China are merely executing their best efforts for the 'protection of the people as well as of their own nationals. Official Tokyo alleges that various military authorities of Chungking and Yenan, and troops under their command are rushing unwarrantedly and without discipline into areas under Japanese control and separately demanding the Japanese to disarm. Japan maintains that appropriate measures are necessary for the general public's protection. JWhether it is deliberate or unavoidable, Japanese forces in China demonstrate a widespread lack of command control; V MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION: The following is reported by Headquarters, Eighth Army:. "A P-38 pilot, who crashed in enemy territory nine days ago, was escorted through enemy lines by the enemy on 19 August. Immediately after capture he was subjected to interrogation for three days, but on 15 August he noted a distinct improvement in the treatment afforded. He was then given medical attention and before given his freedom was handed a letter addressed to the US Force Commander. Letter simply stated that the pilot had conducted himself in the best tradition of the military service and had revealed no military information, During internment he was unaware of the actual surrender of Japan and was first informed of it by Filipino troops after his release."

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document, Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security Classifications.

" :

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1233

19/20 Aug 1945

I GROUND: NEW GUINEA: l.Wewak Area: 18/19 Aug: Scattered minor contacts only. PHILIPPINES: 2.Mindanao: 18/19 Aug: Scattered minor contacts only; 9 en killed, 12 captd during period. 3.Luzon: 1/19 Aug: Friendly patrol fired on in Agno R Valley; Japanese Sgt Maj and est 20 others surrendered to patrol in Kiangan area (Highway 4); civilians est 1000 military, naval and civilian Japanese in Upper Dummun R Valley; 10 surrendered in Sibal Springs-Infanta area; 126 Japanese killed and 19 captd during period. CHINA: 4.Kaifeng: 19 Aug: En surrendered town intact. 5.Yellow River Area: 19 Aug: En rptd assembling Yuncheng to surrender. 6.Suikai: 19 Aug: Strong en posns contacted 1 mi NW Suikai Airfield; fighting continues at village 3 mi NE Suikai. RYUKYUS: 19 Aug: 162 en captd Okinawa. II AIR: Nil Air Activity III NAVY: HAINAN ISLAND: 1.Hoihow: 19 Aug: 3 freighters, 6 luggers anchored. FORMOSA: 2.Keelung: 19 Aug: 3 luggers, 1 tug, 1 poss sub, all anchored inner hbr. CHINA COAST: 3.Swatow-Hongkong Area: 19 Aug: 20-25 Irg sailing junks headed S in pairs, 1-2 miles apart. 4.Ft Bayard: 19 Aug: 1 freighter, 6 luggers anchored. NANSEI SHOTO: 5.Yonakuni Is: 19 Aug: 1 lugger underway on crs E, spd 6. IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION: A. GROUND:

1. Philippines: a) MINDANAO: A wounded Japanese Lt. has reported an estimated 800 Japanese with a radio at the junction of the Tigua and Pulangi Rivers near Kibawe-Talora Trail, northwest of Davao; the fact of surrender is reportedly known to them. Our troops have received a message signed by the CO of the Lasang area, northeast of Davao, acknowledging that the Imperial surrender is known but that no local capitulation is possible until orders are recThe Japanese requested, in this sae messeived from higher headquarters. ed with our forces in the Davao area. be', esabl age, that communicatibo

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Ipjl--^^^^

Resume of the Enemy Situtation - Cont'd
2.

Summary 1233 - Contcrd

Asia: a) CHINA: The Japanese Army Forces in China are making no militant moves either offensively or defensively, but appear to be willing to accept surrender to either the Chinese Central Government of Communist Forces depending upon with whom they are in contact. The 5th Army of the Central Government occupied Kaifeng, an important communication center of North China, after the Japanese had withdrawn eastward. In the Yellow River Bend area the Japanese are reported to be assembling at Yungcheng (200 miles west of Kaifeng) to surrender. Unverified reports state that the CG of the Japanese China Expeditionary Force reported to the Chinese Minister of War at 3rd War Zone Headquarters to surrender, and that the South China Expenditionary Force Headquarters asked Chinese 7th and 9th War-Zone Commanders to set time and place for surrender negotiations. Chu Teh, Communist Army Commander, has -issured detailed instructions to the Japanese as to surrender procedure and has sent a message to the United States, Soviet Union and Great Britain requesting the right to take over Japanese and puppet arms and to participate in Allied acceptance of Japanese surrender. To date there has been no indication that the Japanese are surrendering to Communist Forces. However, it is reported that the 3rd, reputedly one of the better, puppet divisions formerly stationed in Nanking deserted to the Communist troops. Communist forces are presently augmenting their forces northwest of Hengyang and 65 miles south of Nanking for probable drives on these two cities.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it israddressed. When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procudure Officei, Instructions No. 14, 14 March 1944, regarding security classifications.

-2-

'' .;)-

GENERAL UNITED STATES

EADQUARTERS ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1232

18/19 Aug 19T5

I GROUND:

SOLOMONS: lNil contacts rptd; explosions heard direction of Rabaul, New Britain. NEW GUINEA: 2.Nil contacts rptd. BOREO: 3,Nil contacts rptd. On Tarakan, 3 en surrendered, apparently aware of Iir perial Rescript. PHILIPPINES: 4hMindanao: Nil contacts rptd. En personnel captd not aware of surrender. SoLuzon: 18 Aug: Jap attack on our perimeter repulsed vicin Kabayan night 17/18 Aug; minor contacts other areas. II AIR:
Nil Air Activity III NAVY: LESSER SUNDAS: loSoembawa Area: 15 Aug: 3 light cruisers sighted on crs ESE, spd 9-10 off Satengar Id, (Very doubtful size - exaggerated if enemy). HAIINAN: 2.Hoi How Bay: 18 Aug: 2 freighters (150/300T) & 5 luggers anchored. CHINA COAST: 3.HongKong 18 Aug: 3 subchasers underway, 1 freighter (150/300T) & 1 riverboat anchored, 4,Canton Area: 18 Aug: 1 freighter (300/850T) underway; 1 freighter (2/4500T), 3 freighters (10/300T) anchored; 1 freighter (10/300T) underway moving up Canton R mouth. 5oHaichow Bay Area: 16 Aug: freighters (150/300T) sighted. YELLOW SEAI 6,Yellow sea: 16 Aug: Lrg junk on crs INW, spd 4, sighted. CAROLINES: 7.Ulithi: 18 Aug: Oil slick 10 miles x 30-40 miles sighted, 90 miles NxE. MRIANAS: 8.Guams 18 Aug: Oil slick 30 miles x 2 miles sighted, 10 mi NNW. IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION A. GROUND: lo

Northeast Sector: a) NEW BRITAIN: Long range patrols report hearing heavy explosions in the direction of Rabaul, suggesting the enemy is aware of surrender and.\ destruction of some materiel or installation is underway, This is thedseco such report received from the Northeast Sector; stores ,were :dumped fromb."
- .

Ground - Contld jetty on Sohana Island (north Bougainville) 2.

Summary 1232 - Conttd on 16 August,

. Northwest Sector": a) BORNEO: On, Tarakan yesterday, 3 enemy surrendered, apparently aware of the Imperial Rescript, Despite almost coimpleteannihilation, Tarakan remnants seem to be in radio contact with the outside. However, our "own" Jap PW emissaries brought in 13 on 16 August and the word may be spreading, Philippines: a) MINDANAO: Evidence of the difficulties involved in communicating the fact of Japanese surrender to isolated garrisons was indicated on 17 Auggust when 5 Japanese military and 39 Japanese civilians were interned on the Kibawe-Talomo Trail; none of the prisoners knew that hostilities had ceased, Our units continued the establishment of PW collecting points and the maintenance of reconnaissance and security patrols along the communication nets in areas where Japanese remnants are known to exist. b) LUZON: Even though small groups of Japanese have been seen in the open and on ridges, some of whom waved at our aircraft, indicating their knowledge of the cessation of hostilities, there has been no case of large-scale surrender to date. Instead the Japanese are continuing their familiar tactics of employing small groups to harass our positions and patrols. A minor Japanese attack on the night of 17-18 August against our perimeter in the vicinity of Kabayan (4 miles south of Buguias) was repulsed. Three Japanese were killed attacking a security patrol near Adaoay (9 miles south of Buguias), a native patrol and civilians were fired on in the vicinity of Kiangan and 1 of 3 Japanse attacking a patrol in the Infanta area was killed. Asia: Japanese a) CHINA: According to Domei the supreme commander of all troops in China, Gen. Okamura, Yasuji, CG of the China Expeditionary Force, The Chinese Communist ordered his forces to cease fire at dawn 17 August. t Commander in Chief has recently ordered all anti-Japanese armed forced in liberated areas" to issue ultimatums to all Japanese forces to give up their arms, to order puppet troops to surrender, to attack in event either apan or puppets do not surrender, and also allegedly stated that Communist Armies have full power to accept such surrenders and to subsequently administer occupied areas. However, current reports indicate widespread armed clashes between Chinese Central Government and Communist forces in North and East China, and elsewhere dissension is evident between the two. For example, the Central Government guerrilla commander in the Tsingtao area announced that the local Japanese commander offered to surrender the city, airfield and harbor with all facilities intact if Japanese civilianst life and property there were guaranteed protection; but, local Communist forces persisted in further attacks within 8 miles of the city. In the Shanghai-Nanking-Hangchow area local estimates place over a million Communists now deployed for occupation, the bulk of which are interposed between Central Government troops and the Japanese, Contril Govcrnme t forcegh'ear Hangchow itsielf ap6rt armis-tice and surrender feelers C o from the local Japanese commanders. Intevrovon throughout this confused situation arc numeo unp.confirmed rumors of Chinese Communist-Japanese collaboration to the exclusion of the hinese National Government. V NISCELLANEOUS INFORIMTION Officially Concocted Rumors as a Japanese Morale Factor: Evidence has heretofore been presented showing that morale-raising rumors have been deliberately and officially circulated among Japanese troops in difficult situations (See ATIS Research Report No. 123)o Later examples of such rumors have since been found and collated. Internal evidence suggests that most of them are part of the old game of humbug still being practiced on the predominately ignorants ill-informed and gullible Japanese soldier by his leaders: 1, The most fantastic recent rumor, considering the circumstances of the writer on the date (M y 5, 19h5) when he solemnly set it down, is a striking illustration of all these characteristics, Extract from diary belonging to member of 84 Field Anti-airraft
. \* * * ; '

3.

4.

Miscellaneous Information - Cont'd

Summary 1232 - Contld

Artillery Battalion dated 1 February 1942-1

June 19145'

t ity-l be a very short "5 May. MacARTHIUR has fled to New Guinea. time now before we enter Mati(ATIS Blletin No. 21S1, page 3) iybtartling, illustration which has, in the 2. Another, almost e phrase "it is reported" and the officer status of the diarist, a strong implication of official origin, also comes from Luzon. Extract from two hardwritten diaries covering period 7 July 194423 February 1945 belonging to an officer, presumably Second Lieutenant Maki, commanding a company attached to Philippines Railway Unit: "26 January 1945. Went to see Major Fujikuro to receive orders. It was reported that in European Theater of Operations Eisenhower surrendered to German Army and prisoners of war nuribered 700,000. "2 February 1945. It was reported that an armistice was declared between Germany and Soviet." 3. From Cebu Island comes a statement clearly expressing the suspicion of the diarist that the rumor is an official concoction. Extract from notebook containing diary entries dated 6 iarch 19)4*25 March 1945: owner and unit not stated: "I hear rumors of favorable battle conditions, probably circulated to raise the morale of the soldier. They say our air force will come to bomb this area, If just one plane flew over, it would raise our spirits," (Eighth Army ATIS Advanced Echelon Translation No. 71 page 4). Comment by ATIS GHQ.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document, Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyona iWhen not actually in use, this the Staff Section to which it is addressed, kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an document is to be Officer0 See AR 380-5, 15 March 1944 and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14, 1 March 1944, regarding security classifications.

3
:~~ ~ .,a i-

II
r

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1231

17/18 Aug 19h

I GROUND: SOLOMONS: 1.Bougainville: 16/17 Aug: Hvy explosions heard vicin Buka Airfield; nil contacts. lNErT GUINEA: 2.Wewak Area: 16/17 Aug: Minor contacts 3200 yds NWN Boiken, 7 mi ESE Kaboibus, and vicin Mandi. BORNEO: 3.Nil contacts rptd. PHILIPPINES: .1Mindanao: 17 Aug: Nil contacts, 5.Luzon: 17 Aug: Sniper fire rcvd Agno R Valley; numerous small groups seen in open and on ridges V Pacdan, indicating knowledge of surrender. II AIR: JAPAN: 1.Tokyo Area: a) 17 Aug: i) 9-11 en Fs intcptd h B-32s on photo mission; 2 ii) 1 B-32 holed Fs prob shot down and 1 dam; B-32s undam; 1050-11551 by AA over Yokosuka Naval Base; 1135I; 1 F7 fired on by Yokosuka AA; nil b) 15 Aug: Final rpt 3rd Flt Strike: 38 en a/c shot down, dam; 1100I. 10 a/c dest and 13 dam on grd at Kashima and Hyakurigahara a/ds. 2.Kyushu: 17 Aug: 2 FSs were fired on by AA fr 1iyakonojo with nil dam;

10401.
III NAVYt LESSER SUNDAS: l.Lombok Str: 11 Aug: Allied subs sank 1 seatruck, damaged 1 picket boat, JAVA SEA: 2.General: 9 to 12 Aug: Allied subs sank 1 prahu, 1 junk, 2 luggers, 1 sm coastal tender, 6 schooners, 1 landing craft, 1 loaded explosive.freighter; damaged 1 landing barge. GULF OF SIAM: 3.General: 12 Aug: Allied subs sank 1 sm coastal vsl, 15 junks, and 1 patrol boat. FRENCH INDO CHINA: 4.Pulo Tenggol: 12 Aug: Allied sub sank b schooners, 2 junks, 2 sampans off
coast.

SOUTH CHINA SEA: 5.General: 12 Aug: Allied sub sank 1 junk,

HAINAN:
6.Yulin Bay: 17 Aug: 2 luggers. 7.Hoi How Bay: 17 Aug: 1 subchaser, 1 tug, 3 luggers. JAPAN: 8.Honshu: 13 Aug: Photos of Yokosuka reveal following damage to battleship Nagato from 18 July attack: main mast blown off at base, stack missing; '|: hull and main battery damaged not visible due to camouflage.: p- : .

IMIILl~llbS

N1avy - ContI

Sumnary 1231 - Cont t

9.General: 13 Aug: 3rd Fleet previously unrptd results: old livy cruiser Kasuga capsized, old destroyer sunk, old hvy cruiser Asama with Irg hole in starboard quarter.
CENTRAL PACIFIC:

lO.Iwo Jima: 16 Aug; Allied destroyer attacked enemy sub, 160 mi E; indications of damage. IV RESUME OF THE SITUATION A. GROUND:

1. Northeast Sector: a) BOUGAINVILLE: In the northern sector enemy artillery continued to be active. Japanese were observed dumping stores from the jetty on Sohana Island. This is the first evidence in the north eastern sector of Japanese reaction to the Emperors rescript. b) EASTERN NEW GUINEA: Some enemy activity was noted in the VWewak Coastal sector at Mandi where artillery shelled our lines. Minor engagements occurred near Karawop (west of Boiken) and at Kiariva in the inland sector. 2, Philippines: On both Mindanao and Luzon the combined effect of our information leaflets and receptivity of remaining Japanese signal communications, all pointing toward general cessation of hostilities, is apparent: a) MINDANA0: No Japanese contacts were reported throughout the island on 16 August, Rather, our units are withdraving and establishing PW collecting points along communication nets in Agusan Valley, Sayre Highway, KibaweTalomo Trail and northwest of Davao. b) LUZON: In Cagayan Valley on 17 August no Japanese contacts developed, Some sniper fire was encountered in Agno Valley* A guerrilla patrol returning from the Sibul Springs-Infanta area reported finding 21 Japanese dead from disease. However, in Northern Lugon there have been some surrenders and air sightings reveal numerous small Japanese groups moving westward out of the mountains, waving at our aircraft. West of Pacdan, along upper Highway 41 numerous small groups have been observed in the open and on ridges indicating their knowledge of the cessation of hostilities. 3. Asia: a) CHINA: In North China unverified reports stated that the Japanese 110th Infantry Regiment of the 110th Division will send surrender emmissaries to Kursien (190 miles west of Kaifeng), and that the Japanese llth Division representation arrived at Tinghotien (200 miles southwest of Kaifeng) to negotiate surrender to Central Government Forces, In Central and South China, however, scattered fighting continues with minor clashes reported 65 miles northeast of Kwveilin in the Chuanhsien sector, along the Indo-China-Kwangsi Province border, and in the Suichi sector of Northern Luichow Peninsula. a) OKINAWA: A sharp increase in-the number of enemy surrenders occurred on 17 August when 135 Japanese, including 13 officers, were taken by routine security patrols. One Jap was killed. B. AIR: General Japan Area: a) EMPIRE: i. Sporadic Air Activity: The Japanese continued small-scale air on 17 August over the iokyo area, Nine to 11 Jap fighters engaged operations 4 B-32s on a photo mission. In the ensuing action, during which 9 to 10 passes were made on the B-32s, two fighters were probably shot down and one was damaged. The B-32s were undamaged. ii. Continued Operations by Japanese AA: On 17 August, our photo and search aircraft received AA fire from the Yokosuka Naval Base. One B-32 was damaged while a B-24 (F7) was not hit* Over the airdrome at Iiyakonoyo (KIyushu) 2 P-38s (FSs) were fired on by AA wLthout damage.. 5,

4.

Ryukyus:

Air - Conttd

Sunmmnry 1231 - Conttd

iii, Third Fleet Air Operations 15 August: In a final report of the last dayts air operation by aircraft of the Third Fleet, 15. August, carrier aircraft shot down 38 enemy aircraft. Of this total, 30 were destroyed over the Tokyo area, 3 by rescue CAP, and 5 over the fleet units. Types encountered included fighters principally,; and a few torpedo bombers. In the area north of Tokyo, 10 Jap aircraft were destroyed on the ground at Hyakurigahara and Kashima airfields., An additional 13 were damaged, Total score: 61 destroyed or damaged, MISCELLANEOUS IIFORMLTION Japanese Political Manipulation in Defeat: Realignment of conquistadorial aims in the Far East into declarations of colonial freedom which the Allies -will accomplish anyway, is an artful ruse by which the Japanese hope to identify themselves with victory. The promise that the East Indies would be granted independence in the middle of August was officially announced on 7 August 1945. This is clever Japanese propaganda. It is calculated to take the wind out of the Allied sails, It costs the Japanese nothing and is in line with their protests that they are fighting as the champions of freedom for all Asiaticso It may deceive some of the people of Java into resisting the Allies and will certainly prove athorn in the flesh of the Allied uliberators"l The move puts the Allies on the psychological and political defensive and reflects the public expression of the Imperial wish. The Japanese in Judo-fashion are seeking to turn the ideals of the Allies to their detriment, "Felicitation over the imminent attainment of the independence of the East Indies was expressed in a statement by the Supreme Commander of the Japanese armed forces in Djawa which was released today, close on the heels of the announcement by the Japanese forces in the Southern Regions, of the establishment of a Preparatory Committee for the Independence of the East Indies. The Supreme Commander declared that independence is to be granted to the East Indies, following the completion of necessary preparations by the Preparatory Committee for Independence. The independence of the East Indies wil come into existence at the middle of August. The Supreme Commander further added that during the last three years, since the people of the hast Indies emancipated from Dutch fetters, they had been heartily cooperating with the Japanese administration. Therefore the Japanese Empire had promised to grant them glorious independence in asnwer to the peoplets enhanced desire for racial independence, in accordance with the Japanese national policy based on Hakko Ichiut the people of the East Indies with the foundation for independence now laid, are welcoming the dawn of the day of independence. The Supreme Commander further expressed the wish that the preparatory committee would fulfil its mission of laying plans for the new State, and for the defense of East Asia, in answer to the general desire of the people and all Asiatic nations,. In conclusion the Supreme Commander urged the people of Djawa to give utmost cooperation to thepreparatory committee so that it may carry out successfully its important mission," Analysis by ATIS GHQ,

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed, '.hen actually in use, this not document is to bekept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an officer. See AR 380-5 l~ arch 19h., and Standing Operating Procedure 1 Instructions No. 1h, 1 March 19h., regarding security classifications.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-ITI: DAILY SUMMARY OF MESSAGES IV: RESUME OF THE SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1230

16/17 Aug 1945

I GROUND: SOLOIIONS: 1.Bougainville: 15/16 Aug: En arty fire received E Buio Plantation; minor contacts 5000 yds N iMobai R ford; 12 en killed during period, NEW GUINEA: 2.Wewak Area: 15/16 Aug: Minor contacts vicin Kumun and 500 yds W Kiarivu Airfield; 9 en killed, 1 captd during period. BORNEO: Nothing to rpt. PHILIPPINES: 3.indanao: 16 Aug: Small en attack repulsed near Halapitan; scattered contacts along Kibawe-Talomo Trail; 74 en killed, 7 captd during period. h.Luzon: 16 Aug: Widely scattered contacts Cagayan Valley and Agno River Valley. EDPIRE: 5,Tokyo: 16/17 Aug: In connection with surrender, members of Imperial family to be dispatched by air to hqs Kantung Army, ExF in China and to forces in S regions. Emperor issues Imperial Order 1616001 to armed forces to cease hostilities immediately. II AIR: BORNEO: l.Keningau: l Aug: S/E a/c strafed by h P-JOs did not burn. NANSEI SHOTOS: 2.Okinawa: 13 Aug: 1 en suicide a/o showing IFF and running lights crashed into the Lagrange (Attack transport) anchored in Buckner Bay; 2nd a/c narrowly missed ship; casualties 15 killed, 1 missing and 14 wounded; structural dam to vsl; early eve. 3.Iheya Shima: 15 Aug: 2 suicide planes crashed at same time 1 en plane dropped bomb on le Shima; 20451. Sh4.Ie Shima: 15 Aug: 1 en plane dropped bomb on le Shima; 20451.
JAPAN:

S.5,Shikoku: Matsuyama: 12 Aug: 10 serv S/E a/c rptd prior to B-2

1 a/c set on fire 9 others poss dest or dam by bombs. 6.Tokyo: 15 Aug: 26 of 45 airborne en a/c shot down by 3rd Flt over Tokyo area; 6 dest on grd; 5 en planes dest nr TF plus 3 bomb-laden T/Bs heading toward Force; strikes cancelled when cease firing order rcvd; early
morn. III NAVY:

strike;

FRENCH INTO CHINA:

1.General: 16 Aug: Search planes found Phanrang, vicin Hao, Phan Thiet,
Tourane,

HAINAN: ,. 2.Yulin Bay: 16 Aug: 1 luggers anchored. 3.Hoi How Bay: 16 Aug: 1 tug, 6 sm, 1 Irg luggers anchored; 2 dredges ~A pier. ...

Quinhon empty.

Nay - Cottd FORMOSA:

Summary 1230 - Conttd

4.Kizan Is: 16 Aug: 1 lugger anchored. PESCADORES: $.General: Night 14/153iag: Navy search planes sank 1 lugger and 1 sm freighter, S of the Islands. CHINA COAST: 6.Ft. Bayard: 16 Aug: 3 sailing vsls anchored. NANPO SHOTO: 7.Iwo Jima: 16 Lug: Allied destroyer rptd attacking definite sub contact, 160 mi Ei MANSEI SHOTO: 8.Sakishima: 16 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) anchored, at Yonakuni. KOREiA: 9.Jinsen: 15 Aug: 2 destroyers and 10 sm gunboats fired on 7 AF P-47ts, off coast. JAPAN: 10.Tsu Is Area: 14 Aug: FAW 1 Privateers damaged 3 merch vsls. ll.General; 15 Aug: Allied subs sank 3 sm merch vsls in Japan Sea and 3 sm craft off Kyushu. MARSHALLS: 12.Eniwetok: 13 Aug: Anti-sub operations instituted, 60 mi W. IV RESUE~ OF THE SITTTION A. GROUND: 1. Northeast Sector: a) BOUGA'WVILLE: Minor engagements occurred in the southern sector, West of the Mivo River 50 to 60 enemy clashed with our patrol in the Hanung Gardens. Angau reports approximately 100 heavily armed troops astride the Agyuna-Kingori track. In Central and Northern Bougainville, artillery exchanges continued. Enemy guns on Sohana Islands were silenced. Total enemy casualties were 12 killed and 2 wounded, b) EASTERN NEW GUINEA: The only activity reported occurred west of Kiarivu, where patrols engaged an enenm ambush position and also killed 3 of 20 to 30 enemy moving east. Total enemy casualties were 9 killed and 1 PW. Northwest Sector: a) BORNEO: Protective patrolling in all sections, resulted in no enemy contacts or casualties. On Tarakan, 13 Japanese were brought in by Jap PW emissaries. 3. Philippines: a) LUZON: In the Cagayan Valley and east of Highway 5 wivdespread patrolling resulted in 124 Japanese killed and 6 captured. In an area 12 miles east southeast of Jones, a group of 18 enemy was contacted and killed. Perimeter guards of the 127th Infantry killed 4 south of Buguias in the Lower Cordilleras, while patrols east of Highway 11 and in the Agno River Valley, killed 10 and captured 4. Several other minor patrol contacts with individuals and small groups of enemy occurred throughout east Central Luzon howevers no organized enemy activity was reported.: Security and reconnaissance missions to determine the location of Jap troops in remote areas of Luzon continues. As yet, no response has been received to 165,000 14th Corps surrender instruct tion leaflets dropped on enemy positions. All casualties were inflicted prior to order to cease aggressive action except those killed in defensive action. ASIA: a) CHINA: Chinese First War Area troops are reportedly preparing to occupy the Yellow River Bend area in North China and accept Japanese surrender there. The CG of the 2nd War Area and the Japanese are said to have agreed that 2nd War Area troops will occupy Taiyan, 530 miles northwest of Shanghai, There are indications that Japanese forces in the Hangchow area of East China are making exploratory moves in preparation for surrender. Totally unverified reports from South China allege that Japanese Expeditionary Army forces in the Canton area will refuse to surrender and that Canton will be defended..
-2I -~L~g~i~:?

2.

4.

Ground - Coultrd
B. AIR: 5o

Sumnary 1230 - Conttd

General Japan Area: a) FORMOSA-KOREA-EMPIRE: No reports of enemy air activity on the 16th have been received0 For the l th, however, additional activity has been reported. Two suicide planes crashed at Iheya Shima at the same time that a single enemy aircraft bombed Ie Shima; the fragmentary report gives no indication as to the suicide target. There are indications that other attacks planned against Okinawa were cancelled, During early strikes on the 15th before offensive operations were halted 45 enemy aircraft were encountered by 3rd Fleet planes in the Tokyo area, Twenty-six of these were shot dowan Of 8 planes destroyed in the vicinity of the Force 3 torpedo bombers were bomb laden. Later reports establish that the vessel subjected to suicide attack at Okinawa on the 13th vas the Lagrange and not the Woodbury as earlier reported. One aircraft showing IFF and with running lights on crashed into the attack transport while a second suicider narrowly missed the ship. Fifteen men were killed. b) AIR EMISSARIES: The Japanese Government has evolved the following plan to make known to the Japanese armed forces the Imperial order to cease hostilities: "W1ith a view to making the august wish of his Majesty regarding the termination of the war and the Imperial order thoroughly known to all concerned, members of the Imperial family vwll be dispatched as personal representatives of his Majesty to the headquarters of the Kwantung Arm, Expeditionmy forces in China, and the forces in the Southern Region, respectively. The itinerary expected to leave Tokyo at 0900 on 17 August. The party for the South (iii below) is due to-leave on the 18th. By way of the following route, the itinerary is subject to some alterations owing to weather and other conditions: i Bound for Manchuria (Tokyo-Yonago-Seohl). ii Bound for China (Tokyo-Fukoka-Shanghai-Nanking). iii Bound for the South "Tolcyo-Fukuoka-Shanghanghai-(staying one night)-Canton-Tourane-Saigon. Type and markings of airplanes: iv Planes for M.nchuria and China are low-winged monoplane, twin-engined, middle-sized transport of itsubishi MC20-2 type. (Topsy) v Plane for the South is middle-winged monoplane, twin-engined, middle-sized bomber with the cigar-shaped fuselage resembling that of B-26. (Betty) vi Markings are sun flag with red streamer of four (4) metres length. It is presumed that the said Imperial Order will reach the front line and produce full effect after the following lapse of time. vii In Japan proper - 48 hours. viii In China, Manchuria, Korea, Southern regions except Bougainville, New Guinea, the Philippines - 6 days. ix In Bougainville - 8 days. x In New Guinea and the Philippines, in the case of various local headquarters - 12 days but whether and when the order will be received by the first line units is difficult to foresee. V MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION Evidence of Imperial Connivery to stay in Office: An interview in Chungking on 3 August supports earlier suggestions that Imperial authority has found'divinity an insufficient Case for power. Evidence indicates that Prince Chichibu is not regarded by influential Japsnese with as much favor as the third brother, Prince Takamatsu. Remarks below about the Emperor having to give into the militarists to maintain his position is borne out by the general attitude of the leaders of the Kwangtung Armyo "The Emperor of Japan has been afraid of losing his job through a strong

3

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.

. .

*

Miscellaneous Information -

1230 - Contd

and ambitious brother " FripW tp e ~N-"toldby HSU Shu-ying, last Chinese Ambassador to Tokio who granted him the first interview he has given in more than seven years., r. HSU made the assertion that the February 1936 revolt by units of the Japanese army was backed by Prince Chichibu, young brother of the Emperor. Despite the failure of that revolt, the Emperor feared that another attempt might be successful. So he had given in to the militarists whenever a show-dov became imminent in order to hang on to his job, .AM. HSU, a close friend of the former American Ambassador, Mr Grew, differs from many navy men in the State Department. He thinks that the difference between the Japanese "Liberals" and "Militarists" is merely one of method. They both favor Japanese expansion, one group with the bloody swords the other by more subtle means. But China's former Ambassador to Japan likewise differs from many Americans who feel that the only good Jap is a dead Jap., The first victims of Japanese aggression were the real Japanese liberals# For 15 years the goals of Japan have been filled with men and women who thought peace better than war and freedom preferably to slavery. Thousands have died under torture for the same beliefs we hold. Only five feet tall and looking as fragile as a piece of his own Chinese pottery, Mr. HSU offers this reipe for dealing with Japan after her defeat: Destroy the Japanese war-making machine, treat the common.people generously, give what real Japanese liberals we can find a chance to form their own democratic government, Comment by ATIS GHQ

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed, When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an officer. See AR 380-5, 15 March 194k, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No, 14, 4lMarch 1944, regarding security classifications.,
0;. a

A.$
$4 ,.-4.

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I

K

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF ENEMY INTELLIGENCE IV: G-2 ESTIMATE OF THE ENEMY SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1229

15/16 Aug 19$

I GROUND: SOLOMONS: l.Bougainville: 14/15 Aug: En attacks repulsed at Musaraka and Katsuwa. NE-i GUINEA: 2.Wewak Area: 14/15 Aug: Minor contacts 4000 yds E Kaboibus; slight en activity vic Kairivu Airstrip; 4 en killed, 3 captd during period. BORNEO: 3.Balikpapan: 14/15 Aug: Minor contacts vic Soengaiwain and Samarinda Rd; 15 en killed during period. PHILIPPINES: 4 Mindanao: 15 Aug: Scattered contacts Ialagos area; minor contact 3500 yds SE Biao, Linco Bay area, and 6000 yds W Bunawan. 5.Luzon: 15 Aug: Minor contacts Cagayan Valley, Agno Valley, and 12 mi ESE

Jones. II AIR: FORMOSA:
l.NE Formosa: 15 Aug: 4 en Fs intcptd search a/c off NE Formosa, each dropping 1 air bomb; nil dam either side; 10051I 2.Matsuyama: 12 Aug: 1 en a/c dest on grd by 2 F4Uso KOREA: 3oYangdok: 14 Aug: 1 en a/c intcptd 1 B-24; nil dam either side; 01101. EMPIRE: ,4General: 15 Aug: 5 en a/c shot dovn while heckling TF 38; 1200-13131; numerous bogies approaching retiring force. 5.Honshu: a) 14 Aug: 3 u/i a/c blinking lights obsvd by 1 B-24 in Tokyo area; nr coll ision with en B on crs, in same area. b) 13 Aug: (Final Rpt): 254 en-a/c dest on grd, 149 dam, plus 19 shot down & 2 prob shot down by CAP, mostly in Tokyo area; our losses, 7 a/c in cbt, 6.Kyushu: 12 Aug (Further Rpt): 3 en a/c shot down by 89 P-38s, 72 P-47s 9 P-51s hitting RR bridges; 7 friendly a/c lost in day's strike.
III NAVY:

MALAY PENINSULA: leSingapore Str: 14 Aug: 1 junk (50T) left listingo 2eDempo Str: 13 Aug: 13AF P-38ts fired 1 freighter-tpt (2/4500T), 1 freighter (300/1000T), 8 barges; left smoking 1 tug, 3 barges. FORMOSA: 3cTainan: 14 Aug: 1 freighter (2300T) sunk, 20 mi VTW. PESCADORES: 4.lNko: a) 14Aug: 1 freighter unsuccessfully attackedo b) 14 Aug: 1 lugger sunk, mi So CHINA COAST: . SHongKong: 14 Aug: 1 Irg lugger sunk, 15 mi W. :
.4 4i i .' :

*44

-1 -

Navy - Conttd

.

- Summary 1229 - Conttd

KOREA: 6.Chinkai Bay: 14 Aug:i AF-

ts destroyed 3 reI rs (150/300T), 1 loaded barge; 25 freighters (150/300T), junks & sm craft strafed, damaging many. 7.SE Coast: 12 Aug: Photos show that 5AF B-25ts prob destroyed 1 freighter (150/300T), 1 fishing boat (100T), damaged 1 spec duty subchaser, 2 freighters (150/300T), 8.S Coast; 14 Aug: 1 u/i ship (200?) unsuccessfully attacked by Privateers. JAPAN: 9.Sea of Japan: Night 13/l1 Aug: 5AF B-32ts destroyed 1 sloop. lO.Kyushu: a) Night 13/14 Aug: 5AF B-24 sank 1 tender (lO0OOOT) off coast; also scored near misses on freighter (150/300T) & lugger; b) 14 Aug: 5AF P-51s damaged 1 freighter (2300T), 2 freighters (3/850T), 2 freighters (150/300T) at Kuchimotsu; damaged 3-gunboats (75') E of Goryo; damaged or destroyed 10 sm ships, 8 luggers, fired 1 PT boat & 2 freighters (300OO00T); damaged 2 flak boats, 2 freighter-tpts (700/1300T), 100 fishing craft & attacked with unobsvd results 2 freighter-tpts (2/4500T) c) 14 Aug: Privateers rocketed 1 freighter-tpt (2/450OT) off Nv coast, d) 14 Aug: 6 freighters (150/300T), off NY coast, llTsu Is Area: a) Night 13/1l Aug: $AF B-24 sank 2 freighters (2500/6000T), b) 14 Aug: 5AF B-25ts sank 1 freighter (700/1300T), 1 freighter (150/ 300T) & 1 fishing boat & scored near misses on 1 freighter (5500/7500T), c) L14 Aug: Privateers scored 1 hit on u/i freighter (101r) & caused hvy explosion freighter (3501). d) 14 Aug: 4 transports on crs SExE, 12,Honshu: 13 Aug: 3rd Fleet planes sank 1 RO sub & 8 luggers & damaged 1 RO & 21 luggers. IV G-2 RESUnDE OF THE SITUATION: 1. Summary of the Situation, a. Activities in Forward Areas: Northern Philippines (Luzon): Minor contacts Cagayan Valleys Agno River Valley, and east southeast Jones. Southern-Central Philippines (Mindanao): Scattered minor contacts vicinity Biao, Malagos, Linco Bay, and Bunawano Borneo: Minor contacts vicinity Soengaiwain and Samarinda Road, b. Activities in Rear Areas: - Fo sa: 4 en Fs inttd search a/c off NE Formosa; 1 en a/c dest at Matsuyama a/do Korea: 1 en a/c intcptd B-24. TF 38: 5 en a/c shot down heckling fleet. Honshu: Total. 22 en a/c dest by 3rd Fleet, 13 Aug. Kyushu: 3 en a/c shot down, ci Identifications: None. d- leather; Nil rptd interference with principal Allied strikes* 2. Situation Report. a, Operational Areas: Northeast Sector: 1) Bougainville. 2) Eastern New Guinea. Northwest Sector: 3) Borneo. Philippines: 4) Mindanao. 5) Northern Luzon. General Japan Area: 6) Formosa'-Korea-Empire. remain, no In Pacific areas where Japanese expeditionary troops still reaction has as yet been evinced to the Imperial surrender,, In all formerly operational sectors, only minor contacts were reported. I
-

SSumary 1229 - Contid Northeast Sector: 1) Bougainville: Enemy activity continued vith attacks on our positions in the Musakaka and Katsuma areas* In the north *enemy artillery shelled our lines.. Total enemy casualties was one wounded. 2) Eastern New Guinea: There were only minor engagements in the Wewak inland sector where four enemy were killed and three surrendered. Natives state that parties 6f Japanese are moving towards Sulnamdu, Malabeim and Kumiciai south and southeast of the Gwalip group of villages. Northwest Sector: 3) Borneo: Several small scattered enemy groups were encountered during our extensive patrolling in all sectors. In the northwest 2 enemy were killed in the Padas River bend, 4 miles east of Beaufort, another in the vicinity of Lakatan River, 15 miles to the south. On the Samarinda Road in the Balikpapan area, only two contacts were made resulting in 1 enemy killed 9- miles north of Batochampar and an additional 9 one mile further north, Philippines: 1 ) Mindanao: Of an undetermined but small number of Japanese unsuccessfully attacking a Philippine Army perimeter near Halapitan in upper Agusan Valley, 15 August, 9 were killed. In the same area, 38'were found dead southeast of Waloe. Scattered contacts continued along the KibawoTalomo Trailo No contacts developed around Sarangani Bay, 5) Northern Luzon: There was no change in the situation yesterday on Luzon; isolated and minor resistance, particularly noticeable in the areas west of Highway 4 in the Cordillera Mountainss continued. Elements of a Philippine Army regiment advancing on Mb Puloy encountered strong resistance 500 yards southwest of the mountain, while patrols of the 1st Infantry, operating in the Banaue-Ducligan-Hapao area, reported no enemy activity, A minor enemy night infiltration attempt carried out 1,200 yards west of Pacdan was repulsed. Southeast of Mb Kapiligan (9 miles northeast of KP 90), an estimated enemy company was ambushed by Philippine Army troops. Troops of the 37th Division, probing into enemy bivouac areas west of the Cagayan Valley, developed only minor contacts during the period. General Japan Area: 6) Formosa-Korea-Empire: Scattered enemy air contacts continued on 15 August. At 10051, off northeastern Formosa, 4 ehemy fighters intercepted a U.So search aircraft. Each enemy fighter dropped one air bomb without success. Along the East Central coast of Korea, off Yangdok, another search aircraft was ineffectually intercepted by a lone enemy fighter at 0110I. In the Empire waters5 enemy aircraft continued to shadow the Third Fleet as it withdrew. For self protection, 5 of these enemy "snooperst were shot down between noon and 13131. During the period 28 AMrch through 15 August, Third Fleet forces, with British carrier task force in company from 16 July to 12 August, attacked 260 airfields in the Nansei Shotots, Kyushu, Shikoku Honshu and Hokkaido, Two hundred and ninety enemy aircraft were shot down, 1301 destroyed and 1374 damaged on the ground for a grand total of 2965 planes put out of action, Of this total, 6 were shot down 131 destroyed on the ground, and 217 damaged by Task Force 37 (British Units). V MIISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION: Japanese Combat Training Report on Rabaul Defenses: Aside from the following reportts dubious training value, it completely and typically ignored Rabaults obvious status. The tactful ascription of no air "cooperation" to a shift of strategy, was in similar dissimulating vein. According to R Adm Tomioka (formerly Chief of Staff), who returned recently from Rabaul, in view of the training given by successive large-scale enemy air raids, every man in the southeast area, Army or Navy, is determined to fight to the death. Under extremely difficult conditions and with insufficient material they have been doing their best to make Rabaul and New Ireland a fortress zone. After six months the major part of the work has been finished, hereafter it will be further strengthened. pq 3 i :

Miscellaneous Information - Conttd

Conttd

Fortification has been giv L teni a 4erground installations have been built. ~oriexpansion 6rsies of positions and for storage of materiel are all of the cave type. The total length of these underground installations has reached 250 km, "Go"-board type (TN Japanese checker board) positions have been adopted for defense against landings. On fronts vdJere landings are expected tank traps have been constructed in depths of from ten to twenty. An "ideas squad" (Soihan) (section) has been organized to devise tactics weapons and materials. They are achieving great results. Up to 25% of the strength has been assigned to the exploitation of local resources, Anaverage of 200 Tsubo per man has been cultivated. Complete self-sufficiency is being achieved. A halt in the above work was unfortunately necessary on account of daily enemy attacks by as many as 100 planes, but training has continued night and day. Recently training in anti-tank combat hds been stressed. All personnel are being trained to become anti-tank warriors (the army commander and others have personally trained in attack by use of mines), The above training and preparation for combat in the southeast area is a fine example at a time when the strategy of the Imperial Army is changing so that a great deal of cooperation from the air can be expected only in areas of decisive battle and when inter-communication will become difficult, Extracts'from bound mimeographed file of Training references kept by'Headquarters, Okokosu 17664 Force, Dated 20 Sep hh - 17 Dec h4. 612 pp. Captured at'Central Luzon - 2-12 Mar 45. Recd ATIS - 163 Lang Det, I Corps Recd ATIS - 10 Jul 45. ATIS 5-12 Mar 45, Recd ADVATIS - 2 May h~5 translation of document No. 606872, Item 2*

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressedo iWhen not actually in uses this docum6nt is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-, 15 March 194k and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions No. 14,1 1 March 1944. regarding security Classifications,

%^!- '-' tS ^

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF ENEMY INTELLIGENCE IV: G-2 ESTIMATE OF THE ENEMY SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE
1228-

1228

14/15 Aug 1994

I GROUND: SOLOMONS:
1.Bougainville: 13/14 Aug: Several en counterattacks repulsed E Kalikoku; 2 en killed during period. NEW GUINEA: 2.Wewak Area: 13/14 Aug: Minor contact 2000 yds NNW Malabeim; 20 en killed, 12 captd during period. BORNEO: 3oBalikpapan: 13/14 Aug: Minor contact 3 mi E Tempadeong; 5 en killed during period. PHILIPPINES: 40lindanao: 13/14 Aug: Scattered contacts along Kibawe-Talomo Trail; minor contacts vic Waloe; 70 en killed, 6 captd during period. 5.Luzon: 14 Aug: Est 300 en dislodged PA trps from high ground 6 mi E KP 90; en counterattacks repulsed 3 mi ENE KP 90; en driven from peak 4hI mi ENE KP 90; scattered contacts vic Gambang; intense sm arm and M fire caused friendly trps to withdraw 1 mi NW Pacdan. II AIR: NANSEI SHOTOS: 1.Okinawa: 13 Aug: 2 en suicide a/c hit Woodbury (APA 124); extent of dam unrptd; 1981.

KOREA: 2.General: JAPAN:

14

Aug: 3-4 en Fs attacked 7 P-47s; 2 P-47s shot down; 11201,

3.S Honshu: Strike Photos 12 Aug: 6 S/E & 3 Tpt a/c dest on grd at Iwakuni a/d (Kure area) by 5th AF Bs; 27 serv S/E & 1 Tpt a/c remain at a/d, h.Central Honshu: 14 Aug: 17 en a/c dest in air, 2 dest on grd & 2 dam in air by P-47s sweeping Nagoya-Osaka area, 5.N of Tokyo Area: 13 Aug: a) 157 en a/c dest on grd, 150 dam on grd; nil air opposn to 3rd Flt strike; Tokyo weathered out; Nagano, Kiryu, Utsunomiya, Tateyama, Tsuluba & Koriyama a/ds hit. b) 22 en a/c shot down by CAP covering friendly fleet dispositions; dawn to dusk, III NAVY': LESSER SUNDAS: l.Flores: a) 13 Aug: 5 schooners strafed& hit off NW coast. b) 13 Aug: 4 schooners strafed & hit. 15 mi E Reo, 2.Besar Is: 13 Aug: 10 schooners bombed, 3 near missed. 3.Jamdena Is: 13 Aug: 3 prob barges strafed & hit, HAINAN: 4.Hainan Str: Night 13/1 Aug: 1 3-masted junk thoroughly strafed. $.Hoi How Bay: 14 Aug: 1 tug, 2 freighters (10/300T) & 8 luggers. d . : ,.~ S6Yulin Bay: l4 Aug: 3 freighters (1l0/300T)
'Ah~

~~~

B Navy - Contld

Ii ~,i~s
;.' 'sr:

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''

Summary 1228 - Contd

FORMOSA: 7.Takao: 14 Aug: 7 luggers anchored, 8.S Coast: 14 Aug: 1 floating derelict barge sunk, 10 mi SE. PESCADOPRES 9,Mko: 13 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) sunk, 10 mi NE. 10.Kitsubai Is: ll Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) sunk. CHINA COAST: ll.Foochow: 14 Aug: 2 luggers damaged, 40-mi E on crs S, spd 5, 12,Swatow: 14 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T), 4 luggers anchored, 13*HongKong: a) Night 13/14 Aug: 8 3-masted junks damaged, 15 mi E b) 14 Aug: 1 lrg lugger sunk, 20 miV W 14.St John Is: 14 Aug: 1 subchaser seriously damaged, off NE coast, 15oFt Bayard: 14 Aug: 2 luggers, 2 lrg sailing vsls anchored, 5 mi E. 16oCanton R: 14 Aug: 1 tug left dead in water & listing, KOREA: 17.S Coast: 13 Aug: 5AF B-25ts strafed 1 lugger with unobsvd results 30 mi E of Fusan; sank 1 lugger, 10 mi NNE & sighted 1 destroyer S of Yosu and much shipping in Fusan Hbr,

JAPAN:
18.Inland Sea: Night 12/13 Aug: 7AF B-24 destroyed 1 u/i freighter or med stack-aft freighter, 19.Honshu: a) 13 Aug: 5AF B-2s destroyed 1 of 2 freighters (150/300T), 30 mi IT of Shimonoseki Str & sank freighter (150/300T), 4 mi W of the strait; sank 1 freighter (3/85OT), 30 mi 1 MA of Oura; b) 14 Aug: 17 freighters anchored at Nagashima. 20.Kyushu: a) 13 Aug: 3 subs anchored in cove on W coast of Hirada Is; 2 vsls sighted N coast of Iki Is; -llrg freighter on E coast Iki Is, b) 13 Aug: Photos of Hiji, Beppu Bay, reveal escort carrier Kaiyo sunk by B-25 attack on 9th, although photos at time revealed no damage. 21.Sea of Japan: 13 Aug: 2 merch vsls, 50 mi ExS of Ullong-oo. 22,Tsu Is Area: a) Night 12/13 Aug: 5,F B-24ts sank 1 transport (2 stacks),

1 tanker (5200T),

2 freighter-tpts

(5500/7500T),

1 freighter-tpt (2/

hOOT); damaged 1 freighter-tpt (700/1300T); prob dam 1 u/i vsl; unsuccessfully attacked 1 destroyer escort & 6 u/i vsls. b) 13 Aug:'SAF B-25's sank 1 freighter (150/300T); sighted 1 damaged freighter-tpt, 2 gunboats & 2 subchasers, c) 14 Aug: FAT 1 plane damaged 1 freighter NExE, (7000/10,500T); seriously damaged 1 freighter (1500/2500T) on c freighter (3/80OT) in straits. spd ,.d) 14 Aug: FAW 18 B-25ts damaged 1 23,Inland Sea: 14 Aug: 40 ships (type doubtful), sighted.

IV G-2 ESTIMATE OF THE ENEIvM

SITUATION

1, Summary of the Enemy Situation. a. Activities in Forward Areas: SNorthern Philippines (Luzon): Highway 11: Estimated 300 Japs gained high ground E KP 90; enemy forced to withdraw in sharp encounters ENE KP 90. East Highway 11: Scattered contacts near Gambang, Kiangan Sector: Friendly troops withdrew NW Pacdan. Southern-Central Philippines: Scattered minor contacts only. Borneo: No significant contacts, Nansei Shotos: APA hit by 2 suicide en a/c at Okinawa, by Aciitivities in Rear Areas: Korea: 3-4 en Fs shot down 2 P-47s. Honshu: a) Ttl of 329 en a/c dest or dam N of Tokyo area by 3rd Fit 13 Aug.j b) 21 en a/c dest or dam by 87 7th AF P-47s in NagoyaOsaka area., ca Identifications: None L. Weather: Nil rptd adverse effect on air operations. 2. Conclusions, a. Enemy Situation in Operational Areas: Northeast Sector (Ground): , -

I

1) Bougainville,
2) New Britain
_~:

______i

Enemy Situation in Operationa

Areas - Cont'd

1228 Conttd

3) Eastern New Guinea Northwest Sector (Ground):

I) Moluccas
5) Borneo
Philippines (Ground): 6) Mindanao 7) Visayas 8) Luzon Empire: 9) Enemy Air Dispositions 10) Enemy Fleet Disppsitions and Strength Enemy Situation in Operational Areas: 1) Bougainville: The passive defenders of Bougainville haves for the last several months, been steadily compressed into an ever decreasing area of operations. Their total estimated strength of 13,600 troops form the remains of the once powerful XVII Army (Corps); they are the 6th Division and the 38th Independent Mixed Brigade and miscellaneous naval and base and service troops. The principal areas of troop concentration are delimited generally by the south and east coastal sectors of Bougainville and Buka Island lying immediately to the north* Of all these enemy held zones, the southern area of Bougainville$ contains by far the largest number of troops, viz: approximately 6,000. 2) New Britain: Restricted to the confines of the Gazelle Peninsula on the northeastern tip of New Britain, since around mid-1944k the enemy here has persisted in a policy of passive but alert defense in his established positions. Today, his estimated strength of 7j,000 troops is made up principally by the 17th and 38th Divisions augmented by the 39th, 'O4th and These major elements plus the usual base and service com65th Brigadose ponents coupled with the XVII Army (Corps) on Bougainville constitute the located vestige of the Eighth Area Anira the headquarters of which is still at Rabaul, 3) Eastern New Guinea: Confronted by steady pressure, the remnants of the XVIII Army (Corps) have continually withdrawn inland until at the present time the bulk of this force is indicated as in the process of displacing from the general Wewak area toward the Sepik River. The Armyts strength presently totals approximately 8,000 and is formed by the sur-ivors of the 20th, 41st and 51st Divisicns, 4) Moluccas: The 32nd Division, 57th Independent Mixed Brigade, and 10th Expeditionary Force, except for those elements lost on Morotaii remain comparatively intact on Halmahera in strength approximating 21,500. Some 1,200 are possibly still in hiding on Morotai, On Talaud and Sangihe, facing serious problems of survival, remain approximately 200 and 800 Japanese respectively. 5) Borneo: In the northwest the enemy has been withdrawing inland from the eastern1and western coastal areas, as well as from the northern tip of the island, into the fertile Keningau Valley, which extends from Tenom to Ranau, between the Crocker and Wetti Mountain ranges. The major enemy units disposed in this area are believed to include elements of the 56th Independent Mixed Brigade, the 25th Independent Mixed Regiment, 432nd and $$2nd Independent Infantry Battalionso with an estimated over-all strength of approximately 6,000. From the Miri area, enemy troops have moved steadily The 5$3rd Independent Infantry southward in the direction of Kuching. Battalion and several depot units were identified enroute. totalling about 1,500 troops. Information concerning enemy dispositions in the Kuching area has been meager, it is kncwn that the main strength of the 71st Independent Mixed Brigade is present, although reports indicate 'that the battalions making up this organization were not all organized due to the non availability Considering the apparent evacuation into of troops for transfer to Borneo. this vicinity, it is believed the total strength now is close to 6,500. In Southern Borneo, the enemy concentration is oentered around Bandjermasin. Here, the 369th Independent Infantry Battalion, elements of the 454th (about 250 were reported to have arrived from Balikpapan about the
' ^-^ , . ^ \
1 :

.-

1:

'\^

/

Enemy Situation in Operational Areas - Contd -

Summary 1228 - Conttd

end of May) and some naval base personnel estimated at 2S000 made up the defense. The 22nd Naval Base Force and elements of the hShth Independent Infantry Battalion were identified by our troops operating in the Balikpapan Bay and town area. All reports indicate that about 2,000 are concentrated in the vicinity of Semoi and Sepakoe, 30 miles north of Balikpapan* Troops in the Samarinda oilfield area may have planned to join the forces from Balikpapan, with ultimate destination of Kuching on the west coast or Bandjermasin in the south; the latter being the most probable due to the nature of the route and distance involved, The estimated strength in this area was 1,500. Estimated strength on the mainland across from Tarakan does not exceed 500. Further north in the Tawao area, the 370th Independent'Infantry Battalion, estimated strength of 500, was reportedly located, having remained after other elements of the $6th Independent Nixed Brigade left for the west coast. The enemy in the northeast, around Sandakan and Lahad Datu, estimated at 1,000, have not been definitely identified, however, it is believed that the 554th Independent Infantry Battalion. organized from the old 41st Independent Ground Battalion early 1945. present. The 774th Independent Infantry Battalion has also been identified on Borneo, but the exact location

is unknown,

The total enemy strength on Borneo as of 10 August was estimated

at 21,500. 6) Mindanao: Surivivors of the 30th and 100th Divisions and some naval and base and service troops are haphazardly deployed from Agusan Valley to An Sarangani Bay, their combined strength probably not exceeding 9,OO estimated 600 Japanese, from the destroyed 54th and 55th Independent Mixed Brigades, are still isolated in Zamboanga and the Sulu Archipelago. 7) Visayas: Widely dispersed among remote inland mountains, an estimated 1,200 and l,600 Japandse troops respectively remain on the northern portions of Cebu and Negros; this personnel principally comprises remnants of the 102nd Division. Only widely scattered remnants remain on Panay and Palawan. 8) Luzon: With the exception of those troops in the lower Cordillera It is Central, "he enemy on Luzon is widely scattered and ineffective. doubtfuL that groups located generally in areas northeast of ihnila and along the eastern coast of Luzon are organized or under a central command, Although only minor contacts have been made in recent'weeks along the foothills of the Sierra Madre Mountains in Northern Luzon, between the Dummun Piver and Palanan Bay Trail, an estimated 3,000 Japs, mostly'remnants of the 103rd Division, are estimated to be scattered in these areas. Isolated from the remainder of the Fourteenth Area Army Command during the battle for Highway 5, these troops have adopted a familiar course of action, short of surrender, viz: aimless wandering in the rugged and food-less regions That their condition is extremely critical of the Sierra Madre Mountains. was evidenced by recent uncoverings of enemy dead who have died from diseases resulting from malnutrition and disease. While the situation in the lower Cordilleras is similar to that of other operational areas, evidence of better physical condition is noted by the small scale but continuous and stubborn resistance during recent weeks of fighting. Observers and'enemy documents place the enemy strength in this sector at approximately 3,000 mostly remnants of the 10th, 19th, 103rd, 105th and 2nd Armored Divisions, Here, however, the enemy is completely cut off and encircled by our troops and Philippine Army units, North of Luzon, limited reconnaissance to Fuga and Batan Island during the last week of July indicates that the enemy's strength on these two islands possibly approaches 3,500, under the 61st Independent Mixed Brigade Their physical condition, according to the civilians, seems to be, with the exception of the Fuga Island garrisons faire Troops on Fuga Island, with food not as abundant as on other islands, are sick from malnutrition and malaria, Civilians and captured PWs further report that enemy activities are confined mainly to gathering food, farming and coastal patrolling. Thus the enemy situation on Luzon at the time of capitulation, is Only on the high ground west of Highway 4, lower one of degeneration. Cordillera Mountains, does he appear to maintain any semblance of unified control and organization0 (See Enclosure No. 1)o 9) Estimated Enemy Air Strength: On the day of acceptance of the Allied terms of.the Potsdam ultimatum, the enemy is estimated to have approximately $5653 first line operational aircraft, In addition, approximately 5,000

K

Enen~rSi

ioil~A~e~

ontidSummary 1228

-Cn~

trainders, old'and obsolescent aircraft., equipped for suicide missions~vwere being held for projected oporations against an Allied landing on the home islands. The bulk'of' these trainers wrore d istributed in the Tokyqs Nago'ya, and IKittshu areas. Strengths and-dispositions of first-line aircraft are sho'wn in the table here below:,
...... .......... ...... ..... ........... ... ......... ....

.................. .......... ....... .....................

............ ..........

LOCATION KURILES-HOKKAJJJO TOKYO AREA, NqAGOYA--OS;L' K&AREA KU1YRE-KYUSHIJ AREA KORE A MAINCHURIA CHINA: FORMOSA II\IDO CHINA THIIAND-BURMA MRAL.Y-SUMAETRA AST NoEoI., CAROLINES-1.1RSHILLS

.................... ................................ .... . ............. I....I.......................... .............

ISEF I 2EF iSE13 100 560 675 225 125 175 162 30 20 2557 257 125145 10 80

2EB

REC CE 125 150 275 260 140

TOTAL

50
25 30 12 10

40

65 225 170 60

5
20

130 165 180 90

55 50
25 49 40

50
45
3

25 12

430 1335 1225. 1135 450 255 245 268

47
180 68 12

6040 12 1197

3

797

5653

10) Estimated Enem FleetDispositions and Strength: VIth the cessation of hostiliies the enemy fleet-disposition and strength is estimated as, follows*Battleships: Nagato Haruna Battleship Carriers: Ise Carriers:Anagi Katsuragi Hayataka Kasagi Light Carriers: IbuJki Escort Carriers: Kobe type Heavy Cruisers--, Tone I yoko Takao 1.Light Cruisers: Katagami Kashima (trainer) Sakawa Destroyers: Beached, domn by stern, listing. Beachodl heavily damaged,, Stern 1Is sing9 Heavil.y danaged. Daimgcdo Damagedf Operational 26 esti mated operational Kure Kure Singapore Sing apore Kur"e Maizmru Maizuru 2 Singapore Heavily'damaged, Damaged, Inoperational. N tip of Shikoku Kobe Yokohama Superstructure badly damaged, possibly, resting-on bottom. Beached, with large hole in stern, flooded aft, bow smashed, inoperational Badly, battered dom by the bow and apparently resting on the bottom., Still afloat-but minus large portion of flight decksv Still afloat but minus large portion of flight decks. Camouflaged -inoperational. Canou41aged - inoperational. Damaged*Damaged. InoperationAl. Yokosuka Kure Kure Kure Xure Sasebo Sasebo Inla-.,nd Sea Sasebo Kure

Enemy Situation in Operat

|

s

-ontld -S

y 1228 - Conttd

The enemy,merchant fleet is believed to have approximately 300 ships over 1,000 gross tons north of 300 N and 50 to 60 south of this latitude and a total tonnage of about 1- million tons of ships grossing 500 tons and
over

V

AMISCELLANEOUS INFORMITION:

PW Analysis of Empire Military Government Problems and Public Reaction Thereto: Prisoner of War KATO, Kitano claims to have been 25 years in the consular service, and to have spent 11 years in England; that he was Commercial Attache in London, England at the outbreak of the war, An extensive questionnaire was put to him in English. He wrote the answers in English, which has not been edited. The more significant are quoted: "The failure of liberalism in Japan was entirely due to the terrorism machinated by ilitary and Naval cliques who aspired long time for the establishment of hegemony in the Great East Asia." "The present Emperor and his family should be sent abroad after signing peace. They will find an ideal home of sojourn in England where Emperor HIROHITO will observe himself how English people conduct their state business in Westminster. The Crowa Prince will also be benefitted in his study by such an environment, Ultimately he will have faith in democracy. It is a good antidote against totalitarianism in future. In the meantime Japanese people will be told and encouraged to learn to govern themselves under democratic form of government. If they want to have an Emperor they can have him some day, but not until they have proved before the world that they can be a decent member of democratic community. Anyway, the Emperor and his family should be sent abroad immediately after the war. His presence in the country after the peace may cause great hindrance in building up a new democratic country," "Supposing that Regency system being adopted in post-war Japan I would suggest that Prince TAKAIMTSU be a good selection for such a post of responsibility. His elder brother, Prince CHICHIBU may be a natural selection in seniority, but because of his health condition, and various rumors regarding his propensity of nationalism and private affairs, the intelligent class would not accept him as an ideal Regent." "Now certain sections of Japanese people raust be wondering: if Emperor is really the head of Great Family and can declare, war, why he cannot conclude the war at an early date in face of widespread miseries of people all over the country. People may now realize that Emperor is a mere robot, but they will still hold him responsible to that extent." "It is imperative for Allied control to station their armed forces inland in order to eliminate reactionary elements everywhere which may attempt to keep, vith intimidations, honest citizens from participating in New Regime," "I advocate exclusively occidental control fromwhich I can expect fair and upright treatments." "Bitterness against their former political leaders may not be so great, but against military leaders intense bitterness will be fprmented in the mind of civilian population through all classes of communitya" "One must expect a widespread suicide wave in post-war Japan." (ATIS Preliminary Interrogation Report, unconfirmed),

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein uill not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. .When not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer.. See AR 380-5r 15 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions 'No. 14, 14. March 19hL, regarding security Classifications"

To Accompany End No 1

F" Di1Sumary No 1228 "
ELNATORY NOTES: On 13/14 Aug: 1. Estimated 300 Japs drove PA troops from high ground 6 miles ENE KP 90; Jap counterattack repulsed 3 miles ENE KP 90; eneay driven from peak 4V' miles ENE KP 90. 2. Scattered contacts in vicinity of Gambang (4- miles WNW Buguias); 11 Japs killed, 1 captured. 3. Minor contacts developed in areas vicinity Kasibu; 8 Japs killed. 4. Intense enemy small arms and MG fire forced slight withdrawal of friendly troops 1 mile NW Pacdan.

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HYAkQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

GENERAL

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF ENEMY INTELLIGENCE IV: G-2 ESTIMATE OF THE ENEMY SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No. DATE

1227

13/11(Ju

19145

I GROUND: SOLOMONS:

l.Bougainville: 12/13 Aug: Small en counterattack repulsed 4600 yds ENE
Vrai; en party encountered 3S00yds SE Rusei; 2 en killed during period* NEW GUINEA: 2 0 Wewak Area: 12/13 hug: En posns encountered 1000 yds E Kaboibus villages; nil "en casualties during period, BORNEO: 3.Balikpapan: 12/13 Aug: Minor contacts 4000 yds E Tempadeong; 5 en killed, 1 captd during period, 4.Brunei Bay: 12/13 hug: Minor contact E Beaufort; 1 en killed dring period. PHILIPPIES: 5,Mindanao: 12/13 Iug: Minor contacts 7000 yds SW Tamogan and 3500 yds SW Baguio; scattered contacts along Davao R and 7500 yds W Bunawan. 6.Luzon: 12/13 Aug: Minor contacts Cagayan Valley; mopping up continues IHapao area; attack against strong en posn 1 mi S Antipolo continues; scattered contacts in Pingkian-Kayapa area and along Agno R Valley; smallscale night attacks repulsed 1 mi E Badayan; Kasibu captd against moderate resistance,
II AIR:

FORMOS.A: l.Kiirun: 13 hug: 2 en Fs attacked B-24 investigating shipping; 1100I. NANSEI SI-HOTOS: 20.kinawa: 12 Aug: Aerial torpedo dam BE Pennsylvania while at anchor in Buckne- Bay; early evening,. KOREA: 3*Keijo: 13 hug: 16 on a/c shot dom over Keijo, 2 prob, by P-h7s on armed rcn.

48

JAPAN: 4.Kyushu: 12 hug: a) Tanoga Id: 4 serv S/E a/c attacked on a/d by 46 P-47s.
b) Omuta: 1 en F dest by 4 P-51s over Nagasu RR yds (6 mi S of Omuta), 5oGeneral: 12 hug: Japan Sea: 2 en Fs intcptd 21 B-25s attacking shipping; 1 B-25 holed; LA fr shipping holed 11 B-25s, 2 planes missing. 60 Shikoku: 12 hug: Maitsuyama a/d: 2 a/c dest on grd by B-24 bombing. 7Honshu: 13 hug: a) Tokyo: i) Prelim Rpt: 3rd Flt a/c shot don 21 en a/c

vicin TF (12 believed snoopers); 46 planes dest on grd, 71 dam. ii) Nil intcptn 30 Okinawa P-47s on Tokyo rcn, b) Sagami Nada: 11 iug: 4 Fs attacked 2 PBLYs; 1 F shot dovnm, 1 Privateer crashed vwith no survivors,

III NA VY: LESSER STJDAS: l.Lomblem Is: 12 hug:

h schooners bombed, nil obsvd damaged.

2.Flores: 12 hug: 11 schooners bombedP near mis
obsvd damagedo 3,Timor: 12 hug: 17 barges at Dilli.

,.'

Nvy -

Conttd

SSumpary No .227'-Cony (2500T), 1 freigh
'

td

SUMTRA:

4.Bangka Str: 12 Aug: 2 freightt
shipping, t

ooo00T), sm

HJINAN:

1/OT) 16/300T)s 3 luggers. 6,Hainan Strait: Night 12/13 Aug: 10 junks thoroughly worked over, CHINA COAST: 7.Swatow: 12 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) damaged by strafing, 3 river boats. 80HongKong Area: 13 Aug: 25 junks effectively strafed. 9.St John Is: 13 Aug: 1 freighter (150/300T) anchored, 1O.Canton R: 13 Aug: 1 tug destroyed. 0

5,Hoi How: 13 Aug: 1 freighter

NANSEI SHOTO:

KOREA:

110kinawat 12 Aug: Allied landing craft followed for 60 minutes by piloted torpedo, 360 mi SE xS; torpedo madking speed of 10, exploded, 1 mi astern,

12.Chosen Str: 13 Aug: 5 AF planes attacked 2 u/i vsls. JAPAN: 13.Sea of Japan: 12 iAug: B-25ts (SA) sank 2 freighter-tpts

S freighters

(150/300T); damaged 3 luggers.
14.Shikoku: 12 .ug: 1 poss freighter (1500/2500T), 10 mi N of Matsuyama; 1 tanker, 1 freighter (1500/2500T) & 1 poss freighter (1900T), 5 mi N, 15-Kyushu: a) 12 Aug: P-S1's (SAF) sank 2 freighter-tpts (2/4500T); damaged I freighter (300/1000T), 1 freighter (3/8OT), 1 freighter (1S0/300T), 15 mi NNE of Sasebo. b) 12 Aug: P-1ts (SAF) attacked 1 sm sub, 85 mi ESE of S tip, 16.Tsu Id'Area: a) 13 Aug: A/c attacked 2 escorts & 1 u/i vsl sinking the latter, b) 14 Aug: 1 of 5 transports on crs SExE, sunk, 50 mi E of N tip. 17.Tsushima Str: a) Night 11/12 Aug: B-24ts (SAF) sank 1 freighter-tpt (700/ 1300T), 1 freighter (1900T), 1 freighter (150/300T), & 1 u/i freighter; damaged 1 hvy cruiser & 1 vsl, b) 13 Aug: B-25 s (SAF) sank 1 freighter (150/300T), 1 lugger, & 2 fishing craft. c) 13 Aug: 2 dostroyer escorts & 1 u/i tanker. 18.Honshu: a) 12 Aug: Privateers rocketed 1 freighter (3/850T), left it burning; attacked 2 freighter-tpts (700/1300T), off SW coast, b) 13 Aug: 25 Irg merch vsls in Shimizu Thbr,
CENTRAL PACIFIC:

19:Palau: 12 Aug: Sub sighted, 700 mi N. IV G-2 ESTIM1TE OF THE ENEMY SITUATION: lo Summary of the Enemy O ituation, a.. Abotiitios_ in Forwaad Aroa;1r: Northern Philippines (Luzon): Cagayan Valley: Minor contacts only. Kiangan Sector: Mopping up continues near Hapao; strong enemy position being attacked south Antipolo, Highway 5: Kasibu captured against moderate resistance; scattered contacts Pingkian-Kayapa area, Highwayll: Small night attacks repulsed East Badayan, Central-Southern Philippines: (Mindanao): Scattered minor contacts vicinity Tamogan, Baguio$ Davao River, and Bumawan* Borneo: No significant contact, Nil en air active

Nansci Shotos:
Okinaywa: US. Battloship dam by aerial bomb. t b. Activities in Rear Areas: Formosa: 2 en Fs attacked B-24* Korea: 16 en a/c shot down by Ph7ts over Keijo. Japan Sea: 2 en Fs intcptdB-25ts. Tokyo: 21 en a/c shot dovn; 46 planes dest & 71 dam on grd by 3rd Pit; 4 en Fs attacked 2 Privateers. c, Identifications: None d. Weather: Bad weather hampered morning operations of 3rd F1t but improved steadil uring day. 2

Summary 1227 Contd

2. Conclusions.,

a. Enemy Capabilities: Operations in the Phiipines:. : li l 1) Scattered Resisade :Northern Luzon. Operations on Borneo: 2) Continued Withdrawal in the Southeastern Sector. Operations in Northeast Asia: 3) Defense of Ihnchuria. Operations in the Philippines: 1) Scattered Resistance, Northern Luzon: With the exception of a few night harassing attacks against our positions in the Highway 11 sector, the enemy situation in Northern Luzon remained static during yesterdays operations. Observers report that in the Tuccucan (.Tokukan) area, hb miles east of Buguias, an estimated 100 Japs are in caves and air raid shelters and that an additional 300 are entrenched and occupying tunnels along a stream approximately 1 mile east of Tuccucan. It was further claimed that during the night of 8 August an estimated 1,000 (probably exaggerated) were observed moving from the Tuccucan area toward Tinoc, 3 miles south southeast, and that more recently, the enemy has been observed transporting supplies and equipment over this same route. This information coupled with the absence of serious resistance since the battle for Mnkayan, indicates again that the enemy is unable to defend favorable positions along the approaches to his remaining bivouac areas, That this movement is for the purpose of a reconsolidation contemplating an all-out stand in the future is doubtful; more likely it illustrates his completely passive attitude and desire to continually shift to areas affording maximum protection by employment of only a few troops, Information obtained from PWs'and captured documents indicate that the troops now disposed east of Highway ll generally in the areas surrounding Mt Palugloko and Tuccucan (Tokukan), are remnants of the former 19th and 23rd Divisions and 58th Independent Mixed Brigade, all, perhaps under the command of the 19th Division. The enemy troops west of Highway h consist principally of remnants from the former 2nd Armored Division, some elements of the 19th, 103rd and 105th Divisions. Aside from their commander, the identity of troops in areas north of Iayoyao is lacking,' It is possible that they are the remnants of units formerly defending Highway 5, which have during our drive northward, withdrawn west with the intention of joining those troops in the Kiangan area The large-part of the remainder of the 103rd (see Daily Summary No. 1220). Division, with other miscellaneous units, is presently located generally in the areas east of Tuguegarao, along the foothills of the Sierra 1dro Mountains. While strong resistance is being encountered in the Cordillera Contral, enemy activity east of Highway 5 is chiefly characterized by efforts to avoid combat, Although there have been isolated instances of moderate resistance from small groups, the bulk of the enemy has succeeded in these efforts. It should be recalled that according to several PWs, the principal objective of most of the remaining forces in this area is to disperse into the hills in small independent groups; some may atterpt to reach the eastern coast. Recent enemy activities in the lower Cordillera Mountains especially on the high ground west of Highway h, indicate that here, by virtue of a complete encirclement by our troops, the enemy has no other course but continue resisting from positions most favorable for defense and prolonged survival. (See Enclosure Noe 1). Operations on Borneo: 2) Continued Withdrawal in the Southeastern Sector: An Allied patrol yesterday engaged a small enemy group approximately 3 miles east of Tempadoeng Elsewhere, in the upper reaches of the Balikpapan Bay: causing some casualties. there were no contacts of significance. During the past several weeks there has been no significant change in the enemy situation north of the Balikpapan town and bay sector. Harassing and delaying action along the inland Samarinda Road has been reduced considerably, although small enemy parties occupying dug-in positions are offerThere are ing some resistance in the vicinity 6 miles north of Batochampar. indications that the enemy will continue to oppose any Allied attempt to still move northward, at least as far as Mt Mlentawir, where the road branches northwest to Asa-Melak (previously suggested escape route) and northeast to Samarindao Any resistance would permit the withdrawal of troops from the Samarinda

!

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Enemy Capabilities - Cont'd

i.lI!

:

Summary1227-

Cont'd

oilfield area west along the Mahakam Rver, as well as the Balikpapan force on the trail leading to Semoi, Sepakoe and eventually to the headwaters of the Barito River, which offers a convenient means of movement south to Bandjermasin. Some of the troops from Mt Mentawir, probably elements of the 65hth Independent Infantry Battalion rather than Naval troops, may leave the escape route to join forces with those troops withdrawing along the Mahakam River. Whether these personnel, after reaching Asa-Melak will follow the Balikpapan troops down the Barito River or continue west to Nawan, thence to Sibu and Kuching on +he west coast, can not be determined as yet. However, the bulk of evidence points to withdrawal south. The enemy trend in the southeast remains unchanged viz, continued inland withdrawal accompanied by slight delaying actions along the Balikpapan-Samarinda road to check Allied movement northward. Operations in Northeast Asia: 3) Defense of Mhnchuria: Reports reeeived thus far concerning the combat situation in Manchuria have been fragmentary; little positive information has emerged rblative to Japanese reactions and resistance, major unit indentifications through actual contact, and lines of action the enemy may be following with respect to defense of the ianchurian stronghold. Only in the southeast, has there appeared any semblance of vigorous reactions. From the general tenor of activity in the entire area of operations, a withdrawal from the north and perhaps the east, centered on the key rail center of Harbin, possibly is developing. Japanese Army Forces in Ianchuria were reported by the War Department to have as their major mobile combat units b1triangular infantry divisions, 2 armored divisions and 2 tank regiments as of 31 July; total enemy strength was given as 660,000 troops. This force however, has had little success in halting the drives of the Soviet Far East Armed Forces, made up, according to a War Department dispatch 12 August, of a total strength of 1,300,000 men of which one million comprise the Army Ground Forces. The Russians are attacking on three distinct fronts, and are in a position to bisect Manchuria along the general line Voroshilov-Harbin-Lupin. Some attention is apparently being given to Sakhalin Island as unofficial reports indicated that Soviet forces landed at two unlocated points on the west coast of Karafuto. Prior to the opening of hostilities of this fronts the Japanese had concentrated the bulk of their lanchuria forces in the southeast, and in this sector the enemy has offered consistently stubborn resistances from many strongpoints, to the Russian advance. In the Vladivostok zone, Soviet forces have driven west approximately 65 miles across the Ianchuria border along the railway towards Harbin. Several cities were captured in Northern Korea and in Manchuria just north of the Korean border. By amphibious operations the Northwestern Korean ports of Yuki and Rashin were seized. Other Soviet units have made advances of up to 50 miles along the approximately 500 mile front created by the crossing of the Amur River along the Northeastern ihnchurian border. On the trans-Baikal front, the Russians have advanced approximately 185 miles to the southeast seemingly without resistance astride the HailarHarbin Railway. Mobile units have reached the eastern slopes of the Great Khingan Mountain range of Western Manchuria and are approximately h75 miles from leading elements of Soviet forces who are advancing westward towards farbin from the Vladivostok area. During recent months the Japanese have concentrated at least 18 divisions in key rail centers of Northern and Northeastern China, some of vhich were probably to be used for reinforcement of either the North China coast or Manchuria in the event of an Allied attack. Although this reinforcement potential is numerically large the speed of the Soviet advances by superiorly trained and armed troops and the continued destruction of the Japanese lines of communication by the Soviet Air arm, which possesses local a aupremacy preclude the possibility of a Japanese reinforcement in strength sufficient to seriously affect the numerical superiority of Russian Forces now committed to (See Encl No, 2). the Manchurian campaign. b. Relative Probabilities: 1) Assessment of Enemy Strength, Northern Luzon: Recent enemy activities in the lower Cordillera Mountains especially on the high ground west of Highway U, indicates that here, by virtue of a complete encirclement by our troops,

Relative .Probabilities - Cont'd

-

Summary 1227 - Cont'd

the enemy has no other course 'but to-continue resisting fom positions most favorable for defense and prolonged survival. 2) Continued Withdrawal in the Southeastern Sector (Borneo): The enemy trend in the southeast remains unchanged; viz, continued inland withdrawal accompanied by slight delaying actions along the Balikpapan-Samarinda road to check Allied movement northward. 3) Defense of Manchuria: Although the reinforcement potential in Northern and Northeastern China is numerically large, the speed of the Soviet advances by superiorly trained and armed troops and the continued destruction of the Japanese lines of communication by the Soviet Air arm, which possesses lodal air supremacy, preclude the possibility of a Japanese reinforcement in strength sufficient to seriously affect the numerical superiority of Russian Forces now committed to the Manchurian campaign. V IASCELLANEOUS INFORMTION: Service Statistics Polled from Lcyte Ps: An analysis of preliminary interrogations of 442 PWs captured in the Leyte Area from 20 Oct 4h to 20 Mar 45 brings to light the following points of interest: 1) Average length of service was 1 year 8 months. 90% of the 442 had nil previous service prior to induction, Remaining 10% averaged 1 yr 3 months previous service. 2) Length of training in Japan previous to embarking for overseas service averaged 8 months, 90% of the P s had come direct to P.I. with no other combat experience. 3) Of the 90% lacking previous combat experience, 60% arrived in P.I. during 19h4, 2h% arrived during 1943, 9% in 19h2, 7% in 19h1. Remaining 10% had an average of 2 years overseas service prior to arrival in P.I. 4) 90% of all PWs captured were privates, 8% NCOs, 2% Officers. Average age, 26. (Preliminary Tnterrogation ATIS Information Section. Analysis made from 166 Lang Dets 8 Army HQ.)

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. Vhen not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a-safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. Sec AR 380-5, 15 March 1944h and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions, No, lL, 1t MiErch 19Uh, reagading security Classifications.
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Estimated enemy platoon contacted by Philippine Army troops 8 miles E of Gonzaga; 10 Japs killed. 2. Minor contacts developed by 37th Div patrols in areas S of Cumao and N of Penaplancao 3. Of estimated 50 Japs E of Ilagan, 23 were killed by artillery fire, remainder dispersed eastwards 40 Small arms and MG fire encountered as our troops continue advancing to crest of Mt Puloys 5. Small aale harassing attacks during night on our positions 1 mile E Badayan repulsed; 51 Japs killed in attack on hill position 1 mile W Tuccucano 6. No opposition as Kasibu (13 miles E.Dupax), occupied; patrols in surrounding area killed 2 Japs , found 20 killed by artillery fire and over 30 dead from disease or starvation 0
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No. 2
1227

On the trans-Baikal frontSoviet Forces have advvanced approximately 185 miles astride the HailanHarbin Railway, Japanese resistance was reported as nil at the start of the drive and there have been no further reports to indicate the amount of resietance being.net. Mobile Russian units have reached the eastern slopes of the Great Khingan mountain range and are approximately 475 miles from leading elements of Soviet Forces who are advancing westward towards Harbin. Soviet Forces have made gains of up to 50 miles along the approximately 500 mile long front created by the crossing of the Amur River. Incomplete and unofficial reports state that Soviet Forces landed at two unlocated points on Sakhalin Island.(Karafuto). Stubborn Japanese resistance from many strong points is being overcome by Soviet units who have driven approximately 65 miles past the Manchurian border astride the railway towards Harbin. Several cities have been captured by Soviet Forces who have made steady advances in the zone of Northb ern Korea and Southern Manchuria just north of the Korean border. The Korean ports of Yuki and Rashin were captured in amphibious operations. For several months the Japanese have been withdrawing troops from South and Central China to communication centers in North and Northeast China under constant harrassment by Chinese Forces. These strategically located troop concentrations were probably intended to be employed as reinforcements in the event of a Russian attack on Manchuria or an American landing on the North China Coast. Soviet Air Forces have been striking enemy lines of communication in Southern Manchuria probably with the main objective of stopping any pre-planned reinforcement.

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HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES, PACIFIC GENERAL
MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

I-III: DAILY SUMMARY OF ENEMY INTELLIGENCE IV: G-2 ESTIMATE OF THE ENEMY SITUATION V: MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION
No.

No.DATE

1226

12/13 Aug 1945

I GROUND:

SOLOMONS:
l.Bougainville: 12 Aug: En posns located 1500-2000 yds NW Ruri and 1500 yds N and 2500 yds W Chabai; minor contacts 3400-5500 yds ESE Shishigatero; approx 50 Japs encountered 4400 yds NNE Rusei; 6 en killed during period.
TfO GUINEA:

J 2.,Wewvak Area: 12 Aug: 32 en located 2200 yds W Rindogim; minor contacts vic Yamil; well-prepared posns encountered near Shlabeim; en posn captd in Gwalib Villages; Kwimu (1000 yds S Gwalik) occupied; 38 en killed, 17 captd during period. BORNEO: 3.Brunei Bay Area: 12 Aug: Minor contact Padas R bend area; no contacts other areas. PHILIPPINES: h.Mindanao: 11/12 Aug: Minor contacts on Kibawe-Talomo Trail via Kibangay; scattered contacts N Biao; scattered minor contacts 1500 yds SW 1Waloe; en driven fr posns 6000 yds NXV Bunawan. 5.Luzon: 11/12 Aug: Minor contacts 6000 yds E Aguzzao and 500 yds ESE Conzaga; sdattered contacts 10 mi E Cabangan, 8 mi NE Penablanca, and 11 mi Mt E Iguig; counterattack repulsed 2500 yds STh Palugloko; strong resistance encountered on high ground 1900 yds SW same mountain; hill 3200 yds SE Mt Data captd against stubborn resistance; strong en posns encountered 500 yds S t Puloy. II AIR: KOREA: B-2hs over dock area; nil dam; night. 1*Fusan: 10 Aug: 1 u/i a/c intcptd 4. 2.Tokushin: 10 Aug: 2 u/i S/E a/o obsvd by 5 carrier a/c;3nil intcptn. EMPIRE: of 3.Honshu: a) 12 Aug: 1 en a/c shot down by P-ls WVT Bofu a/d* b) 10 Aug: i) Further )t: addtnl 62 en a/c dest on grd, 76 dam by 3rd Flt a/c; 16 addtnl en'a/c dest on grd, 3h dam by British a/c; 7 US, 7 British a/c lost. ii) Final rpt: Ttl 720 en a/c dest or dam by US & British a/c during 9 & 10 Aug, iii) 2 en T/E Bs dam by 2 B-24hs over Iwakuni a/d. h.Kyushu: a) 12 Aug: i) 1 en a/c dest on grd by 162 P-k7s at NLyazaki a/d; en AA shot down 2 friendly a/c. ii) En L1 shot dovn 1 of 48 P-38s over Kadogawa. iii) 30-40 en S/E s obsvd over Sasebo by 10 P-51s; 1 en a/c

shot down; nil intcptn by others, b) 11 Aug: i) $ en S/E a/c intcptd 3 P-1Sls & 3 carrier a/c over Fukuoka, 1 en a/c shot down; nil dam friendly a/c; 1025I. ii) Ein AA shot down 3 P-4.7s vicin Yashiro Id. $.Shikoku: a) 11 Aug Many en a/c on grd at IItsuyama a/d dest & dam by 3 Grps hvy Bs. b) 10 Aug: 1 en a/c dest on grd by 117 P-h7s at tsuyana a/d.

i: "'~~ 8

summary l2~Cont d

MOLUCCALS: l.Soela Is: 11 Aug: 1 launch destroyed* 2.Banggai Arch:, 11 Aug: 2 luggers & 5 canoes left unserviceable# LESSER SUNDAS:3.Flore's: 11 Aug: 3 sailboats sunk on N coast; 2 prob luggers, 12 sailboats unsuccessfully attacked, HINAN: 4.Yulin Bay: 12 Aug: 1 prob tanker (10O0T)a 5oHoi How Bay: 12 Aug: 1 tug., 5 luggers. FORMOSA1: 6.Keelung: 12 Aug: 5 luggers anchored. 7.Ryuku Is: 12 Aug: 5 luggers anchored. PESCADOR~ES: 8.iv&ko: 11 lug-: 1 tug, 2 luggers. CHINA COAST: 9.A1moy: 12 Aug: 1 freighter-tpt (700/1300T), 1 freighter (1501300T) anchored. lO.Swvatow: 12 A1ug: 1 freighter (150/300T), 3 riverboats. ll.H-ongKong: Night 11/12 Aug: 9 lrg junks bombed & strafed, 20 mi E. NAN2-SET SHOTO 12.Okinawa: 11 Aug: Doubtful sub contact, 290 mi S. 13.Anmami-O-Shima: 12 Aug: 5 u/i ships (poss freighters). JAPAN: lh.Sea of Japan: a) 11 Aung: 1 freighter (150/300T) on crs-NEXN, spd 5o 4O mi S of Ulluwng.-do Id. b) 11 Aug: 2 destroyers on crs NExN, spd 20/25, 40 mi ESE of Ulluig-wdo Id.. 15* Inlan~d Sea q)11 Aug: .B-25s (511F) sank 1 tanker (1000/2800T) 2 1 freighter (2300T): 1 freighter (300/10OOT).? 1 freighter (150/300T) & 1 u/i merch vslo b) 12 Aug: 1 poss u/i freighter undenry, 1 lrg u/i freighter., 16*Kure: A 3rea: 11 Aug: P-h7s (7AF) destroyed 1 sm freighter,& left 1 transport smoking. -Near misses scored on 1 sub & 1 battleship., 17.Shikoku: a) 11 Aug: P-47s (MAW 2) scored rocket hit & direct misses -on 1 ,1.,-troyer on crs NE,. 20 mi W of 11,kuyana. b) 11 Aug: 3 subs heading SSW, triin of Nagahama. l8*.yushu: a) 11 Aug: 1 freighter (300/850T), 18 mi SIV of Sasebo.- b) 11 Aug: P-47S (IffiW 2) destroyed 1 beached destroyer & badly damaged 1 u/i vsl (125t) at 0 Id, c) 11 Aug: P-51s (5AF) caused fire & explosion on 1 freighter-~ tpt (700/1300T) in Usuki Bay. d) 11 Aung: 1 merch vsl & 1 Wi ship off .,aikue Id; 2 lrg merch vsls, 3 freightezrs (150/300T) & 11 luggers, 35 mi E of Tanega Id; 20 freighters (150/300T), 18 mi NE of Usa; 1 tanker (10OOT) 1 u/i freighter, 11 freighters (150/300T) at Nagasaki; 1 destroyer, 15 mi NE of Usa; 1 freighter-tpt (?/4500T), 1 vsl., 1Q mi E of Shimonoseki Stro e) 12 Aug: 2 u/i. tankers, 7 freighters (150/300T), numerous sra craft in 0 Id area. 19.Tsushima: 12 Auki 5 AF planes sighted 1 poss light cruiser, 1 destroyer (Terutsuki class), 4 1;/i vsls; the poss light cruiser was attacked &, damaged. IV G'-2 ESTIIMATE OF THE ENEIVY SITUATION 1.. Sumary of the Eemy Situation. a. Activities in Forward Areas

Northern Philippines

TTLuZ7n)

Cagayan Valley: Minor contacts vicinity Augazzao and Gonzaga; scattered contacts Cabagan-Penablanca.-Iguig Area. Kiangan Sector: Strong resistance encountered on high ground southwest Mt Palagloko:- counterattack repulsed 600 yds further southwest; strong enemy~ positions encountered South Mt Puloyo Highway.11: High ground southeast Mit Data captured against stiff resistance. Central-Southern Philippines (1lLndanao): Enemy driven from poositions Northwest lBunawman; scattered minor con-

Summary of the Enemy Situation -

i . . Summary 1226

Cont'd

b. Activities in Rear Areas: SKorea: 1 on a/c intcptd B-2hs over Fusan; 2 en a/c obsvd over Tokushin. Honshu: Ttl 720 en a/c dest or dam by 3rd Fit 9/10 Aug. Kyushuen a/c intcptd P-5ls over ukcuoka. Shikoku: ITany en a/c on grd at Matsuyama dest & dam. c. Identifications: None. d. Weather: Nil rptd interference with principal Allied strikes. 2. Conclusions: a, Enemy Capabilities: Operations in theBhilippines: 1) Defense of High Ground West of Highway 4, Northern Luzon. Operations on Borneo: 2) Withdrawal in the Northwest Sector, Operations on Japan: 3) Mobile Divisional Pack Artillery Available for Empire Defense, Operations in the Philippines: 1) Defense of High Ground West of Highway 4; Northern Luzon: The probability thate troops have reached.the .core of th enemy s defenses in our the lower Cordillera Mountains is evidenced by stiffening resistance offered along the ridge line' extending generally between the barrios of Hapao, Pacdan and Antipolo, west of Highway 4. Forward elements of Philippine Army infantry units attacking toward Batiki, 2 miles north of Hapao, gained 100 yards against enemy positions 500 yards south of Baniki. In the Pacdan area stiffening resistance was encountered and intense 1i fire received by other Philippine Army troops advancing to within 500 yards south of Mt. PuloYs while patrols operating in the area 1,300 yards southwest: of the mountain, meeting only scattered rifle fire, killed 10 enemy during the few clashes. Troops of the 63rd Infantry attacking high ground southwest of Antipolo developed stubborn opposition 2,000 yards southwest of the barrio. Mopping up operations by elements of the 127th Infantry continued astride the mountain trail east of Highway 11, Only contacts with scattered enemy groups, squads or lss, have been made, Philippine Army troops driving south from Mb. Abao secured commanding terrain 2,900 yards to the southwest and overcame strong opposition to capture a hill 1- miles southeast of Mt. Data, Numerous scattered contacts northeast of Ianila were highlighted by the capture of 22 Japs near Novaliches; 21 surrendered in a group. Fifteen enemy dead were found 2 - miles west of Infanta, apparently the result of an air strike. In areas southwest of Sibul Springs our patrols have located several enemy dumps containing small arms ammunition and personal equipment. Stiffening resistance on the high ground west of Highway 4 tends to suggest a probability that our troops have reached the core of the enemy's defenses in the lower Cordillera Mountains* Vile enemy activities in other areas on Northern Luzon do not forecast the imminent development of significant points of resistance, resistance along,the ridge line between Hapao-Pacdan and Antipolo may continue. However, the increasing rate of attrition as evidenced by the number of enemy dead in this sector, plus our continuous air and ground pressure against these defensive installations, precludes a prolongation of their existence. (See Enclosure No, 1) Operations on Borneo: 2) Withdrawal in the Northwestern Sector: Yesterday only one small jadas iver area, southeast of Beaufort, enemy party wasencountered in thse during our extensive patrolling throughout the entire sector. Recent information on guerrilla activities indicates that subcasualties have been inflicted on the enemy, especially in the inland stantial areas. During the period 10 June to 31 July a total of 1039 enemy were reported killed by the guerrillas in the following West Borneo locations: Limbang Trusan Padas Sembakoeng River Upper Baram River Upper Rajang River 90 291 106 281 191 120

Enemy Capabilities - Contd It is also interesting to note thai i several instances the guerrillas have preceded the Allied troops in occupying small villages, i.e,, La'was, Trusan and Ukongo In addition to these casualties, othr reports show that the Dyaks, a hostile tribe which inhabits Central Borneo, have also from time to time attacked small enemy groups endeavoring to escape from our patrols; the actual loss cannot be determined, but it is knovaw that they have caused the enemy considerable annoyance, The situation in the Northwest remains virtually unchanged; the enemy appears to avoid contact whenever possible as the withdrawal to areas he considers less vulnerable continues, viz; the Keningan Valley. Operations in Japan: 3) Mobile Divisional Pack Artillery Available for Empire Defense: The Japanese Army organized and equipped' to fight over varied terrain having a minimum of developed ground communications with a minimum of transport, has given much attention to pack weapons. The great utility of pack weapons. particularly artillery, in a defense of rugged home-island areas is obvious; enemy loss of communications and tranpport in critical target areas will increase the immediate employment of light, mobile artillery against an Empire assault, Organic within the Japanese divisional mountain artillery are the following pieces a, Type 41 (1908) 75mm Mountain (Infantry) Gun: This light, shortbarreled weapon, -c Wh we wodT'hi TTll- a . ic ' er bt "-ich the enemy calls a mountain gun,was designed immediately after the Russo-Japanese War as the weapon of the mountain artillery regiment. Large numbers of this small gun have been manufacturedo It has a monobloc tube, a long trough-type cradle housing the hydro-spring recoil mechanism, and an interrupted thread breech mechanism. Two tubular shafts form an open box trail, coming together at the rear to a single pole trail having a fixed spade. This unusual construction permits an elevation of 40 degrees, rare in weapons of that period. Traverse is limited to 6 degrees. The weapon weighs but 1,180 pounds and breaks readily into six loads of about 200-pounds each. Despite its light weight, and apparently flimsy construction, the gun is very steady in action. The maximum range is 7-000 yards, and a wide variety of rounds is provided, including both armor-piercing high explosive and hollow charge. A new weapon for the mountain artillery was designed in the early 193 0ts and when its issue began in1936, Type 41 was withdrawn and issued to infantry regiments as a close-support heavy weapon. This experiment was immediately successful; as new divisions were formed in preparation for Japants southward drive, the prodiction of Type 41 was resumed on a large scale and it is now very widely distributed. When-ever a battalion or more of enemy troops are committed to a forward area, they will probably employ at least one Type 41 gun as an infantry gun. Usually appearing singly, the gun is almost invariably fired by direct laying without the use of any special instruments; even if used in pairs in immediate support of a defensive position, fire is normally observed visually. Although normal issue of Type 41 has been 4 to each infantry regiment for use in the Infantry Gun Company, special organiztions may have more,'and many independent units may also employ it. It may be pulled by one horse, or frequently manhandled, or carried in a motor truck. It is an ideal ambush weapon, and its hollow-charge round has been effective against our armor at short ranges. Essentially an infantry weapon, its presence in a given area does not mean that enemy artillery .is:.present or that anything resembling a battery with instruments for indirect laying is committed to that
area,

b. Type 94 (1934) 75mm Mountain Gun: This entirely new design , showed strong evTience of Scehnei r characteristics, but apparently was not a copy of any Schneider weapon. The gun is thoroughly modern and is a fine example of lightweight design, electric welding having been used to decrease its weight, which can be packed easily by horses. Type 94 weighs but 1,180 pounds and readily breaks into 11 sections, forming 6 packhorse loads of about 200 pounds each, Its issue is normally confined to tountain artillery units, and in the field has been encountered in only limited numbers. The tube is a light auto-frettaged monobloc, with a horizontal sliding breech block. The hydro-pneumatic recoil system is carried in the

Enemy Capabilities

Cont n-

1226 - Conttd

usual trough-type cradle. ng split trails with driven spades, electrically welded to reduce weight, are provided. The gun may be elevated 45 degrees, aid a traverse of 40 degrees is possible, A large variety of rounds is provided, some weighing over 14 pounds. Maximum range is 9,000 yards, although the weapon would normally be employed at ranges of about 3,000 to 5,000 yards. c. Type 99 (1939) 105mm Mountain Howitzer: This weapon has.an unusual history, Originally produced.by Schneider in 1919 as one of their first post-war weapons, it was adopted by the French Army, but given up in 1937. Some pieces were obtained by the Spanish Army, always interosted in pack artillery, in 1939. Although it was known that the Japanese had copied the weapon, no examples could be obtained, Finally, it was found on exhibition in the Red Square in Moscow in 1943, having been captured by the Russians from the Germans, from the French. Type 99 is a short howitzer, with an auto-frettaged monobloc tube, and an interrupted thread breech mechanism. Ammunition is separate loading, and a De Bange obturator is fitted. The cradle, which is about the same length as the tube, houses a hydro-pneumatic.recoil mechanism. An unusual box trail, which may be broken into two parts, is fitted with a removable spade. The howitzer may be drawn by two horses, but is usually broken down into seven loads for pack transport, The total weight of the piece is only 1,760 pounds. This weapon is not regarded as a success, and there appears to be no good reason why it should have been adopted by the Japanese Army. Because of its instability, only a small propelling charge is used, giving a mazimum range of only 6,000 yards, even with a light 27-pound projectile, Documents show that it may be issued to mountain artillery units, but the weapon has not been encountered in the field. Since the enemy has no specially-designated "mountainldivisions, as do the American, French, Italian and formerly the German Armies his infantry divisions operating in difficult inland terrain probably rill have their normal divisional artillery replaced with pack types; his progressive loss of communications and transport during an assault phase would accelerate such conversion. Independent units, e.g,s independent Mountain Artillery Regiments and Battalions, will frequently be assigned to tactical forces to supplement their firepower, Disruption of railroads, loss of motor transport$ lack of good road nets, and rugged terrain will not appreciably hamper the employment of such weapons; throughout the enemy s Asiatic-Pacific operations, pack artillery has been encountered in extremely remote and inaccessible sites, by its practical light design being lent mobility equal to that of the infantry that in most cases manhandled it. Several types of pack artillery, which would be encountered as infantry divisional artillery in any Empire assault particularly in rugged inland areas, accords the enemy appreciable fire-support capabilities not substantially affected by loss of ground communications or transport. b. Relative Probabilities: 1 ) Deense of High Ground WJest of Highway : IWhile enemy activities in other areas on Northern Luzon do not forcast the imminent development of significant points of resistance, resistance along the ridge line between Hapao, Pacdan, and Antipolo may continue, However, the increasing rate of attrition as evidenced by the number of enemy dead in this sector, plus our continuous air and ground pressure against these defensive installations, precludes a prolongation of their existence. 2) Withdrawal in the Northwestern Sector (Borneo): The situation in the Northwest remains virtually unchanged;.he eneimy appears to avoid contact whenever possible as the withdrawal to areas he considers less vulnerable continues, viz; the Keningau Valley. 3) Mobile Divisional Pack Artillery Available for Empire Defense: Several types of pack artillery, which would be .encounterd as infantry divisional artillery in any Empire assault particularly in rugged inland areas, accords the enemy appreciable fire-support capabilities not substantially affected,y loss of ground communications or transport.

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V MISCELLANEOUS INFOR~MTION
1. More Enemy Mass Murde.:k fi't Civilians Identical in patte | a i iiber of gruesom |®nc attempts, ; elsewhere in the Philippines, ntleir _ i.. civi ov. rom surrendering, is this scene reported along eK'iba-e-Talomo Trail NW of Davao, Mindanao: PW stated that he saw about 40 Jap civilians, mostly women and children, dead in an abaca field between Tamogan and Tuli (Kibangay) on 1 Jul 16. He stated that although some seemed to be victims of an artillery barrage, the majority had their throats cut. This was the result of a mass murder and suicide, according to a 12 - 13 year old girl, who was the lone survivor leftin the vicinity." ATTIS Interrogation of PYW Ito, Haruo, Civilain Employee Akatsuki (In Shipping Group), 18056 Force, Captured in the vicinity of Kibangay, Mindanao, P.io., Jul L6. From 167th Language Detachment Preliminary Interrogation 0180 (subject to confirmation)* 2. Japanese Naval Emergency Weapons: Documentary evidence described a series of short mortars manufactured by the Japanese Navy as emergency weapons. These weapons (8-cm., 12-cm., 12, 7-m, and 1--mm) were designed for the use of Japanese Navy land forces, and were to be used to fire normal Navy artillery projectiles, "when their guns had been put out of action". Several of these weapons have now been captured on Mindanao. All were manufactured by the Kure Naval Arsenal in 191., They are crudely made and can only be used for short range fire; even at short ranges they would be inaccurate, since the Naval projectiles to be used are unstabilized by fins or other means. However, they do provide a means of using up unexpended Naval ammunition. (Source: ATIS Current Translations 166 and ATIS Bulletin 2077; Ordnance Intelligence Report No. 103, 30 July 46, AC of S, 0 2 AFESEAC). Comment: The provision of these emergency mortars shows a Japanese appreciation of the accuracy of our air strikes and Naval gunfire.

Special care must be taken to insure the secrecy of this document. Information contained herein will not be circulated or reproduced beyond the Staff Section to which it is addressed. IJhen not actually in use, this document is to be kept in a safe and is chargeable to the custody of an Officer. See AR 380-5, 1 March 1944, and Standing Operating Procedure Instructions, No. ll, lh March 19L8, regarding security Classifications. i -6; .-

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To Accompany Encl No. Daily Sumnary No. 1226 EXPLANATORY NOTES On 11/12 Aug 1. 2. (y
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Philippin6'*Amny troops gained 100 yds agcnst enemy resistance from undetenmined number of enemy, 500 yds St7 of Baniki. Against stiffening resistance, troops of the 20th Inf advanced to a point' 500 yds S of Mt Puloy; patrols oper-. ating in area 1,300 yds SW of mountain killed 10 Japs.

3. Strong enemy positions 2,000 yds SW of Antipolo impeded advance of 63rd Inf and guerrilla troops, attacking high ground 1 mile SW of barrio. Mopping up of Mountain Trail area by elements of the 127th Inf continues with scattered contacts only. 5. Against an unreported armount of opposition 15th, PA Ift elements secured commanding terrin;2,900 yds SW of it Abao and overcame strong opposition to capture hill 3,200 yds SE of Mt Data.

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