You are on page 1of 11

SB1 Modified Instructions Lesson 8

Lesson 8: Skills Practice 1: Beginning Sounds /m/, /n/, /p/, /kw/, and /r/

T: Open your notebook to the next clean page. Write todays date at the top.
T:

Now, were going to compare the sounds of letters at the beginning of words. Ill
say two words that begin with the same sound. Id like you to write the letter the
words begin with.

/m/
T: The words are man, Mrs.
[S writes m in the top left of the page. If S writes the capitol M, then ask the
learner to write the lower case m beside the M]
[If S has written an incorrect letter, repeat the words and ask them again to write
the correct letter
Note: If S repeatedly writes an incorrect letter or is not able to articulate which
letter to write, then they have worked too fast through the skill book. They will
need to go back through the lessons one at a time and learn to spell each word
in each lesson before progressing to the next one. Alternatively, we have
supplemental materials such as flash cards, letter tiles, computers, and other
ways for the learner to practice spelling, build hearing, feeling, and identifying
the letter sounds until S can confidently distinguish between the letters and the
sounds they make.]
T: When you think of the letter m, what word do you think of?
[Note: You are listening for a word that begins with /m/.
This book uses man as the key word. Your learner may use any appropriate
word. If your learner selects a word from the skill book as their word but
struggles with spelling the word, direct them to the back of the skill book to find
the word in the word list and copy the word below the m. If the learners word
is not from the book, write that word on paper so that your learner can copy the
word under m.]
T: Write that word under the letter m.

/n/

T: Now, I will say two more words from the story. They will also begin with the same
sound. Write the letter for the sound these two words begin with on your paper
to the right of the letter m. The two words are neck, nest.
[S writes n to the right of m.]
T: When you think of the letter n, what word do you think about? (This book uses
neck as the key word.) Write that word under the letter n.
/p/
T: I will say two more words from the story. They will also begin with the same
sound. Write the letter for the sound these two words begin with on your paper
to the right of the letter n. The two words are pan, Pam.
[S writes p to the right of n.]
T: When you think of the letter p, what word do you think about? (This book uses
pan as the key word.) Write that word under the letter p.
/kw/
T: I will say two more words from the story. They will also begin with the same
sound. Write the letter for the sound these two words begin with on your paper
to the right of the letter p. The two words are quarter, Queen.
[S writes q to the right of p.]
T: When you think of the letter q, what word do you think about? (This book uses
queen as the key word.) Write that word under the letter q.
/r/
T: I will say two more words from the story. They will also begin with the same
sound. Write the letter for the sound these two words begin with on your paper
to the right of the letter q. The two words are river, Robert.
[S writes r to the right of q.]
T: When you think of the letter r, what word do you think about? (This book uses
river as the key word.) Write that word under the letter r.

Now use these five letters and key words to practice beginning sounds.
T:

I will say a word. Listen to its beginning sound. This word will begin with one of
the sounds on your paper.

T: The first word is nut. Say nut. Write nut under another word that has the
same beginning sound. (Use the word in a simple sentence, if the learner is
having difficulty pronouncing or understanding the word.)
Note: Do not react to the learner if he or she appears unsure and is looking for
help. Encourage the learner to make a decision and then be silent until the
learner has something written. If the learner asks for help, your response is
What do you think? or Put your answer where you think it goes.
If the learner struggles with the spelling of nut, guide the learner in putting
whatever letters make the most sense based on what the learner thinks, feels in
their mouth and throat, and any other strategies they have available, such as
visual memory. Guide the learner in making appropriate spelling choices.
After the word is written, ask, Is it in the correct place? Whether it is right or
wrong, ask, Why? The point of this is to get the learner to think and to
articulate. Be patient. Guide the learner to the answer if you have to, but dont
give the answer away. The point here is for the learner to create strategies for
building independence and confidence, not for you to show off your skills.
Use the guidelines for above, ask the learner to write these words under the
correct key word. Give the words in random order. (Feel free to substitute other
common one-syllable words.)
/m/ - man, mom, milk, met, more
/n/ - nest, name, nap, net, nose
/p/ - paint, pet, pick, put, pad
/kw/ - Queen, quick, quit, quiet, quiz
/r/ - rob, red, rest, run, rose

Lesson 7: Skills Practice 2: Ending Sounds /p/, /t/, /ks/, /r/


Use the same process (explained in Lesson 1: Skills Practice 1) for building the
Beginning Sounds chart with the letter sounds /p/, /t/, /ks/, /r/. (This chart may be
written on the same page as Skills Practice 1. Write todays date next to this new
chart.)
T: We are going to compare letter sounds. Our focus will be on ending sounds.
I will say two words. They will end with the same sound.
I want you to write the letter for the sound these two words end with on your
paper.
T: The words are pup, cup.
[S writes p on the notebook page. If learner uses the upper case P, then ask
the learner to write the lower case p beside the P]
[If S has written an incorrect letter, repeat the words and ask them again to write
the correct letter.
Note: If S repeatedly writes an incorrect letter or is not able to articulate which
letter to write, then they have worked too fast through the skill book. They will
need to go back through the lessons one at a time and learn to spell each word
in each lesson before progressing to the next one. Alternatively, we have
supplemental materials such as flash cards, letter tiles, computers, and other
ways for the learner to practice spelling, build hearing, feeling, and identifying
the letter sounds until S can confidently distinguish between the letters and the
sounds they make.]
T: When you think of a word ending with /p/, what word do you think of?
T: Write that word under the letter p.
Note: This book does not offer key words for ending sounds. Your learner may
use any appropriate word. If you learner selects a word from the skill book as his
or her key word and struggles with spelling this word, then direct him or her to
the back of the skill book to find the word in the word list and copy the word
below the p. If the learners word is not from the book, then write the learners
selected word on paper so your learner can copy the word under the p.
Continue building the chart (for further directions See Lesson 1: Skills Practice
1). Use these sets of words.
/t/ - tent and pet
/ks/ - box and fix
/r/ - river and her

Note: The exercise can be skipped for /r/ if, in your area, the letter r is not
pronounced almost the same at the end of a word as it is at the beginning of a
word.
Now use these five letters and key words to practice ending sounds.
T: I will say a word. Listen to its ending sound. This word will end with one of the
sounds on your paper.
T: The first word is put. Say put. Write put under another word that has the
same ending sound. (Use the word in a simple sentence, if the learner is having
difficulty pronouncing or understanding the word.)
Note: Do not react to the learner if he or she appears unsure and is looking for
help. Encourage the learner to make a decision and then be silent until the
learner has something written. If the learner asks for help, your response is
What do you think? or Put your answer where you think it goes.
If the learner struggles with the spelling of put, guide the learner in putting
whatever letters make the most sense based on what the learner thinks, feels in
their mouth and throat, and any other strategies they have available, such as
visual memory. Guide the learner in making appropriate spelling choices.
After the word is written, ask, Is it in the correct place? Whether it is right or
wrong, ask, Why? The point of this is to get the learner to think and to
articulate. Be patient. Guide the learner to the answer if you must, but dont give
the answer away. The point here is for the learner to create strategies for
building independence and confidence, not for you to show off your skills.
Using the guidelines for above, ask the learner to write these words under the
correct key word. Give the words in random order. (Feel free to substitute other
common one-syllable words.)
/p/ - top, cup, up, lip, sip
/t/ - put, rest, get, rent
/ks/ - six, ax, fox,
/r/ - car, year, fur, jar, clear
Note: Again, the exercise can be skipped for /r/ if, in your area, the letter r is not
pronounced almost the same at the end of a word as it is at the beginning of a
word.

Lesson 8: Skills Practice 3: Vowel Sounds /a/, /o/, /u/


Build a chart for /a/, /o/, and /u/. Write todays date next to each new chart. (These
charts may be written on the same page as Skills Practice 1 and/or Skills Practice
2. This chart must be double spaced so the learner has room to write x under
the vowel in each word.)
T: We are going to work with three vowels. First, you will build a chart. Then, we will
decide when the vowel sounds are at the beginning of words or in the middle of
words.
T: Lets begin. I will say two words. They both have the same vowel sound. What
vowel sound do you hear? Here are the two words: apple, Ann.
[S says /a/.]
Note: If learner does not say /a/, then work with the learner to say Ann. Help
the learner to hold the initial sound /a/ - feeling where the sound happens in the
mouth, throat, and teeth until the learner can produce the /a/ by itself. Then
ask for the letter name.
Note: If the learner says /Ann/, then immediately says a, acknowledge that the
learner has the correct letter name. Then, redirect the learners attention to
producing the /a/ sound (short a sound) associated with /Ann/.
T: Write the letter in your notebook.
[S writes a in the notebook.]
T: What word do you think about when you hear /a/ (short a sound)?
[S says a word. The word must have the /a/ (the short vowel sound as in apple)
as the first letter of the word. If the word is appropriate, guide the learner in
writing the selected word under the a in his or her notebook. If the word is not
appropriate, then guide the learner in finding an appropriate word. Help the
learner spell or copy his or her word under the a.
T: Where does the vowel sound come in your word? At the beginning of the word or
in the middle of the word?
[S says At the beginning.]
T: Write an x under the a. Write a b to the left of your word. b means the
/a/ is at the beginning of the word.
Note: If the learner does not say at the beginning, then work through the
sounds of the word, identifying the order of the sounds in the word.
T: Lets talk about the second vowel sound next.

T: I will say two words. They both have the same vowel sound. What vowel sound
do you hear? Here are the two words: ox, odd.
[S says /o/.]
Note: If learner does not say /o/, then work with the learner to say olive. Help
the learner to hold the initial sound /o/ - feeling where the sound happens in the
mouth, throat, and teeth until the learner can produce the /o/ sound by itself.
Then ask for the letter name.
T: Write the letter in your notebook.
[S writes o in the notebook.]
T: What word do you think about when you hear /o/ (short o sound)?
[S says a word. The word must have /o/ (the short vowel sound) as the first letter
of the word. If the word is appropriate, guide the learner in writing the selected
word under the o in his or her notebook. If the word is not appropriate, then
guide the learner in finding an appropriate word. Help the learner spell or copy
his or her word under the o.
T: Where does the vowel sound come in your word? At the beginning of the word in
the middle of the word?
[S says At the beginning.]
T: Write an x under the o. Write b to the left of your word. B means the /o/
(short o sound) is at the beginning of the word.
Note: If the learner does not say at the beginning, then work through the
sounds of the word, identifying the order of the sounds in the word.
T: Now lets work on the last vowel sound.
T: I will say two words. They both have the same vowel sound. What vowel sound
do you hear? Here are the two words: up, us
[S says /u/.]
Note: If learner does not say /u/, then work with the learner to say up. Help
the learner to hold the initial sound /u/ - feeling where the sound happens in the
mouth, throat, and teeth until the learner can produce the /u/ sound by itself.
Then ask for the letter name.
T: Write the letter in your notebook.

[S writes u in the notebook.]


T: What word do you think about when you hear /u/ (short u sound)?
[S says a word. The word must have /u/ (the short vowel sound) as the first letter
of the word. If the word is appropriate, guide the learner in writing the selected
word under the u in his or her notebook. If the word is not appropriate, then
guide the learner in finding an appropriate word. Help the learner spell or copy
his or her word under the u.
T: Where does the vowel sound come in your word? At the beginning of the word in
the middle of the word?
[S says At the beginning.]
T: Write an x under the u. Write b to the left of your word. B means the /u/
(short u sound) is at the beginning of the word.
Note: If the learner does not say at the beginning, then work through the
sounds of the word, identifying the order of the sounds in the word.

Now practice distinguishing between the /a/, /o/, and /u/ vowel sounds and
their placements (beginning or middle) in their words.
T: Listen to the word Ann. Write Ann under the correct short vowel.
[S writes Ann under /a/.]
Note: Do not react to the learner if he or she appears unsure and is looking for
help. Encourage the learner to decide and then be silent until the learner has
something written. If the learner asks for help, your response is What do you
think? or Put your answer where you think it goes.
If the learner struggles with the spelling of put, guide the learner in putting
whatever letters make the most sense based on what the learner thinks, feels in
their mouth and throat, and any other strategies they have available, such as
visual memory. Guide the learner in making appropriate spelling choices.
After the word is written, ask, Is it in the correct place? Whether it is right or
wrong, ask, Why? The point of this is to get the learner to think and to
articulate. Be patient. Guide the learner to the answer if you must but dont give
the answer away. The point here is for the learner to create strategies for
building independence and confidence, not for you to show off your skills.
T: Where is the vowel sound in the word Ann located? At the beginning of the
word or in the middle of the word?

[S says At the beginning.]


T: Write an x under the a. Then, write b to the left of your word. B means
the /a/ (short a sound) is at the beginning of the word.
[S writes an x under the a in the word Ann, then writes b to the left of
Ann under the a.]
T: Listen to the word Bob. Write Bob under the correct short vowel.
[S writes Bob under /o/.]
Note: If the learner doesnt write Bob in the correct list, work through
identifying and feeling the production of /o/ sound in Bob. Compare this vowel
sound to the vowel sounds in the learners other key words.
T: Where is the vowel sound in the word Bob located? At the beginning of the
word or in the middle of the word?
[S says In the middle.]
T: Write an x under the o in Bob. Write m to the left of your word. m
means the o (short o sound) is in the middle of the word.
[S writes an x under the o, then writes m to the left of odd.]
T: Listen to the word cup. Write cup under the correct short vowel.
[S writes cup under /u/.]
Note: If the learner doesnt write cup in the correct list, work through
identifying and feeling the production of /u/ sound in cup. Compare this vowel
sound to the vowel sounds in the learners other key words.
T: Where is the vowel sound in the word cup located? At the beginning of the
word or in the middle of the word?
[S says In the middle.]
T: Write an x under the u in cup. Write m to the left of your word. m
means the u (short u sound) is in the middle of the word.
[S writes an x under the u, then writes m to the left of cup.]

Using the guidelines for above, ask the learner to write these words under the
correct key word and then for the position of the vowel. Give the words in
random order. (Feel free to substitute other common one-syllable words.)
/a/ - lend, tan, Fran, man
/o/ - hot, box, not, blot
/u/ - run, duck, pup, luck

Lesson 8: Skills Practice 4: Adding the ending s


T: (Write pups neck on the board.) Here are some words you read in the story.
Read them aloud.
[S. should say pups neck.]
T: Notice the mark in front of the s. We call this mark an apostrophe. It means the
neck belongs to the pup. The -s means belongs to.
[Write these phrases on the board:
the pups dish
the girls leg
Mr. Olivers pup
the womans tent
the mans hand
Mrs. Olivers bird ]
[Have S. read each phrase. Explain that when an apostrophe comes before the s,
it is still one person or thing, but that it means that something belongs to that
person or thing.]
T: Ask the following questions.
of phrases you wrote.
Whose hand is it?
Whose tent is it?
Whose dish is it?

Have S. point to and read the right answer in the list


Whose leg is it?
Whose pup is it?
Whose bird is it?