DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

Proposed Budget 2010-2011

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

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DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

City Council

Planning Commission City Clerk City Manager City Attorney

Police Chief

Assistant City Manager Development Services

Human Resource Director

Finance Director

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Administration Patrol Building Planning Budget Accounting Information Technology Information Technology Investigations Public Works Integrated Waste Economic Development Financial Planning Fleet Support Services Animal Services Code Enforcement Transit Emergency Operations Utility Billing GIS Public Information Officer Purchasing Facilities

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
Transmittal Letter ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 Budget Calendar ......................................................................................................................................................... 7

Financial Analysis ................................................................................................................................9 Financial Summaries .......................................................................................................................... 17 General Fund - 101
1100 City Council ..................................................................................................................................................... 21 1200 City Manager .................................................................................................................................................. 23 1300 City Attorney ................................................................................................................................................... 28 1400 City Clerk ........................................................................................................................................................ 30 1500 Finance ........................................................................................................................................................... 35 1600 Administrative Services .................................................................................................................................. 37 1900 Non-Departmental .......................................................................................................................................... 40 1910 Revenue Neutrality .......................................................................................................................................... 42 1920 Community Service Grants ............................................................................................................................. 43 2200 Police .............................................................................................................................................................. 46 3120 General Fund Planning ................................................................................................................................... 58 3500 Code Enforcement .......................................................................................................................................... 59 102 Equipment Replacement Fund .......................................................................................................................... 62 105 Economic Development Fund ........................................................................................................................... 62 106 Facility Reserve Fund ........................................................................................................................................ 62

Special Revenue Funds - 200s
202 Used Oil Recycling Grant .................................................................................................................................. 63 203 Vehicle Abatement ............................................................................................................................................ 63 204 Household Hazardous Waste ............................................................................................................................ 63 213 Police Off-Duty................................................................................................................................................... 63 215 Asset Seizure ..................................................................................................................................................... 64 216 Office of Traffic Safety Grants ........................................................................................................................... 64 217 Local Police Grants ........................................................................................................................................... 64 221 Gas Tax Fund .................................................................................................................................................... 65 231 Affordable Housing ............................................................................................................................................ 65 233 Agricultural Preservation Mitigation Fee ............................................................................................................ 66 234 Swainson Hawk Mitigation Fee ......................................................................................................................... 66 235 Tree Mitigation ................................................................................................................................................... 67 236 Very Low Income Housing Trust Fund Fee ....................................................................................................... 67 238 Street Trench Cut .............................................................................................................................................. 67 241 Community Development Block Grant .............................................................................................................. 68 245 Elk Grove Redevelopment ................................................................................................................................. 68 251 CFD 2003-1 Police Services ............................................................................................................................. 68 252 CFD 2003-2 Police Services ............................................................................................................................. 69 255 CFD 2006-1 Maintenance Services................................................................................................................... 69 256 CFD 2005-1 Maintenance Services................................................................................................................... 69

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
261 Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 1 ........................................................................................................ 70 262 Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 2 ........................................................................................................ 70 263 Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 3 ........................................................................................................ 71 264 Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 4 ........................................................................................................ 71 265 Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 5 ........................................................................................................ 71 267 Street Lighting Maintenance District 1, Zone 1 ................................................................................................. 72 268 Street Lighting Maintenance District 1, Zone 2 ................................................................................................. 72 280 ........................................................................................................................................................................... 72 285 Neighborhood Stabilization ................................................................................................................................ 72 291 EECBG Energy Block Grant .............................................................................................................................. 73 294 Measure A Maintenance .................................................................................................................................... 73

Development Services Fund – 295 .................................................................................................... 75 Capital Funds - 300s
302 State Capital Grants .......................................................................................................................................... 81 305 Local Transportation Fund – Bikes & Pedestrian .............................................................................................. 81 311 Capital Facilities Fee (CFF) – Civic Center ....................................................................................................... 82 312 CFF – Police ...................................................................................................................................................... 82 313 CFF – Corporation Yard .................................................................................................................................... 83 315 CFF – Library ..................................................................................................................................................... 83 317 CFF – Transit Facilities ...................................................................................................................................... 83 319 CFF – Administration ......................................................................................................................................... 84 324 East Franklin Fee – Landscape Corridor ........................................................................................................... 84 325 East Franklin Fee – Supplemental Drainage ..................................................................................................... 84 326 East Franklin Fee – Administration.................................................................................................................... 84 328 Elk Grove Roadway Fee .................................................................................................................................... 85 329 Impact Fee Administration ................................................................................................................................. 85 333 Laguna Ridge Parks........................................................................................................................................... 86 335 Laguna Ridge Infrastructure Facilities Fee ........................................................................................................ 86 336 Lakeside Service Area ....................................................................................................................................... 86 338 External Agencies Fund .................................................................................................................................... 86 341 CFD 2002-1 East Franklin ................................................................................................................................. 87 343 CFD 2003-1 Poppy Ridge ................................................................................................................................. 87 344 CFD 2005-1 Laguna Ridge ................................................................................................................................ 88 347 Laguna Area CFD .............................................................................................................................................. 88 348 Laguna West CFD ............................................................................................................................................. 89 349 Lakeside CFD .................................................................................................................................................... 89 360 Laguna Ridge Park Fee ..................................................................................................................................... 90 394 Measure A Construction .................................................................................................................................... 90

Debt Service Funds - 400s
402 Debt Service – CFD 2002-1 .............................................................................................................................. 91 403 Elk Grove Finance Authority .............................................................................................................................. 91 404 Debt Service – CFD 2003-1 .............................................................................................................................. 91

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Enterprise Funds - 500s
501 Utility Billing ....................................................................................................................................................... 93 501 Integrated Waste ............................................................................................................................................... 94 502 Commercial Haulers .......................................................................................................................................... 94 503 Drainage & Flood Control .................................................................................................................................. 97 511 Transit ................................................................................................................................................................ 98 512 Transit Prop B .................................................................................................................................................... 98

Internal Service Funds - 600s
601 Risk Management ............................................................................................................................................ 101 602 Facilities/Fleet .................................................................................................................................................. 103 603 Information Technology/GIS ............................................................................................................................ 106

Agency Funds - 700s
730 Employee Sunshine Fund ............................................................................................................................... 111 740 HRA Trust Fund ............................................................................................................................................... 111 756 Debt Service – CFD 2005-1 ............................................................................................................................ 111

Capital Improvement Program
Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................. 113 Accessibility Improvement ...................................................................................................................................... 117 Annual Pavement Resurfacing ............................................................................................................................... 118 Bicycle & Pedestrian Improvements ....................................................................................................................... 119 Bond/Bader Intersection Improvements ................................................................................................................. 120 Bradshaw/Sheldon Road Intersection Improvements ............................................................................................ 121 Campus Landscape Project ................................................................................................................................... 122 Citywide Bus Shelters ............................................................................................................................................. 123 Citywide Community Enhancements ...................................................................................................................... 124 Civic Center ............................................................................................................................................................ 125 Corporation Yard Miscellaneous Improvements .................................................................................................... 126 Curb, Gutter, Sidewalk Program ............................................................................................................................. 127 Elk Grove Blvd/SR 99 Interchange Modifications ................................................................................................... 128 Elk Grove Creek Trail Crossing at State Route 99 ................................................................................................. 129 Elk Grove-Florin Road at East Stockton Blvd Intersection Improvements ............................................................. 130 Emerald Park Drive Storm Drain Pipe Replacement .............................................................................................. 131 Emergency Operations Center ............................................................................................................................... 132 Grant Line Road Widening From E. Stockton Blvd to Waterman Road ................................................................. 133 Harbour Point Median Project ................................................................................................................................ 134 Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility (HHWCF) ................................................................................... 135 I-5/Elk Grove Blvd Interchange Improvements ....................................................................................................... 136 Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Program ................................................................................................... 137 Major Drainage Repairs/Capital Replacement ....................................................................................................... 138 Poppy Ridge Street Light & Various Improvements Program ................................................................................ 139 Program Management/Advance Planning .............................................................................................................. 140 Railroad Crossing Safety Study, Design, and Improvements ................................................................................ 141 Safety, Streetscaping & Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvement Program ...................................................................... 142

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Sheldon/Waterman Road Intersection Improvements ............................................................................................ 143 Slurry and Chip Seal 2009 ...................................................................................................................................... 144 Swainson‘s Hawk Mitigation Property .................................................................................................................... 145 Traffic Control & Safety Program ............................................................................................................................ 146

Fiscal Policies .................................................................................................................................................... 147 Community Profile............................................................................................................................................. 159 Resolution ......................................................................................................................................... 165
Position Listing........................................................................................................................................................ 168 Glossary of Terms .................................................................................................................................................. 171

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8401 Laguna Palms Way Elk Grove, California 95758

Phone: 916.683.7111 Fax: 916.691.3182

Web: www.elkgrovecity.org

May 26, 2010

Mayor and Council Members: I am pleased to submit the Fiscal Year 2010-11 Proposed Budget for your review and consideration. The total Proposed Budget for FY 2010-11 is $210.6 million, which is $6.8 million (3.3%) more than the final FY 2009-10 budget of $203.8 million. The City‘s proposed General Fund budget, which provides discretionary funds for services, is $49.3 million, which is $600,000 (-1.2%) less than the FY 2009-10 final budget of $49.9 million. The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget maintains the Council‘s effort to recalibrate the City‘s fiscal reality while preserving the current level of service to the citizens of Elk Grove. Although FY 2009-10 presented the greatest financial challenges Elk Grove has endured in its relatively short history, economic conditions are slow to improve. As economists look to various factors to predict the timing and intensity of recovery, the following activity in the local economy suggests continued struggle with potential for a more positive outlook: The residential real estate market is experiencing a decline in mortgage defaults, although real estate experts are unclear as to whether improving market conditions or changing lender policies are responsible. Economists continue to warn of a second wave of foreclosure activity to begin in 2011, as many adjustable rate mortgages are reset. However, increased sales activity in recent quarters indicates that Proposition 8 assessed values will flatten or even experience modest growth, which could represent a bottoming out of the recent decline in property tax revenues. The past year continued to see national retailers close their doors or indefinitely delay expansion plans in Elk Grove, as the tight credit market and decreased consumer spending took their toll. While auto sales, which represent about a quarter of the City‘s sales tax revenues, remain sluggish, additional dealers are positioning themselves in the Elk Grove market in preparation to take advantage of rising consumer confidence. Despite many economists‘ agreement that the recession has ended, employment-related indices are lagging indicators of economic recovery. Unemployment will continue to hover around ten percent through the coming year in the Sacramento region, with potential for modest job growth expected in 2011. This continued unavailability of jobs, coupled with the State of California‘s ongoing employee furlough program, will adversely impact the ability of Elk Grove citizens to purchase goods and afford their homes. The City exercised prudent planning for the current fiscal environment by cutting nearly ten percent of the General Fund budget in FY 2009-10. As economic recovery gets underway, growth will be much more moderate than the growth rates the region experienced in the mid-2000s. Consequently, the next two to three fiscal years will likely see major revenue sources trending at flat to modest growth. Thus, this budget proposal continues the recalibration effort of FY 2009-10 through a balanced approach of: Reducing operational expenses, Suspending components of employee compensation, and Using one-time resources on a limited basis. 1

FY 2010-11 Service Plan
Through a series of Town Hall Meetings and Strategic Planning Sessions held in early 2009, the City Council adopted five goals to guide City activities for FY 2009-10 and FY 2010-11. The City‘s FY 2010-11 Work Plan furthers accomplishments of FY 2009-10 toward the ultimate achievement of these five goals: Create a vibrant, diverse economy Economic Development Corporation: The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget assumes that the City will continue its close working relationship with the Elk Grove Economic Development Corporation (EGEDC). The agreement between the City and the EGEDC calls for a contribution of $150,000 in either cash or inkind services, and the FY 2010-11 Budget assumes a cash contribution of $150,000. Redevelopment: The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget provides for continued efforts to explore the feasibility of creating a Redevelopment Agency through a $550,000 loan from unallocated fund balance in the General Fund. (The Redevelopment Agency would repay the loan once formed and generating sufficient revenue to do so.) As findings emerge from those studies, staff is committed to involving all stakeholders, including all taxing entities, in the process. State Agency Incentive Program: In December 2009, the City Council adopted an incentive program specifically targeting State office buildings. The program is designed to bring State jobs closer to where their employees reside by offering incentives that may be used towards relocation costs, building improvements, monthly rent, or even transportation or other quality of life subsidies for the employees. In FY2011, Economic Development efforts will be focused on implementing this incentive program due to the fact that 33% of Elk Grove‘s workforce comprises state employees. Economic Development Incentive Fund: The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget includes the establishment of an Economic Development Incentive Fund. Established through a transfer from the General Fund, the $600,000 appropriation will allow the City to offer grants or low-interest loans for specific projects as approved by the City Council. Regional Awareness Campaign: This fall, the City will be launching a regional campaign to support the City‘s Economic Development efforts. The campaign is aimed at raising awareness throughout the region about the City‘s continual efforts to streamline its processes, become more business friendly, and provide top-notch amenities to employers and residents alike. Ads will focus on new programs and services designed to make opening a business in Elk Grove as easy and efficient as possible. Market Study: During the current fiscal year, the City and private sector partners began a market study to determine the best economic niches for the City to fill within the Sacramento region. The study will identify future land use needs and economic development opportunities. This Study is a collaborative effort between the City, existing business interests and future development interests. The Market Study will be a tool the City ultimately uses to develop a formal Economic Development Strategy. Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods Emergency Management: The City Manager‘s work plan for FY 2010-11 includes recruiting and hiring an Emergency Operations Coordinator, who will be responsible for convening the City‘s Disaster Council; managing structural and technological upgrades to the Emergency Operations Center; and supervising emergency preparedness and disaster response exercises. One-Stop City Hall Contact Number: The FY 2010-11 work plan for the City Manager‘s office includes evaluating, implementing, and marketing a one-stop City Hall contact number. Citizens will be able to use 2

one phone number to reach knowledgeable staff to answer and address questions, suggestions, and concerns pertaining to any of the services the City furnishes. Improved Traffic Safety and Circulation: During FY 2010-11, the Public Works Department will oversee the installation of additional Intelligent Transportation Software to minimize traffic congestion during peak commute hours. Rental Housing and Abandoned Property Registries: The Rental Housing and Vacant Building Registries, created by the City Council in March 2010, will strengthen Community Enhancement‗s ability to proactively monitor properties for violations while also improving communication with property owners who are absent while their properties are vacant or rented.

Promote Elk Grove as a recreational and cultural center that attracts visitors Civic Center and Community Park: The FY 2010-11 work plan calls for embarking on initial design schemes for the Civic Center and Community Park based on Council‘s direction regarding the feasibility program and market analysis. The FY 2010-FY 2015 Capital Improvement Program includes future construction phases of the Civic Center through FY 2013-14. Historic Preservation: The City is currently working towards attaining Certified Local Government (CLG) status through the California Office of Historic Preservation. Once attained, the City‘s CLG status will allow for acquisition of grant funding to conduct a Historic Context study, to gain a better understanding of the City‘s place in the historic fabric of the region. Following completion of the Historic Context study, the City will then embark on an Historic Resources Inventory, to inventory all existing historic resources present within the City today. These two studies will provide technical basis for discussions and policy directions by the City Council to actively preserve the history of the Elk Grove community and foster a positive community image. Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources Multi-Year Projections: The Finance Department will continue to review and address sustainability of current operations through the development and analysis of five-year financial forecasts for the General Fund and the major enterprise funds. Given that it may take as long as three years for the current economy to adjust to sustainable conditions, the multi-year forecast is more important than ever so that the City continues to operate within its means and not create a structural deficit for future years. Performance Measurement System: The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget includes a number of performance measures that each department will use to measure its progress towards providing responsible, effective, and efficient services to our citizens. The City will also continue its participation in the International City/County Management Association‘s Center for Performance Measurement to educate staff in best practices and learn from the successes of similar-sized agencies nationwide. Develop an efficient and effective City organization with a regional perspective Electronic Plan Submittal/Plan Check Software: The Development Services and Information Technology departments will complete the implementation phase of electronic plan submittal in FY 201011. Working closely with the development industry group, Development Services will begin allowing customers to submit their building plans electronically. All agencies included in the development review process will provide comments on plans together instead of providing their comments sequentially, thus reducing processing time between submittal and building permit issuance. 3

Development Services Fee Study: Development Services is conducting a fee study for Council consideration and implementation in FY 2010-11. Comparison to other municipalities in the region and stakeholder involvement will facilitate competitive rates, a business-friendly environment, and more efficient work flow processes for Development Services and Finance staff.

Financial Overview
General Fund Revenue Sources. The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget reflects relative stabilization in the City‘s major revenue sources. After declining for two years, property tax receipts for FY 2010-11 are projected to remain at FY 2009-10 levels. Additionally, the decline in retail sales appears to have hit bottom in FY 2009-10. Statewide, sales taxes are projected to increase by 6% in FY 2010-11, as consumer confidence improves, fuel prices increase, and additional retailers enter the market. The City‘s sales tax consultant sees a similar growth pattern for Elk Grove, and the 6.6% projected increase in sales tax revenues reflects the statewide growth estimate. Fund Balance Analysis. In FY 2008-09, the City Council adopted a Fund Balance Reserve Policy: The contingency reserve is composed of designations for economic uncertainty (75%) and for exposures to emergencies (25%). The contingency reserve will fall no lower than 15% of appropriations. The optimum level is 20% of appropriations. The adopted FY 2009-10 Budget assumed an appropriation of almost $3.4 million from fund balance to provide for the following: State property tax ―borrowing‖ ($1,452,086), from fund balance designated for economic uncertainty; Equipment replacement ($725,000), from fund balance designated for equipment replacement; Loan for redevelopment activities ($200,000), from undesignated fund balance; and Transfer to Development Fund to cover the FY 2008-09 operating deficit ($1,000,000), from undesignated fund balance. In determining the revised estimates, for FY 2009-10, staff has determined that there will be sufficient revenue available at June 30, 2010 to cover all expenditures without any appropriation from fund balance necessary. Consequently, the level of fund balance at June 30 prior to appropriations in the FY 2010-11 Budget is the same as it was prior to appropriation in the FY 2009-10 Budget, as shown in the table below:
Fund Balance at July 1, 2009 FY 2010 (CAFR) Appropriation Beginning Fund Balance at July 1 Designated for Contingency Reserve - Economic Uncertainty - Exposure/Emergencies Subtotal Designated for Contingency Reserve Designated for Equipment Replacement Undesignated Total Fund Balance Fund Balance at July 1, 2009 after FY 10 appropriation Add to/(Take From) Estimated Fund Balance at Fund Balance June 30 at July 1, 2010

$

7,875,000 $ (1,452,086) $ 6,422,914 2,625,000 $ 2,625,000 $ 10,500,000 $ (1,452,086) $ 9,047,914 2,744,396 (725,500) 2,018,896 4,196,899 (1,200,000) 2,996,899 $ 17,441,295 $ (3,377,586) $ 14,063,709

$ $

$

1,452,086 $ 7,875,000 $ 2,625,000 1,452,086 $ 10,500,000 725,500 2,744,396 1,445,000 4,441,899 3,622,586 $ 17,686,295

There are two reasons for this result:

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The State property tax ―borrowing‖ was covered through reductions in interfund transfers during the course of the fiscal year, saving the $1,452,086 in fund balance designated for economic uncertainty. Departmental expenditures were below budget by $2.1 million. The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget assumes the following uses of fund balance: Equipment replacement ($725,000), from fund balance designated for equipment replacement; Loan for redevelopment activities ($550,000), from undesignated fund balance; Transfer to Development Fund to cover the FY 2008-09 operating deficit ($250,000), from undesignated fund balance; and Transfer to Economic Development Incentive Fund ($600,000), from undesignated fund balance. The following table demonstrates that the planned use of fund balance in the Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget is compliant with the City Council‘s fund balance policy:
Fund Balance at July 1, 2010 FY 2011 after FY 11 Appropriation appropriation

Estimated Fund Balance at July 1, 2010 Beginning Fund Balance at July 1 Designated for Contingency Reserve - Economic Uncertainty - Exposure/Emergencies Subtotal Designated for Contingency Reserve Designated for Equipment Replacement Undesignated Total Fund Balance General Fund Appropriations Fund Balance at 7/1 as % of appropriations Contingency Reserve as % of appropriations

$ 7,875,000 $ 2,625,000 $ 10,500,000 2,744,396 4,441,899 $ 17,686,295

$ $

$

$ 7,875,000 $ 2,625,000 $ 10,500,000 (275,000) 2,469,396 (1,400,000) 3,041,899 (1,675,000) $ 16,011,295 $ 49,520,350 32.33% 21.20%

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Five-Year Projection. The current five-year forecast suggests that the restoration of compensation levels and the implementation of a step play plan system in FY 2011-12 will expose the City to a $4.6 million structural deficit annually. (This forecast assumes the current level of services and a 1.5% growth in operating revenues.) Reserve balances are not adequate to weather the slow recovery of property and sales tax revenues through the forecast period. We will continue to monitor and analyze revenues to determine the extent of additional, permanent cost reductions versus draws on reserves to recommend at the FY 2010-11 mid-year review and during the preparation of the proposed FY 2011-12 Budget and FY 2012-13 fiscal plan. More detail concerning the City‘s financial position can be found in the Financial Analysis section of this document.

Organizational Issues
Compensation. The Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget is prepared with the continuation of the following reductions to the City‘s compensation plan, representing a savings of $1,250,000: Take eight furlough days, or the equivalent of 3% of salary, for FY 2010-11, which represents the percentage increase that most employees received in July 2008. 5

Reduce 401(a) match to 3%. Reduce the number of times that employees can cash out a portion of their vacation and/or administrative leave from twice a year to once per year. Reduce cash overtime compensation to members of the Elk Grove Police Officers Association consistent with the Memorandum of Understanding. As noted earlier, the revised estimates for fund balance levels in the General Fund reflect $2.1 million in operational savings projected to be achieved in FY 2009-10. If these results remain at the conclusion of the annual audit for FY 2009-10, and if local economic conditions warrant, I will return to the City Council with a recommendation to suspend the four furlough days to be taken between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011. Position Management. Continuing a practice begun in FY 2008-09, staff implemented a flexible freeze on vacant positions. Administrative positions were frozen as they were vacated and evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Departments have been allowed to fill positions that either provide direct services to the public in order to keep field staff whole or provide essential support to field staff. Over the course of this fiscal year, two Deputy City Managers left the organization. The proposed FY 2010-11 Budget assumes the replacement of these positions with two much-needed and less-expensive positions: a Police Lieutenant to oversee the Animal Control and Problem-Oriented Policing units, and an Emergency Operations Coordinator. In addition, the proposed FY 2010-11 Budget assumes the implementation of the Public Works reorganization by adding three contract managers and three administrative/accounting positions to the department. The cost of the positions will be offset by contract savings. More detail concerning City positions can be found in the Financial Analysis section of this document.

Conclusions/Acknowledgements
During 2009-10, departments were vigilant in limiting their spending and prioritizing those services directly affecting the citizens of Elk Grove. Their sustained dedication through the 2010-11 budget process facilitated the balanced plan I am proposing, which once again could not have been achieved without their assistance. I wish to acknowledge the staff of the Finance Department, particularly Katy Baumbach, for their perseverance and dedication in preparing this document. I also want to thank the City Council for their support of our workforce. I have dedicated the City Council meeting of June 9 to the Council‘s deliberation of the Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget, with adoption opportunities at either regularly scheduled meeting in June. My staff and I look forward to working with you as you review the proposed budget. During your review, please contact me with any questions that you or the public may have concerning the Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget. Respectfully submitted,

Laura S. Gill City Manager

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Budget Calendar

Date
January January – February February February February March March April May May June

Item
Departments submit ICMA Center for Performance Measurement data Cost allocation plan development Community grant applications available Budget instructions distributed to departments Capital improvement project requests due Department budget requests due Develop department work plans according to Council priorities Community grants awarded by City Council 2010-15 Capital Improvement Program reviewed by Planning Commission Present Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget to City Council City Council Budget Work Session and opportunities for budget adoption

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FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

General Fund
All City activities not accounted for in special revenue, capital, debt service, proprietary or agency funds are included in the General Fund. The General Fund accounts for approximately 25% of all activities in FY2010-11.

Revenues
The City of Elk Grove experienced significant population growth from 2003 through 2006 that resulted in an expanded residential and commercial assessed value base that generated additional retail sales.

General Fund Revenues Actual, Estimated and Projected
$70,000,000 $60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000 $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 $2005-06 • 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Sales Tax Property Tax Other Taxes Operating Other Funds

Sales tax is a volatile revenue source, yet it is the City‘s largest single source for general operations. Although retail sales have weakened since FY 2006-07, projections indicate the decline has reached bottom in FY 2009-10 at -15% growth. Sales tax revenues will stabilize and are projected to increase statewide by 6% in FY 2010-11 as consumer confidence improves, fuel prices increase, and additional retailers enter the market. Property taxes are considered a stable revenue source for long-term dependability; however, the market is correcting for multi-year over-inflated new home values. Although assessed values declined 5% and 11% in FY2008-09 and FY2009-10, respectively, recent sales activity indicates that assessed value growth will be flat or even experience marginal growth in FY2010-11. One-fourth of the sales tax revenue and all Vehicle Licensing Fees (VLF) are distributed per State formulas (Triple Flip and VLF Swap agreements) semi-annually based upon assessed property values and are therefore projected to remain constant with FY2009-10 activity. Other taxes, including Utility User‘s, Transient Occupancy and Franchise fees, are remaining steady for now. The City accounted for the development processing and related permit fees in the General fund as operating revenue until they were segregated to a special revenue fund in FY2008. 9

• •

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

Base Expenditures
The City appropriates and accounts for the majority of its programs including police, governance, community enhancement, animal services, special events, community grants and other general government programs in the General Fund.

$80,000,000 $70,000,000 $60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000 $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 $-

General Fund Expenditures by Function
Governance

Finance
Administration Police Neighborhood Services Code Enforcement Development Services ISF Transit ISF Subsidy Revenue Neutrality Non-Departmental Transfers Out

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Operating expenditures decreased by nearly 8% from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10. Expenditures are projected to be over $2 million under budget for FY 2009-10, which protects the General Fund‘s contingency reserve for future use. The City initially procured Police Services through a contract with the County Sheriff and subsequently established its own force in FY 2006-07. Further, the City segregated contracted Development Services to a special revenue fund in FY2007-08. The General Fund provides support to the Planning Commission and $643,000 for advanced planning functions requested of the Planning Department. Reorganization resulted in the elimination of some costs associated with Neighborhood Services and Animal Services has been incorporated into the Police Department. The General Fund does not provide direct support for Transit‘s operations; however, it absorbs Transit‘s share of indirect support identified through cost allocation and internal service fund (ISF) charges. The City Manager proposes a transfer of $1 million to address prior year Development Services fund shortfall; a $550,000 loan to initiate a Redevelopment Authority (RDA); $600,000 to establish an economic development incentive fund; $275,000 for capital outlay, including replacement computers and servers; $100,000 for a utility rate assistance program; and $800,000 for Development Services operations. 10

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

$80,000,000 $70,000,000 $60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000 $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 $-

General Fund Expenditures by Category
Compensation Contract Services Operating Internal Services Revenue Neutrality Capital Debt Service Transfers Out

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Salaries and benefits for 247 General Fund FTE equals 58% of the annual budget and totals $28.8 million, approximating $116,500 per position. Total funded positions increase by 9.2 in FY 2010-11, as follows: FY2009-10 Position Count 2.0 6.0 5.0 5.0 15.0 4.0 200.0 8.0 245.0 FY2009-10 Position Count 3.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.2 5.0 4.0 1.0 4.0 268.2 FY2010-11 Position Count 5.0 8.0 5.0 4.0 14.0 4.0 200.0 8.0 248.0 FY2010-11 Position Count 4.0 1.0 2.0 5.0 3.4 5.0 4.0 1.0 4.0 278.4 Change in Position Count 1.0 1.0 4.0 0.2 9.2 Change in Position Count 3.0 2.0 -1.0 -1.0 03.0

Department General Fund: City Council City Manager City Attorney City Clerk Finance Human Resources Police Code Enforcement General Fund Total Department Other Funds: Dev Svcs Admin Planning Building Public Works Integrated Waste Utility Billing Transit Risk Management Facilities & Fleet All Funds Total

Revenue Neutrality accounts for the incorporation agreement to hold the County of Sacramento costneutral. The County collects and retains a portion of the property taxes collected from the original 11

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

incorporation boundaries at a declining rate over twenty-five years (see chart on page 42). In FY 201011, the retention percentage decreases from 85% to 80%. The City expects the County to retain $5.875 million, which totals 1/8 of all general revenues. A non-departmental contingency account totaling $100,000 has been established. This foresight provides the City Council and City Manager authorized appropriations in the event unforeseen activities arise beyond those programmed.

Employee Services
The City Manager implemented a flexible hiring freeze in Fall 2008 at the Council‘s request to mitigate declining revenues. As such, many vacant positions have either been unfunded, eliminated, or under-filled. The Council directed staff to create six positions in Development Services, funded by contract savings. Also, two Deputy City Managers left the organization in FY 2009-10; those positions are proposed to be eliminated and replaced by two much-needed and less-expensive positions: a Police Lieutenant and an Emergency Management Coordinator. A summary of the position changes: New Police Lieutenant Emergency Management Coordinator 3 Development Services-Public Works Contract Managers Administrative Assistant in Development Services Accounting Technician in Development Services Customer Service Specialist in Development Services Administrative Assistant in Police Part Time Battery Collector (add 0.2 FTE) in Integrated Waste Eliminate Customer Service Specialist in Police 2 Deputy City Managers Employee compensation deductions will continue in FY 2010-11, totaling $1.25M, or 4% of wages and benefits. The savings are identified in the table below: Non-POA Furlough (8 days annually) Reduce 401(a) by 50% Reduce buy-back to 1x/year POA Concessions Total $ 570,000 $ 320,000 150,000 100,000 $ $ 680,000 680,000 $ POA $ Total 320,000 150,000 100,000 680,000 1,250,000

In December 2009, the City Council revised the Health Retirement Account (HRA) Benefit for employees. Program costs for FY 2010-11, approximately $400,000, will continue to be funded through prior year Annual Retirement Contribution (ARC) payments that now exceed the amount required by actuarial study. In FY 201112, program expenses will be incorporated in the compensation budget.

12

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

Internal Services
Risk Management, Information Technology, Geographic Information Systems, Facilities Management and Fleet operations support multiple city departments and are budgeted in separate internal service funds (ISFs). Independent oversight ensures operating departments are charged a proportionate value for each function, resulting in a clearer picture of program costs. ISFs are classified as Proprietary and operate as self-sustaining businesses with a long-term focus. Internal Service Fund Risk Management Facilities Fleet Services Information Technology Geographic Info Sys Total Portion Total Budget $ 649,683 1,870,258 1,470,950 2,243,092 788,848 $7,022,831 General Fund $ 565,089 901,010 1,455,084 708,000 338,283 $3,967,466 56% Other Funds $ 84,594 969,249 15,866 1,535,092 450,565 $3,055,365 44%

The Transit fund‘s share of ISF charges are reflected within the Transit budget, although revenues are not sufficient to absorb the cost. Consequently, the General Fund subsidizes the $302,677 in ISF charges, as well as $487,344 in overhead charges sent to the Transit fund through the Cost Allocation Plan.

Cost Allocation Plan
The City hired a consultant to identify the costs incurred by the General Fund and Development Services fund that support other funds‘ activities. Further, the consultant determined multiple applicable bases to allocate the costs. The resulting Plan documents the cost allocations with supporting data and methodology. A table summarizing these allocations can be found in Schedule 3 on page 20.

General Fund Reserves
The City Council adopted a Fund Balance Reserve Policy in February 2009 that establishes a goal to retain 20% of General Fund adjusted appropriations for contingency purposes. The contingency reserve is comprised of designations for economic uncertainty (75%) and for exposures and emergencies (25%). The Council may reduce the balance for allowable uses to 15% as needed and define a plan for returning the balance to 20% reserves goal within three years.

13

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

The following chart outlines the use of fund balance in FY 2009-10 and the Proposed FY 2010-11 Budget:
Fund Balance 7/1/09 Beginning Fund Balance at July 1 Designated for Contingency Reserve - Economic Uncertainty - Exposure/Emergencies Subtotal Contingency Reserve Designated for Equipment Replacement Undesignated Ending Fund Balance at June 30 $ $ $ 7,725,000 2,575,000 10,300,000 2,700,000 4,600,000 17,600,000 $ $ 245,000 $ 245,000 $ $ $ 7,725,000 2,575,000 10,300,000 2,700,000 4,845,000 17,845,000 $ $ $ (275,000) (1,400,000) (1,675,000) $ $ $ 7,725,000 2,575,000 10,300,000 2,425,000 3,145,000 16,170,000 FY 2010 Activity Fund Balance 7/1/10 FY 2011 Appropriation Fund Balance 7/1/11

Adjusted Appropriations Fund Balance as % of appropriations Contingency Reserve as % of appropriations

$

49,860,500 35.79% 20.66%

$

49,526,595 32.04% 20.80%

The total fund balance at July 1, 2009 was $17.6 million, of which $10.3 million is reserved for contingency. Of the remaining $7.3 million, $2.7 million is reserved for future equipment replacement, in line with the policy‘s allowable use. The FY 2009-10 budget proposed to draw down the Undesignated Reserve balance by $1.2 million; however, reduced operating expenditures are expected to add $245,000 to the fund balance. The Proposed FY 2010-11 budget assumes the following uses of fund balance: Equipment Replacement ($275,000) Loan for redevelopment activities ($550,000) Establish economic development incentive program ($600,000) Transfer to Development Services fund to cover FY 2009-10 operating deficit ($250,000)

14

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

General Fund Actual and Estimated Total Reserves versus Contingency Policy
20,000,000 17,500,000 15,000,000 12,500,000 10,000,000 7,500,000 5,000,000 2,500,000 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 20% Contingency 2008-09 2009-10 15% Contingency 2010-11

Total Reserves

A five-year forecast of the General Fund suggests that, if services remain at current levels and compensation reductions are restored in FY 2011-12, the City is at risk of running an ongoing structural deficit between $3-4 million. Reserve balances are not adequate to weather the slow recovery of property and sales tax revenues. Staff will continue to monitor and analyze revenues to determine the extent of additional, permanent cost reductions versus draws on Reserves to recommend in FY 2011-12 and beyond.

Development Services Fund
The City segregated the activities encompassing the processing of planning, building and engineering services related to residential and commercial private development provided by multiple contracted service providers in FY 2007-08. This fund also accounts for administration of city-wide planning projects and public works‘ oversight of infrastructure capital and maintenance. Although current development is not occurring at the pace experienced in 2004-2007, the City Council is cognizant of its long-range opportunities and supports the Advanced Planning function accordingly. Due to the economic downturn and the revenue policy that does not fully support operations, levels of service are continuing to be reduced throughout the department and the General Fund is transferring $800,000 to support customer service at the public counter. The service delivery model was 100% contractor-provided until FY2008-09. In January 2009, three department heads were hired and proposed positions for FY 2010-11 include three contract managers, an accounting technician, an administrative assistant, and a customer service specialist, pursuant to Council direction.

Capital Improvement Plan
The Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) identifies the infrastructure, land, buildings and equipment expected to be needed in providing services and amenities to the residents through the next five years. Further, the plan documents the various funding sources. The projects and equipment requested for FY 2010-11 have been entered as requests for appropriation within the proposed budget. 15

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

Impact Fee Deferral Program
To stimulate private development during this construction slow-down, Council adopted an Impact Fee Deferral Program in April 2008. The program allows land-owners to apply for deferral of certain city-wide impact fees, including roadway, capital facilities, affordable housing and very low income affordable housing at time of building permit. The program sunsets June 30, 2012 and can be extended at the Council‘s discretion. The short-term impact of existing and recommended measures will be the deferral of revenue collections and associated construction of facilities necessitated by the impact for many years. With minimal impact fee monies expected to be received during the next few years, the existing funds‘ balances are the only monies that will be available for appropriation in FY 2010-11 unless the Council chooses to loan monies from the General Fund.

Integrated Waste
In May 2010, the City Council enacted legislation to address the cash flow and write-off issues that face the integrated waste utility billing operation through stop service authorization on delinquent accounts and application with deposit requirements for new accounts. New processes will be introduced and implemented in Summer 2010. With verbal discussions indicating a shrinking competitive market and resulting cost increases associated with trash and recycling collection and disposal, the City Council approved a residential rate increase effective July 1, 2007 to fund a long range planning project that explores options for constructing and operating an Integrated Waste Transfer Station, Materials Recycling Facility, Household Hazardous Waste Facility and other possible ancillary facilities. The proposed FY 2010-11 includes funding for land acquisition, design, and construction of a Household Hazardous Waste Facility through debt financing. If approved, staff will coordinate the debt issuance with a financial adviser and bond counsel.

Transit Operations
The fixed, commuter and para-transit bus service operation commenced FY 2009-10 with a $1.3 million negative balance. Through a combination of increased fares, revised service provision, and a renegotiated contract with the service provider, transit operations are nearing a sustainable level. The General Fund continues to subsidize Transit‘s support operations, valued at approximately $800,000 in FY 2010-11, and the proposed Transit budget continues to reflect an operating deficit, although it has narrowed to approximately $325,000.

16

Schedule 1 Summary of Estimated Financial Activity and Fund Balance Fiscal Year 2010-2011

Fund No. General Fund Contingency Replacement Undesignated Total General Fund

Estimated Balance 7/1/2010

Estimated Revenues 6/30/2011

Estimated Expenses 6/30/2011

Estimated Balance 6/30/2011

101 101 101

$

$

10,300,000 2,700,000 4,845,000 17,845,000

$

$

-

$

$

275,000 1,700,000 1,975,000

$

$

10,300,000 2,425,000 3,145,000 15,870,000

Equipment Replacement Fund Operations 102 Total Equipment Replacement Fund Economic Development Fund Operations 105 Total Economic Development Fund Facilitiy Reserve Fund Operations Total Reserve Fund

$ $

30,179 30,179

$ $

293,300 293,300

$ $

293,300 293,300

$ $

30,179 30,179

$ $

-

$ $

600,000 600,000

$ $

600,000 600,000

$ $

-

106

$ $

15,143,999 15,143,999

$ $

-

$ $

1,150,000 1,150,000

$ $

13,993,999 13,993,999

Development Services Fund Operations 295 Total Development Services Fund Special Revenue Funds Used Oil Recycling Grant Vehicle Abatement Household Hazardous Waste Police Off-Duty State Seizure OTS Grant Local Police Grants Gas Tax Fund Affordable Housing Agricultural Preservation Swainson Hawk Tree Mitigation VLIHTF Street Trench Cut CDBG Elk Grove Redevelopment CFD 2003-1 Police Services CFD 2003-2 Police Services CFD 2006-1 Maintenance Services CFD 2005-1 Maintenance Services Street Maintenance D1 Zone 1 Street Maintenance D1 Zone 2 Street Maintenance D1 Zone 3 Street Maintenance D1 Zone 4 Street Maintenance D1 Zone 5 Street Light Maintenance Zone 1 Street Light Maintenance Zone 2 Neighborhood Stablization EECBG Energy Block Grant Measure A Maintenance Total Special Revenue Funds

$ $

(2,851,154) $ (2,851,154) $

9,507,875 9,507,875

$ $

10,300,292 10,300,292

$ $

(3,643,571) (3,643,571)

202 203 204 213 215 216 217 221 231 233 234 235 236 238 241 245 251 252 255 256 261 262 263 264 265 267 268 285 291 294 $

10,647 231,286 30,000 661,594 (432,649) 10,803 (946,076) 12,184,200 2,475,154 (2,057,801) 437,095 2,707,643 297,103 (31,432) 112,200 122,878 381,323 100,901 2,898,005 2,326,620 25,154 535,162 630 5,582 214,222 13,159 (27,940) 705,693 (135,344) 22,855,812 $

23,787 70,000 250,000 180,000 300,642 72,000 3,658,383 870,000 30,000 145,000 15,000 49,000 35,000 813,575 550,000 648,000 740,000 430,500 790,000 575,000 15,750 160,000 4,500 176,500 776,000 95,100 1,298,965 2,682,162 15,454,864 $

23,787 140,000 495,000 322,109 72,000 2,308,381 10,670,000 2,010,000 2,175,000 3,600,000 80,000 813,575 662,200 606,821 701,244 388,340 786,160 118,532 4,321 166,500 1,250 2,250 773,000 134,152 1,260,400 705,693 2,513,243 31,533,958 $

10,647 301,286 250,000 70,000 166,594 (454,116) 10,803 403,926 2,384,200 495,154 (4,087,801) 452,095 (843,357) 252,103 (31,432) 164,057 420,079 143,061 2,901,845 2,783,088 36,583 528,662 3,880 179,832 217,222 (25,893) 33,575 6,766,093

17

Schedule 1 Summary of Estimated Financial Activity and Fund Balance Fiscal Year 2010-2011

Fund No. Capital Project Funds Federal Capital Grants State Capital Grants Local Transportation Fund CFF - Civic Center CFF - Police CFF - Corporation Yard CFF - Library CFF - Bus Facilities CFF - Administration East Franklin Fee - Landscape Corr. East Franklin Fee - Supp. Drainage East Franklin Fee - Admin Elk Grove Roadway Fee Impact Fee Administration Laguna West Service Area Lakeside Service Area External Agencies Fund CFD 2002-1 East Franklin CFD 2003-1 Poppy Ridge CFD 2005-1 Laguna Ridge Laguna Area CFD Laguna West CFD Lakeside CFD Laguna Ridge Park Fee Measure A Construction Total Capital Project Funds Debt Service Fund Debt Service - CFD 2002-1 Debt Service - Financing Authority Debt Service - CFD 2003-1 Total Debt Service Fund Enterprise Fund Integrated Waste Commercial Hauler Drainage Transit Operations Total Enterprise Fund Internal Service Funds Risk Management Facilities & Fleet IT & GIS Total Internal Service Fund Agency Funds Employee Sunshine Fund HRA Trust Fund Debt Service CFD 2005-1 Total Agency Fund GRAND TOTAL 730 740 756 $ 301 302 305 311 312 313 315 317 319 324 325 326 328 329 335 336 338 341 343 344 347 348 349 360 394 $

Estimated Balance 7/1/2010 (2,822,506) $ (448,822) (113,140) 4,164,674 4,336,850 358,878 962,507 1,601,053 30,179 12,221,067 454,757 118,838 42,175,311 42,865 506,118 101,637 1,573,790 3,241,717 9,409,660 3,992,934 1,147,941 920,693 (368,342) 2,198,345 283,112 86,090,116 $

Estimated Revenues 6/30/2011 3,488,000 64,262 60,000 85,000 6,000 20,000 10,000 175,000 7,000 2,000 1,000,000 37,500 1,500 15,000 130,000 135,000 140,000 2,300,000 232,145 347,511 598,068 8,853,986 $

Estimated Expenses 6/30/2011 1,900,000 108,819 446,257 150,000 40,179 11,500,000 275,000 14,165 32,038,962 2,000 58,911 101,303 3,371,717 9,319,409 2,085,319 21,490 232,145 347,511 9,869 795,063 62,818,119 $

Estimated Total 6/30/2011 (2,822,506) 1,139,178 (157,697) 4,224,674 3,975,593 364,878 982,507 1,451,053 896,067 186,757 106,673 11,136,349 40,865 484,707 1,834 1,588,790 225,251 2,047,615 3,426,451 920,693 (368,342) 2,188,476 32,039,866

$

$

$

402 403 404

$

7,723,358 2,260,430 6,737,916 16,721,704

$

3,575,000 1,806,538 5,381,538

$

3,570,762 1,809,038 3,012,908 8,392,708 $

7,727,596 2,257,930 3,725,008 13,710,534

$

$

$

501 502 503 511

$

5,691,189 1,732,114 13,760,898 225,111 21,409,312

$

12,490,655 529,500 6,005,000 8,887,805 27,912,960

$

11,135,997 438,996 4,599,030 9,213,644 25,387,667

$

7,045,847 1,822,618 15,166,868 (100,728) 23,934,605

$

$

$

$

601 602 603

$

595,812 94,369 124,530 814,711 12,064 338,167 9,827,625 10,177,856

$

2,098,269 3,341,210 3,132,940 8,572,419 10,000 400,000 3,728,698

$

2,098,269 3,372,987 3,183,320 8,654,576 20,000 400,000 3,728,698

$

595,812 62,592 74,150 732,554 2,064 338,167 9,827,625

$

$

$

$

$ $

4,138,698 80,115,640

$ $

4,148,698 153,504,318

$ $

10,167,856 99,608,116

$ 173,093,536

18

Schedule 2 General Fund Activity Fiscal Year 2009-2010
FY 2009 Actual Revenues Taxes Property Taxes Sales & Use Tax Other Taxes Taxes Total Intergovernmental Property tax in lieu VLF MVL + Mandates Intergovernmental Total Fines & Forfeitures License, Fees & Permits Interest Other Revenue Cost Allocation Transfers In Revenue Total Expenses by Function City Council City Manager City Attorney City Clerk Finance Administrative Services Human Resources Non-Departmental Revenue Neutrality Community Service Grants Police Department Neigborhood Services Code Enforcement Information Technology Facilities Development Services Expenses by Function Total Expenses by Category Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out Expenses by Category Total Change in Fund Balance Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance $ 29,992,988 17,643,529 902,198 57,330 2,453,679 $ 29,657,000 13,487,000 4,791,500 725,000 1,200,000 $ 27,804,008 10,894,450 4,791,500 9,800 3,623,388 $ 28,707,419 11,701,361 3,967,466 4,949,104 $ (949,581) (1,785,639) (824,034) (725,000) 3,749,104 (535,150) 250,000 246,882 496,882 FY 2010 Budget FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Budget Change From FY 2010

$

12,037,378 16,281,060 5,395,156 $ 33,713,594 11,058,997 450,880 $ 11,509,877 1,772,013 618,650 618,234 579,066 1,688,686 1,116,643 $ 51,616,763

$

10,400,000 14,496,500 5,429,000 $ 30,325,500 9,600,000 540,000 $ 10,140,000 2,222,500 443,000 300,000 265,500 2,075,000 2,164,000 $ 47,935,500

$

10,750,000 13,842,000 5,430,000 $ 30,022,000 9,810,000 385,000 $ 10,195,000 1,401,628 532,393 300,300 387,133 2,075,774 2,455,800 $ 47,370,028

$

10,800,000 14,755,000 5,465,000 $ 31,020,000 9,850,000 500,000 $ 10,350,000 1,452,500 464,650 300,000 443,091 2,255,109 1,365,000 $ 47,650,350

$

$ $ $ $

400,000 258,500 36,000 694,500 250,000 (40,000) 210,000 (770,000) 21,650 177,591 180,109 (799,000) (285,150)

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

360,066 1,493,619 965,927 508,336 1,744,202 353,257 667,509 3,758,771 7,588,135 147,113 27,683,742 1,510,119 658,609 1,195,604 2,404,211 10,504

$

458,750 1,516,360 1,152,431 539,590 2,034,445 449,919 593,656 1,768,262 6,348,500 298,000 29,783,393 1,416,690 772,504 2,728,000

$

405,703 1,462,335 1,039,226 505,839 1,945,943 198,578 410,535 2,046,388 6,220,000 300,160 27,979,241 1,041,887 987,311 2,580,000

$

437,288 2,123,959 1,122,687 702,263 1,893,638 805,843 2,781,419 5,875,000 320,000 29,952,623 859,430 2,451,200

$

(21,462) 607,599 (29,744) 162,673 (140,807) (449,919) 1,013,157 (473,500) 22,000 169,230 (1,416,690) (276,800)

$ 51,049,724

$ 49,860,500

$ 47,123,146

$ 49,325,350

$

(834,263)

$ 51,049,724 567,039 16,874,256 17,441,295

$ 49,860,500 (1,925,000) 17,441,295 15,516,295

$ 47,123,146 246,882 17,441,295 17,688,177

$ 49,325,350 (1,675,000) 17,688,177 16,013,177

$

19

Schedule 3 Summary of Cost Allocation
Fund 602 Facilities 901,010 15,161 65,696 121,285 90,664 292,806 35,722 2,011 7,790 447 144 7,753 1,010 31,860 976 2,559 998 142,719 2,611 85 74 13,656 376 1,213 2,040 299 599 326 23,024 26,125 25,268 26,125 15,161 181,982 4,856 45,797 33,992 38,848 1,870,261 Fund 602 Fleet 1,455,084 6,030 5,555 4,280 1,470,949 Fund 603 IT 708,000 33,159 176,845 176,845 200,985 587,834 79,189 4,458 17,270 990 319 17,187 2,238 70,628 2,164 5,673 2,211 316,384 5,788 189 164 30,273 834 2,689 4,523 663 1,327 722 51,040 27,632 66,317 27,632 55,264 77,370 21,748 32,622 21,748 2,243,092

Fund 101 General Fund 295 DS - Admin 295 Planning 295 Building 295 PW - Eng Dev Services Fund 221 Gas Tax 251 CFD 252 CFD 255 CFD 256 CFD 261 St Maint Dist 262 SMD 263 SMD 267 SLMD 268 SLMD 294 Measure A Maint. 305 LTF Bike & Ped 319 CFF-Admin 326 E. Franklin Admin 328 Roadway Fee 333 Laguna Ridge Parks 335 Laguna West SA 336 Lakeside SA 341 E. Franklin CFD 343 Poppy Ridge CFD 344 Laguna Ridge CFD 347 Laguna Area CFD 348 Laguna W CFD 349 Lakeside CFD 360 LR Park Fee 394 Measure A Const. 501 Solid Waste 501-1560 Utility Billing 502 Commercial Haul 503 Drainage 511 Transit 601 Risk Management 602-1810 Facilities 602-1843 Fleet 603-1630 IT 603-1640 GIS 460,321 46,363 147,460 654,144 55,272 5,321 8,244 7,142 28,427 7,212 1,671 3,577 21,519 2,777 56,988 2,656 46,063 7,866 226,859 4,031 3,874 835 34,856 5,033 17,660 8,607 10,082 2,360 7,813 51,624 336,200 36,685 47,306 77,473 474,931 2,255,109

Fund 295 Fund 601 Risk 109,583 24,924 12,462 209,587 246,972 91,491 5,151 19,953 1,144 368 19,857 2,586 81,600 2,500 6,554 2,555 365,533 6,687 218 190 34,976 964 3,107 5,226 766 1,533 834 58,969 11,265 4,201 679 183,384 12,413 1,281,259 1,165,089 11,536 3,845 3,845 944 20,170 372 21 81 5 1 81 11 332 10 27 10 1,487 27 1 1 142 4 13 21 3 6 3 240 7,691 15,381 7,691 15,381 9,613 5,768 1,249,683

Fund 603 GIS 338,283 2,453 46,413 17,249 47,639 113,754 18,770 1,057 4,094 235 75 4,074 531 16,741 513 1,345 524 74,992 1,372 45 39 7,176 198 637 1,072 157 315 171 12,098 6,211 13,239 6,211 137,408 22,389 1,464 2,196 1,464 788,847

Total 4,677,049 62,309 778,044 378,049 697,279 1,915,680 280,816 5,321 8,244 19,840 77,615 10,032 1,671 4,485 70,471 9,152 258,149 8,819 62,220 14,165 1,127,974 20,516 4,411 1,303 121,079 7,409 25,319 21,490 11,971 6,139 9,869 196,995 421,153 161,091 115,643 468,690 790,021 28,068 48,711 74,777 33,992 38,848 11,159,201

20

Governance

101-1100

CITY COUNCIL
MISSION
The mission of the City Council is to create a superior quality of life for Elk Grove residents through increased services, safety, and quality local amenities. The Council works for improved services for today‘s residents, while maintaining and preserving history for our children.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 122,579 165,450 237,487 186,050 360,066 351,500 FY 2010 FY2011 Change from Estimate Budget FY 2010 133,653 167,310 1,860 164,800 148,900 (37,150) 298,453 316,210 (35,290)

Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 1100 Intern to Councilmember 1100 City Council Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 2 5 3 1 2 5 3

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$316,210

The City Council serves as a five-member policy board of the city. As an elected body, the City Council provides direction, establishes goals and sets priorities for the City. The City Council is the chief legislative body in City government. Councilmembers are elected at-large and serve four-year terms. The City council is charged with a variety of duties and responsibilities, which include: Established community goals and objectives Adopting an annual balanced budget Generally setting forth policies of the City Appointing personnel as provided by state law or other municipal code Adopting ordinances and resolutions Approving contracts Providing grant recognition to outside agencies

21

Governance

101-1100

CITY COUNCIL
FY 2010-11 CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Create a vibrant, diversified economy. Significant employment growth, through both recruitment of new high quality job opportunities and continued growth of existing businesses, will fuel future prosperity. We will create a balance between jobs and jousting by targeting industry sectors that support stable employment and a healthy local economy. Creating innovative public-private partnerships, collaborating with local and regional economic development agencies, and enhancing City business practices will promote success. Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods. The City of Elk Grove will work collaboratively with neighborhood groups and individual homeowners and business owners to maintain and improve safety, aesthetics, and property values throughout the City. The City‘s public spaces will be beautiful, well-designed, and well-maintained. The City will promote the co-location of commercial, recreational, and social amenities that encourage residents to live, work, and play. While planning for new development, the City will recognize the needs of existing neighborhoods. Promote Elk Grove as a recreational and cultural center that attracts visitors. The City of Elk Grove will capitalize on our diverse, family-oriented community and our respect for the City‘s heritage and character. We recognize that natural resources and constructed facilities should be available to serve our residents and invite visitors. We will develop facilities, activities, and amenities that promote Elk Gore as a regional cultural and tourism destination. Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. City Council and staff will serve as wise stewards of the City‘s fiscal resources in safeguarding assets, planning long-term financial stability and maintaining adequate contingency reserves. Fiscal activities will be justifiable, efficient, effective, transparent, and accountable. Develop an efficient and effective City organization with regional perspective. In regional partnerships with other agencies, the City of Elk Grove is committed to improving service delivery to our residents and businesses. Our commitment is to our customers, both internally and externally. We provide a positive organizational culture where we recruit, retain, and promote the best employees who are regionally focused and always willing to work with all stakeholders in achieving success.

22

Governance

101-1200

CITY MANAGER

MISSION
The City Manager‘s Office ensures efficient day-to-day operations throughout the City while overseeing programs that provide residents with high quality housing, shopping, working and recreating opportunities. The City Manager continually strives to keep the City in a fiscally strong and economically sound environment. The Office includes Public Information, Emergency Services, ADA Coordination, Economic Development Ombudsman, Federal and State Legislative programs, as well as the Office of Management and Budget.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Actual Budget Estimate Budget FY 2010 677,440 628,074 586,094 1,102,011 473,937 814,234 772,340 760,295 939,054 166,714 1,945 1,493,619 1,400,414 1,346,389 2,041,065 640,651

Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 1200 Administrative Assistant 1200 Assistant to the City Manager 1200 Budget Manager 1200 City Manager 1200 Economic Development Coordinator 1200 Emergency Management Coordinator 1200 Executive Administrative Assistant 1200 Public Information Officer 1200 Sr. Customer Service Specialist 1200 City Manager Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 7 6 8 2

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
City Manager’s Office $926,065 8.0 FTEs

The City Manager is charged with a variety of duties and responsibilities, which include: carrying out policies and direction from the City Council; enforcing ordinances of the City; preparing and recommending to the City Council a balanced municipal budget annually; appointing and supervising all City personnel except as provided by State law or other municipal code; administering the personnel system; creating a healthy and safe working environment for all personnel; and being responsive and available to the community. The City Manager‘s office is also charged with the following responsibilities:

23

Governance

101-1200

CITY MANAGER
Public Information $405,000 The Public Information Office is responsible for the City‘s monthly newsletter, the City‘s Website and community calendar, press releases, advertising, marketing, public and community relations, speech writing, special events, community outreach and public meetings. Additionally, the Office organizes all City special events, groundbreakings and grand openings for city projects, and provides marketing/public information support to all City departments and programs. Emergency Services $160,000

The City Manager is charged with providing emergency services coordination for its residents. This coordination includes response planning, first responder support, and post event recovery for major emergencies that might trigger a large scale emergency response. Recognizing that emergency situations often cross jurisdictional boundaries, the City Manager supports emergency services planning with all first responder agencies in the South Sacramento region through participation in the Disaster Council. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Coordination The City‘s ADA Coordinator is charged with a variety of duties throughout the City including: coordination and development of ongoing efforts for full ADA compliance including consultative services to management. Other tasks include arranging for and/or conducting training on the ADA; coordinating and monitoring architectural barrier surveys; developing processes for prompt fulfillment of requests for alternative formats; development of the required Self-Evaluation Transition Plan to remove access barriers; involvement of the City‘s Disability Advisory Committee (DAC) to facilitate policy formation and to review existing policies such as reasonable accommodation. Economic Development $425,000

The Economic Development Ombudsman functions as a liaison to local businesses and developers to help minimize barriers to local economic development. The Ombudsman works closely with the Elk Grove Economic Development Corporation to encourage the retention and expansion of existing businesses and to attract new employers. The Ombudsman also works directly with businesses to assist them in obtaining information, navigating the permitting and business license process, and assisting them throughout the process. This position also administers any City Economic Development incentive programs. State and Federal Legislative Programs The State and Federal Legislative programs are closely monitored for impacts to the City, region and nation. Each year, the City works to advance critical public safety and priority projects through the federal Appropriations process as well as other venues. The City also works closely with the California Legislature to advance State legislation as well as monitor bills that impact local government. Office of Management and Budget $125,000

The Office of Management and Budget is responsible for preparation, delivery, and monitoring of annual budgets, multi-year fiscal plans, and five-year capital improvement programs. The OMB develops and analyzes financial forecasts to ensure sustainability of current operations. Also charged with measuring performance in order to facilitate resource allocation decisions, the OMB assists departments with performance benchmarking, identifies opportunities for improved efficiency and efficacy, and coordinates participation in International City/County Management Association‘s Center for Performance Measurement. Budget Issues The following functions have been transferred to the City Manager‘s Office for FY 2010-11: o Economic Development (from Development Services) o Office of Management and Budget (from Finance) 24

Governance

101-1200

CITY MANAGER
The budget also includes the following: o $7,500 for Youth Commission Management o $100,000 for a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy o $150,000 for the Elk Grove Economic Development Corporation The City contracts with Sacramento County for hazardous materials incident responses. This contract has moved from the City Manager‘s budget to Public Works.

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Create a vibrant diversified economy. Facilitate continued processing of the City‘s Sphere of Influence application. Provide a direct point of contact through the Economic Development Ombudsman for existing and new businesses to facilitate the retention and creation of new jobs and industries. Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods. Use new technologies and techniques, including existing resources on the City‘s website, to ensure that the public has easy access to information about city government and to connect Elk Grove residents and neighborhoods with information and resources at City Hall. Develop and strengthen relationships with key organizations and community groups; identify partnership and resource sharing opportunities. Promote Elk Grove as a recreational and cultural center that attracts visitors. Complete market and development analyses to guide the future development of the Civic Center and Community Park, including the involvement of Private Sector partners in the development of the project. Develop City ―wayfinding‖ program to direct visitors to City landmarks and attractions. Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Track performance measures that provide feedback in the achievement of Council goals. Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective. Strategically align the organization to support the identified and adopted FY09/10 and FY10/11 City Council Goals, Objectives and Strategies. Revise City Personnel Rules & Regulations. Implement a ―One Stop for City Hall‖ number that residents can call for information, assistance, or work orders. Continue to strengthen relationships with regional partners, particularly those related to economic development.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Measure Average monthly media inquiries received Number of visits to the City‘s website FY10 Estimate 60 1,116,026 FY11 Target N/A 1,150,000

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CITY MANAGER
In addition, the City Manager‘s Office will track: Percentage of City Manager Office inquiries within 48 hours Percentage of City Council follow-up items within 20 business days Current status of emergency management procedures as compared to Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) standards Usage trends on the City‘s web site. In FY 2009-10, the five most frequented pages are: 1. City home page 2. Elk Grove Police Department home page 3. E-tran web pages 4. Request for Proposals/Bids 5. Utility billing, Solid Waste and Storm Water Billing ADA grievance procedures as outlined in the City‘s formal Grievance Procedure

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 09-10
Recruited and hired a new Director of Human Resources and Assistant City Manager. During fall 2009, the City embarked on a citywide survey through the International City/County Management Association (ICMA). Developed by ICMA and National Research Center, Inc., The National Citizen Survey (The NCS) is a low-cost resident survey service for local governments. The NCS allows jurisdictions to survey resident opinion for: program planning, goal setting, budgeting, and performance measurement. The City also conducted multiple focus groups to confirm and learn more about the survey results. The results of both the survey and focus groups are used on a regular basis to improve business at City Hall. Successfully completed tasks related to the City‘s FY2011 Appropriations process. Due to budget constraints and the legislative climate, staff conducted conference calls to Washington, DC to advocate for projects instead of conducting an in-person visit. Staff continues to work proactively with the City‘s federal advocates and Councilmembers to win support for federal earmarks that will help fund critical community projects, including the Capital Southeast Connector JPA. Secured a $750,000 Congressional Grant in the Fiscal Year 2010 Homeland Security Appropriations bill for the City‘s Emergency Operations Center. Attended the annual Sacramento Metro Chamber Cap-to-Cap trip in Washington, D.C., to build and strengthen partnerships and generate support for earmark requests. Continued to make strides for improved customer service with the building industry which included: regular attendance at the Building Industry Association (BIA) monthly Elk Grove specific meeting, conducted regular outreach regarding City fees, standard updates, and process improvements, as well as co-sponsoring interagency forums with BIA and Builder‘s Exchange to bring together all of the City‘s agency partners to discuss the development process and brainstorm improvements. Created two Economic Development Incentive programs to attract and retain employers: Economic Development Incentive Program and State Office Incentive Program. The Economic Development Incentive program provides incentives to new businesses that create jobs or generate sales tax revenue. The State Office Incentive program specifically targets state office projects to locate in Elk Grove and provides incentives to do so. Kicked-off citywide Market Study that will identify future land use needs and economic development opportunities. This Study is a collaborative effort between the City, existing business interests and future development interests. The Market Study will be a tool the City ultimately uses to develop a formal Economic Development Strategy. 26

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CITY MANAGER
The City completed a Retail Leakage Analysis which identifies both local and regional opportunities to capture retail sales currently under-utilized. This study will provide demographic data as well as specific retail vendor opportunities to aid in our economic development efforts to better serve our residents. Publicized and coordinated multiple opportunities for public input and involvement in City programs and activities, including the citywide ―Think, Shop, Live Elk Grove‖ shop local program, shoe recycling program, State of the City event, Arbor Day celebration, Sheldon Interchange grand opening, spring cleaning program, and the grand opening celebration of Laguna Creek Trail Bridge. Conducted citywide research—including extensive public outreach—to explore the most effective methods to communicate with residents and businesses, which would include analysis of the effectiveness of traditional communication channels (newsletters, public notices, print advertising) to new media (social networking Websites, online community forums, blogging). Utilized new technologies and techniques, including social media and existing resources on the City‘s website, to ensure that the public has easy access to information about their city government and to connect Elk Grove residents and neighborhoods with information and resources at City Hall. New communications tools include: weekly news updates ("Week at a Glance"), Facebook and Twitter pages, an Elk Grove Online partnership that features City news and web chats, an online photo and video gallery on the City's website, emergency response blog, and a PDA-friendly City website. Submitted award applications on behalf of the City of Elk Grove that resulted in nearly a dozen awards from the Sacramento Public Relations Association, International Association of Business Communicators and the Annual Communicator Awards Program.

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CITY ATTORNEY

MISSION
Our mission is to provide expert legal counsel for the City on a wide variety of complex legal matters to assist departments in implementing the City Council‘s goals and objectives. The City Attorney‘s Office consists of two divisions: City Attorney and Risk Management.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 691,465 736,719 274,462 315,225 965,927 1,051,944 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Estimate Budget FY 2010 628,589 724,170 (12,549) 310,150 294,900 (20,325) 938,739 1,019,070 (32,874)

Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 1300 Assistant City Attorney 1300 City Attorney 1300 Deputy City Attorney II 1300 Executive Administrative Assistant 1300 Legal Assistant 1300 City Attorney Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 5 5 5 0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$1,019,070 5.0 FTEs

The City Attorney‘s office investigates, evaluates, and resolves complex legal matters for the City. Additionally, we provide legal advice to the City Council, Planning Commission, City Departments and other boards and committees on a wide range of municipal law topics. The City Attorney‘s office remains current on cases and legislation affecting the conduct of the people‘s business and actively participates in meetings with internal and external stakeholders to achieve desired results. Budget Issues If the District Attorney‘s office discontinues misdemeanor prosecution, the City Attorney‘s office will investigate the hiring of additional staff to prosecute misdemeanors, including drunk driving, in the City of Elk Grove.

28

Governance

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CITY ATTORNEY

FY 2009-10 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods. Increase prosecution of Municipal Code violations through the court system. Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Continue to reduce reliance on outside counsel. Being fully staffed allows the City Attorney‘s Office to handle more litigation matters in house, particularly Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective. Amend purchasing ordinance to better track actual City operations. Work with Sacramento County District Attorney and other City Attorneys in the County on misdemeanor prosecution issues.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS
Will monitor assignments received to ensure appropriate cost recovery.

COMPLETED INITIATIVES FOR FY 09-10
Hired a Deputy City Attorney, continuing the reduction in reliance on outside counsel. Actively prosecuted Municipal Code violations, including obtaining warrants for abatement. Completed contract process and procedure, including launch of on-line insurance compliance program

29

Governance

101-1400

CITY CLERK
MISSION
While operating under statutory provisions of the California Government Code, the Elections Code, and City ordinances and policies: Ensure the City’s legislative processes are open and public by providing a link between citizens and government through the dissemination of information; Accurately record and preserve Elk Grove’s legislative history, safeguarding vital, historic, and permanent records of the City; and Serve with courtesy, promptness, and integrity – the public, City Council, and City staff in an unbiased and fiscally responsible manner.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Actual Budget Estimate Budget FY 2010 413,032 408,413 387,412 409,103 690 95,304 48,565 35,815 191,445 142,880 508,336 456,978 423,227 600,548 143,570

Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position Administrative Assistant Assistant City Clerk City Clerk Customer Service Specialist Deputy City Clerk/Records Manager Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 -1 1 1 1 0 5 5 4 -1

1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 City Clerk Total

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Administration

$600,548
4.0 FTEs

The City Clerk, appointed by and under the direction of the City Council, serves as the Clerk to the City Council, and Secretary to the Finance Authority, Parking Authority, and Redevelopment Agency. It is the responsibility of the City Clerk to provide support to the legislative body, as well as to respond and to implement processes responsive to the Brown Act, the Public Records Act, the Political Reform Act, Election laws and various other statutes. The City Clerk is the filing officer and official for Statements of Economic Interests and Campaign Disclosure Statements. The City Clerk 30

Governance

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CITY CLERK
is the custodian of the City Seal and Redevelopment Agency Seal, and attests and acknowledges official City documents as required. Operations The City Clerk’s Office is responsible for agenda preparation and posting, as well as the duplication and distribution of agenda materials to the City Council, senior executives and the public. Public notice is achieved as mandated by various statutes through posting, publication and mailing processes. The City Clerk’s Office receives for tracking and processing to other departments subpoenas, motions, claims against the City, capital improvement bids, consultant service proposals, contracts, as well as appeals to decisions of the Planning Commission, the City Engineer, and Code Enforcement staff. Records The City Clerk’s Office is the repository for the legislative records of the City Council, as well as contracts and a variety of other recorded documents. Records Division staff receives and processes for review and release, public requests for records under the Public Records Act. The Records Division staff is also responsible for securing records in an optical imaging system for citywide staff access and makes records available utilizing the City’s website. Records Division staff facilitates the delivery of records from other departments for inactive storage pursuant to retention policy. Elections The City Clerk is responsible for administering General Municipal Elections, as well as any Special Elections that may be called, in addition to annexation elections to Street Maintenance Districts and Community Facility Districts. Budget Issues One full-time Customer Service Specialist position has remained vacant since September 2008. During these 19 months, workload has not necessitated the reinstitution of this position; therefore, its elimination is recommended. This action will achieve an annual cost savings of $51,000. The November 2, 2010 General Municipal Election for Districts 2 and 4 is estimated to cost $70,000. Ballot measures will cost an additional $8,100 for each question. As of the time of budget preparation, possible ballot measures include: 1) Utility User Tax revision, 2) establishing the office of elected mayor, and 3) an advisory question on the desired number of Council districts. If all three measures were placed on the November 2, 2010 ballot, the total cost of election services could reach $94,300. Redistricting of City Council Member Residency Districts is scheduled to occur in 2011, subsequent to receiving the results of the decennial census. The length of the process will depend upon its complexity, which will, in part, be contingent upon voter preference for an elective mayor position, i.e. requiring either a decrease or increase in the number of districts and, therefore, creating the need for multiple district scenarios to be developed and brought before the voters for approval. A Request for Proposals will be issued in November 2010 to seek a qualified professional services consultant, which is estimated to cost $50,000.

31

Governance

101-1400

CITY CLERK
FY 2010-2011 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Develop an efficient and effective City organization with regional perspective Administer the November 2, 2010 General Municipal Election (Districts 2 and 4, and possible ballot measures); Initiate redistricting of Council Districts, based on results of the 2010 Census; Conduct Conflict of Interest Code Biennial Review; Continued development/expansion of Records Management Program; Continued implementation of a Digital Records Initiative to increase access to public records.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Administer the November 2, 2010 General Municipal Election (Districts 4 and 6) Prepare for City Council consideration, appropriate resolutions for election consolidation and possible ballot measures for November 2, 2010 Election; Prepare 2010 Candidate’s Instruction Manual; Issue and receive nomination papers from candidates residing in City Council Districts 2 and 4; Prepare all necessary publications and notices related to the election and Fair Political Practices Commission filing obligations; Prepare and present resolution for certification of the November 2, 2010 General Municipal Election results, administer oaths of office, and compile all information necessary for City Council reorganization procedures (e.g. compile information for annual review of Council service on local and regional bodies and member appointments/reappointments to City boards, commissions, and committees). 2010 Conflict of Interest Code Biennial Review The Political Reform Act requires that each city review its Conflict of Interest (COI) Code during even-numbered years and bring forward any necessary amendments to the City Council for adoption within 90 days of its review. To this end, the City Clerk’s Office will prepare required notifications to departments, compile results, and present necessary documents to the City Council in order to receive the Biennial Notice of Intention to Amend the Elk Grove COI Code and to adopt the 2010 COI Code Revision no later than December 8, 2010. Administer Process to Reapportion Council District Boundaries Draft and administer the Request for Proposals for professional services to reapportion district boundaries, the scope of which will include: database creation, block splitting, base map development, graphic 2010 Census Demographic Report, development of redistricting concepts, collaboration with a Redistricting Advisory Committee, public outreach, presentations at public meetings, and final Council district boundary descriptions. Records Management Program Expansion Provide technical advice regarding recommended records management practices to the divisions of Building Inspection, Police Services, Administration, and Neighborhood Services, toward the goal of creating specific departmental Record Retention Schedules; 32

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CITY CLERK
Conduct annual records retention review in accordance with Resolution 2008-63 (records maintained by the City Clerk’s Office); Increase effective use, by staff, of the citywide records archive program. Information Accessibility through the Digital Records Initiative Provide online video archive from incorporation to present; Implement additional stages of the City Council Agenda preparation and follow-up processes into a streamlined, digital format; Increase number of City Clerk Forms, Policies, Procedures, and Templates on the Intranet; Reduce costs of distributing and reproducing hard copy materials.

COMPLETED INITIATIVES FOR FY 09-10
Provide Staff Support to the Elk Grove City Charter Commission Throughout Fiscal Year 2009-10 City Clerk’s Office staff provided support to the Charter Commission through preparation and posting of agendas pursuant to the Brown Act, facilitating the organization, duplication and distribution of agenda materials, attending all meetings, providing requested subject matter research, and preparing minutes to memorialize the actions of the Commission in development of a City Charter. The draft charter was presented to the City Council on January 13, 2010, at which time the Charter Commission was disbanded. Development/Expansion of Records Management Program Consolidated all City Clerk’s Office records from the 8380 Laguna Palms Way facility to the Finance Department File Room at the 8401 Laguna Palms Way building (freeing approximately 1,200 linear feet of space for the Police Department in our vacated records storage room); Increased annual City retention review four-fold, from 22 linear feet in Fiscal Year 2008-09, to over 100 linear feet Fiscal Year 2009-10 (Resolution No. 2009-180 was adopted on September 9, 2009 authorizing the destruction of certain records retained by the Finance Department). Information Accessibility through the Digital Records Initiative by: Provided a fully updated online, text searchable, and downloadable version of the Elk Grove Municipal Code to the City website; Added 23 City Council meeting video webcasts to the City website; Added 56 sets of Closed Caption transcription notes to the City website; Posted Fair Political Practices Commission filings to the City website (607 Campaign Disclosure Statements covering 1999 through 2009, and 102 Statements of Economic Interest covering 2009 and 2010); Implemented and administered Intranet workflow tracking of: 1) Agenda Preparation, 2) Contract Processing, and 3) Public Requests for Information Tracking; Conducted test conversion of the City Clerk digital record archive (PaperVision) into the consolidated, City-wide digital record archive system (Real Vision Imaging).

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Governance

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CITY CLERK
Comprehensive Policy and Procedure Manual: Created and updated over 50 department policies/procedures and presented two policies for Council Approval (Resolution No. 2009-238 was adopted on December 9, 2009 implementing a policy governing the receipt and distribution of tickets and/or passes, and Resolution No. 2010-24 was adopted on January 27, 2010 regarding the conduct of City Council meetings and amending the rules of procedure); Streamlined pagination and compilation of electronic staff reports, reducing production process steps in half.

34

Governance

101-1500

FINANCE
MISSION
The Finance department provides innovative leadership in the financial management of the public resources entrusted to the City in order to enhance the quality of life in Elk Grove.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual 1,505,782 238,420 1,744,202 FY 2010 Budget 1,483,956 251,251 1,735,207 FY 2010 Estimate 1,373,680 211,950 1,585,630 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 1,250,911 (233,045) 289,000 37,749 1,539,911 (195,296)

Compensation Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position Accounting Manager Accounting Technician Customer Service Specialist Finance Analyst Director of Finance & Admin Services Payroll Technician Purchasing Agent Purchasing Manager Senior Customer Service Specialist Senior Administrative Assistant Senior Accountant Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 4 5 4 -1 3 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 16 15 14 -1

1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 Finance Total

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$1,539,911 14.0 FTEs

Finance supports the City Council, management, and other departments with financial planning and administration, cash management, accounting and reporting, payroll processing, purchasing, and cash receipting. Budget Issues: One Accounting Technician position will be converted to a Sr. Customer Service Specialist and transferred to the City Manager‘s Office. The Budget function will also be transferred to the City Manager‘s Office. The Finance budget includes $226,500 in professional services for audit services, technical financial services consulting, and support to the Council audit committee.

35

Governance

101-1500

FINANCE
FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Audit utility user tax remittances for compliance Implement utility billing cash flow controls: applications, deposits, lifeline rate and service suspension Assist with new facility and program planning by providing feasibility analysis and financing alternatives Identify and implement strategies to maximize paperless solutions

PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Measure Number of payrolls processed without errors Percentage of debt payments made on time and in compliance The Finance Department will also track: Monthly cash reconciliations completed within 30 days of month‘s end Investment Portfolio Return to Market 100% external funding requisitioned within 30 days of period end FY10 Estimate 24 100% FY11 Target 26 100%

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
Supported the negotiation of the first Memorandum of Understanding with the Elk Grove Police Officers Association Supported Internal Audit consultant‘s review of Public Works Developed employee step plan pay structure Implemented paperless business license processing Implemented paperless payroll distribution Encouraged vendor migration from paper checks to electronic payments Supported implementation of the citywide Travel Policy Provided fiscal analysis for the Transfer Station Long-Range Planning and Household Hazardous Waste projects, including preparation for debt financing and modeling impacts to ratepayers Prepared five-year forecasts for the General Fund Administered delinquent Mello-Roos special tax accounts per bond covenants, including collection demand process, continuing disclosure obligations and advancement to judicial foreclosure Provided fiscal analysis for various operational improvements and proposed capital projects Published second Annual Financial Report to the Community summarizing technical document Received GFOA awards for Budget and CAFR Conducted in-house accounting, purchasing and budgeting training Participated in regional fiscal officers meetings to foster relationships and sharing of information Supported the Council Audit Committee

36

Governance

101-1600

HUMAN RESOURCES

MISSION
To provide excellent customer service by strategically partnering with City departments and facilitating to effectively recruit, retain, develop, compensate, manage and lead a diverse and innovative City workforce that is committed to excellence.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual 461,614 205,890 667,504 FY 2010 Budget 398,481 149,190 547,671 FY 2010 Estimate 212,398 108,762 321,160 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 596,725 198,244 112,570 (36,620) 709,295 161,624

Compensation Operating Expenses Expense Total

POSITION LISTING

Authorized Position 1610 Management Analyst 1600 Administrative Assistant 1600 Human Resources Director 1600 Human Resource Specialist 1600 Hum an Resources Total

Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 4 4 4 0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$709,295 4.0 FTEs

The Human Resources Department is responsible for providing the City with well-trained and motivated employees by maximizing employee potential through proactive employee relations and development. The Human Resources Department serves to promote the development, well-being and success of employees in the various departments within the City, and to advise the City‘s Executive Team, managers and supervisors in all aspects of human resource management. Its primary functions include recruitment, selection and retention of qualified employees; monitoring and administering the City‘s classification, compensation and benefits plans; coordinating Citywide training and development sessions; labor relations (including the negotiation and administration of agreements with recognized employee organizations and administration of personnel rules and procedures); and to present strategies for organizational development.

37

Governance

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HUMAN RESOURCES

Budget Issues: Human Resources commits to excellent levels of service to employees and the public with a status quo budget for employee related expenses. Total overall operating expenditures have been reduced by $54,055.00 from the 2009-2010 FY. The Human Resources Analyst position will be filled at the Human Resource Specialist level to better meet the needs of the department. The City‘s workers compensation program will be administered in the Human Resources Department, rather than in Risk Management with no need for departmental budget expansion. The City‘s employee wellness program will be administered in the Human Resources Department, rather than in Risk Management with no need for departmental budget expansion.

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective Revise City Personnel rules and Regulations to update them with current public sector best practices for human resource management and current employment laws. Ensure city is in regulatory compliance in all areas of Human Resources. Develop and enhance training opportunities for staff citywide. Develop an effective New Hire Orientation Program.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS
Number of polices developed and/or revised Percentage of the Personnel Rules and Regulations updated Number of trainings provided Number of staff trained Percent of staff trained who found the training to be beneficial to their work or professional development. Percent of employees satisfied with working for the City of Elk Grove Percent of employees who feel ―engaged‖ to the City‘s overall mission Percent of employees who feel valued as an employee with the City

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
EGPOA labor agreement - Worked collaboratively through the collective bargaining process to complete the City‘s first labor agreement with the EGPOA. Deferred Compensation Plan - Modified the City‘s deferred compensation plan to comply with Internal Revenue Code changes. Administrative Policy Development - Led a cross departmental Administrative Policy team o Developed an effective procedures process o Created consistency in the format of all citywide administrative policies 38

Governance

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HUMAN RESOURCES

Created intranet file storage for easy accessibility to all staff The Team Effectively developed six (6) Administrative Policies  Computer Use Policy  Vehicle Use Policy  Email Policy  Social Media Policy  Identity Protection Policy  Employee Travel & Expense Policy  Furlough Leave Policy Ensured all staff reviewed newly developed policies Return to work Program - Collaborated with risk management staff to document a Return to Work program for work and non-work related injuries. Recruitments - Successfully recruited and filled 14 positions within the City. Class and Compensation Study - Completed Classification and Compensation Analysis. City Wide Training - Enhanced city wide training Developed a citywide training schedule Rolled out ―Prevention Link‖ online training program city wide o Computer Use Policy – 261 Staff trained o Vehicle Use Policy – 261 Staff trained o Harassment Awareness – 193 Staff trained o AB 1825 Sexual Harassment Supervisor Train. – 11 Supervisors trained Joined Liebert Cassidy training consortium to cost effectively provide training to staff on a variety of topics o Advanced FLSA – 7 Staff trained o Public Agencies During Lean Economic Times – 11 Staff trained o The Most Important Part of the Hiring Process - 1 Staff trained o Discipline: Putting It Into Practice – 7 Staff trained o Discipline and Harassment Investigations - 4 Staff trained o Labor Relations: The Meet and Confer Process – 2 Staff trained

o o

39

Other programs

101-1900

NONDEPARTMENTAL
BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Expense Total 2,641,771 1,117,000 3,758,771 FY 2010 Budget 56,100 247,000 4,791,500 2,873,388 7,967,988 FY 2010 Estimate 45,000 392,000 4,791,500 2,873,388 8,101,888 FY 2011 Budget 243,515 3,967,466 4,336,104 8,547,085 Change from FY 2010 (56,100) (3,485) (824,034) 1,462,716 635,197

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The non-departmental section includes appropriations that are not directly attributable to any one function. Internal Service Fund Allocation $3,967,466

The Risk Management (601), Facilities & Fleet (602), and Information Technology & Geographic Information Systems (603) functions have been segregated as internal service funds for cost recognition and allocation to other funds that benefit from services provided. The following table reflects those charges allocated to the General Fund:
Risk Mgmt General Liability City Council City Manager City Attorney City Clerk Finance Human Resources Police Code Enforcement Subtotal GF Draw on ISF Reserves $ $ 27,460 15,692 19,614 15,692 62,766 15,692 976,791 31,382 $ 1,165,089 (600,000) 565,089 Risk Mgmt Fund Balance Draw $ Geographic Information Information Technology Systems 1,423,112 31,972 $ 1,455,084 $ 1,455,084 $ 76,928 51,285 64,106 64,106 217,962 64,106 66,936 102,571 $ 708,000 $ 708,000 $ 5,003 3,336 4,169 4,169 22,672 4,169 288,097 6,670 $ 338,283 $ 338,283 $ 3,967,466 $

Facilities 25,829 20,663 25,829 25,829 82,651 20,663 687,568 11,979 $ 901,010 $ 901,010 $

Fleet

Total 121,078 82,894 103,617 101,715 353,727 96,548 2,939,475 168,413 $ 3,967,466

(14,141) $ (8,081) (10,101) (8,081) (32,323) (8,081) (503,030) (16,161)

$ (600,000)

40

Other programs

101-1900

NONDEPARTMENTAL
Special Events $143,515

The City of Elk Grove supports many community events throughout the year. In-kind services and funds from multiple departments are captured in this non-departmental division. Supported events include: Harvest Festival Dickens Faire/Santa Parade Old Town Elk Grove special events Red, White & Blue Run 4 Independence Safety Fair Santas & Sirens School parades Spotlight Elk Grove Strauss Festival Western Festival Veterans Day Parade

Transfers Out
The General Fund makes transfers to other funds for overhead and operating purposes, as follows:

$4,336,104

Transfer To 102 105 245 295 295 295 295 501 511

Purpose Fund capital equipment replacement Initial funding for economic development incentive program Initial funding for Redevelopment Agency Operations subsidy Overhead allocation Cover prior year deficit Hazardous incident response Utility Rate Assistance program Transit overhead and ISF subsidy

Amount $ 293,300 $ 600,000 $ 550,000 $ 798,200 $ 129,583 $ 1,000,000 $ 75,000 $ 100,000 $ 790,021 $ 4,336,104

Contingency

$100,000

The $100,000 Contingency Funds is available for unexpected needs or events that may arise throughout the fiscal year.

41

Other programs

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REVENUE NEUTRALITY

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual 7,588,135 7,588,135 FY 2010 Budget 6,348,500 6,348,500 FY 2010 Estimate 6,220,000 6,220,000 FY 2011 Budget 5,875,000 5,875,000 Change from FY 2010 (473,500) (473,500)

Operating Expenses Expense Total

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Under the terms of incorporation, the City transfers a percentage of its property tax revenues from the original City boundary to Sacramento County for a period of 25 years. During the first half of Elk Grove‘s ten years of cityhood, 90% of property taxes were transferred. 85% was transferred in the latter half. Now, in FY‘s 20102015, 80% will be returned to the County.

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Other programs

101-1920

COMMUNITY SERVICE GRANTS

BUDGET SUMMARY

Operating Expenses Expense Total

FY 2009 Actual 147,113 147,113

FY 2010 Budget 298,000 298,000

FY 2010 Estimate 300,160 300,160

FY 2011 Budget 320,000 320,000

Change from FY 2010 22,000 22,000

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
City Council Committee for the Arts $20,000

The City Council-appointed Committee for the Arts locates and recommends specific pieces of art to be installed at City-owned facilities, provides recommendations to the City Council for arts and entertainment within the City, and dialogues with regional and local entities interested in arts and entertainment. City Council Community Service Grants $300,000

Awards granted by the City Council to organizations to fund activities for the betterment and improvement of the community.

COMMUNITY SERVICE GRANT REQUESTS
FY10 Funding FY11 Funding FY11 Funding Awarded Requested Adopted

Organization

Activity Description Provide low cost spay/neuter and vaccinations for 500 cats and initiate educational campaign.

Animal Rescue League

$

2,500

$

25,500

$

-

Asian Community Center Chicks in Crisis/ Empowering Relationships Inc.

Provide hot home-delivered meals five days per week to homebound seniors $ and provide five frozen meals one day per week to homebound Elk Grove seniors. $

22,595

$

37,365 $

22,595

Parenting and life skills training, pregnancy and HIV testing, teen pregnancy support. A collaboration of three non-profit Community Action organizations to provide counseling, Partnership training, and mentoring to at-risk youth ages 12-24. In partnership with Playground Partners, Consumnes Legacy this is a multi-year project to resurrect Foundation Pirates Island Playground in Elk Grove Regional Park.

10,000

$

60,000 $

10,000

$

-

$

15,000

$

-

$

-

$

38,000

$

-

43

Other programs

101-1920

COMMUNITY SERVICE GRANTS
FY10 Funding FY11 Funding FY11 Funding Awarded Requested Adopted

Organization

Activity Description Provides a new Football, Cheer & Marching Band program for youths 6 to 14 years of age, and an annual ―NFL Skills Camp‖ at Cosumnes Oaks High School. Promotes affordable football and cheer programs, and activities to replace recent program cuts. Create a website that will meet ADA accessibiity standards to expand the visibility of services and programs for people with developmental disabilities. Funds EGUSD High School Art contest for the 6th yr. Open to all high school juniors/seniors; encourages students showing a heightened level of artistic talent regardless of academic standing. Hosts both the Pacific South West 9U and 10U regional tournaments at the Kloss Complex inside Elk Grove Park, bringing in thousands of people. This will have a benefit to Elk Grove restaurants, hotels and stores. Funding will pay for fees to host the tournament and equipment. Proposes to add 14 food bank plots to the community garden, which provides the EG Food Bank with a source of fresh, organic produce. The new phase would provide a larger children‘s garden to educate children on the importance of eating healthy foods and taking care of the environment. Develops a free program of fine art lectures. Funding will be used for presenter fees and promotion of the event. The fee of $2,000 per lecture will enable EGFAC to invite high profile speakers to lecture on topics of interest to the community. Provides programs and services to low/moderate income persons, focusing on rising needs of children and seniors. Includes Food Closet, Clothes Closet, Helping Hand, Support Works for Women and Mobile Pantry. Focus on rising needs of children and seniors.

Consumnes Oaks Jr. Wolfpack Football & Cheer Inc

$

-

$

88,230

$

8,000

Elk Grove Adult Community Training

$

15,000

$

3,200

$

2,000

Elk Grove Artists, Inc.

$

2,500

$

5,000

$

2,500

Elk Grove Cal Ripken Baseball League

$

-

$

10,000

$

5,000

Elk Grove Community Garden and Learning Center

$

3,800

$

7,029

$

3,000

Elk Grove Fine Arts Center

$

-

$

12,000

$

-

Elk Grove Food Bank Services

$

25,000

$

58,800 $

33,000

Provide ADA accessibility to the historic Elk Grove Historical Rhoads School House in Elk Grove Park $ Society with the construction of a concrete ramp. Elk Grove Police Activity League Provide youth crime prevention programs; involve youth at risk with no cost sports, education and recreational activities.

-

$

12,355

$

-

$

37,010

$

148,275 $

38,000

44

Other programs

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COMMUNITY SERVICE GRANTS
FY10 Funding FY11 Funding FY11 Funding Awarded Requested Adopted

Organization

Activity Description

Elk Grove Rotary

Mentoring program for high school-age atrisk youth. Those who complete the $ program are awarded a $5,000 scholarship. Provide after school services such as interviewing, job readiness, etiquette and $ personal development skills, mentoring relationship building, counseling, etc. Veterans Day parade on November 22, 2010 to honor our military veterans of all branches of service as well as Police, Firefighters, Paramedics, etc. Two-day annual community event at Elk Grove Regional Park. Provide fair housing services to Elk Grove residents, including telephone hotline, landlord-tenant workshops, and investigation of complaints. Provide parents/guardians with the skills and support needed to assist their children to be successful in the community, their schools, and at home.

-

$

20,000

$

1,000

Elk Grove Teen Center

36,000

$

100,000 $

38,000

Elk Grove Veterans Day Parade Elk Grove Western Festival Human Rights Fair Housing Commission

$

2,000

$

2,000

$

-

$

2,000

$

15,000

$

38,515 $

15,000

People Reaching Out, Inc.

$

-

$

35,262

$

-

Provides children and adults with special needs a safe, educational and Project R.I.D.E. Inc. recreational equine experience to enrich their physical and emotional development. Community Outreach Program for spay/neuter education. Funds will assist with advertising and fund continued rescue efforts for the growing number of Sister's Animal abandoned animals due to foreclosures, Sanctuary Inc. and educating the public on medical emergencies, re-homing their pets, and stray or feral animals in their neighborhood. The FTC‘s Procurement Assistance Program promotes economic development by helping small businesses learn to sell their products to The Federal all levels of government. All small Technology Center business in Elk Grove are eligible for free training courses and workshops related to government contracting, counseling to meet individual business needs, contract administration. Provide staffing and operations support to the Elk Grove Senior Center including The Senior Center offering the congregate dining program of Elk Grove that provides nutritious meals five days per week. Provides the Elk Grove community and The Strauss Festival greater Sacramento with a free annual of Elk Grove festival featuring the works of Johann Strauss. Total

$

16,650

$

38,250 $

16,910

$

-

$

10,000

$

-

$

5,000

$

5,000

$

5,000

$

99,995

$

112,000 $

99,995

$ $

293,050

$ $

15,000 898,781 $ 300,000

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POLICE

MISSION
The Elk Grove Police Department is a premier public safety agency. Our basic mission is to improve public safety by reducing the fear of crime and disorder through enforcement, education, and vigilance. We are dedicated to continuing an open, proactive, and creative environment with our many community partners in this effort. We maintain the public trust through integrity, diversity, and excellence in our programs, our social actions, and in our most valuable asset, our employees.

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Debt Service Expense Total 24,402,680 2,478,779 747,546 54,737 27,683,742 FY 2010 Budget 24,073,335 2,652,782 26,726,117 FY 2010 Estimate 23,045,471 1,866,695 9,800 24,921,966 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 23,850,447 3,162,702 27,013,149 (222,888) 509,920 287,032

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POSITION LISTING

Authorized Position Police Chief Captains Captain Lieutenants Sergeants Police Officers Total Sw orn Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistant (Senior) Animal Services Officer Animal Services Supervisor Community Services Officer Crime Analyst Crime Prevention Specialist Customer Service Specialist Dispatcher Dispatch Supervisor Forensic Investigator IT Analyst IT Analyst (Sr.) IT Manager Management Analyst Policy Equipment/SupplyTechnician Police Records Manager Police Records Supervisor Police Records Technician Police Services Analyst Police Support Services Manager Police Volunteer Coordinator Property & Evidence Manager Property & Evidence Tech Security Officer Subtotal Non-Sw orn Police Total FY 2009 1 1 0 7 18 99 126 6 1 3 1 11 1 1 1 18 3 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 1 2 2 72 198 1 2 U 6 18 98 125 6 1 3 1 11 1 1 1 18 3 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 8 1 1 1 1 2 2 75 200

Funded FY 2010 FY 2011 1 2 U 7 17 98 125 7 1 3 1 11 1 1 0 18 3 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 8 1 1 1 1 2 2 75 200 Change 0 0 0 1 -1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 -1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Administrative Services $ 4,601,908

The Administrative Services Division provides executive, management, and logistical support to the Elk Grove Police Department (EGPD). The Chief‘s Office is responsible for coordinating activities of the department in furtherance of the City‘s overall goals in partnership with the City Manager‘s Office and other City of Elk Grove Departments. The Chief‘s Office responds to requests for information from the Elk Grove City Council, the media, and the public. The Chief‘s office is also responsible for long-range planning and budgeting, administrative systems, and providing policy guidance for the employees of the department. The Chief of Police is responsible for maintaining proactive, responsive, and effective police services to the City of Elk Grove and coordinating EGPD‘s activities with other law enforcement agencies and community organizations. The Administrative Services Division consists of the following sections: Office of the Chief Finance – Budget – Procurement The Finance unit is responsible for the development and oversight of the Elk Grove Police Department‘s overall budget. Finance provides financial management and support services to other service areas within the Police Department and works closely with other City departments. Additionally, the Finance unit provides coordination and evaluation of all fiscal activities including: budget, purchasing, facilities, cost recovery, special events, and grants. Information Technology Information Technology (IT) serves the Police Department‘s mission by providing integrated computer systems and data, negotiating and managing information technology related contracts, and technology support. The IT unit is a lead and active partner in regional data-sharing networks and is dedicated to providing quality service through teamwork, partnerships, and developing team and individual strengths. Public Information The Public Information Officer‘s role is to provide information on police incidents, activities, and programs to members of the community, staff, and media. Office of Professional Standards Internal Investigations Internal Investigations conducts prompt and thorough investigations of personnel complaints; monitors high risk and high liability activities such as employee vehicle collisions, use of force incidents, and pursuits; maintenance of policies which are legally current and represent the best law enforcement practices available. Training Manager 48

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The Training Manager organizes, processes, develops, and monitors all mandated and compulsory training; creates cost effective, innovative, and useful training; and seeks out other valuable training opportunities. Off-Duty Program The Off-Duty Program Coordinator maintains a program for the business community to utilize uniformed, off-duty personnel for specialized police security purposes. Reserve Program The Reserve Program maintains and utilizes a team of reserve officers to provide additional support and expertise as needed. Budget Issues Reflects a decrease in funding from US Department Homeland Security Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) grant Animal Services transferred from Neighborhood Services to the Police Department

Field Services

$ 11,682,289

The Field Services Division provides basic call response and police patrol services to the City of Elk Grove, including emergency incident response, routine call response, traffic and vehicle enforcement, and collision investigation. Personnel assigned to the Field Services Division also conduct law, ordinance, and regulation enforcement, as well as preliminary crime scene investigations, nuisance and criminal investigations, and proactive patrol activities. The Field Services Division consists of the following sections: Patrol Services (Dayshift, Swingshift, Graveyard) Patrol is the largest component of the Field Services Division and includes 3 lieutenants, 8 sergeants, 53 patrol officers, and 10 community services officers. These personnel provide continuous delivery of police services to the community through numerous and varied functions, which include response to citizens‘ requests for service, proactive patrol, maintenance of public order, discovery of hazards, investigation of crimes and incidents, arresting offenders, traffic enforcement and control, providing emergency services, and the reporting of information to appropriate organizational components. Traffic Bureau (Motor Unit, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Unit, Collision Investigation Unit) The Traffic Bureau is dedicated to improving traffic and pedestrian safety, reduction of traffic collisions, and improvement of traffic flow. The Traffic Bureau works to keep all drivers on Elk Grove‘s streets safe through enforcement, education, and engineering. The Traffic Bureau consists of 1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants, 10 motor officers, 2 commercial enforcement officers, 2 traffic investigators, and 1 part-time administrative assistant. The Traffic Bureau manages the Red Light Camera Program and in FY09-10, one additional red light camera system was installed at an Elk Grove intersection. There are now four of these enforcement systems operating in the City. The Traffic Bureau also manages several traffic safety grants funded by the Office of Traffic Safety and other sources. The Traffic Bureau is also involved in

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community outreach programs with local high schools, Union Pacific Railroad, the Every 15 Minutes Program, National Night Out, and the Sacramento Youth and Alcohol Coalition.

Canine Unit The Canine Unit is comprised of 6 sworn canine handlers and their canine partners. Each handler is assigned a specific shift in patrol and works under the supervision of a patrol sergeant and lieutenant. This program is an essential element to a successful police agency by significantly reducing the amount of time an officer spends on calls for service, particularly associated with the dog‘s ability to track, locate, and apprehend people. The Canine Unit also reduces officer safety risks, risks to the public at large, and provides community outreach as a conduit to educate the public in the use of canines in law enforcement. Crisis Response Unit (SWAT Team, Hostage Negotiations Team, tactical dispatchers, and tactical medics) The primary objective of this unit is the preservation of life during high-risk incidents and events. This is an auxiliary assignment; all members of this unit have full-time assignments in other areas of the department. The SWAT Team consists of 1 lieutenant, 2 team leaders, and 15 operators. The Hostage Negotiations Team has 10 members and its duty is to act in concert with the SWAT Team to resolve critical incidents. There are 5 tactical dispatchers who work at the scene of a critical incident to gather, document, and provide information for the different components of the Crisis Response Unit. Tactical medics provide emergency medical care to those who may be injured in a critical incident. Budget Issues Office of Traffic Safety STEP Grant will end September 30, 2010 UC Berkeley Click It or Ticket Grant will end September 8, 2010 UC Berkeley Sobriety Checkpoint Grant will end September 8, 2010 AVOID the 15 DUI Grant will end September 30, 2010 Investigative Services $ 7,285,941

The Investigative Services Division provides follow-up investigation and support to identify, apprehend, and aid in the prosecution of those responsible for criminal conduct. Personnel of the Investigative Services Division also provide information and services aiding in the prevention of crime. The Investigative Services Division consists of the following sections: Detectives General Investigations (Personal and Property Crimes) General Investigations is responsible for the investigation of crimes against persons, such as homicide, felony assault, robbery, kidnapping, domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, elder abuse, and missing persons. General investigators are also responsible for the investigation of property crimes, such as burglary, theft, receiving stolen property, forgery, credit card fraud, embezzlement, identity theft, auto theft, and the monitoring of pawn shops. One detective in this section is attached to the Central Valley Hi-Tech Task Force (part-time basis) and is also responsible for all computer forensics. 50

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POLICE
Narcotics Unit Narcotics detectives are responsible for investigating those individuals who participate in the sales, possession, and creation of illegal drugs. These detectives are also responsible for undercover drug operations, handling of informants, drug related search warrants, and case presentation to the District Attorney‘s Office. This unit also handles vice related crimes and asset forfeiture investigations. Street Crimes Unit Street Crimes detectives are primarily responsible for dealing with those individuals that have been identified as gang members or those who choose to follow a gang lifestyle pattern. They work proactively throughout the City to identify gang members, gang activity, and gang related issues. This unit focuses its efforts in three major areas; prevention, intervention, and suppression. Outreach and education are the key components of prevention and intervention, while high impact operations aid in the suppression of gang and other illegal activity. Forensic Services Unit The Forensic Unit is comprised of specially trained Forensic Investigators who handle the detection, collection, and preservation of evidence at crime scenes. Forensic Investigators process physical evidence, such as fingerprints, blood, fibers, and hair. Crime scenes are processed using a variety of tools and technologies to protect the integrity of items of evidence. Forensic Investigators take both still photographs and video to document a crime scene and are often called to testify in court regarding the collection and preservation of evidence. Crime Analysis Crime Analysis is responsible for systematic, analytical processes directed at providing timely and pertinent information relative to crime patterns and trend correlations. The Crime Analyst assists operational and administrative personnel with the planning and deployment of resources, preventing and suppressing criminal activity, aiding the investigative process to increase the apprehension of criminals, and assisting in clearing cases. Community Resources Volunteers Police volunteers are an integral component of customer service delivered at our Service Center. These volunteers greet the public, take reports, consult with citizens in need of assistance on a variety of topics, and assist with special department projects. Volunteers also provide support in the field by conducting vacation house checks, performing graffiti and illegal signage abatement, collecting and returning illegally dumped shopping carts from city streets, and performing other duties which provide assistance to officers in the field. Volunteers additionally provide administrative support to the department by staffing the Police Administration reception counter during regular business hours. In total, police volunteers provide well over a thousand hours of service to the community over the course of a year. Problem Oriented Policing (POP)/Youth Services Unit POP Officers are responsible for working closely with residents to improve the quality of life in city neighborhoods. These officers work with Community Enhancement, Animal Control, and our VIPS (Volunteers in Police Service) to investigate neighborhood complaints and resolve complex, and often 51

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chronic, neighborhood problems. Utilizing a team approach, City staff makes use of all available tools and resources to advance the Department‘s commitment to community policing. POP Officers form partnerships with residents and business operators, allowing for a free flow of information leading to more effective communication and problem solving. Ultimately, this in-depth analysis of problems and effective utilization of resources in problem solving leads to a positive impact on quality of life issues for our citizens. The Youth Services Unit focuses on matters affecting and involving the youth of Elk Grove. These officers work closely with city schools and School Resource Officers to identify and resolve youth related issues. These officers coordinate curfew/truant sweeps and conduct operations targeting the illegal sales of alcohol and tobacco to minors. Youth Officers work very closely with the Police Activities League (PAL) and assist with the Department‘s Police Explorer Program. Crime Prevention Unit The Crime Prevention Specialist is responsible for working with residents and business owners to prevent crime throughout the City of Elk Grove. The primary programs for Crime Prevention are Neighborhood Watch, Business Watch, Crime Free Multi-Housing, and National Night Out. The Crime Prevention Specialist coordinates Neighborhood Watch and attends many of their meetings. Crime Prevention is also responsible for reviewing building plans to ensure the proper application of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles. Animal Services Animal Services Officers patrol the streets within City limits for loose or stray animals; investigate calls from citizens on reported abuse or neglect of animals; and investigate reports of animal bites, dangerous and vicious animals, and barking complaints. Officers provide education and enforcement of all City ordinances and state laws as they pertain to animal control and investigate calls from citizens on reported abuse or neglect of animals. In addition, the City contracts with the Sacramento Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SSPCA) for shelter services. The SSPCA offers pet adoptions, low cost spay and neuter programs, low cost vaccination and microchip clinics, and dog behavioral classes.

Support Services

$ 3,443,011

The Support Services Division answers incoming emergency and routine calls for police services from the public; provides dispatch support for field personnel to respond to calls for service; collects, maintains, and disseminates police-related records and information; and collects, maintains, and manages all evidence and personal property coming into possession of the agency in the course of its business. The Support Services Division consists of the following sections: Dispatch Bureau The Dispatch Bureau uses state-of-the-art equipment to operate the 911 Dispatch Center. Dispatchers process emergency and routine calls for service in the Dispatch Center as well as communicate with Elk Grove Police field units via radio and mobile data computers. In addition to law enforcement, Communications provides dispatch support for Animal Services and Code Enforcement.

52

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Property and Evidence Bureau The Property and Evidence Bureau is responsible for custody of a wide variety of property including personal property held for safekeeping, found property, and physical evidence associated with a crime. The main duty is to maintain the integrity and condition of all property received ensuring it is not compromised for court exhibit or damaged before it is released to its rightful owner. All property received must be documented in a case file, along with the strict maintenance of chain of custody records, documenting all movement of the property from the time it is received until its final release, disposal, or other disposition. Records Bureau The Records Bureau securely maintains, disseminates, and protects the official law enforcement records of the City of Elk Grove. In addition to other duties, Records Technicians complete District Attorney Packages, requests for reports and CAD call printouts, backgrounds, and answer phone calls from citizens and the law enforcement community. The staff coordinates the City‘s alarm permits and processes false alarm statements, as well as maintaining and coordinating Parking Citation enforcement. Staff also provides assistance to employees and citizens with official law enforcement records. The Service Center is part of the Records Bureau and is operated during normal business hours. Staff in the Service Center includes Security Officers, Records Technicians and Volunteers who conduct business at the public counter and by telephone; assisting the citizens of Elk Grove with a variety of issues and problems. Non-priority reports are taken in person or by telephone. The Service Center provides assistance ranging from having a ticket signed off to releasing vehicles from storage/impound. In addition, Security Officers are responsible for maintaining security and access systems and for providing specialized security at the city /police campuses. Budget Issues Update of Dispatch Manager/Supervisory command structure

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods. Appropriately and expeditiously respond to calls from the public for police services Increase community safety by providing proactive enforcement and education (enhanced by CrimeReports.com) Identify beats and subsectors warranting high visibility patrols; encourage and oversee active policing through regular patrols and citizen contacts to provide increased public safety Utilize resources such as Gang and Narcotic detectives, POP and Traffic officers to supplement patrol as a deterrent against crime and disorder (consistent in-progress arrests for serious felonies such as robbery and burglary) Identify beats warranting community outreach; provide education and presence through beat officers and other associated resources including: Traffic officers, Code Enforcement and POP officers Expand utilization of our Domestic Violence Response Team (DVRT) to better serve the victims/survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault Create and foster relationships with community groups to educate and partner in the prevention of gang and gang pattern violence in our community through education and presentations Continue and further develop POP officer programs such as Crime Free Housing and Juvenile Diversion

53

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Develop timely and appropriate intelligence related to criminal enterprises and individuals and direct to appropriate investigators Improve service provided to the residents of Elk Grove through call answer times, wireless 911 call routing, 911 community education and quality assurance. Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Maintain a high degree of professionalism by conducting timely and quality personnel complaint investigations; continue to monitor high risk activities and prevent unnecessary liabilities Provide reliable and accurate information on the preparation and monitoring of the annual PD budget and Capital Improvement Projects Participate in community events, Neighborhood Watch meetings, and conduct 911 for Kids presentations at local elementary schools Add processes to the quality assurance program to receive feedback from citizens regarding their interaction with staff Records will complete all requests within 5 days of receipt Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective. Provide efficient and effective training opportunities; continue to satisfy all mandated training The Street Crimes Unit will participate in regional operations in which criminal intelligence will be shared, probation/parole compliance checks will be conducted, and arrests will be made where appropriate Detectives will attend regional robbery, auto theft, and other such meetings to ensure timely sharing of information related to crime in the general area Work with CHP and the State DGS 911 Office to review cell sector routing so that wireless 911 calls originating in the City are routed to EGPD by participating agencies in the RED (Routing on Empirical Data) Project being conducted by the State Support Services staff will attend and/or host regional training and meetings pertaining to 911 services, communications interoperability, emergency preparedness, Records/Service Center processing and Property & Evidence functions to ensure consistent and effective sharing of data and/or work processes

PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Support Services Measure Answer 90% of 911 calls within 10 seconds FY09 Actual FY10 Estimate FY11 Target 96.50% 97.70% 92% 97% 92%

Answer 90% of non-emergency calls within 15 seconds 91.60% Investigations Measure # of Domestic Violence community presentations and counseling meetings

FY09 Actual FY10 Estimate FY11 Target

N/A

110*

121

*Reflects 10 months actual and 2 months estimated

54

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Field Services Measure FY09 Actual FY10 Estimate FY11 Target 50% avg 51% avg Respond to 90% of Priority 1 calls within 5 minutes 90% 5.89 min 5.62 min 56% avg 56% * avg Respond to 90% of Priority 2 calls within 10 minutes 90% 11.9 min 11.33 min Increase DUI arrests by 10% 259 328** 400 towards a goal of .8 of estimated (.29) (.41%) (.45%) licensed drivers *Statistics are for calendar 2009 ** As of 5.19-2010

Administrative Services Maintain an accurate inventory for all IT equipment Complete at least 60% of all complaint investigations within 60 days Complete at least 40% of all complaint investigations within 30 days Provide training and continuing education that meet or exceed P.O.S.T. standards to department employees Field Services Schedule and attend quarterly beat meetings to identify concerns regarding safety and crime prevention Continue to obtain and analyze data to aid in the deployment and prioritization of department resources Automate collection of performance statistics and monthly reviews Increase Field Services DUI arrests by 10% toward a goal of .8% of estimated licensed drivers (2008 measure was .33%) Reduce alcohol and speed related injury and fatal collisions through enforcement and education by 10% Additional performance measures for Field Services will be developed during FY 10-11 to be implemented in FY 11-12 Investigative Services Increase community stakeholder awareness and reduce property crime victimization through crime analysis by issuing internal and external informational bulletins and making community presentations Respond to neighborhood complaints about gang and narcotics issues to reduce their community impact and to improve the quality of life for residents Increase outreach and domestic violence prosecution services to victims by increasing the number of counseling meetings and community presentations by 10% Continue community outreach and public participation programs such as the Citizen‘s Academy, Coffee with a Cop, National Night Out, and community beat meetings The Street Crimes Unit will work toward mitigating the influence of violent crime within the city by participating in 3-5 regional operations in which criminal intelligence will be shared, probation/parole compliance checks will be conducted, and arrests will be made where appropriate Maintain an average clearance time of 45 days or less on cases assigned to detectives for follow-up investigation

55

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Support Services Answer at least 90% of 911 calls within 10 seconds in Dispatch Answer at least 90% of non-emergency calls within 15 seconds in Dispatch Continue to process all property in intake by the end of the business day and respond to all inquiries for property on the same day Continue to improve the purge rate to mitigate space limitations and backlog Continue to provide excellent customer service in Records and Service Center by call answering, handling of requests/inquiries and data management

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Red Light Camera program expanded by one intersection With the addition of the intersection at Bruceville and Elk Grove, the number of violations recorded at existing camera monitored intersections is decreasing over time, indicating compliance and program effectiveness Field Services increased DUI enforcement by 36% The average number of DUI arrests by Field Services grew to 30/month. This increase is accompanied by a decrease of alcohol related injury accidents of 25%. There have been no alcohol related fatal collisions this fiscal year Traffic Bureau increased moving violation citations by 9% This increase is accompanied by an increase in speed related injury collisions of 8%. There were no speed related fatal collisions this fiscal year A new Juvenile Diversion program was launched by the POP Unit. The program is designed to give first time, non-violent juvenile offenders an opportunity to atone for their behavior without being channeled into the already impacted Juvenile Justice System While seeing a drop of 6.5% in items received, the Property & Evidence Bureau increased the purge rate of property by 75% over the previous year, from 2,753 items in 2008 to 4,821 items in 2009. This was accomplished primarily by streamlining the disposition policy with detectives and researching cases from 2006 for clearance Increased the amount of money transferred to the Department of Revenue Recovery by 50.8%, from $2,822.55 in 2008 to $4,258.94 in 2009. These funds recovered help to cover court mandated fees/fines/restitution costs incurred by the prosecution of crime

COMPLETED INITIATIVES FOR FY 09-10
Administrative Services Performed several replacement infrastructure installations, including computers, in-car video and servers Police Fence Project was completed under budget

56

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Field Services Completed Office of Traffic Safety Street Racing Grant K-9 unit on-viewed 1156 events, made 25 arrests, apprehended 32 suspects, and participated in 32 community demonstrations The Crisis Response Unit responded to 10 incidents; including assistance to other Elk Grove Police units, such as narcotics and gangs in carrying out high risk duties, and support to neighboring agencies, including a regional incident involving the California Department of Justice The Red Light Camera program was increased by one intersection in 2010 Beat meetings continued in the community to identify concerns regarding safety and crime prevention Crime Analysis continued to work in coordination with patrol to analyze data and aid in the deployment of field resources. A computer resource (CrimeReports.com) was initiated to enhance this function Field Services performance statistics were initiated, automated and reviewed monthly Investigative Services POP Unit initiated a new Juvenile Diversion program in order to provide first time, non-violent minor offenders with an opportunity to change their paths, atone for their actions and relieve pressure on the already impacted Juvenile Justice System The Gang Unit continued its proactive efforts toward making the City of Elk Grove a safer place by conducting approximately 500 contacts, 280 searches and making 125 arrests The Domestic Violence Response Team (DVRT), a team made up of domestic violence advocates and a police detective, worked together to better serve victims of domestic violence in Elk Grove. The DVRT conducted 30 counseling sessions and approximately 80 domestic violence presentations in Elk Grove The Crime Prevention Unit facilitated 35 National Night Out Celebrations throughout Elk Grove and made over 40 Neighborhood Watch presentations Forensics responded to crime scenes to document, search for and collect evidence that links suspects and crimes Support Services Dispatch continued to meet the State standard for answering at least 90% of 911 calls within 10 seconds; 97.3% of 911 calls received by the Dispatch Center were answered within 10 seconds 92.1% of non-emergency calls were answered within 15 seconds in the Dispatch Center Property & Evidence continued to process intake of all items on the same day as received With the addition of the signature pad to capture electronic versions of signatures for chain of custody records, all major Property & Evidence related functions of the Records Management System are fully operational The responsibility for day to day operation of the Service Center was successfully transitioned from Community Resources to the Records Bureau. The Records Bureau is now responsible for the daily operation and all assistance provided within the Service Center. The goal was to improve upon an already high level of customer service, while assigning the Volunteer Coordinator to a role which focuses solely on coordinating the VIPS Program

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GENERAL FUND PLANNING

BUDGET SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual 10,504 10,504 FY 2010 Budget 30,000 750,000 780,000 FY 2010 Estimate 30,000 750,000 780,000 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 40,000 10,000 613,000 (137,000) 653,000 (127,000)

Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Planning Commission

$40,000

The Elk Grove Planning Commission is appointed by the City council to review and approve a wide variety of planning applications. The commission also makes recommendations to the City Council on zone changes, General Plan amendments, and other matters.

Advanced Planning

$613,000

The General Fund supports the Development Services Fund in the provision of advanced planning for the City. Advanced planning activities may include General Plan and zoning code amendments, sphere of influence, South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan, Council-appointed historic preservation and trails committees, market studies, climate change planning, Old Town SPA triennial review, and community development.

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CODE ENFORCEMENT
MISSION
The Code Enforcement Division is committed to enhancing the quality of life for our residents by addressing concerns about unsafe, unhealthy or unsightly conditions in homes, neighborhoods, and the entire Elk Grove community.

BUDGET SUMMARY

Compensation Operating Expenses Expense Total

FY 2009 Actual 542,580 92,103 634,683

FY 2010 Budget 637,886 134,618 772,504

FY 2010 Estimate 583,284 61,785 645,069

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 606,742 (31,144) 84,275 (50,343) 691,017 (81,487)

POSITION LISTING

Authorized Position 3540 Administrative Assistant 3540 Code Enforcement Field Insp 3540 Code Enforcement Manager 3540 Customer Service Specialist 3540 Code Enforcem ent Total

Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 3 5 5 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 6 8 8 0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$691,017

8 FTEs The Code Enforcement Division enhances the appearance and quality of life in Elk Grove through educating the public to adhere to the standards set forth in the Municipal and Zoning Code. The division focuses on concerns regarding unsafe, unsanitary or blighted conditions within dwellings and neighborhoods throughout the community. Code Enforcement promotes interactive working partnerships within the City, County, State and private agencies to enforce these ordinances, and with active community awareness and involvement, the Elk Grove community can continue to be a place everyone feels proud to call home. If we do our job right, you‘ll never think about us. Budget Issues $2,000 for overtime expenses has been allocated to provide on-call services, call-outs during the evening hours and lecture at the Citizens‘ Academy to educate and inform interested residents about the various aspects of municipal code enforcement. Community Enhancement will be reorganized to the Building Safety & Inspection Department and will be known as the Code Enforcement Division. Through performing most abatements with in-house labor and after closely monitoring legal and professional services line items for a couple of years we have been able to more accurately predict our expenses in these areas and are therefore requesting significantly less than in years past. 59

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CODE ENFORCEMENT
DEPARTMENT WORK PLAN FOR FY 2010-11
Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods. Continue with the implementation of the Rental Housing and Vacant Building Registration Ordinances that will benefit Elk Grove by strengthening Code Enforcement‘s ability to proactively monitor properties for violations while also improving communication with property owners who are absent while their properties are vacant or rented. Establish a ride-along policy to provide members of the community with the opportunity to see firsthand how their Code Enforcement Division handles calls for service. Participate in community outreach events and meetings in neighborhood associations meetings, police beat meetings and other forums to continue to provide education to residents and assist them with their concerns. Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Implement an alternative hearing officer program with the assistance of the City Attorney‘s Office which will significantly reduce the cost of hearings while maintaining a fair and unbiased process for property owners. Implement a process to add large unpaid fines and fees to the tax rolls. Through recordation of a Certificate of Nuisance for noncompliance, this will provide the Code Enforcement Division with an additional tool to collect outstanding revenues from property owners who fail to maintain their properties.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS
Measure Percentage of cases closed with voluntary compliance through courtesy notification Percentage of Code Enforcement calls responded to within 60 minutes when an imminent danger exists FY10 Estimate 63% FY11 Target 100%

100%

100%

Code Enforcement will also begin tracking: Percentage of correspondence from residents (phone calls, e-mail, online service request form, etc). responded to within 24 hours during the normal business week Percentage of Code Enforcement cases resolved via voluntary or forced compliance Percentage reduction of spring cleaning violation cases over previous year activity

COMPLETED INITIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
Performed the second annual “Elk Grove Spring Cleaning” from March 2009 to June 2009. Code Enforcement Officers visited every street in the City and worked with residents and businesses to correct visible nuisances. Through this effort, staff opened 2,336 cases and closed 1,672 cases both from Spring Cleaning and cases that had been opened in prior months. In an effort to maintain property values and our quality of life here in Elk Grove, a new ordinance takes effect that requires property owners to register vacant and rental properties with the City. The implementation of the approved ordinance will include classes that teach best practices for landlords, landlord-tenant law and Elk Grove‘s local ordinances. 60

101-3540

CODE ENFORCEMENT
Established beekeeping standards by implementing new ordinances through open community outreach meetings and visits with beekeepers at their properties. In an effort to be a sustainable City, Code Enforcement implemented a web based software called Comcate which increased the department‘s efficiency, effectiveness and productivity. Code Enforcement executed six inspection warrants to abate violations that have not been corrected by the property owner in a timely manner. Code Enforcement generated approximately $33,000 in reimbursement from the Sacramento Transportation Authority for abandoned vehicles and tows by Code Enforcement and the Elk Grove Police Department.

61

102 & 106

REPLACEMENT AND RESERVE FUNDS

Equipment Replacement Fund - 102
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget 622,788 622,788 622,788 FY 2010 Estimate 663,818 13,639 620,000 633,639 30,179 30,179 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 293,300 (329,488) 293,300 (329,488) 293,300 (329,488) 30,179 -

Revenue Total Operating Expense Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Economic Development Fund – 105
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000 -

Revenue Total Operating Expense Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Facility Reserve Fund - 106

FY 2009 Actual Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

-

FY 2010 Budget 7,767,917 250,000 250,000 7,517,917 7,517,917

FY 2010 Estimate 7,926,082 300,000 300,000 7,626,082 15,143,999

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 - (7,767,917) (250,000) 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 900,000 (8,667,917)

Campus Landscape Project Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility Total

FY 2011 Estim ate 100,000 1,000,000 1,100,000

62

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
202 - Used Oil Recycling Grant
Fund received from the California Integrated Waste Management Board to comply with waste diversion. Funds are used to educate the public on oil recycling.
FY 2009 Actual 35,042 24,323 24,323 10,719 7,627 FY 2010 Budget 14,046 14,046 14,046 7,627 FY 2010 Estimate 35,217 32,197 32,197 3,020 10,647 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 23,787 9,741 23,787 9,741 23,787 9,741 10,647

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

203 - Vehicle Abatement
Funds received from this Sacramento Abandoned Vehicle Service Authority to assist with the removal of abandoned vehicles from streets, parking lots, fields, and private parcels.
FY 2009 Actual 78,903 60,000 60,000 18,903 153,036 FY 2010 Budget 60,000 60,000 60,000 213,036 FY 2010 Estimate 78,250 78,250 231,286 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 70,000 10,000 148,250 88,250 88,250 70,000 (78,250) 301,286

Vehicle Abatement Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

204 - Household Hazardous Waste
Funds received from California Integrated Waste Management Board to design and obtain regulatory approvals for proposed facility.
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget 210,000 210,000 210,000 FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 250,000 40,000 (210,000) (210,000) 250,000 250,000 250,000

Revenue Total Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

213 - Police Off-Duty
FY 2009 Actual 153,959 123,692 123,692 30,267 30,267 FY 2010 Budget 106,000 94,000 12,000 106,000 FY 2010 Estimate 215,000 185,000 185,000 30,000 30,000 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 180,000 (47,959) 140,000 (29,692) 12,000 140,000 (17,692) 40,000 (30,267) 40,000

Revenue Total Compensation Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

63

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
215 - Asset Seizure
FY 2009 Actual 361,279 10,190 3,625 13,815 347,464 421,594 FY 2010 Budget 375,000 375,000 (375,000) 46,594 FY 2010 Estimate 250,000 10,000 218,000 10,000 240,000 661,594 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 495,000 120,000 495,000 120,000 (495,000) (120,000) 166,594

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Amount Available for Allocation Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

216 - Office of Traffic Safety Grants
Funds provided by the State of California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) to be utilized for DUI enforcement.
FY 2009 Actual 773,331 573,759 205,942 60,687 164,000 1,004,388 (231,057) (432,649) FY 2010 Budget 696,568 150,384 382,184 164,000 696,568 (432,649) FY 2010 Estimate 1,007,605 550,400 246,590 210,615 1,007,605 (432,649) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 300,642 (395,926) 281,109 130,725 41,000 (341,184) (164,000) 322,109 (374,459) (21,467) (21,467) (454,116)

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

217 - Local Police Grants
FY 2009 Actual 121 10,000 35,108 45,108 (44,987) (42,087) FY 2010 Budget 72,108 10,000 133,744 143,744 (71,636) (113,723) FY 2010 Estimate 127,890 75,000 75,000 52,890 10,803 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 72,000 (108) 72,000 62,000 (133,744) 72,000 (71,744) 71,636 10,803

Revenue Total Compensaton Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

64

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
221 - Gas Tax Fund
Gas Tax Street Maintenance provides a variety of transportation infrastructure maintenance services including implementation of the City‘s Pavement Management Program, construction of capital projects, and coordination with other entities as needed. Gas Tax is the City‘s share of the $0.18 per gallon California State gasoline tax and is restricted to street expenditures. The State Board of Equalization administers the tax and the State Controller distributes the proceeds to cities and counties using formulas based on population and lane-miles of maintained roadways. The legislation that governs the use of these funds is the State of California Streets and Highways Code Sections 2105, 2106, 2107 and 2107.5.
FY 2009 Actual 2,978,829 1,009,943 154,000 1,413,029 100,331 2,677,303 301,526 (1,714,158) FY 2010 Budget 2,317,000 1,000,000 526,365 700,000 90,635 2,317,000 (1,714,158) FY 2010 Estimate 2,308,832 283,996 163,780 1,002,339 90,635 1,540,750 768,082 (946,076) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 3,658,383 (661,829) 156,244 250,000 (9,943) 280,816 372,365 1,697,000 (713,029) 80,565 (9,696) 2,308,381 (360,303) 1,350,002 (301,526) 403,926

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expense Transfers Capital Outlay Debt Service Total Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 221
FY 2011 Estim ate 300,000 1,000,000 137,000 60,000 200,000 1,697,000

Accessibility Improvement PT0058 Annual Pavement Resurfacing PT0035 Bicycle & Pedestrian Improvements PT0074 Curb, Gutter, Sidew alk Program PT0075 Program Management/Advance Planning Total

231 - Affordable Housing
This Citywide fee is imposed on residential development to ensure that adequate housing opportunities exist for very low- and low-income households and sufficient funds are available to facilitate construction of these very lowand low-income housing units.
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 1,566,508 200,000 8,107,645 12,300,000 30,000 8,137,645 12,300,000 (6,571,137) (12,100,000) 13,059,200 959,200 FY 2010 Estimate 1,255,000 2,130,000 2,130,000 (875,000) 12,184,200 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 870,000 670,000 10,670,000 (1,630,000) 10,670,000 (1,630,000) (9,800,000) 2,300,000 2,384,200

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

65

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
233 - Agricultural Preservation Mitigation Fee
This fee is imposed upon the development in the East Franklin Specific Plan area. The fee revenue is used to purchase construction easements or other similar instruments on agricultural land and to provide for the ongoing monitoring and administration of these easements.
FY 2009 Actual 58,957 58,957 2,440,154 FY 2010 Budget 30,000 10,000 2,000,000 2,010,000 (1,980,000) 460,154 FY 2010 Estimate 35,000 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 30,000 10,000 2,000,000 2,010,000 (1,980,000) 495,154

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Transfers Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

35,000 2,475,154

234 - Swainson Hawk Mitigation Fee
This mitigation fee is used to purchase/monitor land and/or easements on property the City and the State Department of Fish and Game determine to be suitable Swainson‘s Hawk habitat as mitigation for the loss of habitat caused by development.
FY 2009 Actual 181,299 164,059 22,000 275 69,218 255,552 (74,253) (1,115,686) FY 2010 Budget 35,000 190,000 779,766 95,349 1,065,115 (1,030,115) (2,145,801) FY 2010 Estimate 315,000 227,000 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 145,000 110,000 185,000 (5,000) (779,766) 1,900,000 1,900,000 90,000 (5,349) 2,175,000 1,109,885 (2,030,000) (999,885) (4,087,801)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Capital Outlay Debt Service Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Other Fund Offset Available Fund Balance

227,000 88,000 (2,057,801)

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 234
FY 2010 Estim ate 1,900,000 1,900,000

Sw ainson's Haw k Mitigation Property Total

66

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
235 - Tree Mitigation
This fund is to be used for preservation of oak trees.
FY 2009 Actual 76,359 197,504 3,500 201,004 (124,645) 576,595 FY 2010 Budget 15,000 185,000 185,000 (170,000) 406,595 FY 2010 Estimate 15,500 155,000 155,000 (139,500) 437,095 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 15,000 (61,359) 190,000 (12,504) (3,500) 190,000 (16,004) (175,000) (45,355) 262,095

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

236 - Very Low Income Housing Trust Fund Fee
This Citywide fee is imposed upon nonresidential development to increase and improve the supply of housing units affordable to households of very low income.
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 83,585 49,863 3,600,000 1,800 1,800 3,600,000 81,785 (3,550,137) 2,533,293 (1,016,844) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 49,000 (863) 3,600,000 3,600,000 174,350 (3,551,000) (863) 2,707,643 (843,357) FY 2010 Estimate 174,350

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

238 - Street Trench Cut
This fee is used for the associated cost of cutting pavement and the future maintenance of roadways.
FY 2009 Actual 208,993 11,600 11,600 197,393 361,603 FY 2010 Budget 210,000 200,000 200,000 10,000 371,603 FY 2010 Estimate 35,500 100,000 100,000 (64,500) 297,103 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 35,000 (175,000) 80,000 (120,000) 80,000 (120,000) (45,000) (55,000) 252,103

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

67

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
241 - Community Development Block Grant
Funds received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to develop viable urban communities by providing housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate income persons.
FY 2009 Actual 434,652 379,656 29,843 409,499 25,153 (27,932) FY 2010 Budget 1,330,626 1,330,626 1,330,626 (27,932) FY 2010 Estimate 855,177 855,177 3,500 858,677 (3,500) (31,432) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 813,575 (517,051) 569,275 (761,351) 244,300 244,300 813,575 (517,051) (31,432)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 241
FY 2011 Estim ate 244,300 244,300

Curb, Gutter, Sidew alk Program PT0075 Total

245 - Elk Grove Redevelopment
Establish a Redevelopment Agency with loan from General Fund.
FY 2009 Actual Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance FY 2010 Budget 200,000 200,000 200,000 FY 2010 Estimate 200,000 87,800 87,800 112,200 112,200 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 550,000 350,000 662,200 462,200 662,200 462,200 (112,200) (112,200) -

-

251 - CFD 2003-1 Police Services
This fund is used to pay for a portion of the costs associated with providing police protection services in CFD 2003-1.
FY 2009 Actual 630,717 1,218 281,000 282,218 348,499 399,701 FY 2010 Budget 647,000 1,500 924,573 926,073 (279,073) 120,628 FY 2010 Estimate 649,250 1,500 924,573 926,073 (276,823) 122,878 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 648,000 1,000 1,500 605,321 (319,252) 606,821 (319,252) 41,179 320,252 164,057

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

68

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
252 - CFD 2003-2 Police Services
This fund is used to pay for a portion of the costs associated with providing police protection services in CFD 2003-2.
FY 2009 Actual 595,153 4,290 573,000 577,290 17,863 643,194 FY 2010 Budget 744,000 17,500 995,621 1,013,121 (269,121) 374,073 FY 2010 Estimate 745,750 12,000 995,621 1,007,621 (261,871) 381,323 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 740,000 (4,000) 18,000 500 683,244 (312,377) 701,244 (311,877) 38,756 307,877 420,079

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

255 - CFD 2006-1 Maintenance Services
This fund is used to pay a portion of maintenance costs. Maintenance costs in the CFD may include public parkways, public parks, open space, landscape setbacks, bike and other paths, landscaped medians in and adjacent to roadways, maintenance and operation of a community center, recreation center, sports facilities, cultural arts center, water features and maintenance of other related facilities.
FY 2009 Actual 336,138 262,551 20,000 282,551 53,587 86,570 FY 2010 Budget 337,250 273,000 60,069 333,069 4,181 90,751 FY 2010 Estimate 336,900 262,500 60,069 322,569 14,331 100,901 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 430,500 93,250 368,500 95,500 19,840 (40,229) 388,340 55,271 42,160 37,979 143,061

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

256 - CFD 2005-1 Maintenance Services
This fund is used to pay a portion of maintenance costs. Maintenance costs in the CFD may include public parkways, public parks, open space, landscape setbacks, bike and other paths, landscaped medians in and adjacent to roadways, maintenance and operation of a community center, recreation center, sports facilities, cultural arts center, water features and maintenance of other related facilities.
FY 2009 Actual Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance 1,953,839 651,069 651,069 1,302,770 2,906,118 FY 2010 Budget 750,000 873,000 90,313 963,313 (213,313) 2,692,805 FY 2010 Estimate 945,000 862,800 90,313 953,113 (8,113) 2,898,005 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 790,000 31,149 708,545 77,615 786,160 3,840 2,901,845 (164,455) (12,698) (177,153) 217,153 40,000

69

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
261 - Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 1
This multi-zonal assessment district funds a portion of street maintenance costs in developing areas located within Zone 1 in the City.
FY 2009 Actual 619,789 32,739 30,000 62,739 557,050 1,877,120 FY 2010 Budget 545,000 308,500 41,560 350,060 194,940 2,072,060 FY 2010 Estimate 554,000 104,500 104,500 449,500 2,326,620 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 575,000 30,000 108,500 (200,000) 500,000 10,032 (31,528) 118,532 (231,528) 456,468 261,528 2,783,088

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 261
FY 2011 Estim ate 500,000 500,000

Annual Pavement Resurfacing PT0035 Total

262 - Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 2
This multi-zonal assessment district funds a portion of street maintenance costs in developing areas located within Zone 2 in the City.
FY 2009 Actual 2,951 1,072 1,072 1,879 15,780 FY 2010 Budget 11,800 3,250 3,250 8,550 24,330 FY 2010 Estimate 15,250 4,750 1,126 5,876 9,374 25,154 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 15,750 3,950 2,650 (600) 1,671 1,671 4,321 1,071 11,429 2,879 36,583

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

70

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
263 - Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 3
This multi-zonal assessment district funds a portion of street maintenance costs in developing areas located within Zone 3 in the City.
FY 2009 Actual 154,114 10,164 10,000 20,164 133,950 415,912 FY 2010 Budget 136,000 16,500 12,448 28,948 107,052 522,964 FY 2010 Estimate 131,500 12,250 12,250 119,250 535,162 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 160,000 (18,114) 16,500 6,336 150,000 2,448 166,500 8,784 (6,500) (26,898) 528,662

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 263
FY 2011 Estim ate 150,000 150,000

Annual Pavement Resurfacing PT0035 Total

264 - Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 4
This multi-zonal assessment district funds a portion of street maintenance costs in developing areas located within Zone 4 in the City.
FY 2009 Actual 4,686 140 140 4,546 (3,145) FY 2010 Budget 4,000 1,550 1,550 2,450 (695) FY 2010 Estimate 4,000 225 225 3,775 630 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 4,500 500 1,250 (300) 1,250 (300) 3,250 800 3,880

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

265 - Street Maintenance District No. 1, Zone 5
This multi-zonal assessment district funds a portion of street maintenance costs in developing areas located within Zone 5 in the City.
FY 2009 Actual 5,690 165 165 5,525 (10,373) FY 2010 Budget 5,300 1,550 1,550 3,750 (6,623) FY 2010 Estimate 17,005 1,050 1,050 15,955 5,582 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 176,500 171,200 2,250 700 2,250 700 174,250 170,500 179,832

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

71

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
267 - Street Lighting Maintenance District 1, Zone 1
The City Council on April 27, 2005 approved initiating the process of detaching the portion of County Service Area 1 which is within the City of Elk Grove. This assessment district funds a portion of street lighting costs.
FY 2009 Actual 814,562 846,829 846,829 (32,267) 151,732 FY 2010 Budget 841,000 764,760 76,240 841,000 151,732 FY 2010 Estimate 825,750 763,260 763,260 62,490 214,222 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 776,000 26,438 773,000 (82,069) 76,240 773,000 (5,829) 3,000 32,267 217,222

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

268 - Street Lighting Maintenance District 1, Zone 2
This assessment district funds street lighting costs in Laguna Ridge, Lent Ranch, and the future development areas in between.
FY 2009 Actual 88,623 44,403 44,403 44,220 13,334 FY 2010 Budget 86,250 64,323 21,927 86,250 13,334 FY 2010 Estimate 85,075 63,323 21,927 85,250 (175) 13,159 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 95,100 8,850 125,000 60,677 9,152 (12,775) 134,152 47,902 (39,052) (39,052) (25,893)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

280 – Library Ownership
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget FY 2010 Estimate 150,000 150,000 150,000 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 (100,000) (100,000) 50,000

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

285 - Neighborhood Stabilization
FY 2009 Actual 27,539 27,539 (27,539) (27,539) FY 2010 Budget 2,388,914 2,388,914 2,388,914 (27,539) FY 2010 Estimate 1,079,949 1,080,350 1,080,350 (401) (27,940) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 1,298,965 (1,089,949) 1,260,400 (1,128,514) 1,260,400 (1,128,514) 38,565 38,565 10,625

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

72

200S

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
291 - EECBG Energy Block Grant
Funds received from the US Department of Energy as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to help stimulate the economy through the funding of projects and programs promoting energy efficiency and conservation in the City of Elk Grove.

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

FY 2009 Actual -

FY 2010 Budget 1,160,800 1,160,800 1,160,800 -

FY 2010 Estimate 1,160,800 455,107 455,107 705,693 705,693

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 (1,160,800) 279,589 (881,211) 426,104 426,104 705,693 (455,107) (705,693) (705,693) -

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 291
FY 2011 Estim ate 166,442 259,662 426,104

Cityw ide Community Enhancements Corp Yard Miscellaneous Improvements Total

294 - Measure A Maintenance
A portion of the proceeds from Sacramento County voter-approved Measure A are dedicated to local street maintenance. The half-cent sales tax, originally approved in 1988, was renewed for an additional 30 years in 2004. The new program begins in FY 2009-10, represented in the new fund 294.
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget 2,964,000 2,824,656 139,344 2,964,000 (135,344) FY 2010 Estimate 2,369,000 2,365,000 139,344 2,504,344 (135,344) (135,344) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 2,682,162 (281,838) 125,094 2,130,000 (694,656) 258,149 118,805 2,513,243 (575,851) 168,919 294,013 33,575

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

73

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295

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES FUND SUMMARY
FY 2009 Actual
Revenue Charges for Services License Fees and Permits Other Revenue Other Financing Sources Revenue Total Expenses Development Services Admin Planning & Environmental Building Safety & Inspection Svcs Public Works Public Works Engineering GIS Expenses Total $ 3,132,182 1,352,118 55,247 2,429,981 6,969,528 $

FY 2010 Budget
4,190,000 1,031,000 15,000 5,010,719 $

FY 2010 Estimate
1,618,200 1,119,450 11,500 5,010,719 7,759,869 $

FY 2011 Budget
3,200,500 1,065,000 15,000 5,227,375 9,507,875

Change From FY 2010
$ $ $ $ $ 1,057,818 (321,118) (40,247) 2,580,738 3,277,191

$

$ 10,246,719

$

$

$

529,239 2,465,256 1,029,598 535,958 2,930,510 554,413 8,044,974 (1,075,446) (1,117,000) (2,198,916)

$

807,057 3,455,180 1,320,469 1,895,414 3,970,742 -

$

691,058 2,521,637 1,200,257 1,888,044 2,111,111 8,412,107 (652,238) (2,198,916) (2,851,154)

$

730,552 2,856,453 1,222,186 2,158,985 3,332,116 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

277,818 989,924 290,871 1,359,456 1,040,232 (554,413) 3,403,888 (126,697) (3,401,059)

$

$ 11,448,862 (1,202,143) (2,198,916) (3,401,059)

$

$ 10,300,292 (792,417) (2,851,154) (3,643,571)

Change in Fund Balance Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance

75

295

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
MISSION
Development Services is responsible for all development-related activity in the City of Elk Grove, including Building, Planning, Public Works, and Water Resources.

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 3110 Assistant City Manager 3110 Accounting Technician 3110 Customer Service Specialist 3110 Finance Analyst 3110 Management Analyst 295 Developm ent Services Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 3 5 2

Development Services Administration - 295:3110
The Development Services Administration division provides oversight and support to all Development Services operations.

$730,552 5.0 FTE

Revenue Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Transfers Capital Outlay Expense Total Net Cost

FY 2009 Actual 444,381 84,858 529,239 529,239

FY 2010 Budget 691,485 506,748 81,420 113,889 702,057 10,572

FY 2010 Estimate 691,485 459,279 117,890 113,889 691,058

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 2,956,259 2,264,774 585,693 78,945 82,550 1,130 62,309 (51,580) 730,552 28,495 (2,236,279)

(427) (2,225,707)

Budget Issues: One Accounting Technician and one Customer Service Specialist are added to support Development Services functions. The proposed positions will be funded from savings in contractual services. Operating expenses include $21,000 for half the cost of the City‘s state advocacy firm.

76

295

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
Planning – 295:3120
Current Planning The Current Planning Division is responsible for current planning projects which encompasses reviewing all proposed development projects including new residential, commercial, and office development. This division provides customer assistance at the public counter and coordinates with other City Departments and local, regional, state, and federal agencies. It also provides staff support to the Planning Commission, advisory committees, and the City Council regarding all land use matters. Advanced Planning The Advanced Planning Division provides advanced planning in the implementation of the General Plan, Zoning Code, and other specific plans as well as conducts special planning studies, including design guidelines and new ordinances. Environmental Services The Environmental Services division is responsible for completing and/or managing the environmental review of all current planning projects, reviewing improvement plans for mitigation compliance, and monitoring of developments during construction activities. This division also provides support to Public Works through environmental review of Capital Improvement Projects and regulatory permitting. Housing The Housing Division facilitates the Affordable Housing program. This responsibility includes ensuring not only that adequate housing opportunities exist for very low- and low- income households but also that sufficient funds are available to facilitate construction of these very-low and low-income housing units. This division administers the Community Development Block Grant programs which provide opportunities for develop of housing, suitable living environments, and expanded economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate income persons.
Fund: Dept 295:3120 Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Transfers Expense Total Net Cost FY 2009 Actual 552,041 91,742 2,373,514 2,465,256 1,913,215 FY 2010 Budget 2,500,000 196,019 2,422,000 216,607 614,315 3,448,941 948,941 FY 2010 Estimate 1,749,000 183,715 1,507,000 216,607 614,315 2,521,637 772,637 FY 2011 Budget 1,601,700 188,109 1,890,300 292,799 485,245 2,856,453 1,254,753 Change from FY 2010 (898,300) (7,910) (531,700) 76,192 (129,070) (592,488) 305,812

$2,856,453 1.0 FTEs

Budget Issues: The FY 2010-11 budget includes funding for a City-employed Planning Director. The budget includes funds $763,000 for advance planning projects which include the Sphere of Influence application, Habitat Conservation Plan, climate change activities, historic preservation ordinance, market studies, high speed rail, General Plan and zoning code amendments, State-required General Plan reports, and support for the Historic Preservation and Trails committees.

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DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
Building Safety and Inspection – 295:3130 $1,222,186 1.0 FTEs

The Building Safety and Inspection Services group provides building permit application processing, plan review, construction inspection and records maintenance. Public outreach is provided to promote awareness and education of the value in obtaining required building permits, to ensure safe, healthy and code compliant buildings.
FY 2009 Actual 1,374,597 80,865 948,733 1,029,598 (344,999) FY 2010 Budget 1,031,000 161,247 767,826 298,194 93,089 1,320,356 289,356 FY 2010 Estimate 1,119,450 161,178 740,885 319,224 1,221,287 101,837 FY 2011 Budget 1,065,000 233,692 610,445 319,224 58,825 1,222,186 157,186 Change from FY 2010 34,000 72,445 (157,381) 21,030 (34,264) (98,170)

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Internal Services Transfers Expense Total Net Cost

Budget Issues: The FY 2010-11 budget reflects the new building services contract, effective January 2010.

Public Works – 295:4100, 4110
Project Delivery and Programming Division

$2,158,985 1.0 FTEs

The Project Delivery and Programming Division delivers the city's transportation projects from inception to ribbon cutting. This Division manages the Department‘s five year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and pursues funding sources to leverage the city's local dollars. It works closely with other regional transportation partners (SACOG, STA, Caltrans, FHWA, etc) to coordinate transportation improvement plans. Project delivery activities include oversight and management of the environmental, design, right of way acquisitions, and construction phases of an array of capital and major maintenance projects including traffic signals, pavement maintenance, roadway widening, and interchange improvements. Development Engineering Division The Development Engineering Division supports private land development activity, including plan check, map check, construction inspection, storm water inspection, drainage review, and traffic engineering review. The Division provides customer support at the front counter; fee schedules maintenance; customer invoicing; contract administration; construction standard maintenance, ensures subdivision and street ordinances reflect changes in state law and general plan policies, maintains the City‘s project management software, and issues special use permits, transportation permits, and encroachment permits. Traffic/Transportation Engineering Division The Traffic Engineering and Transportation Programming Divisions supports traffic planning associated private and public projects. Services are funded through the Capital Improvements Program, Private Development, and Maintenance Programs, and Gas Tax fund. Services include management and oversight of traffic operations within the City include traffic investigations, traffic signal operations, traffic volume counts, observation during 78

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DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
peak hours, traffic control, establishing speed limits or modifying as necessary, transportation program management, securing on-call traffic consultants to perform traffic analysis, participation in outside agencies, grant writing efforts for various projects, monitoring transportation. Water Resources Division The Water Resources Division manages the City‘s Drainage System. Responsibilities include delivering drainage and flood control services, securing regional permits, maintaining data and monitoring requirements for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), partnering with the Sacramento Storm Water Quality Partnership, providing engineering support to Capital Improvement Projects, managing and providing response strategies to storm related issues, updating storm utility fees, and managing and resolving flooding issues. Operations and Maintenance Division Operations and Maintenance (O&M) operates and maintains the City‘s roadway and drainage infrastructure. Included is maintenance service contract oversight; annual work plan development; scheduling routine maintenance; implementation of maintenance programs; utility expense administration for landscaping, street lighting, and traffic signals; managing and maintaining the City‘s service request and electronic maintenance management system; updating City infrastructure inventory; providing emergency management and support during storm events and other emergencies; and responding to citizen service requests.

PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION: 4100
FY 2009 Actual 9,595 93,494 442,464 535,958 526,363 FY 2010 Budget 2,214,234 205,752 318,900 1,475,762 2,000,414 (213,820) FY 2010 Estimate 2,210,734 204,338 207,944 1,475,762 1,888,044 (322,690) FY 2011 Budget 1,404,916 372,806 401,600 1,384,579 2,158,985 754,069 Change from FY 2010 (809,318) 167,054 82,700 (91,183) 158,571 967,889

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Net Cost

DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING: 4110
FY 2009 Actual 424,477 2,930,510 2,930,510 2,506,033 FY 2010 Budget 2,810,000 3,010,000 777,923 3,787,923 977,923 FY 2010 Estimate 989,200 1,333,188 777,923 2,111,111 1,121,911 FY 2011 Budget 2,480,000 2,704,500 627,616 3,332,116 852,116 Change from FY 2010 2,385,523 79,490 777,923 857,413 (1,528,110)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Net Cost

Budget Issues: The FY 2010-11 assumes current operations; however, a Request for Proposals for public works professional services will be evaluated early in the fiscal year. 79

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DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Create a vibrant diversified economy

Draft and finalize a Development Processing Manual for processing entitlement applications, improvement plans, revisions, final maps and record drawings. Assign a project manager to coordinate with assigned project managers from other departments on larger development projects.
Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods

Complete amendments to the Zoning Code to ensure clarity of the City’s regulations. Facilitate continued processing of the City’s Sphere of Influence request including identification of common interests and solutions with the County, continued public outreach, and support to LAFCo. Administer the City’s Community Development Block Grant Program and Neighborhood Stabilization Program. Pursue the completion of the ITS Master Plan. Complete development of the Storm Drainage Master Plan (SDMP). Administer the annual Pavement Markings Maintenance program to include striping, legends, and RPM’s. Replace Traffic Signal Pedestrian push button at non-compliant locations.
Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources Continued development of a fully functional asset maintenance management system (MMS) utilizing HTE Work Order module. This MMS will enable the tracking of historical maintenance information vital to the development of annual and five year maintenance programs such as traffic signal re-lamping, traffic sign replacement, along with the development of the Pavement Markings Replacement Program. Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective Continue to implement electronic plan check and submittal software. Complete a comprehensive study of Development Services fees.

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300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS

302 - State Capital Grants
This fund receives money from the State of California to fund capital projects.
FY 2009 Actual 11,291,017 17,109 11,386,514 11,403,623 (112,606) (233,822) FY 2010 Budget 1,988,000 1,988,000 1,988,000 (233,822) FY 2010 Estimate 400,000 615,000 615,000 (215,000) (448,822) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 3,488,000 1,500,000 1,900,000 (88,000) 1,900,000 (88,000) 1,588,000 1,588,000 1,139,178

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 302
FY 2011 Estim ate 1,000,000 900,000 1,900,000

Elk Grove Blvd/SR 99 Interchange Modifications Elk Grove Creek Trail Crossing at State Route 99 PT0062 Total

305 - Local Transportation Fund -Bikes & Pedestrian
TDA funding is used for public transportation planning, public transportation services, and community transit purposes. LTF allocations: transit bicycle/pedestrian uses.
FY 2009 Actual 284,532 69,289 69,289 215,243 74,940 FY 2010 Budget 74,940 FY 2010 Estimate 74,494 243,400 19,174 262,574 (188,080) (113,140) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 64,262 64,262 100,000 100,000 8,819 8,819 108,819 108,819 (44,557) (44,557) (157,697)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 305
FY 2011 Estim ate 100,000 100,000

Safety, Streetscaping, and Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvements PT0104 Total

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CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
311 - Capital Facilities Fee (CFF) – Civic Center
Funds new development‘s share of the construction/acquisition of civic center facilities.
FY 2009 Actual 220,550 196,046 196,046 24,504 4,039,674 FY 2010 Budget 75,000 515,662 8,000 523,662 (448,662) 3,591,012 FY 2010 Estimate 125,000 125,000 4,164,674 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 60,000 (15,000) (515,662) (8,000) (523,662) 60,000 508,662 4,224,674

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 311
FY 2011 Estim ate 125,000 125,000

Emergency Operations Center Total

312 - CFF – Police
Funds new development‘s share of the construction/acquisition of police facilities and related equipment.
FY 2009 Actual 372,489 274,775 249,513 524,288 (151,799) 5,408,301 FY 2010 Budget 110,000 321,451 42,000 363,451 (253,451) 5,154,850 FY 2010 Estimate 210,000 960,000 321,451 1,281,451 (1,071,451) 4,336,850 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 85,000 (25,000) 321,257 (194) 125,000 83,000 446,257 82,806 (361,257) (107,806) 3,975,593

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 312
FY 2011 Estim ate 125,000 125,000

Emergency Operations Center Total

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300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
313 - CFF – Corporation Yard
Funds new development‘s share of the construction/acquisition of the corporation yard facilities and related equipment.
FY 2009 Actual 221,444 19,593 19,593 201,851 393,378 FY 2010 Budget 5,500 107,000 107,000 (101,500) 291,878 FY 2010 Estimate 115,500 150,000 150,000 (34,500) 358,878 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 6,000 500 (107,000) (107,000) 6,000 107,500 364,878

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

315 - CFF – Library
Funds new development‘s share of the construction/acquisition for library facilities.
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 327,524 6,738,136 6,738,136 327,524 (6,738,136) 6,814,660 76,524 FY 2010 Estimate 6,814,660 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 - (6,738,136) - (6,738,136) 6,738,136 6,814,660

Revenue Total Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

317 - CFF – Transit Facilities
Funds new development‘s share of the construction/acquisition for transit-related equipment and facilities.
FY 2009 Actual 89,860 89,860 (1,231,360) FY 2010 Budget 2,663,162 501,988 1,580 503,568 2,159,594 928,234 FY 2010 Estimate 2,832,413 2,832,413 1,601,053 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 - (2,663,162) 150,000 (501,988) (1,580) 150,000 (503,568) (150,000) (2,159,594) 1,451,053

Reventue Total Capital Outlay Transfers Debt Services Total Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 317
FY 2011 Estim ate 150,000 150,000

Cityw ide Bus Shelters Total

83

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
319 - CFF – Administration
This fee levied to cover the City‘s cost of administering the Citywide Capital Facilities Fee Program.
FY 2009 Actual 28,927 118,728 155,000 273,728 (244,801) 82,272 FY 2010 Budget 7,500 10,000 61,093 71,093 (63,593) 18,679 FY 2010 Estimate 14,000 5,000 61,093 66,093 (52,093) 30,179 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 10,000 2,500 5,000 (5,000) 35,179 (25,914) 40,179 (30,914) (30,179) 33,414 -

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

324 - East Franklin Fee – Landscape Corridor
The landscape corridor fee is used to fund the design and construction of landscape corridor areas in the East Franklin Specific Plan.
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 638,639 100,000 11,000,000 11,000,000 638,639 (10,900,000) 11,991,067 1,091,067 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Estimate Budget FY 2010 230,000 175,000 75,000 11,500,000 500,000 11,500,000 500,000 230,000 (11,325,000) (425,000) 12,221,067 896,067

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

325 - East Franklin Fee – Supplemental Drainage
The supplemental drainage fee acquires land for the drainage channels in the East Franklin Specific Plan.
FY 2009 Actual 132,376 132,376 441,257 FY 2010 Budget 7,500 250,000 250,000 (242,500) 198,757 FY 2010 Estimate 13,500 13,500 454,757 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 7,000 (500) 275,000 25,000 275,000 25,000 (268,000) (25,500) 186,757

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

326 - East Franklin Fee – Administration
This fee is covers the City‘s cost of administering the East Franklin Fee Program.
FY 2009 Actual 37,262 125 140,000 140,125 (102,863) 304,616 FY 2010 Budget 15,000 193,028 193,028 (178,028) 126,588 FY 2010 Estimate 7,250 193,028 193,028 (185,778) 118,838 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 2,000 (13,000) 14,165 (178,863) 14,165 (178,863) (12,165) 165,863 106,673 292,451

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

84

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
328 - Elk Grove Roadway Fee
The Elk Grove Roadway Fee is a Citywide, multi-zonal fee program that generally funds the center lanes and medians of major roadways, and funds major intersections, freeway interchanges, and bridges.
FY 2009 Actual 6,453,763 214,835 15,704,137 396,000 16,314,972 (9,861,209) 39,701,926 FY 2010 Budget 11,112,916 10,065,000 4,328,600 770,000 15,163,600 (4,050,684) 35,651,242 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Estimate Budget FY 2010 13,574,930 1,000,000 (10,112,916) 30,000 10,030,000 (35,000) 10,300,000 20,880,988 16,552,388 771,545 1,127,974 357,974 11,101,545 32,038,962 16,875,362 2,473,385 (31,038,962) (26,988,278) 42,175,311 11,136,349

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 328
FY 2011 Estim ate 200,000 200,000 6,992,040 540,700 11,498,248 250,000 1,000,000 200,000 20,880,988

Bond/Bader Intersection Improvements Bradshaw /Sheldon Road Intersection Improvements Elk Grove Blvd/SR 99 Interchange Modifications Elk Grove-Florin Road at East Stockton Blvd Intersection Improvements PT0085 Grant Line Road Widening - East Stockton Blvd to Waterman Road I-5/Elk Grove Blvd Interchange Improvements Intelligent Transportation System Program Sheldon/Waterman Road Intersection Improvements PT0051 Total

329 - Impact Fee Administration
The City receives a 50% share of the administrative fee component in two fee programs that the City administers on behalf of the Elk Grove Community Services District - the Laguna South Fire Fee Program and the East Elk Grove Park and Fire Fee Program. This fund includes a separate sub-account for each of these two fee programs. These funds are used to cover the City‘s cost of administering these two fee programs.
FY 2009 Actual 15,434 37,900 37,900 (22,466) 31,315 FY 2010 Budget 14,000 2,000 2,000 12,000 43,315 FY 2010 Estimate 11,550 11,550 42,865 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 (14,000) 2,000 2,000 (2,000) (14,000) 40,865

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

85

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
333 – Laguna Ridge Parks
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget FY 2010 Estimate 12,000 12,000 12,000 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 10,000 10,000 50,000 30,000 20,516 50,000 50,516 (40,000) (40,516) (28,000)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

335 - Laguna West Service Area
Funds ongoing operations and maintenance costs for specialized services related to drainage, roadways, and street sweeping.
FY 2009 Actual 62,098 17,545 5,000 22,545 39,553 498,473 FY 2010 Budget 60,000 55,145 4,855 60,000 498,473 FY 2010 Estimate 57,500 45,000 4,855 49,855 7,645 506,118 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 37,500 (22,500) 54,500 (645) 4,411 (444) 58,911 (1,089) (21,411) (21,411) 484,707

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

336 - Lakeside Service Area
This service area funds the review of the Home Owner‘s Association mitigation/ compliance efforts of the Lakeside Lake.
FY 2009 Actual 2,606 3,204 2,000 5,204 (2,598) 104,561 FY 2010 Budget 2,500 103,300 1,324 104,624 (102,124) 2,437 FY 2010 Estimate 1,700 3,300 1,324 4,624 (2,924) 101,637 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 1,500 (1,000) 100,000 (3,300) 1,303 (21) 101,303 (3,321) (99,803) 2,321 1,834

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

338 - External Agencies Fund
This fund accounts for other agencies‘ contributions to projects completed in tandem with City-delivered projects.
FY 2009 Actual 1,195,077 1,195,077 1,560,290 FY 2010 Budget 2,200,000 2,200,000 2,200,000 1,560,290 FY 2010 Estimate 23,500 10,000 10,000 13,500 1,573,790 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 15,000 (2,185,000) (2,200,000) - (2,200,000) 15,000 15,000 1,588,790

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

86

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
341 - CFD 2002-1 East Franklin
The purpose of the CFD is to permit the levy of special taxes to fund the construction and acquisition of certain facilities. The planned public improvements eligible to be financed through the CFD include the costs of the construction, reconstruction, or reconfiguration of the following public facilities: street improvements, wastewater system improvements, potable and non-potable water system improvements, drainage system improvements, and other public facility improvements.
FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Actual Budget Estimate Budget FY 2010 351,813 510,000 565,736 130,000 (380,000) 5,085,199 7,700,765 1,105,550 2,161,638 (5,539,127) 3,093,283 1,799,235 4,279,500 1,089,000 (710,235) 1,428,327 13,710 13,710 121,079 107,369 9,606,809 9,513,710 5,398,760 3,371,717 (6,141,993) (9,254,996) (9,003,710) (4,833,024) (3,241,717) 5,761,993 8,074,741 (928,969) 3,241,717 -

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 341
FY 2011 Estim ate 1,089,000 1,089,000

Annual Pavement Resurfacing PT0035 Total

343 - CFD 2003-1 Poppy Ridge
The purpose of the CFD is to permit the levy of special taxes to fund the construction and acquisition of certain facilities and to fund eligible police protection operation services. The planned public improvements eligible to be financed through the CFD include the costs of the construction, reconstruction, or reconfiguration of the following public facilities: street improvements, wastewater system improvements, potable and non-potable water system improvements, drainage system improvements, and other public facility improvements.
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 259,893 230,000 34,256 4,400,000 106,723 4,200,000 180,000 6,361 320,979 8,606,361 (61,086) (8,376,361) 9,696,071 1,319,710 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Estimate Budget FY 2010 140,000 135,000 (95,000) 35,050 8,555,000 4,155,000 385,000 757,000 (3,443,000) 6,361 7,409 1,048 426,411 9,319,409 713,048 (286,411) (9,184,409) (808,048) 9,409,660 225,251

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 343
FY 2011 Estim ate 600,000 157,000 757,000

Civic Center Poppy Ridge Street Light & Various Improvements Program PT0106 Total

87

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
344 - CFD 2005-1 Laguna Ridge
CFD 2005-1 Laguna Ridge was formed for the purpose of levying special taxes to fund both infrastructure and operation and maintenance services related to Laguna Ridge. The infrastructure component funds construction, reconstruction, or reconfiguration of the following facilities: street improvements, wastewater system improvements, potable and non-potable water system improvements, drainage system improvements, parks and parkway facilities, and other public facility improvements. The services component funds maintenance of public parkways, public parks, open space, landscape setbacks, bike and other paths, landscape medians in and adjacent to roadways within the CFD, maintenance and operations of a community center, recreation center, sports (including aquatics) facilities, cultural arts center, water features, and maintenance of other related facilities.
FY 2009 FY 2010 Actual Budget 263,484 175,000 2,310,937 2,180,500 200,000 75,000 9,202 2,585,937 2,189,702 (2,322,453) (2,014,702) 3,887,284 1,872,582 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change from Estimate Budget FY 2010 150,750 140,000 (35,000) 45,050 2,060,000 (120,500) 50 25,319 16,117 45,100 2,085,319 (104,383) 105,650 (1,945,319) 69,383 3,992,934 2,047,615

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

347 - Laguna Area CFD
This County Administered CFD funds the construction of roadway facilities located in the City of Elk Grove.
FY 2009 Actual 3,763,213 423,926 423,926 3,339,287 1,130,941 FY 2010 Budget 2,300,000 83,856 7,798 91,654 2,208,346 3,339,287 FY 2010 Estimate 17,000 20,000 1,076,135 1,096,135 17,000 1,147,941 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 2,300,000 (83,856) 21,490 13,692 21,490 (70,164) 2,300,000 70,164 3,447,941

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfer Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

88

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
348 - Laguna West CFD
This County administered CFD funds the construction and reconstruction of certain roadway and transit related facilitates located in the City of Elk Grove.
FY 2009 Actual 1,108,137 20,843 20,843 1,087,294 1,052,154 FY 2010 Budget 146,320 76,362 76,362 69,958 1,122,112 FY 2010 Estimate 233,539 365,000 12,212 365,000 (131,461) 920,693 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 232,145 85,825 232,145 155,783 11,971 232,145 155,783 (69,958) 920,693

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 348
FY 2011 Estim ate 232,145 232,145

Harbour Point Drive Median Project Total

349 - Lakeside CFD
This County administered CFD funds the construction and reconstruction of certain roadway and transit related facilitates located in the City of Elk Grove.
FY 2009 Actual 112,063 112,063 (112,063) (233,232) FY 2010 Budget 230,036 230,036 (3,196) FY 2010 Estimate 324,890 460,000 460,000 (135,110) (368,342) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 347,511 117,475 347,511 347,511 347,511 347,511 (230,036) (368,342)

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 349
FY 2011 Estim ate 347,511 347,511

Harbour Point Median Total

89

300S

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS
360 - Laguna Ridge Park Fee
The Laguna Ridge Park fee program funds the construction of the Civic Center park located in the Laguna Ridge and funds a fair share portion of the construction costs of the Bartholomew Sports Park located in East Franklin.
FY 2009 Actual 377,382 14,118 14,118 363,264 1,720,837 FY 2010 Budget 300,000 7,992 307,992 (307,992) 1,412,845 FY 2010 Estimate 495,500 10,000 7,992 17,992 477,508 2,198,345 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 (300,000) 9,869 1,877 9,869 (298,123) (9,869) 298,123 2,188,476

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

394 - Measure A Construction
Measure A is funded by a countywide one-half percent sales tax, approved by voters in 2004 for a 30-year period. This fund is dedicated to the portion of Measure A revenues earmarked for highway, street, and road construction.
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget 615,951 615,951 193,748 809,699 (193,748) (193,748) FY 2010 Estimate 506,860 30,000 193,748 223,748 283,112 283,112 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 598,068 (17,883) 598,068 (17,883) 196,995 3,247 795,063 (14,636) (196,995) 86,117 (3,247)

Revenue Total Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 394
FY 2011 Estim ate 336,558 261,510 598,068

Safety, Streetscaping and Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvements Traffic Control & Safety Program Total

90

400S

DEBT SERVICE FUNDS

402 - Debt Service – CFD 2002-1
Principal and interest payments on CFD 2002-1 (East Franklin) debt issue.

Revenue Total Debt Service Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Fund Balance Restricted for Debt Service

FY 2009 Actual 4,394,887 3,796,144 10,119 3,806,263 588,624 7,666,414

FY 2010 Budget 3,600,000 3,580,556 10,000 3,590,556 9,444 7,675,858

FY 2010 Estimate 3,640,000 3,580,556 2,500 3,583,056 56,944 7,723,358

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 3,575,000 (25,000) 3,560,762 (19,794) 10,000 3,570,762 (19,794) 4,238 (5,206) 7,727,596 7,670,652

403 - Elk Grove Finance Authority
Principal and interest payments on Elk Grove Finance Authority debt.
FY 2009 Actual 8,430,816 2,950 1,788,537 6,602,656 8,394,143 36,673 2,254,770 FY 2010 Budget 8,402,784 5,000 8,402,784 8,407,784 (5,000) 2,249,770 FY 2010 Estimate 4,193,081 1,500 1,807,968 2,377,953 4,187,421 5,660 2,260,430 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 1,806,538 (6,596,246) 2,500 (2,500) 1,806,538 (6,596,246) 1,809,038 (6,598,746) (2,500) 2,500 2,257,930

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Debt Service Transfers Out Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Fund Balance Restricted for Debt Service

404 - Debt Service – CFD 2003-1
Principal and interest payments on CFD 2003-1 (Poppy Ridge) debt issue.
FY 2009 Actual 3,572,395 3,016,513 9,151 3,025,664 546,731 6,698,676 FY 2010 Budget 3,015,000 3,014,260 3,500 3,017,760 (2,760) 6,695,916 FY 2010 Estimate 3,055,000 3,014,260 1,500 3,015,760 39,240 6,737,916 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 3,010,000 (5,000) 3,009,408 (4,852) 3,500 3,012,908 (4,852) (2,908) (148) 6,735,008 6,695,768

Revenue Total Debt Service Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Fund Balance Restricted for Debt Service

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501-1560

UTILITY BILLING

BUDGET SUMMARY

Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total

FY 2009 Actual 252,295 205,831 80,036 538,162

FY 2010 Budget 323,396 243,530 119,477 77,274 763,677

FY 2010 Estimate 296,250 225,015 119,477 77,274 718,016

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 294,918 (28,478) 249,900 6,370 120,205 728 71,500 71,500 40,886 (36,388) 777,409 13,732

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 1560 Customer Service Specialist 1560 Sr Customer Service Specialist 1560 Administrative Analyst 1560 Utility Billing Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 3 3 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 5 5 0

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501 & 502

INTEGRATED WASTE
MISSION
Integrated Waste provides Elk Grove residents with cost-effective, environmentally sound, high-quality, efficient services covering the full range of solid waste management through collection, recycling, and education.

BUDGET SUMMARIES
INTEGRATED WASTE: 501-5110, 5120

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Debt Service Total Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Repayment of advance Available Fund Balance

FY 2009 Actual 12,489,883

FY 2010 Budget 12,429,935

FY 2010 Estimate 12,478,655

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 12,490,655 60,720 510,047 (617,049) (8,064) 3,000 9,250 (102,816) 163,536 -

144,111 164,238 9,408,606 10,609,607 81,753 6,580 2,420 343,265 383,215 9,904,982 11,238,813 2,584,901 1,191,122 4,125,214 5,316,336

148,568 674,285 10,288,909 9,992,558 81,753 73,689 3,500 3,000 389,950 392,465 10,912,680 11,135,997 1,565,975 1,354,658 5,691,189 7,045,847

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 501
FY 2011 Estim ate 500,000 500,000

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility Total

COMMERCIAL HAULERS: 502

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

FY 2009 Actual 687,627 132,545 55,247 200,000 387,792 299,835 1,487,233

FY 2010 Budget 513,000 157,146 178,324 70,198 120,556 526,224 (13,224) 1,474,009

FY 2010 Estimate 622,500 144,565 42,300 70,198 120,556 377,619 244,881 1,732,114

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 529,500 16,500 153,407 124,945 67,659 92,985 438,996 90,504 1,822,618 (3,739) (53,379) (2,539) (27,571) (87,228) 103,728

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501 & 502

INTEGRATED WASTE
Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 502
FY 2010 Estim ate 1,000,000 1,000,000

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility Total

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 501 Integrated Waste Coordinator 501 Integrated Waste Manager 501 Part Time Battery Technician 501/502 Integrated Waste Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 2 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0.2 0.4 0 3 3.2 3.4 0.2

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Residential and Commercial Integrated Waste $10,884,311 3.4 FTEs

The Integrated Waste Division manages the City‘s residential solid waste franchises and monitors the authorized commercial solid waste haulers and plans, coordinates, promotes, and implements city-wide solid waste reduction, recycling, composting, and public education activities. Additionally, the Division works with Code Enforcement and the Police Department on illegal dumping, illegal hauling, and other issues of non-compliance, to ensure that our community is clean and safe. The Division also tracks solid waste and recycling tonnages as part of the reporting (and 50% diversion) requirements mandated by the State of California. Utility Billing $77,409 5.0 FTEs

Utility Billing provides solid waste and storm water billing for residential and commercial accounts throughout the City of Elk Grove. Budget Issues: Hired one part-time (0.2 FTE) employee to collect and manage the battery recycling program; an additional 0.2 FTE is proposed for battery pick-up. Turn off Trash initiative was adopted by Council and will begin July 1, 2010.

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods. Implement two new commercial programs: o Business Recycling o Construction and Demolition (C&D) Reduction, Reuse, and Recycling Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Effectively communicate and implement Title 3.70, whereby trash service accounts that are delinquent for a period in excess of 60 days will be suspended. 95

501 & 502

INTEGRATED WASTE

PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Measure Average number per month of missed pick-ups serviced by Allied Waste Percentage of missed collection pick-ups recovered within 24 hours Average number of service complaints sustained per month Number of commercial and multi-family outreach meetings FY10 Estimate 130 100% 6 5 FY11 Target 100 (<5 per 1,000 accounts) 100% 3 (<4% requirement) 13

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
A $250,000 grant from the California Integrated Waste Management Board to design a Permanent Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility (PHHWCF) and issued a Notice to Proceed with the Design of the PHHCW Facility. Extended Allied Waste‘s contract an additional seven years at a very low rate Transfer Station Project Master Plan was adopted and the Final Environmental Impact Report was certified. Initiated activities related to land acquisition for the Transfer Station Project Phase 1 - PHHWCF Created and distributed six informational utility bill inserts Held four composting workshops and offered composting bins at subsidized rates rd Collected 2 ½ tons of athletic shoes in our 3 Annual Nike Reuse-A-Shoe Collection Program during Earth Week Continued to manage grant funding for free Curbside Used Oil Collection Program Managed the Used Battery Program, including collection and disposal Reached 50% diversion goal of recyclables Passed Title 30 which enables the enactment of a Business Recycling and C&D Ordinance

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503

DRAINAGE & FLOOD CONTROL

BUDGET SUMMARY
Change from FY 2010
78,000 91,840 (206,500) 72,791 (1,600,000) (233,166) (1,875,035)

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency)

FY 2009 Actual 6,439,365 3,288,914 20,524 502,443 3,811,881 2,627,484

FY 2010 Budget 5,927,000 3,995,000 135,042 1,600,000 744,023 6,474,065 (547,065)

FY 2010 Estimate 6,055,050 3,530,177 135,042 355,000 744,023 4,764,242 1,290,808

FY 2011 Budget 6,005,000 91,840 3,788,500 207,833 510,857 4,599,030 1,405,970

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 503
FY 2011 Estim ate 580,000 900,000 1,480,000

Emerald Park Drive Storm Drain Pipe Replacement Major Drainage Repairs/Capital Replacement Total

The expenditures within this fund include the management and delivery of drainage and flood control services. For information on the Drainage division‘s responsibilities, accomplishments, and 2010-11 work plan, please refer to the Public Works Department within Development Services, on pages 76-80.

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511

TRANSIT
MISSION
Transit provides fixed route and paratransit services within the City of Elk Grove and beyond, featuring a strong commitment to on-time performance and customer service.

BUDGET SUMMARIES 511 Transit

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

FY 2009 Actual 2,511,125 233,116 6,218,257 3,148,175 7,850 186,250 9,793,648 (7,282,523) (325,839)

FY 2010 Budget 11,044,312 414,203 8,313,542 4,000,000 13,840 12,741,585 (1,697,273) (2,023,112)

FY 2010 Estimate 12,920,200 414,077 7,353,333 4,588,000 13,840 12,369,250 550,950 225,111

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 8,887,805 8,533,187 428,039 6,294,873 302,677 1,685,711 15,000 487,344 9,213,644 (325,839) (100,728) 181,087 2,095,285 851,825 5,990 (186,250) 2,947,937 5,585,250

Capital Improvement Projects Funded by 511
FY 2011 Estim ate 485,711 1,200,000 1,685,711

Cityw ide Bus Shelters Corporation Yard Misc Improvements Total

512 Transit Prop 1B
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget 157,000 157,000 (157,000) (157,000) FY 2010 Estimate 111,856 111,856 111,856 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 900,000 900,000 900,000 111,856 157,000 157,000 (157,000)

Revenue Total Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

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511

TRANSIT
POSITION LISTING

511 511 511 511 511 Transit Total

Authorized Position Administrative Assistant Management Analyst Transit Services Planner Transit System Manager

Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 4 4 0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$9,213,644 4.0 FTEs

Transit Services is responsible for the operation of e-tran and e-van within the City of Elk Grove and beyond. etran commuter fixed route service operates 9 routes weekdays while the local fixed route service offers up to 9 routes daily. e-van provides Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Complementary Paratransit as well as Dial-ARide style responsive door-to-door, shared ride services within the City of Elk Grove and to destinations within urbanized Sacramento County. This service is for persons certified unable to utilize e-tran as well as passengers age 74 or older. Staff participates with the Sacramento Area Council of Governments, Federal Transit Administration, Air Resources Board, and fellow regional partner agencies regarding transit funding issues and coordination. Budget Issues: The Proposed FY 20010-11 Budget reflects a continued downturn in regional sales tax receipts which is affecting the Local Transportation Funds received for operations.

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Grow and support safe, livable, attractive neighborhoods.

Purchase and delivery of 8 new CNG vehicles funded from the Economic Stimulus. Vehicles anticipated to be delivered in September 2010
Deliver an expansive bus shelter installation project installing approximately 40 shelters throughout Elk Grove Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources Actively pursue and develop public-private partnership for fast fill fueling of CNG transit buses; Continue restructuring the transit service to close and minimize future operating deficits Begin a 10-year Short Range Transit Plan

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TRANSIT
PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Performance Measures Operating Cost per passenger: e-tran Operating Cost per passenger: e-van Total Number of e-tran passengers Total Number of e-van passengers Total Number of Revenue hours: e-tran Total Number of Revenue hours: e-van Passengers per revenue hour: e-tran Passengers per revenue hour: e-van 2007/08 (Actual) $7.73 $51.09 1,196,694 26,998 65,847 15,987 18.17 1.12 2008/09 Actual $7.01 $46.05 1,313,630 33,163 64,812 17,408 20.2 1.9 2009/10 (Estimated)

1,000,000 16,000 53,073 12,253.87 18.84 1.31

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
Implemented a new contract for Commuter, Fixed Route, ADA Paratransit and Dial-A-Ride Operations and Maintenance services with increased emphasis on reporting and Contractor accountability Continued rebuilding and restructuring the transit service to close and minimize future operating deficits Coordinated with Clean Energy to locate a Fast Fill CNG Fueling Station on Elkmont Way, in close proximity to the City‘s Corporation Yard Continued to work with Sacramento Regional Transit (RT) on development of a new AB466 Agreement Developed and began the public outreach process on possible e-van restructuring in response to budget shortfalls and the significant service reductions taken by RT Awarded a contract for design of the Corporation Yard improvement project to Kappe and Du. The project will add fall protection and a CNG Methane Detection to the Transit shop. Began operations of the slow fill CNG fueling facility at the Corporation Yard.

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601

RISK MANAGEMENT

MISSION
Risk Management is committed to effectively handling claims, recovering funds lost due to City property damage, and developing and promoting effective risk management, safety, and health and wellness programs.

BUDGET SUMMARY

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

FY 2009 Actual 2,510,581 327,524 2,012,306 2,339,830 170,751 2,484,776

FY 2010 Budget 1,822,524 65,750 2,615,110 84,585 2,765,445 (942,921) 1,541,855

FY 2010 Estimate 1,258,416 62,809 2,057,065 84,585 2,204,459 (946,043) 595,812

FY 2011 Budget 2,098,269 66,471 2,994,635 28,068 3,089,174 (990,905) (395,093)

Change from FY 2010 (688,057) 721 379,525 (56,517) 323,729 (1,011,786)

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 601 Administrative Analyst 601 Risk Management Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

$3,089,174 1.0 FTE

Under direction of the City Attorney, Risk Management administers General Liability/Property Claims, Workers‘ Compensation Claims, Safety/Loss Control; and Health & Wellness. Budget Issues State Compensation Insurance Fund, the City‘s workers compensation insurer, raised their rates 5% in January and can raise their rates again in July. The City‘s experience modification will rise from 92% in FY10 to an estimated 105% in FY11. These combined increases will result in premium, deposits and fees increases of approximately $360,000.

FY 2009-10 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Reduce non-salary operating costs by 20% Reduce Safety, health & Wellness budget by 5% while expanding services. 101

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RISK MANAGEMENT

Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective. Pursue Joint Facility Use agreement with EGUSD. Pursue Joint Facility Use agreement with CCSD.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS
Measure # of lost worker days per work comp claim # of lost worker days per Full Time Equivalent FY09 Actual 23.48 3.72 FY10 Estimate 8.05 1.11 FY11 Target 8.5 1.5

COMPLETED INITIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
Streamlined Return to Work Program –payroll savings of $97,000 (70%) Streamlined Recovery process – resulting recoveries $82,500 Provided 57 Hepatitis A/B vaccinations and 70 flu vaccinations for employees.

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602-1810/1843

FACILITIES AND FLEET

MISSION
The City‘s facilities and fleet will be maintained and operated in a professional and presentable manner to serve the public.

BUDGET SUMMARIES 1810: Facilities

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Capital Outlay Transfers Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

FY 2009 Actual 65,505 1,067,532 1,336,679 2,404,211 (2,338,706) -

FY 2010 Budget 2,440,172 63,058 1,123,949 51,150 231,500 970,515 2,440,172 -

FY 2010 Estimate 2,412,913 94,543 982,646 51,150 100,000 970,515 2,198,854 214,059 214,059

FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 1,870,261 2,440,172 193,264 63,058 841,450 56,417 48,711 51,150 231,500 969,930 (366,164) 2,053,355 35,961 (183,094) 30,965

1843: Fleet
FY 2009 Actual 0 FY 2010 Budget 1,463,681 136,602 726,795 113,974 486,310 1,463,681 FY 2010 Estimate 1,497,470 135,880 843,655 113,974 523,651 1,617,160 (119,690) (119,690) FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 1,470,949 -33,789 136,697 722 783,158 (116,860) 74,777 325,000 (37,341) 1,319,632 (153,479) 151,317 31,627

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Internal Services Total Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 1843 Administrative Assistant 1810/ 1843 Facilities and Fleet Manager 1810 Facilities Technician 1810 Receptionist 602 Facilities and Fleet Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 4 0

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FACILITIES AND FLEET

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
Facilities $2,053,355 2.5 FTEs

The Facilities Division maintains and repairs City owned and leased properties. Current City owned properties include the City Hall campus located at 8380, 8400, and 8401 Laguna Palms Way, the Fleet Facility at 10190 Iron Rock Way, the Corporation Yard at 10250 Iron Rock Way, the Elk Grove Library at 8900 Elk Grove Boulevard, the Old Courthouse at 8978 Elk Grove Boulevard, and the Hull Building, located at 10535 East Stockton Boulevard. Facilities also assists with long-term planning for future facilities, ongoing utilization planning, and modification of existing facilities. Budget Issues: The Facilities budget includes $93,600 for contract staffing services, $139,400 for janitorial services, and $45,000 for landscaping services. Facilities will be conducting a Request for Proposals for landscaping services in FY 2010-11. The FY2010-11 Compensation budget for Facilities reflects the addition of one Facilities Technician at the FY 2009-10 mid-year budget amendment.

Fleet Services

$1,319,632 1.5 FTEs

Fleet Services provides all operational aspects to the City of Elk Grove‘s fleet of vehicles and equipment. This includes procurement, maintenance, fueling, and disposal, effectively allowing other departments to perform their missions. Budget Issues: Extending vehicle replacement cycles will require additional maintenance and repair funding to keep vehicles safe and reliable. Ford Motor Company will discontinue manufacturing the Crown Victoria, currently used for patrol vehicles. Staff will need to determine a suitable replacement. Components currently used in vehicles may not fit into selected manufacturer or vehicle.

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Develop long-term master plan and implementation strategies for City Facilities Investigate, recommend, and implement green and clean practices that create long term savings. Continual development of the partnership with Transit to continuously utilize City contract resources to lower operating cost Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective. Install safety equipment, provide training, and create and publish policies for safe use of facilities. Provide professional preventative maintenance and repair services for 176 City vehicles and equipment 104

602-1810/1843

FACILITIES AND FLEET

Replace all budgeted vehicles in this year‘s vehicle replacement program

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS
Measure Number of Facilities helpdesk tickets resolved Average fuel consumption of marked patrol vehicles Number of work orders processed for vehicle maintenance and repair FY10 Estimate 590 11 mpg 1300 FY11 Target 550 11 mpg 1300

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
Facilities Creation of a comprehensive asset management plan for long-term maintenance and replacement costs associated with City owned facilities. Re-organization and consolidation space planning for more efficient utilization of the City Hall campus at Laguna Palms Way Collaborated with Corp Yard Stakeholders to initiated redesign of Corp Yard vehicle entry drive

Fleet Purchased 9 vehicles within the budgeted vehicle replacement program Amended 2 service contracts; Maintenance and Repairs of City Vehicles with Downtown Ford Sales and Tires and Roadside Service with Les Schwab Tires Implemented Vehicle Use Policy

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603

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

MISSION
The Information Technology division strives to be innovative in the manner in which we provide technical services so that our users may focus on serving the public. We will also be reliable, forward thinkers that provide solution to technical problems in a precise and timely fashion so that we may always be thinking ahead to ways in which we can better serve our customers.

BUDGET SUMMARIES Information Technology: 1630
FY 2009 Actual 33,304 1,123,921 71,683 1,195,604 (1,162,300) FY 2010 Budget 2,330,327 2,018,630 30,749 280,948 2,330,327 FY 2010 Estimate 2,415,827 1,949,150 30,749 320,948 2,300,847 114,980 114,980 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 2,344,092 13,765 2,252,480 233,850 33,992 3,243 108,000 (172,948) 2,394,472 64,145 (50,380) 64,600

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Internal Sevices Total Capital Outlay Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

Geographic Information Systems: 1640
FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Budget 855,749 825,000 30,749 855,749 FY 2010 Estimate 855,749 815,450 30,749 846,199 9,550 9,550 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 788,848 855,749 750,000 825,000 38,848 30,749 788,848 855,749 9,550

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Internal Sevices Total Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
Geographic Information Systems $788,848

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a technology that serves as a resource to store, analyze, integrate and display data with a spatial component. GIS resources are used in support of Enterprise management systems. GIS Staff is responsible for maintaining and distributing the authoritative data for multiple geographic layers. As a necessity of this responsibility we are involved in the business workflows of nearly every City department. Budget Issues: 106

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The GIS budget includes $693,585 for contract professional services. Information Technology $2,394,472

The Information Technology Services division works collaboratively with all departments to provide first class technical support. We maintain desktops, printers, handheld devices, phones, and network infrastructure. We provide direction to the City‘s Information Systems including long term planning, software and hardware refresh cycles, e-commerce availability and network security. IT Services maintains data integrity, remote access support, and GIS support. Budget Issues: The IT Services budget includes $752,000 for contract staffing; $203,100 for technical professional services such as website maintenance, media services, and public meeting support; and $410,640 for annual maintenance of citywide software. 60 desktop computers are scheduled for replacement in FY 2010-11.

FY 2010-11 WORK PLAN SUPPORTING CITY COUNCIL GOALS
Serve as wise, responsible stewards of fiscal resources. Continue to replace servers and desktops based on our replacement cycles while being fiscally responsible in our choices so that we may balance the hardware needs with our budgets. Develop an efficient and effective organization with a regional perspective.

Continue work on implementation of E-Plan to assist the community and be more efficient in our processing. Implement the recommended asset management plan and begin work on needed data entry. Continue to update and create IT policies to be consistent with current technologies and best practices. Customize the GeoBlade tools to be utilized more by Police and Emergency Management staff. Further Customize GeoBlade to enhance staff’s ability to analyze and report data. Develop Debris Management Data for the Integrated Waste Department.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS
Measure Percentage of helpdesk tickets resolved within 24 hours Percentage of helpdesk tickets resolved between 24 and 48 hours FY10 Estimate 65% 12% FY11 Target 70% 15%

COMPLETED INIATIVES FOR FY 2009-10
Geographic Information Systems

107

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Drainage Easements – The GIS staff developed GIS data layers that depict the location and type of drainage easements in the city. These are linked to support documentation that demonstrates the legal access rights the city holds for entry into property. This is critical to field maintenance staff. Land Use Capacity and Inventory –GIS staff further refined the land use capacity GIS data by ensuring is currency and establishing new tracking criteria in support of projects such as Sphere of Influence research and Regional Market Analysis. Planning GIS Data Support – The GIS staff took on the responsibility for managing the GIS Data for the planning department. This included General Plan, Zoning and the Trails data. Significant time was spent partnering with the planning staff researching the data to ensure it was current and accurate. GeoBlade Deployment –GIS Staff worked closely with the IT staff to fully deploy the GeoBlade Viewer tool. This tool collects data from multiple city systems and integrates it into a centralized viewing tool allowing staff to see data on a map and then reference other source systems such as SunGard, Capital Improvement and the Elknet Management Console. Public GIS and County Partnership – The GIS Staff developed a partnership with Sacramento County to deploy highly functional and very cost effective public mapping website. This tool allows the public to see land use data and development activity in an easy to use map interface. Residents can search for their address and be presented with a list of critical information surrounding their home. Address Coordination –GIS Staff worked with representatives from development services, Sacramento County, Cosumnes Community Services District and the US Post Office to establish a collaborative process for creating and sharing address data. This has improved the address data stored at each agency. Each group is working towards more technology improvements to further improve the tools used to share data between them. The City GIS staff is in a lead role in these cooperative efforts. Information Technology Begin Implementation of E-Plan IT Services has partnered with Development Services to begin work on implementing E-Plan, an electronic plan checking system that will increase overall efficiencies among departments and outside agencies. This software will reduce the amount of paper that the City maintains and will provide documented activity of each plan set that comes through City Hall. Digital Design Standards and updated processing documentation is included with this project. Plan for Asset Management Implementation IT Services lead multiple discussions and team meetings to discuss the City‘s assets, what information needed to be collected for each department, evaluated various software programs to store the data to make it more efficient and accessible, and provided written recommendations to the Finance Director. Increased Employee Efficiencies by Meeting with Departments to Develop Customized Training Plans. IT Services continued its ―Training Tuesdays‖ program and expanded its course offerings to staff. We have continued to attend department meetings and discuss software needs with each department. We included new software applications in our training such as GeoBlade, Contact Management, and the Management Console to assist staff in using new tools. We are continually adding new material and classes as the needs arise. Partnered with GIS Staff to Finish Implementing GeoBlade IT Services assisted the GIS department in creating reports that were converted to maps in GeoBlade. We took existing monthly reports and turned them into coding that could be transferred to GeoBlade to create visual representations of the data. IT Services worked with the various departments to learn how to utilize GeoBlade and get feedback. Continued to be Fiscal Stewards in Regards to Equipment Replacement 108

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

IT Services frugally replaced computers and worked extremely hard to make sure that we were getting every possible use out of a computer before it was replaced. We began moving to virtual servers to reduce the amount of energy and servers needed to maintain work at City Hall. Created IT Policies to Protect the City’s Network and Information IT Services passed a Computer Use policy to protect the City‘s infrastructure and ensure that proper protocol is being followed for using City owned equipment. Every Staff member was required to read and sign that they understood the policy and would abide by it.

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700S

AGENCY FUNDS

730 - Employee Sunshine Fund
FY 2009 Actual 26,909 25,581 895 26,476 433 5,654 FY 2010 Budget 25,000 25,000 25,000 5,654 FY 2010 Estimate 21,410 15,000 15,000 6,410 12,064 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 10,000 (15,000) 20,000 (5,000) 20,000 (5,000) (10,000) (10,000) 2,064

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Transfers Out Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

740 – HRA Trust Fund
FY 2009 Actual 240,387 29,720 29,720 210,667 210,667 FY 2010 Budget 210,667 FY 2010 Estimate 250,000 85,000 37,500 122,500 127,500 338,167 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 338,167

Revenue Total Compensation Operating Expenses Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Available Fund Balance

756 - Debt Service – CFD 2005-1
Principal and interest payments on CFD 2005-1 (Laguna Ridge) debt issue.
FY 2009 Actual 4,863,022 2,198 3,586,053 3,588,251 1,274,771 9,827,625 FY 2010 Budget 3,656,020 3,656,020 3,656,020 9,827,625 FY 2010 Estimate 3,657,020 1,000 3,656,020 3,657,020 9,827,625 FY 2011 Change from Budget FY 2010 3,728,698 72,678 1,000 (3,655,020) 3,727,698 3,727,698 3,728,698 72,678 9,827,625

Revenue Total Operating Expenses Debt Service Expense Total Current Year Excess (Deficiency) Fund Balance Restricted for Debt Service

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Capital Improvement Program

INTRODUCTION

The 2010-15 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) describes transportation, drainage, and facility capital improvements planned by the City for the five-year period from Fiscal Year 2010-11 through Fiscal Year 2014-15 and sets forth a funding strategy for their implementation. The CIP will be updated each year and presented to the City Council for consideration in coordination with the City‘s annual budget process. The capital improvements listed in the CIP necessitate the expenditure of public funds over and above the City‘s annual operating expenditures. As a multi-year program which includes forecasts of anticipated capital improvement expenditures, the CIP links the project development process with the fiscal planning process of the City. The expenditures shown for the first year of the CIP comprise the Capital Budget for the upcoming fiscal year (FY 2010-11), which is adopted by the City Council as part of the annual Appropriation Resolution. Subsequent years are also included in the CIP, although these future years are subject to change due to more detailed engineering analyses becoming available, possible changes in priorities, updates or revisions to anticipated revenues, and/or changes in cost and funding projections. The information included in the CIP is based on the best information available at the time the program was developed (February – May, 2010). A new five-year CIP will be submitted for consideration to the City Council each year with recommended adjustments to project budgets, funding sources, descriptions, and/or schedules. Financial information included in the CIP is shown in 2010 dollars. The CIP includes all active transportation, drainage, and facility projects and those expected to have identifiable funding sources and be undertaken during the coming five fiscal years. Specific projects and their scheduled completions were selected based on: Implementation of the City‘s General Plan; Existing traffic patterns and associated improvement needs; Projected traffic patterns, based on assumptions regarding the quantity and location of expected development; The need to establish a coherent roadway network, with strategic connections that distribute traffic flows efficiently; Minimizing disruptions associated with construction activity; Availability of funding; and City Council direction.

OVERVIEW OF THE 2010-15 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
The City of Elk Grove plans to invest approximately $320 million over the next five years through the 2010-15 CIP, composed of 11 City-delivered transportation projects, eight annual programs, two major drainage project, and five facility projects. A summary of the programmed funding for the CIP, by funding source and fiscal year, follows.

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Capital Improvement Program

INTRODUCTION

2010-15 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FUNDING SOURCES
Funding Source
106 Capital Facility Reserv e 221 Gas Tax Fund 234 Sw ainson's Haw k 241 CDBG 261 Street Maint Dist Zone 1 263 Street Maint Dist Zone 3 291 Energy Block Grant 301 Federal Grants 302 State Grants 305 LTF - Bikes & Pedestrians 311 CFF-Civ ic Center 312 CFF-Police Facilities 315 CFF-Library 317 CFF-Bus Facilities 328 Elk Grov e Roadw ay Fee 341 CFD 2002-1 343 Poppy Ridge 2003-1 344 CFD 2005-1 Laguna Ridge 348 Laguna West CFD 349 Lakeside CFD 394 New Measure A 501 Solid Waste 502 Solid Waste Commercial Hauler 503 Drainage 511 Transit Debt Financing Unidentified

FY10/11 1,100,000 1,697,000 1,900,000 244,300 500,000 150,000 426,104 750,000 1,900,000 100,000 125,000 125,000 150,000 20,880,988 1,089,000 757,000 232,145 347,511 598,068 500,000 1,000,000 1,480,000 1,200,000 10,000,000 47,252,116

FY11/12 2,700,000 50,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 150,000 2,900,000 618,517 600,000 18,454,249 28,472,766

FY12/13 3,000,000 2,700,000 50,000 3,000,000 16,000,000 150,000 2,000,000 640,196 600,000 13,400,000 41,540,196

FY13/14 4,500,000 2,700,000 50,000 150,000 22,000,000 677,034 600,000 172,500,000 203,177,034

FY14/15 2,700,000 50,000 150,000 710,885 1,000,000 4,610,885

Total FY 10-15 % of Total % FY10/11 8,600,000 9,797,000 1,900,000 244,300 500,000 150,000 426,104 750,000 1,900,000 250,000 5,125,000 125,000 17,000,000 150,000 21,330,988 1,089,000 3,657,000 24,000,000 232,145 347,511 2,533,815 500,000 1,000,000 3,280,000 1,200,000 10,000,000 204,354,249 320,442,112 2.7% 3.1% 0.6% 0.1% 0.2% 0.05% 0.1% 0.2% 0.6% 0.1% 1.6% 0.04% 5.3% 0.0% 6.7% 0.3% 1.1% 7.5% 0.1% 0.1% 0.8% 0.2% 0.3% 1.0% 0.4% 3.1% 63.8% 100.0% 2.3% 3.6% 4.0% 0.5% 1.1% 0.3% 0.9% 1.6% 4.0% 0.2% 0.3% 0.3% 0.0% 0.3% 44.2% 2.3% 1.6% 0.0% 0.5% 0.7% 1.3% 1.1% 2.1% 3.1% 2.5% 21.2% 0.0% 100.0%

Total

A variety of funding sources support the 2010-15 CIP, including impact fees, grant funds, Community Facilities Districts (CFDs), and debt financing. The Elk Grove Roadway Fee Fund is the most significant funding source in FY 2010-11, with nearly $21 million programmed for infrastructure projects. The Grantline Road Widening and Elk Grove Blvd/State Route 99 Interchange Modifications projects represent $11.5 million and $7 million of that appropriation, respectively. The City also anticipates $10,000,000 in debt financing for land acquisition, design, and construction of a local Household Hazardous Waste facility. Other significant funding sources in FY 2010-11 are state grants, Swainson‘s Hawk monitoring fees, and Gas Tax. The 2010-15 CIP plans possible funding for the design and construction of a new Elk Grove Civic Center, the scope of which continues to be refined. Several funding sources are expected to contribute to the project, including capital facility impact fee funds and CFDs. In addition, the funding plan assumes significant funding from an as-yet unidentified source in FYs 2012 through 2014. Citizens of Elk Grove can expect the $330,000,000 CIP investment to benefit the community in multiple ways. The following chart illustrates CIP expenditures categorized by project/program purpose. Many of the projects and programs in the CIP serve multiple purposes (e.g., a project that provides additional vehicular capacity may also provide safety benefits, improved mobility for alternate modes, and aesthetic benefits). The chart reflects classification of projects and programs by their primary purpose.

114

Capital Improvement Program

INTRODUCTION
2010-15 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS CATEGORIZED BY PURPOSE

77%
Facility Improvements Capacity Improvements 1% 2% 4% 16%
Implementation of the 2010-15 CIP will result in significant improvements to the City‘s facilities – most notably, the Civic Center complex. Residents will also benefit from nearly $55,000,000 in transportation projects dedicated to increasing roadway capacity. These capacity improvements will be key to easing existing congestion and maintaining a high quality of life for residents over the next five years.

Maintenance Safety Improvements Alternate Modes

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT SUMMARIES
Project/Program Accessibility Improvement Annual Pavement Resurfacing Program Bicycle & Pedestrian Improvements Bond/Bader Intersection Improvements Bradshaw/Sheldon Road Intersection Improvements Campus Landscape Project Citywide Bus Shelters Citywide Community Enhancements Civic Center Corporation Yard Improvements Curb, Gutter, Sidewalk Program Elk Grove Blvd/SR 99 Interchange Modifications Elk Grove Creek Trail Crossing at State Route 99 Elk Grove-Florin Rd at East Stockton Blvd Intersection Improvements Emerald Park Drive Storm Drain Pipe Replacement Emergency Operations Center Grant Line Road Widening Harbour Point Drive Median Project Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility I-5/Elk Grove Blvd Interchange Improvements Intelligent Transportation System Program Major Repairs/Restore Drainage Facilities Poppy Ridge Street Lights & Various Improvements Program management/Advance Planning Railroad Crossing Safety Study, Design, and Improvements Safety, Streetscaping, and Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvement Program Sheldon/Waterman Road Intersection Improvements Slurry and Chip Seal 2009 Swainson‘s Hawk Mitigation Property Traffic Control and Safety Program 115 Page 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146

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116

Capital Improvement Program

PT0058

ACCESSIBILITY IMPROVEMENT
Description
This program provides funding to upgrade and/or install curb ramps to meet current Americans with Disabilities Act standards along with related improvements that improve mobility for disabled citizens (e.g. sidewalk improvements).

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax Fund

Prior Years

FY2011 300,000

FY2012 400,000

FY2013 400,000

FY2014 400,000

FY2015 400,000

Future Years

Totals 1,900,000 -

Totals

-

300,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

-

1,900,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

300,000 300,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000 -

1,900,000 1,900,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

117

Capital Improvement Program

PT0035

ANNUAL PAVEMENT RESURFACING
Description
This ongoing program consists of performing pavement resurfacing each year based on the City‘s Pavement Management Program and funding availability. The primary resurfacing treatments include overlays (a layer of asphalt placed on top of existing pavement) and slurry seals (sealing the entire street surface with an asphalt emulsion/sand slurry).

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax Fund 223 Traffic Congestion Relief 261 Street Maint Dist Zone 1 263 Street Maint Dist Zone 3 341 CFD 2002-1 Other - Unidentified Totals

Prior Years 500,000 1,319,902

FY2011 1,000,000

FY2012 2,000,000

FY2013 2,000,000

FY2014 2,000,000

FY2015 2,000,000

Future Years

Totals 9,500,000 1,319,902

500,000 150,000 1,089,000 1,000,000 1,819,902 2,739,000 3,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 -

500,000 150,000 1,089,000 4,000,000 16,558,902

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

1,819,902 1,819,902

2,739,000 2,739,000

3,000,000 3,000,000

3,000,000 3,000,000

3,000,000 3,000,000

3,000,000 3,000,000 -

16,558,902 16,558,902

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

118

Capital Improvement Program

PT0074

BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
Description
This program provides funding to undertake various bicycle and pedestrian related safety improvements throughout the City in accordance with the City‘s bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, which was adopted by City Council in July 2004. This program funds a wide array of improvements, including but not limited to new bike trails/lanes, new sidewalks, sidewalk replacement, curb ramp improvements, high-visibility crosswalks, countdown pedestrian signals, pedestrian refuges, etc. This program is also used to provide required local matching funds for bicycle and pedestrian-related projects with State and/or Federal grants.

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax fund

Prior Years

FY2011 137,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 137,000 -

Totals

-

137,000

-

-

-

-

-

137,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

137,000 137,000 -

137,000 137,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

119

Capital Improvement Program

BOND/BADER INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS
Description
Environmental and preliminary engineering for intersection improvements, including roundabouts, in response to City‘s Rural Road Policy. This CIP project evaluates engineering only and does not include construction funding at this time. support only for future intersection improvements at Bond Road and Bader Road intersection.

Funding Source 328 Roadway Fee

Prior Years

FY2011 200,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 200,000 -

Totals

-

200,000

-

-

-

-

-

200,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

200,000

200,000 -

-

200,000

-

-

-

-

-

200,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

120

Capital Improvement Program

BRADSHAW/SHELDON ROAD INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS
Description
Environmental and preliminary engineering for intersection improvements, including roundabouts, in response to City‘s Rural Road Policy. This CIP project evaluates engineering only and does not include construction funding at this time. support only for future intersection improvements at Bond Road and Bader Road intersection.

Funding Source 301 Federal Grants 328 Roadway Fee Totals

Prior Years 50,000 30,000 50,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 50,000

200,000 200,000 -

230,000 280,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years 30,000 50,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 30,000 50,000 -

200,000 80,000 200,000 -

200,000 280,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

121

Capital Improvement Program

CAMPUS LANDSCAPE PROJECT
Description
The purpose of this project is to create a drought tolerant, minimal water need environment that is attractive and useful on a vacant lot that is currently not improved with drainage, irrigation, or landscaping. The landscaping will utilize the space where lawn grass might otherwise be planted with decorative elements that require no or little water such as rock gardens, succulent plants and ground covers, and wildflowers and ornamental grasses native to the area and climate.

Funding Source 106 Capital Facility Reserve

Prior Years

FY2011 100,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 100,000 -

Totals

-

100,000

-

-

-

-

-

100,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

100,000 100,000 -

100,000 100,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

122

Capital Improvement Program

PF0014

CITYWIDE BUS SHELTERS
Description
Construct thirty-eight new e-tran bus shelters throughout the City.

Funding Source 302 State Grants
511 Transit Other - 317 CFF Bus Facilities

Prior Years
430,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 430,000

485,711 263,211 150,000

485,711

Totals

693,211

635,711

-

-

-

-

-

915,711

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years
95,800 11,400 100,300

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 95,800 11,400 100,300 -

485,711

150,000 485,711

635,711 485,711 1,328,922

693,211

635,711

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

123

Capital Improvement Program

CITYWIDE COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENTS
Description
This program is used to fund landscape or streetscape enhancements. This program is dedicated to improving medians or gateways through upgrades or modifications of existing landscaping or medians. The goal is to enhance street corridors or entryways to communities.

Funding Source 291 Energy Block Grant

Prior Years

FY2011 166,442

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 166,442 -

Totals

-

166,442

-

-

-

-

-

166,442

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

166,442 166,442 -

166,442 166,442

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

124

Capital Improvement Program

CIVIC CENTER
Description
The master planning process is the first step towards the refinement of the Civic Center project. Cost estimates and funding strategies will be developed and presented as part of the Master Plan. Work will include extensive public workshops to determine the elements of the project. This phase of the project will be funded by the Civic Center component of the Capital Facilities development impact fee program (46.3%) and the Facilities Fund (From General Fund proceeds) (53.7%).

Funding Source 311 CFF - Civic Center 315 CFF - Library 343 CFD 2003-1 Poppy Ridge 344 CFD 2005-1 Laguna Ridge 106 Capital Facility Reserve Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012 2,000,000 1,000,000

FY2013 3,000,000 16,000,000

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 5,000,000 17,000,000 4,500,000

1,000,000

600,000

2,900,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 12,400,000 22,000,000 4,500,000 171,500,000 198,000,000 -

24,000,000 7,500,000 183,900,000 241,900,000

1,000,000

600,000

5,900,000

36,400,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years 1,000,000

FY2011

FY2012 3,000,000 2,900,000

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 4,000,000 2,900,000 -

4,400,000 5,000,000 600,000 1,000,000 600,000 5,900,000 27,000,000 36,400,000

13,000,000 10,000,000 175,000,000 198,000,000 -

17,400,000 15,000,000 202,600,000 241,900,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

125

Capital Improvement Program

PT0017

CORP YARD MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS
Description
This project will address both long- and short-term improvements necessary for continued efficiency of operations located at the facility.

Funding Source 291 Energey Block Grant 511 Transit Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 259,662 1,200,000 1,459,662

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 259,662 1,200,000

-

-

-

-

-

1,459,662

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

1,534,662 1,534,662 -

1,534,662 1,534,662

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

126

Capital Improvement Program

PT0075

CURB, GUTTER, SIDEWALK PROGRAM
Description
This program is used to fund various types of repairs to curbs, gutters, and sidewalks throughout the City. Priority for repairs is given to safety-related problems and those which have been requested by citizens.

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax Fund 241 DCBG Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 60,000 244,300

FY2012 50,000

FY2013 50,000

FY2014 50,000

FY2015 50,000

Future Years

Totals 260,000 244,300

-

304,300

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

-

504,300

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

304,300 304,300

50,000 50,000

50,000 50,000

50,000 50,000

50,000 50,000 -

504,300 504,300

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

127

Capital Improvement Program

PT0055

ELK GROVE BLVD/SR 99 INTERCHANGE MODIFICATIONS
Description
Provide a northbound loop on-ramp to State Route 99 from East Stockton Boulevard (south of Elk Grove Boulevard), eliminate the signal at the existing northbound on-ramp at Elk Grove Boulevard, and add a second left-turn lane to westbound Elk Grove Boulevard at the existing southbound on-ramp.

Funding Source 302 State Grants 304 Measure A Construction 328 Roadway Fee Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 1,000,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 1,000,000 494,535

494,535 1,978,315 2,472,850 6,992,040 7,992,040 -

8,970,355 10,464,890

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years 1,746,250 368,171 348,600 4,505 5,324

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 1,746,250 368,171 348,600 4,505 5,324

7,992,040 2,472,850 7,992,040 -

7,992,040 10,464,890

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

128

Capital Improvement Program

PT00062

ELK GROVE CREEK TRAIL CROSSING AT STATE ROUTE 99
Description
This project will extend the existing Class 1 bikeway from Laguna Springs Drive and connect to Emerald Park Drive and includes construction of an overcrossing at State Route 99. This project is funded through Local Transportation Funds – Bicycles and Pedestrians along with Federal grants and Measure A Construction funds.

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax 301 Federal Grants 302 State Grants 304 Measure A Construction 305 LTF - Bikes & Pedestrians Totals

Prior Years 154,117 5,011,283

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 154,117 5,011,283

900,000 724,796 35,000 5,925,196 900,000 -

900,000 724,796 35,000 6,825,196

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years 1,224,796 620,000 80,000 425,000 3,575,400

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 1,224,796 620,000 80,000 425,000 3,575,400

900,000 5,925,196 900,000 -

900,000 6,825,196

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

129

Capital Improvement Program

PT00085

ELK GROVE-FLORIN ROAD AT EAST STOCKTON BLVD INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS
Description
This project consists of intersection widening for turn lanes and installation of traffic signals at the intersection of Elk Grove-Florin Road and East Stockton Boulevard. This project will be funded through the Elk Grove Roadway Fee Program (EGRFP ID No. 275).

Funding Source 328 Elk Grove Roadway Fee Totals

Prior Years 707,000 707,000

FY2011 540,700 540,700

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 1,247,700 1,247,700

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years 107,000 8,500 120,000 43,000 428,500

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 107,000 8,500 120,000 43,000 428,500

540,700 707,000 540,700 -

540,700 1,247,700

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

130

Capital Improvement Program

EMERALD PARK DRIVE STORM DRAIN PIPE REPLACEMENT
Description
This project will replace and upsize the existing storm drain pipe within Emerald Park Drive from La Nuez Drive to Elk Grove Creek.

Funding Source 503 Drainage

Prior Years

FY2011 580,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 580,000 -

Totals

-

580,000

-

-

-

-

-

580,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

580,000 580,000 -

580,000 580,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

131

Capital Improvement Program

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER
Description
This project involves communications infrastructure improvements to existing municipal building(s) to further prepare for critical incident response.

Funding Source 301 - Federal Grants 311 - CFF - Civic Center 312 - CFF - Police Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 750,000 125,000 125,000 1,000,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 750,000 125,000 125,000

-

-

-

-

-

1,000,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

1,000,000 1,000,000 -

1,000,000 1,000,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

132

Capital Improvement Program

PT0034

GRANT LINE ROAD WIDENING FROM E. STOCKTON BLVD TO WATERMAN ROAD
Description
This project involves widening Grant Line Road from two to four lanes from East Stockton Boulevard to the realigned Waterman Road. The project includes a four-lane overhead grade separated crossing of the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. The intersection of Grant Line Road and Mosher Road will also be improved by adding a left-turn lane from eastbound Grant Line Road onto Mosher Road. The road improvements will consist of two travel lanes in each direction, a center median or turn lane as appropriate, and drainage improvements as needed. A Sacramento County trunk sewer and a Sacramento County Water Agency transmission main will be installed as part of this project.

Funding Source 328 Elk Grove Roadway Fee 338 Other Agency Unidentified Totals

Prior Years 14,272,601 4,400,000 18,672,601

FY2011 11,498,248

FY2012 17,454,249 17,454,249

FY2013 -

FY2014 -

FY2015 -

Future Years -

Totals 25,770,849 4,400,000 17,454,249 47,625,098

11,498,248

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years 1,948,000 756,000 7,732,501 2,134,349 5,701,751 400,000 18,672,601

FY2011 11,498,248 11,498,248

FY2012 17,454,249 17,454,249

FY2013 -

FY2014 -

FY2015 -

Future Years -

Totals 1,948,000 756,000 7,732,501 2,134,349 5,701,751 29,352,497 47,625,098

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

133

Capital Improvement Program

HARBOUR POINT MEDIAN
Description
The completed Phase I project constructed a landscaped/hardscaped median and channelization along Harbour Pt from Renwick to Maritime Drive. Phase 2 of the proposed project would apply a darker median concrete stain color in the existing medians and rehabilitate the Harbour Point roadway.

Funding Source 348 Laguna Wast CFD 349 Lakeside CFD Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 232,145 347,511 579,656

FY2012 -

FY2013 -

FY2014 -

FY2015 -

Future Years -

Totals 232,145 347,511 579,656

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 579,656 579,656

FY2012 -

FY2013 -

FY2014 -

FY2015 -

Future Years -

Totals 579,656 579,656

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

134

Capital Improvement Program

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE COLLECTION FACILITY (HHWCF)
Description
The city has identified a need for a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility (HHWCF). The State of California has contributed grant funding to the design of such a facility. This project includes site selection, design, and construction of a facility that would accept, process, and ship household hazardous and special wastes.

Funding Source 106 - Capital Reserve 501 - Solid Waste 502 - Solid Waste - Commercial Hauler Debt Financing Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 1,000,000 500,000 1,000,000 10,000,000 12,500,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 1,000,000 500,000 1,000,000 10,000,000

-

-

-

-

-

12,500,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

12,500,000 12,500,000 -

12,500,000 12,500,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

135

Capital Improvement Program

I-5/ELK GROVE BLVD INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENTS
Description
Environmental and Preliminary Engineering Support only for future widening of the northbound on-ramp to the I5/Elk Grove Boulevard interchange.

Funding Source 328 Roadway Fee

Prior Years

FY2011 250,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 250,000 -

Totals

-

250,000

-

-

-

-

-

250,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

250,000 250,000 -

250,000 250,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

136

Capital Improvement Program

PT0084

INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM (ITS)

Description
This program is for various Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) improvements throughout the City.

Funding Source 314 CFF-ITS 328 Roadway Fee 341 CFD 2002-1 CFD 2003-1 Totals

Prior Years 150,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 150,000

1,000,000 500,000 300,000 1,000,000

150,000

150,000

150,000

150,000

1,600,000 500,000 300,000

150,000

150,000

150,000

150,000

-

2,550,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

950,000 950,000

1,000,000 1,000,000

150,000 150,000

150,000 150,000

150,000 150,000

150,000 150,000 -

2,550,000 2,550,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

137

Capital Improvement Program

PD0006

MAJOR DRAINAGE REPAIRS/CAPITAL REPLACEMENT

Description
This project will improve, repair, and restore a limited number of drainage deficiencies within the City. The work will be determines during design of these drainage improvements. This project will be funded through the Drainage Fund.

Funding Source 503 Drainage Totals

Prior Years 2,000,000 2,000,000

FY2011 900,000 900,000

FY2012 600,000 600,000

FY2013 600,000 600,000

FY2014 600,000 600,000

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 4,700,000

-

-

4,700,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years 30,000 40,000 20,000 30,000 280,000 1,600,000 2,000,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 30,000 40,000 20,000 30,000 280,000

900,000 900,000

600,000 600,000

600,000 600,000

600,000 600,000 -

4,300,000 4,700,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

138

Capital Improvement Program

PT0106

POPPY RIDGE STREET LIGHT & VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS

Description
This project will replace street lights and complete various miscellaneous improvements in the Poppy Ridge CFD area.

Funding Source 343 CFD 2003-1 Totals

Prior Years 250,000 250,000

FY2011 157,000 157,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 407,000 407,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

250,000 250,000

157,000 157,000 -

407,000 407,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

139

Capital Improvement Program

PT0076

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT/ADVANCE PLANNING
Description
This program provides funding for planning and administration of the City‘s transportation program. Activities include: Studying the need for, and feasibility of, specific transportation improvements Participating in regional transportation planning efforts (coordinating with outside agencies such as the Sacramento Area Council of Governments, the Sacramento Transportation Authority, and the Connector Road Joint Powers Authority); Identifying funding needs and securing outside funding opportunities; Developing the Transportation Improvement Program; City‘s local contribution to the Connector JPA operations (Gas Tax funded only).

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax Fund Unidentified Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 200,000

FY2012 250,000

FY2013 250,000

FY2014 250,000

FY2015 250,000

Future Years

Totals 1,200,000 600,000

600,000 200,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 -

1,800,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

600,000 600,000

200,000 200,000

250,000 250,000

250,000 250,000

250,000 250,000

250,000 250,000 -

1,800,000 1,800,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

140

Capital Improvement Program

PT0066

RAILROAD CROSSING SAFETY STUDY, DESIGN AND IMPROVEMENTS
Description

Funding Source 221 Gas Tax Fund 304 Measure A Construction 328 Elk Grove Roadway Fee 302 State Grants

Prior Years

FY2011 40,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 40,000 95,000 270,000

95,000 270,000 408,714 (40,000)

368,714 -

Totals

773,714

-

-

-

-

-

-

773,714

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years 558,513 5,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 558,513 5,000 -

26,448 183,753

26,448 183,753 -

773,714

-

-

-

-

-

-

773,714

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

141

Capital Improvement Program

PT0104

SAFETY, STREETSCAPING & BICYCLE/PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENT
Description
This ongoing program undertakes various bicycle and pedestrian-related improvements throughout the City in accordance with the City‘s Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, which was adopted by City Council in July 2004.

Funding Source 305 LTF - bikes & Pedestrians Other - 394 New Measure A Totals

Prior Years

FY2011 100,000

FY2012 50,000 350,456 350,456

FY2013 50,000 364,005 364,005

FY2014 50,000 387,029 387,029

FY2015 50,000 406,380 406,380

Future Years

Totals 300,000 2,192,163 2,492,163

347,735 347,735

336,558 336,558

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

347,735 347,735

436,558 436,558

400,456 400,456

414,005 414,005

437,029 437,029

456,380 456,380 -

2,492,163 2,492,163

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

142

Capital Improvement Program

PT0051

SHELDON/WATERMAN ROAD INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS
Description
Environmental and preliminary engineering for intersection improvements, including roundabouts, in response to City‘s Rural Road Policy. This CIP project evaluates engineering only and does not include construction funding at this time. support only for future intersection improvements at Bond Road and Bader Road intersection.

Funding Source 328 Roadway Fee

Prior Years

FY2011 200,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 200,000 -

Totals

-

200,000

-

-

-

-

-

200,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

200,000 200,000 -

200,000 200,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

143

Capital Improvement Program

PT0098

SLURRY AND CHIP SEAL 2009
Description
Work includes engineering, environmental documentation, and construction of various street improvements near railroad crossings in order to establish three Quiet Zones throughout the City: (1) Quiet Zone 1 – Elk Grove Boulevard, Bond Road, Elk Grove-Florin Road, Sheldon Road, and Calvine Road; (2) Quiet Zone 2 – Bilby Road, private road MP124,9, and Franklin Boulevard; and (3) Quiet Zone 3 – Dwight road and Sims Road.

Funding Source
221 Gas Tax Fund 304 Measure A Construction 302 State Grants Other - 224 Prop 1B

Prior Years
45,000 455,000

FY2011
(40,000)

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 5,000 455,000

40,000 775,000 1,275,000 -

40,000 775,000 1,275,000

Totals

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years
55,000 1,000 150,000 1,069,000

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 55,000 1,000 150,000 1,069,000 -

1,275,000 -

1,275,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

144

Capital Improvement Program

SWAINSON’S HAWK MITIGATION PROPERTY
Description
Installation of irrigation and drainage improvements including, but not limited to, pipelines, drainage ditches and ponds, recirculation pumps, irrigation valves and sprinklers, and associated components. Installation of fencing (perimeter and interior) as needed to support agricultural activities on the property.

Funding Source 234 - Swainson's Hawk Mitigation Fee

Prior Years

FY2011 1,900,000

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals 1,900,000 -

Totals

-

1,900,000

-

-

-

-

-

1,900,000

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

1,900,000 1,900,000 -

1,900,000 1,900,000

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

145

Capital Improvement Program

PT0105

TRAFFIC CONTROL & SAFETY

Description
This program is dedicated to making improvements to traffic controls throughout the City that are not funded through other means. Improvements may include additional turn lanes, modifications to signal timing, pedestrian safety enhancements, or other measures to manage vehicle speeds.

Funding Source Other - 394 New Measure A Totals

Prior Years 268,216 268,216

FY2011 261,510 261,510

FY2012 268,061 268,061

FY2013 276,191 276,191

FY2014 290,005 290,005

FY2015 304,505 304,505

Future Years

Totals 1,668,488 1,668,488

Expenditures Preliminary Engineering Environmental Right-of-Way Acquisition Construction Engineering Construction Contract Other CIP Costs Totals

Prior Years

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

Future Years

Totals -

268,216 268,216

261,510 261,510

268,061 268,061

276,191 276,191

290,005 290,005

304,505 304,505 -

1,668,488 1,668,488

*Preliminary Engineering includes all engineering activities undertaken prior to construction, including project scoping, surveys, soil testing, and associated consultant services, if any. *"Future Years" represent unfunded needs for various project phases and identifies possible revenue sources to fund these phases.

146

FISCAL POLICIES

The overall goal of the City‘s budget is to establish and maintain effective management of the City‘s resources. Formal statements of budget policy and major goals provide the foundation for effective planning.

Overview
Some of the benefits to establishing financial policy include: Publicly adopted policy statements contribute greatly to the credibility of and public confidence in the City. For the credit rating industry and prospective investors, such statements show the City‘s commitment to sound financial management and fiscal integrity. Established policy saves time and energy. Once decisions are made at the policy level, the issues do not need to be discussed each time a decision has to be made. The process of developing overall policy directs the attention of staff and Council to the City‘s total financial condition rather than single-issue areas. Moreover, this process requires staff and Council to think about linking long-term financial planning with day-to-day operations. Developing financial policies reinforces the Council‘s policy role in maintaining a positive financial condition. Setting sound financial policies can improve the City‘s fiscal stability by setting a forward-looking approach to planning while contributing to continuity in handling the City‘s financial affairs.

Fund Structure
The annual budget is divided into many separate funds with a specific purpose. Understanding the City of Elk Grove‘s fund structure is the basis for interpreting the City‘s finances. As such, the budget document is divided into the following categories:

General Fund – 100 Series
This is the City‘s main operating fund, which pays for basic services such as governance, administration, public safety, and quality of life functions.

Special Revenue Funds – 200 Series
These funds account for revenues received or set aside for a specific purpose, such as public safety and recycling grants, street maintenance, and environmental mitigation. The Development Services fund, one of the City‘s major funds, is categorized as a special revenue fund.

Capital Project Funds – 300 Series
These funds account for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities. Revenue sources include federal and state grants, development impact fees, and special taxes from community facility districts.

Debt Service Funds – 400 Series
These funds accumulate resources for and make the payment of long-term debt principal and interest.

Enterprise Funds – 500 Series
These funds account for specific services funded directly by fees and charges to users and are intended to be self-supporting. Functions such as transit, drainage, and integrated waste are captured in enterprise funds.

147

FISCAL POLICIES

Internal Service Funds – 600 Series
These funds are created to finance and account for services and commodities provided to internal City departments, rather than directly to the public. Examples of internal services are risk management, information technology, facilities management, and fleet services.

Agency Funds – 700 Series
These funds are used to account for assets held by the City as an agent for individuals, other governments, and other organizations.

Budget Strategies
Strategic Focus – The City‘s financial management should be strategic, reflecting the Council‘s and the community‘s priorities for service while providing resources that realistically fund routine operations. Fiscal control and accountability – The City‘s financial activities should be fiscally sound and accountable to the City Council through the City Manager. Clarity – The City‘s financial planning and reporting should be clear and easy to understand so that all participants, the Council, the community, and staff can productively participate in making good decisions. Long-term planning – The City‘s financial planning should emphasize multi-year horizons to promote longterm planning of resource uses. Flexible and cost effective responses – The City‘s financial management practices should encourage a mission-driven organization that responds quickly and straightforwardly to community demands. The City‘s management should flexibly respond to opportunities for better service, should proactively manage revenues, and should cost-effectively manage ongoing operating costs. Staff philosophy – The City Council desires to retain a mix of contract staff and employment staff in order to ensure a cost effective and flexible service delivery system. A core group of City employees create the oversight and administrative guidance necessary for contractual staff.

Major City Goals
The involvement of the City Council in setting major City goals is essential to the budget process. These goals provide short-term and long-term direction to staff, determine the allocation of resources, and establish priorities. These goals will provide focus to the organization-wide efforts of staff and ensure that the most important, highestpriority objectives are accomplished and that these priorities are communicated to the public.

Financial Plan Organization
Through its financial plan, the City will: Identify community needs for essential services. Establish policies and goals which define the nature and level of services required. Identify and organize activities required to provide these services. Propose objectives for improving the delivery of services. Set standards to measure and evaluate the output of activities, accomplishment of objectives, and expenditure of appropriations. 148

FISCAL POLICIES

The status of major program objectives will be reported to the Council who will review and amend appropriations as necessary to achieve these objectives.

Financial Activity Reporting
The City‘s financial activity will be reported in a variety of funds, which are the basic accounting and reporting entities in governmental accounting. The City‘s accounting structure will make it possible: To present fairly and with full disclosure the financial position and results of financial operations of the funds of the City in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles and government auditing standards. To determine and demonstrate compliance with finance-related legal and contractual provisions.

Annual Budget and Financial Plan
The City Manager will present an annual budget and financial plan and periodic financial information to the City Council setting from the following information; Actual revenues, expenditures, reserve balances, and fund balances for the prior fiscal year. Fund balance is the difference between assets and liabilities in any given fund. Estimated revenues, expenditures, reserve balances, and fund balances for the current fiscal year. Projected revenues, expenditures, reserve balances, and fund balances for the next fiscal year. Articulated priorities and service levels to be achieved by the organization over the next year. Long-range financial plan, which will include projected revenues, expenditures, and reserve balances for the next seven years. Capital Improvement Program for the next five years. Budget Development and Administration The City's annual budget represents the official financial and organizational plan by which City policies and programs are implemented. It is also an action and financial plan of services to be provided to the citizens of Elk Grove. Development The budget is prepared by City staff under the direction of the City Manager. The annual budget process commences in January with the City Manager and the Budget Manager providing to the department managers information on the financial condition of the City and establishing general parameters for budget submittal. The department managers prepare their operating and capital budget requests in accordance with the general parameters. The City Manager, along with the budget review team, reviews each manager‘s requests and proposals and formulates them into a "Proposed Budget" for submission to the City Council. The proposed budget is balanced when expenditures are equal to or less than the sum of total revenues and the use of reserves, according to Council adopted policy.

149

FISCAL POLICIES

Budget study sessions between the City Council, City Manager and City staff are scheduled in April or May. In May or June, a public hearing is scheduled by the City Council to receive public input for consideration regarding the proposed budget. The budget is then adopted by Council Resolution and becomes the City's action plan for the ensuing fiscal year. If the City Council fails to adopt the budget by July 1, the City Council may elect one of the following courses of action until passage of a budget and the appropriation of funds: Provide the City Manager with Continuing Resolution Authority to allow continued services at expenditure levels not greater than those levels approved in the prior year budget; or Require staff to obtain prior approval for the expenditure (disbursement) of City funds. Copies of the City budget as adopted are public records and shall be made available to the public upon request. Appropriation Control Appropriations of fiscal resources are the responsibility of the City Council and the City Manager. Appropriations requiring Council action are: Appropriation of reserves, except replacement reserves Transfers between funds Appropriations of any unassigned revenues – assigned revenues are those revenues that are not associated with a particular business or service unit Inter-fund multi-year loans over $500,000 Appropriations requiring City Manager action are: Transfers within a fund or department Appropriation of unbudgeted assigned revenues – unassigned revenues support a specific business or service unit and allow expansion or contraction of that unit in response to demand as manifested by receipt of assigned revenues Appropriation of replacement reserves Inter-fund loans under $500,000

Administration City departments perform the following budgetary control functions: Reviews purchasing transactions and payment requests for compliance with City rules, regulations, and budgetary limits; Administers the City's payment system to review, process, and pay purchasing transactions and expense claims; Receives and deposits all City receipts, which are invested by the elected City Treasurer; Maintains records for all these transactions and their effect on cash balances; 150

FISCAL POLICIES

Maintains a position control system, based on the budget, to control City staffing in conjunction with the City Manager Department; Administers the City's payroll system to process personnel transactions and to review and pay personnel expenses. Monthly detail budget reports are prepared and distributed to the City Council, department managers, and support staff. These reports are organized by department, division, and line item showing the authorized budget amount as well as expenditures and encumbrances to date. As a matter of policy, expenditures are not to exceed the appropriated budget. In the course of the fiscal year, it may become necessary to amend, transfer, or adjust the amounts appropriated in the adopted budget. Any subsequent appropriation of additional monies for a fiscal year requires approval by the City Council, as does the transfer of appropriations between departments in the operating budget or between capital project accounts. Fees and Rates Ongoing Review Fees and rates will be reviewed and updated on an on-going basis to ensure that they are correct and appropriate based on the changing needs of the community, including economic concerns, social issues, and public safety. General concepts regarding the use of service fees and rates include: Revenues normally will not exceed the reasonable cost of providing the service. Cost recovery goals should be based on the total cost of delivering the service, including direct costs, departmental administration costs, and organization-wide costs such as accounting, personnel, data processing, vehicle/building maintenance and insurance. The method of assessing and collecting fees should be as simple as possible in order to reduce the administrative cost of collection. Rate structures should be sensitive to the ―market‖ for similar services as well as to smaller, infrequent users of the service and the influence rates and fees have on economic development. A unified approach should be used in determining cost recovery levels for various programs based on the factors discussed above. Fund Balance Designations and Reserves The City strives to maintain adequate fund balances in the General Fund. This is necessary to maintain the City‘s credit worthiness and to adequately provide for: Economic uncertainties, local disasters, and other financial hardships or downturns in the local economy; Contingencies for unforeseen operation or capital needs; and Cash flow requirements. The City establishes and maintains Facilities Improvement and Equipment Fund to provide for the timely replacement of capital equipment and public facilities. The minimum fund balance in these funds should allow for annual 151

FISCAL POLICIES

fluctuations in expenditures while maintaining a level annual transfer and allow for emergency replacement purchases. Interest earnings and sales of surplus equipment, as well as, any related damage and insurance recoveries will be credited back to these funds to reduce the need for other revenue enhancements. Fund balance levels will be sufficient to meet funding requirements for projects approved in prior budgets that are carried forward into the new year. Sufficient fund balances will also be maintained to meet debt service reserve requirements, reserves for encumbrances, and other reserves or designations required by contractual obligations, state law, or generally accepted accounting principles. Appropriation Limitation The Council will annually adopt a resolution establishing its appropriation limit calculated in accordance with Article XIIIB of the Constitution of the State of California, Section 7900 of the State of California Government Code, and any other voter-approved amendments of state legislation that affect the City‘s appropriation limit. The City will strive to develop revenue sources, both new and existing, which are considered non-tax proceeds in calculating its appropriations subject to limitation. Investments Investment and cash management will be the responsibility of the Administrative Services Director/City Treasurer or designee. The City Treasurer will develop and maintain an Investment Policy which addresses the City‘s administration of its portfolio, including investment guidelines, practices, and procedures. Additionally, the Treasurer will develop and maintain a comprehensive, well-documented investment reporting system which complies with Government Code Section 53607. The City‘s primary investment objective is to achieve a reasonable rate of return while minimizing the potential for capital losses arising from market changes or issuer default. Accordingly, the following factors will be considered, in priority order, in determining individual investment transactions: Safety Liquidity Yield

The City will strive to keep idle cash balances fully invested through daily projections of cash flow requirements. To avoid force liquidation and loss of investment earnings, cash flow and future liquidity needs will be the primary consideration when selecting maturities. As the market and the City‘s investment portfolio change, care will be taken to maintain a healthy balance of investment types and maturities. The City will invest only in those instruments authorized by the California Government Code Section 53601. The City will not invest in stock, will not speculate, and will not deal in futures, options or reverse repurchase agreements. The investment market is highly volatile and continually offers new and creative opportunities for enhancing interest earnings. Accordingly, the City will thoroughly investigate any new investment vehicles prior to committing City funds to them. Ownership of the City‘s investment securities will be protected through third-party custodial safekeeping. 152

FISCAL POLICIES

In order to maximize yields from its portfolio, the City will consolidate cash balances from all funds for investment purposes, and will allocate investment earnings to each fund in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Capital Financing and Debt Management Capital Financing The City will consider the use of debt financing for capital projects and under the following circumstances: When the project‘s useful life will exceed the term of the financing. When project revenues or specific resources will be sufficient to service the long-term debt. Debt financing will not be considered appropriate for any recurring purpose such as current operating and maintenance expenditures. The issuance of short-term instruments such as revenue, tax or bond anticipation notes is excluded from this limitation. Capital improvements will be financed primarily through user fees, service charges, assessments, special taxes, or developer agreements when benefits can be specifically attributed to users of the facility. The City will use the following criteria to evaluate ―pay-as-you-go‖ versus ―long-term financing‖ in funding capital improvements: Pay-As-You-Go When current revenues and adequate fund balances are available or when project phasing can be accomplished. When debt levels adversely affect the City‘s credit rating. When market conditions are unstable or present difficulties in marketing. Long-Term Financing When revenues available for debt service are deemed sufficient and reliable so that long-term financing can be marketed with investment grade credit ratings. When the project securing financing is of the type which will support an investment grade credit rating. When market conditions present favorable interest rates and demand for City financing. When State or Federal requirements and current revenues mandate a project and available fund balances are insufficient. When the project is required to meet or relieve service requirements. When the life of the project or asset financed is 10 years or longer. Debt Management The City will not obligate the General Fund to secure long-term financing, except when the marketability can be significantly enhanced. A feasibility analysis will be prepared for each long-term financing to assess debt service on current and future operations. This will also include an analysis on the reliability of revenues to support a debt service. The City will generally conduct debt financing on a competitive basis. However, negotiated financing may be used due to market volatility or the use of an unusual or complex financing or security structure. The City will seek 153

FISCAL POLICIES

investment grade ratings (Baa/BBB or greater) on any direct debt and will seek credit enhancements such as letters of credit or insurance when necessary for marketing purposes, availability and cost-effectiveness. The City will monitor all forms of debt annually coincident with the budget process. This process will include monitoring compliance with bond covenants and ensuring adherence to federal arbitrage regulations. The City will maintain good communications with bond rating agencies about its financial condition. The City will follow a policy of full disclosure on every financial report and bond prospectus (Official Statement). Capital Improvement Budget The Capital Improvement Budget will emphasize project planning, with projects progressing through at least two and up to six of the following phases: Designated - Set-aside funding for future project development under ―pay-as-you-go‖ financing. Study - Includes concept design, site selection, feasibility analysis, schematic design, environmental determination, property appraisals, scheduling, grant application, grant approval, and specification preparation for equipment purchases. Acquisition - Includes equipment purchases and property acquisition for projects, if necessary. Design - Includes final design, plan and specification preparation, and construction cost estimation. Construction - Includes bid administration, construction, project inspection and management, and closeout. Debt Service - Installment payments of principal and interest for completed projects funded through debt financing. Funding and related appropriations to a project account will only be made upon approval of each phase by the City Council. Accordingly, project appropriations for acquisition and construction will generally be approved when contracts are awarded. Personnel Resource Management Regular employees are the core work force and the preferred means to staff ongoing, year-round activities. Where possible and justified, the City strives to provide fair compensation and benefit schedules for its regular work force. Each regular employee will: Fill an authorized position. Receive salary and benefits consistent with the labor market. To manage the growth of the regular work force and overall staffing costs, the City will follow these procedures: The City Council will authorize all regular positions. Human Resources will coordinate the hiring of all employees and evaluate the reallocation of existing positions. 154

FISCAL POLICIES

All requests for additional regular positions will be supported by an explanation as to the necessity, term, and expected results of the proposed position; staffing and material costs including salary, benefits, equipment, uniforms, clerical support and facilities; and cost effectiveness (additional revenues or cost savings which may be realized). Part-time or temporary employees are employees other than regular employees, elected officials, and volunteers. Part-time or temporary employees will augment regular staffing only as limited-term employees, seasonal employees, emergency, intermittent, contract employees, and interns. Temporary employees will be used to meet peak workload requirements, fill interim vacancies, and accomplish tasks where less-than-regular, year-round staffing is required. Independent contractors will not be considered City employees. Independent contractors may be used in three situations: Short-term, peak workload assignments to be accomplished through the use of personnel contracted through an outside employment agency. All placements through an outside employment agency will be coordinated through the Administration Department. Construction of public works projects and the provision of operating, maintenance, or specialized professional services not routinely performed by City employees. Such services will be provided without close supervision by the City staff, and the required methods, skills, and equipment will generally be determined and provided by the contractor. When it is determined that work can be completed affectively and cost efficiently through the use of contractors. The work performance of the contractors should be periodically evaluated. Productivity Review The City will constantly monitor and review its methods of operation to ensure that services continue to be delivered in the most cost-effective manner possible. The review process encompasses a wide range of issues, a few of which are discussed below. Maintaining a decentralized approach in managing City‘s services Although some level of centralization is necessary for review and control purposes, decentralization supports productivity by: Encouraging accountability by delegating authority to the lowest possible level. Stimulating creativity, innovation, and individual initiative. Reducing the administrative cost of operation by eliminating unnecessary review procedures. Improving the organization‘s ability to respond to changing needs and to identify and implement cost saving programs. Assigning responsibility for effective operations and citizen responsiveness to the department.

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Analyzing systems and procedures This analysis provides a means to identify and remove unnecessary review requirements. The process includes investing in the City‘s most valuable asset, its employees, by developing the skills and abilities of all City employees. This process also recognizes that those who perform the function are a vital part of the process. Identifying and evaluating the ability of new technologies As new technology emerges, whether it is in the computer-related or mechanical equipment field, an objective evaluation provides the City with necessary information as to how it may enhance employee efficiency, thereby allowing the City to continue providing high-quality services. Evaluating local market service providers An evaluation of other local market service providers, including other government agencies, assists in determining whether the comparable service is available at a lower cost than provided by City staff. Allocating the Cost of Services General Policy Guidelines The City is committed to achieving efficiency by centralizing general administrative services to the extent they serve the needs of the City as a whole and provide for greater cost efficiency. Accordingly, general and administrative services will be charged to those activities not financed by General Fund by use of a cost allocation plan. Cost Allocation Criteria Cost will be allocated considering the following criteria: Cause and effect - the identification of output in proportion to the service provided. Benefits received - the allocation of cost in relation to the benefits received. Fairness and equity - the allocation must be mutually satisfactory to the parties affected. Ability to bear - the allocation of cost must consider the ability to pay and the impact on the services provided. Purchasing The City will maintain a purchasing policy designed to support and enhance the delivery of governmental services while seeking to obtain the maximum value for each dollar expended. Performance Measures The City Manager will annually develop performance measures and assess how efficiently and effectively the functions, programs, and activities in each department are provided and for determining whether program goals are being met. Funds of the City of Elk Grove Governmental accounting systems are organized and operated on a fund basis. A fund is a self-balancing set of accounts recording cash and other financial resources, together with all related liabilities and residual equities or 156

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balances. Funds are used to segregate the City‘s financial activities in categories that attain certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. Basis of Budgeting The budget is adopted on a modified accrual basis, consistent with generally accepted accounting principles. Under the modified accrual basis, revenues are recognized when they are measurable and available. ―Measurable‖ means the amount can be determined and ―available‖ means collectible within the current period. Expenditures are recorded when the related fund liability is incurred.

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Redding *

Sacramento

*

* Lake Tahoe

San Francisco *

Elk Grove
* San Jose * Fresno

Bakersfield * Santa Barbara * * Los Angeles

San Diego

*

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History
In 1850, Elk Grove was established as a hotel stop and a stop for the stage. It is located about 15 miles south of historic Sutter‘s Fort and thus became a crossroads for business, entertainment, mail service and agriculture, and acted as home base for gold miners in nearby communities. After it played its part in the early gold rush and statehood history in California, a close-knit community evolved with a distinctly rural and western lifestyle. Despite its close proximity to California‘s capital city, Elk Grove remained quietly independent of Sacramento‘s growth and development as it expanded into adjoining countrywide areas until the 1980‘s. Today, Elk Grove had its start in agriculture and it is still a big part of the area‘s economy today, with vineyards, dairy and cattle and row crops; but, now, there is also high technology, professional service, commercial and retail enterprises. Our community is located in the southern portion of Sacramento County and is halfway between Sacramento and Stockton, straddling Highway 99. It is within easy driving distance from both the Bay Area and Sierra Mountain resorts.

Climate
Elk Grove‘s climate varies from low temperatures of 24 to 44 degrees to highs of 80 to 110 degrees. Average annual rainfall is 22 inches per year falling primarily from October through April. Elevation is 45 feet.

Type of Government
The City of Elk Grove incorporated on July 1, 2000. We are a general law city and operate on the Manager-City Council type of governance. Elk Grove is in the 3rd and 5th Congressional Districts, the 10th and 15th State Assembly Districts, and the 1st and 5th State Senate Districts. The current office holders and their term expirations are as follows:

Name/Office Patrick Hume, Councilmember Gary Davis, Councilmember James Cooper, Councilmember Steve Detrick, Vice-Mayor Sophia Scherman, Mayor

Term Expiration 2010 2010 2012 2012 2012

One of the most important resources of Elk Grove is its rich educational environment. The Elk Grove Unified School District (EGUSD) alone boasts a reputation for being one of the best districts in the state! EGUSD students regularly score above the state average as a whole. Local institutions of higher learning offer programs for most undergraduate and graduate degrees, and several cater directly to the business community. This is reflected in our city, which offers a well-educated community and labor force. The City of Elk Grove is within the Elk Grove Unified School District (EGUSD), one of the fastest growing school districts in the country and the 8th largest in California. The entire EGUSD includes 320 square miles, or about 160

COMMUNITY PROFILE
one third of Sacramento County. Notably, Elk Grove is projected to experience a greater growth in its student population over the next 25 years than any other city in Sacramento County. Cosumnes River Community College is near the City‘s northern boundary, and California State University, Sacramento is just a short drive away in the City of Sacramento. Primary, Secondary and Higher Education in the Region: Elk Grove Unified School District Los Rios Community Colleges California State University, Sacramento UC Davis, UC Davis Extension National University University of San Francisco University of Southern California Golden Gate University University of Phoenix Chapman University St. Mary‘s College McGeorge School of Law DeVry University Center Vocational Training Heald Business College MTI College of Business Technology

Airport
The Sacramento International Airport is located approximately 26 miles north of Elk Grove off I-5 and provides the major carrier airlines.

Attractions
Local attractions include: Laguna Creek Parkway, a 13-mile waterway featuring wetlands, open space, walking and riding trails, fishing and bird watching. Stone Lakes Refuge is on the western edge of Elk Grove, a narrow stretch of floodplain, was recently dedicated as a National Wildlife Refuge comprised of 3,000 acres along the Pacific Flyway. Cosumnes River Preserve is on the southern edge of Elk Grove, a riparian habitat running along the Cosumnes River.

Churches
More than 50 churches in the greater Elk Grove area provide worship services for many faiths.

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Hospitals
Elk Grove residents have the best medical providers located in their community. A full range of physicians, including many specialists, have active practices in the area. Additionally, the city is serviced locally by the following medical facilities: Kaiser Permanente Hospital Methodist Hospital/Mercy Healthcare Sutter Health Systems UC Davis Medical Center

Hotels
Local hotels that are easily accessible are the Holiday Inn, located at Hwy 99 and Laguna Boulevard. Comfort Inn Suites and the Marriott Extended Stay located off Hwy 5 at Elk Grove Boulevard .and soon-to-open will be the Hilton Garden Inn.

Housing
Housing available in the Elk Grove area ranges from the low $300,000s for new, entry-level homes and can go to the $600,000+ price range for executive homes.

Newspapers
The local newspaper is the Elk Grove Citizen/Herburger Publication that is published twice weekly.

Recreation
Golf Courses: Emerald Lakes Golf Center and Valley Hi Country Club and a number of driving ranges provide area golfers with facilities to meet their needs. Health Clubs: There are three main health clubs that serve the Elk Grove area: California Family Fitness, 24 Hour Fitness and Laguna Creek Racquet Club. These clubs offer full facilities for swimming, indoor basketball court, weight training, racquetball, tennis and aerobics. Parks: Elk Grove has close to 50 parks, totaling more than 140 acres of lush landscaping and recreational amenities. This includes picnic areas, softball fields, a skate park and swim center. Theaters: The two main theater complexes are Century 16 and United Artists and Laguna Village.

Restaurants
There are over 70 local restaurants that serve food varying from American, Mexican, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, to Italian.

Senior Center
The Elk Grove Senior Center provides classes, trips, game night, yoga, bingo, estate planning, AARP classes and tax preparation assistance. Lunches are served during the week for a nominal cost.

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Service Clubs
Service clubs in Elk Grove are: American Legion, Bahai, Elks Lodge, Chamber of Commerce, Knights of Columbus, Masonic, Odd Fellows & Rebekahs, Civic League, Kiwanis, Lions, Native Daughters of the Golden West, Optimist, Rotary, Soroptimist and Moose.

Shopping
There are several shopping centers located within Elk Grove, which provide some of the more popular chain stores. Old Town Elk Grove provides a unique collection of historical buildings, antique shops and small businesses. For shopping nearby, we have several large retail malls within the Elk Grove area. There is also a proposed plan to create a regional mall "The Elk Grove Promenade", which will be 1.2 million square feet, and surrounding satellite retail of about 1.8 million square feet.

Transportation
Elk Grove has convenient access to two major highways—Interstate 5 and Highway 99, providing easy access to highway transportation routes. Rail transportation is also available in Sacramento, 15 miles north of Elk Grove. Public transportation is provided by e-tran, the City‘s first in the nation 100% hybrid electric commuter bus fleet.

Youth Organizations
Youth organizations in Elk Grove are: 4-H, Camp Fire, Teen Center, Future Farmers of America and Scouts.

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RESOLUTION

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POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 1100 Intern to Councilmember 1100 City Council Total Authorized Position 1200 Administrative Assistant 1200 Assistant to the City Manager 1200 Budget Manager 1200 City Manager 1200 Economic Development Coordinator 1200 Emergency Management Coordinator 1200 Executive Administrative Assistant 1200 Public Information Officer 1200 Sr. Customer Service Specialist 1200 City Manager Total Authorized Position 1300 Assistant City Attorney 1300 City Attorney 1300 Deputy City Attorney II 1300 Executive Administrative Assistant 1300 Legal Assistant 1300 City Attorney Total Authorized Position Administrative Assistant Assistant City Clerk City Clerk Customer Service Specialist Deputy City Clerk/Records Manager Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 2 5 3 1 2 5 3 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 7 6 8 2 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 5 5 5 0 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 -1 1 1 1 0 5 5 4 -1 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 4 5 4 -1 3 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 16 15 14 -1 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 4 4 4 0

1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 1400 City Clerk Total

1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 Finance Total

Authorized Position Accounting Manager Accounting Technician Customer Service Specialist Finance Analyst Director of Finance & Admin Services Payroll Technician Purchasing Agent Purchasing Manager Senior Customer Service Specialist Senior Administrative Assistant Senior Accountant

Authorized Position 1610 Management Analyst 1600 Administrative Assistant 1600 Human Resources Director 1600 Human Resource Specialist 1600 Hum an Resources Total

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POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position Police Chief Captains Captain Lieutenants Sergeants Police Officers Total Sw orn Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistant (Senior) Animal Services Officer Animal Services Supervisor Community Services Officer Crime Analyst Crime Prevention Specialist Customer Service Specialist Dispatcher Dispatch Supervisor Forensic Investigator IT Analyst IT Analyst (Sr.) IT Manager Management Analyst Policy Equipment/SupplyTechnician Police Records Manager Police Records Supervisor Police Records Technician Police Services Analyst Police Support Services Manager Police Volunteer Coordinator Property & Evidence Manager Property & Evidence Tech Security Officer Subtotal Non-Sw orn Police Total Authorized Position 3110 Assistant City Manager 3110 Accounting Technician 3110 Customer Service Specialist 3110 Finance Analyst 3110 Management Analyst 295 Developm ent Services Total Authorized Position 3120 Planning Director 3120 Developm ent Svcs/Planning Total 1 1 0 7 18 99 126 6 1 3 1 11 1 1 1 18 3 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 1 2 2 72 198 1 2 U 6 18 98 125 6 1 3 1 11 1 1 1 18 3 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 8 1 1 1 1 2 2 75 200 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 2 U 7 17 98 125 7 1 3 1 11 1 1 0 18 3 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 8 1 1 1 1 2 2 75 200 0 0 0 1 -1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 -1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 3 5 2 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0

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POSITION LISTING
Authorized Position 3130 Administrative Assistant 3130 Building Official 3130 Developm ent Svcs/Building Total Authorized Position 3540 Administrative Assistant 3540 Code Enforcement Field Insp 3540 Code Enforcement Manager 3540 Customer Service Specialist 3540 Code Enforcem ent Total Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 3 5 5 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 6 8 8 0

Authorized Position 4100 Administrative Assistant 295 /503 Contract Manager #1 256 /294 Contract Manager #2 221 Contract Manager #3 4100 Public Works Director 4100 Developm ent Svcs/Public Works Total Authorized Position 501 Integrated Waste Coordinator 501 Integrated Waste Manager 501 Part Time Battery Technician 501/502 Integrated Waste Total Authorized Position 1560 Customer Service Specialist 1560 Sr Customer Service Specialist 1560 Administrative Analyst 1560 Utility Billing Total Authorized Position Administrative Assistant Management Analyst Transit Services Planner Transit System Manager

Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 5 4 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 2 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0.2 0.4 0 3 3.2 3.4 0.2 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 3 3 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 5 5 0 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 4 4 0 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 Funded FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Change 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 4 0

511 511 511 511 511 Transit Total

Authorized Position 601 Administrative Analyst 601 Risk Managem ent Total Authorized Position 1843 Administrative Assistant 1810/ 1843 Facilities and Fleet Manager 1810 Facilities Technician 1810 Receptionist 602 Facilities and Fleet

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

ACCRUAL BASIS – Sometimes called ―full accrual‖ basis. A basis of accounting in which revenues are recognized when earned regardless of when they are received, and expenses are recorded at the time the liability is incurred, regardless of when it is paid. ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION – The amount of depreciation that has accumulated to date during the existing useful life of City assets. ADOPTED BUDGET – The City Council approved annual budget establishing the legal authority for the expenditure of funds as set forth in the budget resolution adopted by Council. APPROPRIATION – An authorization by the City Council to make expenditures and to incur obligations for a specific purpose. An appropriation is usually limited in amount as to the time when it may be expended. APPROPRIATION RESOLUTION – The official enactment by a legislative body establishing the legal authority for officials to obligate and expend resources. ASSESSED VALUATION – A dollar value placed on real estate or other property by Sacramento County as a basis for levying property taxes. ASSESSMENT DISTRICT – Not a separate government entity, but rather a defined area of land that will benefit from the acquisition, construction, or maintenance of a public improvement. AUDIT – A systematic collection of sufficient and competent evidential matter needed to attest to the fairness of management‘s assertions in the financial statements, or to evaluate whether management has efficiently and effectively carried out its responsibility. BALANCED BUDGET - The total sum of revenues budgeted equal the total amount of the expenditures budgeted. BEGINNING/ENDING FUND BALANCE – Appropriated resources available in a fund from the prior/current year after payment of the prior/current year‘s expenses. This is not necessarily cash on hand. BOND – A City may raise capital by issuing a written promise to pay a specific sum of money, called the face value or principal amount, at a specified date or dates in the future together with periodic interest at a special rate. BUDGET – A plan of financial operation listing an estimate of proposed applications or expenses and the proposed means of financing them for a particular time period. The budget is proposed until it has been approved by the City Council. BUDGET CALENDAR – A schedule of key dates and milestones that a government follows in the preparation and adoption of the budget. BUDGET MESSAGE – Included in the opening section of the budget, the Budget Message provides the Council and the public with a general summary of the most important aspects of the budget, changes from previous fiscal years, and the views and recommendations of the City Manager. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES - Expenditures which result in acquisitions of or addition to fixed assets - including furniture, vehicles, machinery and equipment - and the costs necessary to place the capital item into service. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT – A permanent addition to the City‘s assets, including the design, construction, or purchase of land, buildings, or facilities, or major renovations of the same.

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) – A financial plan of proposed capital improvement projects with single and multiple-year capital expenditures. This program plans for five years and is updated annually. CAPITAL OUTLAY – A budget category which budgets all equipment having a unit cost of more than $5,000 and an estimated useful life of over one year. Capital outlay is budgeted in the operating budget. CERTIFICATES OF PARTICIPATION – Form of lease-purchase financing used to construct or acquire capital facilities and equipment. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) – A federal grant that aims to develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded opportunities for persons of low and moderate income. The City of Elk Grove receives an annual CDBG entitlement from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. DEBT SERVICE – Payment of the principal and interest on an obligation resulting from the issuance of bonds or notes. DEFICIT – An excess of expenditures or expenses over resources. DEPARTMENT – A major organizational unit of the City that has been assigned overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within a functional area. DEPRECIATION – The decrease in value of physical assets due to use and the passage of time. DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEE – Fees placed on the development of land or conditions required for the approval of a development project such as the donation (dedication or exaction) of certain land (or money) to specific public uses. The fees are typically justified as an offset to the future impact that development will have on existing infrastructure. ENCUMBRANCES – A legal obligation to pay funds for an expenditure that has not yet occurred. They cease to be encumbrances when the obligations are paid or otherwise terminated. ENTERPRISE FUNDS – This fund type is used to account for operations that are: (a) financed and operated in a manner similar to private sector enterprises and it is the intent of the City that the costs (including depreciation) for providing goods or services to the general public be financed or recovered primarily through the user charges; or (b) the City or an outside grantor agency has determined that a periodic determination of revenues earned, expenses, and net income is appropriate for capital maintenance, public policy, management control, accountability, or other purposes. The City has established the following enterprise funds: water, sewer, solid waste, transit, and recreation. EXPENDITURE – The outflow of funds paid or to be paid for an asset or goods and services obtained regardless of when the expense is actually paid. This term applies to all funds. Note: An encumbrance is not an expenditure; an encumbrance reserves funds to be expended. FIDUCIARY FUNDS - Used to report assets held in a trustee or agency capacity for others. FISCAL YEAR (FY) – A 12-month period of time to which the budget applies. The City of Elk Grove‘s fiscal year is July 1 through June 30. FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) – The decimal equivalent of a part-time position converted to a full-time base (i.e., one person working half time would equate to 0.5 FTE).

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

FUND – An independent fiscal and accounting entity used to record all financial transactions related to the specific purpose for which the fund was created. The seven generic fund types used by the City are: General Fund, Special Revenue, Debt Service, Capital Projects, Enterprise, Internal Service, and Trust and Agency. FUND BALANCE – The amount of financial resources available for use. Generally, this represents the detail of all the annual operating surpluses and deficits since the fund‘s inception. Also known as the financial position, fund balance is the excess of assets over liabilities, and represents the cumulative effect of revenues and other financing sources over expenditure and other financing issues. GANN APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT – This term refers to Article XIIIB of the California State Constitution that places limits on the amount of proceeds from taxes that state and local governmental agencies can receive and spend each year. GAS TAX – Administered by the State Board of Equalization (SBOE), this is a per gallon tax on fuel used to propel a motor vehicle or aircraft. Use of the revenue is for research, planning, construction, improvement, maintenance, and operation of public streets and highways or public mass transit. GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES (GAAP) – Uniform minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting. GENERAL FUND – The primary fund of the City used to account for all revenues and expenditures of the City not legally restricted as to use. Examples of departments financed by the General Fund include the City Council, City Manager‘s Office, Police, Fire, Personnel, Attorney‘s Office, Finance, and others. GENERAL PLAN – California State law requires each City to adopt a General Plan that describes the direction the City will take concerning its future development. GOAL – The desired result of accomplishments within a given time frame. GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS - Funds used to account for tax-supported activities. GRANT – Contribution or gift or cash or other assets from another governmental entity to be used or expended for a specific purpose, activity, or facility. HTE – The City‘s primary financial, community development, and public safety software vendor. INFRASTRUCTURE – Facilities on which the continuance and growth of the community depend on, such as roads, water lines, sewers, public buildings, etc. INTER-FUND TRANSFERS – Monies moved from one fund to another. The money is transferred to finance the operations of another fund or to reimburse the fund for expenses. INTERNAL SERVICE FUND – Funds established to account for the financing of goods or services provided by one department for other departments within the City on a cost reimbursement basis. LANDSCAPE AND LIGHTING DISTRICT – An assessment district that is formed for the maintenance of landscaping and street light improvements. MEASURE A – Sacramento County voters approved a ½ cent sales tax funding source in the late 1980‘s to fund specific transportation projects.

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

MELLO ROOS DISTRICT – The formation of a special tax district for the installation and maintenance of public improvements. MODIFIED ACCRUAL – An adaptation of the accrual basis of accounting for governmental fund types. Revenues and other financing resources are recognized when they become available to finance expenditures for the current period. Expenditures are recognized when the fund liability is incurred. MOTOR VEHICLE IN-LIEU – A State vehicle fee imposed on motorists for the privilege of operating a motor vehicle on the public highways. It is imposed ―in-lieu‖ of a local property tax. MUNICIPAL CODE – A book that contains City Council approved ordinances currently in effect. The Code defines City policy with respect to areas such as planning, zoning, building, etc. OBJECTIVES – The necessary steps that need to be accomplished to achieve a desired goal. OPERATING BUDGET – Annual appropriation of funds for on-going program costs, including salaries and benefits, services and supplies, debt service and capital outlay. OPERATING EXPENSES – Expenditures for materials, supplies, and services which are ordinarily consumed within a fiscal year and which are not included in program inventories. ORDINANCE – A formal legislative enactment by the City Council. It is the full force and effect of law within City boundaries unless pre-empted by a higher form of law. An ordinance has a higher legal standing than a resolution. PERFORMANCE MEASURES – Performance measures are an important component of decision making, and at a minimum they should be based on program goals and objectives, measure program results or accomplishments, provide for comparisons over time, measure efficiency and effectiveness, and be reliable, verifiable, and understandable. PROPERTY TAX – Property tax is imposed on real property (land and permanently attached improvements such as building) and tangible personal property located within the City. PROPOSED BUDGET – This refers to the status of an annual budget which has been submitted by the City Manager and is pending public review and City Council adoption. REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (RDA) – A separate legal entity charged with the responsibility for elimination of blight through the process of redevelopment. REIMBURSEMENT – The payment of an amount remitted on behalf of another party, department, or fund. RESERVE – An account used to record a portion of the fund‘s balance that is legally restricted for a specific purpose and is, therefore, not available for general appropriation. RESOLUTION – A special order of the City Council which has a lower legal standing than an ordinance. RETAINED EARNINGS – An equity account reflecting the accumulated earnings of an enterprise or internal service fund. REVENUE – Amount received for taxes, fees, permits, licenses, interest, and intergovernmental sources during the fiscal year.

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

REVENUE BONDS – A type of bond usually issued to construct facilities. The bonds are repaid from the revenue produced by the operation of these facilities. SALARIES AND BENEFITS – A budget category that generally accounts for full-time and temporary employees, overtime, and all employee benefits, such as medical, dental, and retirement. SPECIAL ASSESSMENT – A compulsory levy made against certain properties to defray all or part of the cost of a specific capital improvement or service deemed to benefit primarily those properties. SPECIAL REVENUE FUND – A fund used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are legally restricted to expenditures for specified purposes. STAFFING – A budget category which generally accounts for full-time and temporary employees. TAXES – Compulsory charges levied by a government for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit. TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX (TOT) – A tax imposed on travelers who stay in temporary lodging facilities within the City. Also referred to as a Hotel/Motel Tax.

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