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LESSON PLAN for EDUC 470

ELD & SDAIE


TEACHER
CANDIDATE:
Breanna David

DATE:
12/1/16
LITERATURE
SELECTION:
Beauty and the
Beast by Walt
Disney (1993
version)

GRADE/Acquisition
Level:

LESSON TITLE:
Roll a Story

1st Grade
Expanding
SUBJECT (Content
Area):
English Language
Arts

LESSON
OBJECTIVE:
Given a number
cube, the students
will be able to roll
to create an
original story of
five sentences
using characters,
settings, and
problems from
Disneys Beauty
and the Beast, as
well as draw a
picture that
informs the story.

LANGUAGE STANDARDS AND CONTENT OBJECTIVES


COMMON CORE CONTENT STANDARD
CCSS.Writing.1.2 Write
informative/explanatory texts in which
they name a topic, supply some facts
about the topic, and provide some sense
of closure.

Collaborative
ELD.PI.1.3.Ex Offer opinions and
negotiate with others in conversations
using an expanded set of learned
phrases (e.g., I think/dont think X. I
agree with X), as well as open responses
in order to gain and/or hold the floor,
elaborate on an idea, and so on.

CCSS.Speaking and Listening.1.5


Add drawings or other visual displays to
descriptions when appropriate to clarify
ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
Interpretive
ELD.PI.1.6.Ex Describe ideas,
phenomena (e.g., how
earthworms eat), and text elements
(e.g., setting, main idea) in greater
detail
based on understanding of a variety of
grade-level texts and viewing of
multimedia,
with moderate support.

Productive
ELD.PI.1.10.Ex Write short literary
texts (e.g., a story) and informational
texts (e.g., an informative text on the
life cycle of an insect) collaboratively
with an adult (e.g., joint construction of
texts), with peers, and with increasing
independence.

INTO, THROUGH, and BEYOND


INTO

RATIONALE
Ask students if they know the Opening with a
story of Beauty and the Beast quick discussion
helps the
and display a picture or two

REFLECTION
Most students were
familiar with the story, but
there were a few who did

from the book/movie (discuss


potential characters they
know, plot, conflicts, etc.)
Show the video of the read
along story.
When finished, refresh on the
terms: character (including
traits), setting, and
conflict/problem using
examples from the story
As a class, define each of the
three terms.

THROUGH
Now that they know some of
the characters, settings, and
problems that occur
throughout the story, they are
going to create their very own
story.
Pass out Roll A Story
worksheets and number
cubes.
Have the students roll the
number cube and see what
number they get for
character. Repeat this for
setting and problem. The cube
should be rolled 3 times in
total per student.
Ask the students to circle the
character, setting, and
problem that they roll on their
sheet. (For example, 1st roll is
a 3= Gaston, 2nd roll is a 1=
The Town, 3rd roll is a
1=Fights)
When all 3 areas are rolled,
give students their writing
sheet and have them create a
story using the character,
setting, and problem they
rolled.
Have students write 5

students start
thinking about
the parts of
literature we are
going to be
using later in the
lesson. I am
showing the
video of the
story so that
visual and
auditory learners
benefit from the
story being on a
big screen
through a loud
speaker. It is
also important
to refresh
student
knowledge of
the key terms
they have
already learned
before
continuing.
RATIONALE
This activity is
designed to
strengthen
students
writing
because they
must fill in the
missing parts
to the story
they rolled.
Allowing the
students to roll
their story
gives them
ownership
over it and
also allows
creativity
within certain
boundaries.
Highlighting
the words is
important so
that both I and
the student
can keep track
of what still
needs to go
into the story.
Drawing a
picture speaks

not know it. Looking back,


it may have been better
for me to just read the
story rather than show a
video of it. The video
seemed to drag on, but
luckily the students
remained attentive. I was
happy that I put problem
on the worksheet because
when we did preliminary
discussion about the three
components of the story,
they had not heard of the
word conflict. I used it as
an opportunity to remind
them of synonyms and to
let them know that it
means the same thing as
problem.

REFLECTION
This portion of the lesson
took much longer than I
had anticipated. The
students had a
challenging time
understanding what they
needed to circle on their
Roll A Story worksheets.
Most of them simply
circled the same things I
did instead of rolling their
own. The writing portion
proved even more
challenging because the
students could not wrap
their heads around
creative writing. I should
have prepared them with
a sentence starter and
explained better that the
story could be about
anything. I learned that
they are still too
egocentric to be able to
write about a character
doing things that did not
really happen. They were
able to repeat what I said
or to retell the story, but
only about five students
actually did what they

sentences and include a


conclusion (examples will be
provided).
Using a yellow crayon, the
students will highlight the
words in their story that they
rolled.

When the writing is finished,


have students draw a picture
in the box provided that helps
further tell their story.
BEYOND
In small groups, have each
student read his/her story one
at a time.
When the student finishes
reading, each of the other
students in the group gives an
opinion about their story while
still being respectful of one
another.
Continue until each student
has shared his/her story with
the group then collect.
Grades will be based on a
participation rubric. 6 points
are given for participation in
number cube rolling and the
read-aloud/discussion after, 1
point for a sentence using the
character rolled, 1 point for a
sentence using the setting
rolled, 1 point for using the
problem rolled, and 1 point for
the picture drawn giving a
possible total of 10 points.

to the visual
learners and
allows those
that have
difficulty with
words still tell
their story.

were supposed to do. Not


coincidentally, these
students were the most
advanced in the class.
Many students never even
made it to drawing their
picture.

RATIONALE
Reflecting on
and sharing
the work that
the students
have done
helps them
take ownership
of their writing.
Giving
feedback using
opinions helps
the students
practice
politeness and
constructive
comments.
They are
graded
primarily on
participation
because this is
a
strengthening
activity, not
something
they should be
penalized for. I
just want to
see that they
practiced their
writing and
speaking skills.

REFLECTION
Unfortunately, I ran out of
time for the last portion of
this lesson. The students
never got to share their
stories with each other,
but I think this would have
added a great deal of
value to the lesson. It
would have helped the
students who did not quite
understand to see a model
of how it could be written
in the future. I was
disappointed that the
lesson ran too long and
was unable to be finished.
Now I know, however,
what I need to do to make
adjustments to this lesson
so that it better meets the
needs of the students.