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Sample of Egg Harbor Township

Public Schools Curriculum


Retrieved from:
http://tinyurl.com/gnrhnqn

Drawing and Painting


Grades 9-12

Length of Course:

Full Year

Elective / Required:

Elective

Schools:

High School

Student Eligibility:

Grades 9-12

Credit Value:

5 credits

Date Approved:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Mission Statement __________________________________________________ 3


Philosophy ________________________________________________________ 3
Statement of Purpose _______________________________________________ 3
Introduction _______________________________________________________ 4
District Curriculum Template __________________________________________ 4
Guiding Principles __________________________________________________ 4
Intent of the Guide __________________________________________________ 5
Unit 1 Elements of Art _____________________________________________ 6
Unit 2 Principles of Design _________________________________________ 9
Unit 3 History and Culture __________________________________________ 12
Unit 4 Critique and Aesthetics ______________________________________ 16

This curriculum guide was prepared by:


Debra Nealy, Egg Harbor Township High School
Coordinated by: Thomas Weber - Supervisor of Fine and Performing Arts

DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT


Our mission in the Egg Harbor Township School District is to partner with the student,
family, school, and community to provide a safe learning environment that addresses
rigorous and relevant 21st Century standards and best practices which will develop
academic scholarship, integrity, leadership, citizenship, and the unique learning style of
students, while encouraging them to develop a strong work ethic and to act responsibly
in their school community and every day society.
FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS - PHILOSOPHY
It is our belief that it is in a childs inherent nature to create. Experiences in creating in
the arts are essential to a well-rounded education. Furthermore, creative and artistic
exploration enhances critical thinking and problem solving skills. The arts also promote
an atmosphere that embraces cultural diversity. Children who are exposed to the art of
past and present cultures learn about themselves, the society in which they live, and
people throughout history.
FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS - STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
Education exists for the purpose of enabling each individual to realize and maintain
her/his full potential. Music/visual arts education, as a social, intellectual, and physical
discipline, specifically involves the development of each individual's aptitude,
understanding, and appreciation and serves as an essential element to the
developmental process.
The music and visual arts programs provide the opportunity for each individual to
develop a comprehensive foundation of basic knowledge, skills, and techniques and
serves not only as an arts specific course but also provides a vehicle by which
associated disciplines are enhanced and supported.
This curriculum guide has been designed to expose all students to the arts educational
experience outlined within. Each student will be offered thorough and analogous arts
instruction and will be fully prepared for the continuing education offered at the
secondary level. Additionally, through active participation, students will develop positive
individual and group behavioral patterns while exploring the vast cultural and ethnic
diversity reflective of our community and the art form itself.
Our school district provides an extensive arts program, which will enable students to
succeed and compete in the global marketplace using the New Jersey Core Curriculum
Content Standards in conjunction with the New Jersey Visual and Performing Arts
Curriculum Frameworks and technological exploration.

INTRODUCTION
The most precious resource teachers have is time. Regardless of how much time a
course is scheduled for, it is never enough to accomplish all that one would like.
Therefore, it is imperative that teachers utilize the time they have wisely in order to
maximize the potential for all students to achieve the desired learning.
High quality educational programs are characterized by clearly stated goals for student
learning, teachers who are well-informed and skilled in enabling students to reach those
goals, program designs that allow for continuous growth over the span of years of
instruction, and ways of measuring whether students are achieving program goals.
THE EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT CURRICULUM TEMPLATE
The Egg Harbor Township School District has embraced the backward-design model as
the foundation for all curriculum development for the educational program. When
reviewing curriculum documents and the Egg Harbor Township curriculum template,
aspects of the backward-design model will be found in the stated enduring
understandings/essential questions, unit assessments, and instructional activities.
Familiarization with backward-design is critical to working effectively with Egg Harbor
Townships curriculum guides.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES: WHAT IS BACKWARD DESIGN?
WHAT IS UNDERSTANDING BY DESIGN?
Backward design is an increasingly common approach to planning curriculum and
instruction. As its name implies, backward design is based on defining clear goals,
providing acceptable evidence of having achieved those goals, and then working
backward to identify what actions need to be taken that will ensure that the gap
between the current status and the desired status is closed.
Building on the concept of backward design, Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (2005)
have developed a structured approach to planning programs, curriculum, and
instructional units. Their model asks educators to state goals; identify deep
understandings, pose essential questions, and specify clear evidence that goals,
understandings, and core learning have been achieved.
Programs based on backward design use desired results to drive decisions. With this
design, there are questions to consider, such as: What should students understand,
know, and be able to do? What does it look like to meet those goals? What kind of
program will result in the outcomes stated? How will we know students have achieved
that result? What other kinds of evidence will tell us that we have a quality program?
These questions apply regardless of whether they are goals in program planning or
classroom instruction.
The backward design process involves three interrelated stages for developing an entire
curriculum or a single unit of instruction. The relationship from planning to curriculum
design, development, and implementation hinges upon the integration of the following
three stages.

Stage I: Identifying Desired Results: Enduring understandings, essential questions,


knowledge and skills need to be woven into curriculum publications, documents,
standards, and scope and sequence materials. Enduring understandings identify the
big ideas that students will grapple with during the course of the unit. Essential
questions provide a unifying focus for the unit and students should be able to answer
more deeply and fully these questions as they proceed through the unit. Knowledge
and skills are the stuff upon which the understandings are built.
Stage II: Determining Acceptable Evidence: Varied types of evidence are specified to
ensure that students demonstrate attainment of desired results. While discrete
knowledge assessments (e.g.: multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, short answer, etc) will
be utilized during an instructional unit, the overall unit assessment is performance-based
and asks students to demonstrate that they have mastered the desired understandings.
These culminating (summative) assessments are authentic tasks that students would
likely encounter in the real-world after they leave school. They allow students to
demonstrate all that they have learned and can do. To demonstrate their understandings
students can explain, interpret, apply, provide critical and insightful points of view, show
empathy and/or evidence self-knowledge. Models of student performance and clearly
defined criteria (i.e.: rubrics) are provided to all students in advance of starting work on
the unit task.
Stage III: Designing Learning Activities: Instructional tasks, activities, and
experiences are aligned with stages one and two so that the desired results are obtained
based on the identified evidence or assessment tasks. Instructional activities and
strategies are considered only once stages one and two have been clearly explicated.
Therefore, congruence among all three stages can be ensured and teachers can make
wise instructional choices.
At the curricular level, these three stages are best realized as a fusion of research, best
practices, shared and sustained inquiry, consensus building, and initiative that involves
all stakeholders. In this design, administrators are instructional leaders who enable the
alignment between the curriculum and other key initiatives in their district or schools.
These leaders demonstrate a clear purpose and direction for the curriculum within their
school or district by providing support for implementation, opportunities for revision
through sustained and consistent professional development, initiating action research
activities, and collecting and evaluating materials to ensure alignment with the desired
results. Intrinsic to the success of curriculum is to show how it aligns with the
overarching goals of the district, how the document relates to district, state, or national
standards, what a high quality educational program looks like, and what excellent
teaching and learning looks like. Within education, success of the educational program is
realized through this blend of commitment and organizational direction.
INTENT OF THE GUIDE
This guide is intended to provide teachers with course objectives and possible activities,
as well as assist the teacher in planning and delivering instruction in accordance with the
New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. The guide is not intended to restrict or
limit the teachers resources or individual instruction techniques. It is expected that the
teacher will reflectively adjust and modify instruction and units during the course of
normal lessons depending on the varying needs of the class, provided such modified
instruction attends to the objectives and essential questions outlined below.

UNIT
Unit Name: Elements of Art

UNIT SUMMARY
Students will learn how to effectively use the elements of art in solving a variety of
design problems. Students will create works of art that demonstrate the
experimental application of the elements of art .
UNIT RESOURCES
Textbook Understanding Art 2007 edition by Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
Chapter 2, Lessons 1-2
Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards
Internet Resource Links:
projectarticulate.com
thevirtualinstructor.com
new.4-hcurriculum.org
Princetonol.com
Goshen.edu
Artsonia.com

STAGE ONE
GOALS AND STANDARDS
Standard State: NJ
1.1.12.D.1 Distinguish innovative applications of the elements of art and principles of design in
visual artworks from diverse cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes.
1.3.12.D.1 Synthesize the elements of art and principles of design in an original portfolio of twoand three-dimensional artworks that reflects personal style and a high degree of technical
proficiency and expressivity.
1.3.12.D.2 Produce an original body of artwork in one or more art mediums that demonstrates
mastery of visual literacy, methods, techniques, and cultural understanding.
1.3.12.D.3 Organize an exhibit of personal works of visual art that convey a high level of
understanding of how the expression of ideas relates to the art media, art mediums, and techniques
used.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS
Knowledge of the elements of art enhances design aesthetics.
Artists organize ideas through knowledgeable use of design elements.
Artists express themselves through the skilled use of the elements of art.
Studying art elements assists in personal decision making in the drawing and painting process.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

What is art?
How can artists use the elements to create a successful work of art?
Why and how do people create?
How does art communicate ideas to others?
What factors influence artists and artistic expression?

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS


Students will know...
How elements of art are essential to creating effective works of art.
How to experiment with different art media to create unique works of art.
How to use basic drawing and painting techniques that reflects knowledge and understanding of
the elements.
Students will be able to...
Identify and use their knowledge of the elements of art in the creation of works of art.
Communicate through personal expression using the elements of art.
Use a variety of methods and techniques to create original works of art.

STAGE TWO
PERFORMANCE TASKS
Title: Elements
In this unit students will be introduced to the elements of art, and their varying contributions to the
creative process in drawing and painting.
OTHER EVIDENCE

Sketchbooks and/journals
Projects
Quarterly
Teacher observation of student productivity
Student Self-evaluations

Rubric: Drawing and Painting Assessment Rubric


Trait: Use of Elements

Accuracy of
Design
(Followed all of
the project
directions)
Craftsmanshi
p
(Neat, clean,
and complete.
Skillful use of
materials)
Creativity/
Aesthetic
(Took time to
develop ideas
and completed
a neat final
project)
Effort/
Perseverance
(Work was
completed with
consistency
and effort)
Studio Work
(Good use of
class time,
cleanliness,
and behavior)

Comments:

Excellent:
Followed all
guidelines
explicitly
within criteria

Good:
Followed
most of the
guidelines
within
criteria

Average:
Completed
some of the
criteria, but
did not follow
guidelines

Needs
Improvement:
Did not
complete
criteria within
time allotted

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

Teacher
Rating

Total:
__ /50
Final Grade:
_____

STAGE THREE
LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Students organize ideas in sketchbooks.
Activity 2: Students will use drawing and painting techniques in a variety of projects throughout the year.
Activity 3: Students will use rubric to evaluate their work and reflect on their learning.
Activity 4: Students use critical thinking skills and teacher feedback to rethink and refine project before
completion.
UNIT
Unit Name: Principles of Design
UNIT SUMMARY
Knowledge of the principles of design will be the basis for improving students design skills. Students will
produce works of art that demonstrate understanding of these design principles and will create thought
provoking projects utilizing pre-established knowledge of the elements of art.
UNIT RESOURCES
Textbook Understanding Art 2007 edition by Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
Chapter 2, Lessons 3-4
Internet Resource Links:
Principlesofart.com
Princetonol.com
Goshen.edu
Projectarticulate.org
Slideshare.net
Filmclass.net
Artsonia.com

STAGE ONE
GOALS AND STANDARDS
Standard State: NJ
1.1.12.D.1 Distinguish innovative applications of the elements of art and principles of design in visual
artworks from diverse cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes.
1.3.12.D.2 Produce an original body of artwork in one or more art mediums that demonstrates mastery of
visual literacy, methods, techniques, and cultural understanding.
1.4.12.A.4 Evaluate how exposure to various cultures influences individual, emotional, intellectual, and
kinesthetic responses to artwork.

1.4.12.B.2 Evaluate how an artist's technical proficiency may affect the creation or presentation of a work
of art, as well as how the context in which a work is performed or shown may impact perceptions of its
significance/meaning.
ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

Principles of art are the language of art.


Artists use the principles of design to arrange the elements of art.
Principles of design are universal in nature.
Principles of design help organize ideas and express ideas.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

How does the creative process work?


How do people express themselves through art?
Why is it important to practice mastering art skills or techniques?
How does art expand our thinking?
How can exaggeration or emphasis of one or more elements/principles alter the meaning or quality
of a composition?

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS


Students will know
Studying how the principles of art have been used in the past and have significance and
importance for future work.
How the principles of art play a role in the development of successful works of art.
Students will be able to
Make intentional decisions about how they arrange the elements of art using the principles of
design to produce an effective work of art.
Create works of art that represent originality, personal expression, and craftsmanship.
STAGE TWO
PERFORMANCE TASKS
Title: Principles
Students will utilize their knowledge of the principles of design to create projects using a variety of wet and
dry media. They will enhance their work by effectively using balance, emphasis, unity, contrast, pattern,
harmony, movement, and proportion while incorporating aesthetic appeal through the use of texture, line,
shape, and color, space, and form.
OTHER EVIDENCE

Sketchbooks and /visual journals


Projects
Quarterly
Teacher observation of student productivity
Self-evaluations

10

Rubric: Drawing and Painting Assessment Rubric


Trait: Use of Principles

Accuracy of
Design
(Followed all of
the project
directions)
Craftsmanshi
p
(Neat, clean,
and complete.
Skillful use of
materials)
Creativity/
Aesthetic
(Took time to
develop ideas
and completed
a neat final
project)
Effort/
Perseverance
(Work was
completed with
consistency
and effort)
Studio Work
(Good use of
class time,
cleanliness,
and behavior)

Comments:

Excellent:
Followed all
guidelines
explicitly
within criteria

Good:
Followed
most of the
guidelines
within
criteria

Average:
Completed
some of the
criteria, but
did not follow
guidelines

Needs
Improvement:
Did not
complete
criteria within
time allotted

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

10 pts

9-8 pts

7-6 pts

5 pts or Less

Teacher
Rating

Total:
__ /50
Final Grade:
_____

11

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Activity1: Practice techniques using sketchbooks and journals.
Activity 2: Utilize drawing and painting techniques through hands on activities and projects.
Activity 3: Discuss and evaluate performance.
UNIT
Unit Name: History and Culture
UNIT SUMMARY
In this unit students will study the history and culture of the visual arts. Their studies will expand their
multi-cultural awareness and context, as well as, increase their understanding of the history and
appreciation of the arts from different perspectives.
UNIT RESOURCES
Printed Materials:
Textbook Understanding Art 2007 edition by Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
Internet Resource Links:
Artyfactory.com
Googleartproject.com
Nga.gov
Projectarticulate.org

STAGE ONE
GOALS AND STANDARDS
1.1.12.D.1 Distinguish innovative applications of the elements of art and principles of design in visual
artworks from diverse cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes.
1.2.12.A.1 Determine how dance, music, theatre, and visual art have influenced world cultures
throughout history.
1.2.12.A.2 Justify the impact of innovations in the arts (e.g., the availability of music online) on societal
norms and habits of mind in various historical eras.
1.3.12.D.2 Produce an original body of artwork in one or more art mediums that demonstrates mastery
of visual literacy, methods, techniques, and cultural understanding.

12

1.3.12.D.5 Identify the styles and artistic processes used in the creation of culturally and historically
diverse two- and three-dimensional artworks, and emulate those styles by creating an original body of
work.
1.4.12.A.1 Use contextual clues to differentiate between unique and common properties and to
discern the cultural implications of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
1.4.12.A.4 Evaluate how exposure to various cultures influences individual, emotional,
intellectual, and kinesthetic responses to artwork.
1.4.12.B.1 Formulate criteria for arts evaluation using the principles of positive critique and
observation of the elements of art and principles of design, and use the criteria to evaluate
works of dance, music, theatre, visual, and multimedia artwork from diverse cultural contexts
and historical eras.
1.4.12.B.3 Determine the role of art and art-making in a global society by analyzing the
influence of technology on the visual, performing, and multimedia arts for consumers, creators,
and performers around the world.
ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS
Art reflects the time period, culture, geography, and status of a regions inhabitants.
The history of art involves the study of the relationship of the artist to a time and place from societal,
cultural, and political perspectives.
Artists of different cultures communicate ideas and express themselves using a variety of
themes, media, styles, and techniques.
The study of art history, cultures, and artists provide vocabulary skills and a foundation for students
to discuss and evaluate works of art.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
What is art?
Why is art created?
What were the creative origins and artistic influences of early and rising civilizations?
Why is an understanding of these origins and influences important to the study of art history?
What can works of art tell us about a culture/society?
In what ways have artistic traditions, cultural values, and social issues influenced artistic
expression?
How have they influenced new traditions in artistic expression?
How does time and place socially, politically, and culturally influence works of art?

13

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS


Students will know
The relationships of works of art to one another in terms of history, aesthetics, and culture.
The connections between particular artistic styles and historical development of the worlds cultures.
Differences among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of events, characteristics,
purposes, and artistic development
Summarize and reflect upon how various art forms and cultural resources preserve cultural
heritage and influence contemporary art

Students will be able to


Describe and identify the meaning, characteristics, functions and purposes of works art within varied
cultures and historical eras.
Identify major art movements and influential artists from various historical periods.
Compare and contrast the stylistic characteristics of works of art from various historical periods.
Demonstrate an ability to gather information and knowledge of cultures and places to analyze
meaning within their own art making.

14

STAGE TWO
PERFORMANCE TASKS
Title: Research Report and Project
Within this unit the students will utilize class time and the media center to gather relevant information
about a selected artist, piece of art work, or genre. Ultimately the research information collected will
culminate into either a written report or visual presentation to the class. Work must be completed by
the end of marking period three; some work may have to be completed on the students own time.
OTHER EVIDENCE
Periodic evaluations and discussions
Quarterly
Rubric: Research Paper Rubric
Trait: Historical Research

Name_____________________________________________

Period _____

Art History Research Report


1St Marking Period
Students will decide on a topic on a particular artist, historical or cultural era to begin researching
and brainstorming. Choose between a written essay or a presentation with visual aids.
25pts
2nd Marking Period
Students will prepare a rough draft of their chosen subject.
25pts
3rd Marking Period
Students complete report or visual presentation on their chosen topic.
25pts
4th Marking Period
Students do well thought out sketches in preparation for the completion of a final project relating to
their chosen topic.
25pts
Total _____ /100

15

STAGE THREE
LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

Activity1: Students will create an art history timeline. Students will be able to understand that art has
developed through time and can be placed into different art era categories.
Activity 2: Students will create art work incorporating historical references and design elements inspired by
their selected artist or genre.
Activity 3: Students will be given sufficient time to research, write, and create a final project based on their
selected topic (i.e. artist, culture, era, and genre) in art history. The research must be presented in written form
or a PowerPoint presentation. A work of art must accompany the report; students may use any medium of their
choice, but subject matter and materials must reflect chosen artist or topic.
UNIT
Unit Name: Critique and Aesthetics
Author: Debbie Nealy
UNIT SUMMARY
In this unit students will be encouraged to use the skills of critique and knowledge of aesthetics to formulate
critical judgment regarding the artistic merit of artwork. While learning these processes students should gain
a deeper appreciation for the arts, ultimately making them more inventive and imaginative decision makers
when it comes to their own work.
UNIT RESOURCES
Textbook Understanding Art 2007 edition by McGraw-Hill/Glencoe
Internet Resource Links:
Princetonal.com
Nga.gov
Artsedge.com

STAGE ONE
GOALS AND STANDARDS
Standard State: NJ
1.3.12.D.3 Organize an exhibit of personal works of visual art that convey a high level of understanding of how
the expression of ideas relates to the art media, art mediums, and techniques used.
1.3.12.D.4 Analyze the syntax and compositional and stylistic principles of two- and three-dimensional artworks
in multiple art media (including computer-assisted artwork), and interpret themes and symbols suggested by
the artworks.

16

1.4.12.A.1 Use contextual clues to differentiate between unique and common properties and to discern the
cultural implications of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
1.4.12.A.2 Speculate on the artist's intent, using discipline-specific arts terminology and citing embedded
clues to substantiate the hypothesis.
1.4.12.A.3 Develop informed personal responses to an assortment of artworks across the four arts
disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art), using historical significance, craftsmanship, cultural
context, and originality as criteria for assigning value to the works.
1.4.12.A.4 Evaluate how exposure to various cultures influences individual, emotional, intellectual, and
kinesthetic responses to artwork.
1.4.12.B.1 Formulate criteria for arts evaluation using the principles of positive critique and observation of
the elements of art and principles of design, and use the criteria to evaluate works of dance, music, theatre,
visual, and multimedia artwork from diverse cultural contexts and historical eras.
1.4.12.B.2 Evaluate how an artist's technical proficiency may affect the creation or presentation of a work of
art, as well as how the context in which a work is performed or shown may impact perceptions of its
significance/meaning.
1.4.12.B.3 Determine the role of art and art-making in a global society by analyzing the influence of
technology on the visual, performing, and multimedia arts for consumers, creators, and performers around
the world.
ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

An understanding of the elements of art and principles of design are essential in a critique.
Analyzing an original work of art requires the viewer to describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate.
Critique involves a variety of aesthetic view points.
Art can be understood and appreciated within its historical and cultural context.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
How are aesthetics reflected in everyday life?
How does the process of critiquing works of art contribute to the development, understanding and
appreciation of a piece?

How can you analyze an original work of art?


How can an artist represent their emotions using the elements of art and principles of design?
How do artist categorize their work?
Can you describe the aesthetic properties found in this work of art?

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

Students will know...


That critiquing works of art requires specific reference to the elements of art and principles of
design.
How to establish criteria to participate in critiques.
How to reflect on and analyze personal responses to works of art.

17

Students will be able to...


Interpret and compare historical and aesthetic references found in original works of art.
Classify works of art.
Describe the aesthetic properties found in works of art.
STAGE TWO
PERFORMANCE TASKS
Title: Critique and Aesthetics
The students will describe, analyze, interpret, and judge works of art in a written format using provided
guidelines (attached).
The students will identify and analyze characteristics of works of art that represent a variety of styles.
The students will demonstrate the ability to reflect on, and respond to the beauty of artistic experiences.
Some of these responses will be written and others discussed in an open class format so the students
can share their personal responses to works of art.
OTHER EVIDENCE: CLASS DISCUSSION
Rubric: Critique Rubric
Trait: Written Critique

Name_____________________________________________

Period _____

Written Critique Paper


I. Description
(Did the student describe the subject, size and media? What elements of art are used in
the piece?)
12 pts
II. Analysis
(Did the student focus on the composition? Did they analyze the principles of design in the piece?)
12pts
III. Interpretation
(Did the student convey a logical explanation of the content of the work?)
12pts
IV. Evaluation / Judgment
(Did the student support their aesthetic viewpoints with reasoned processes, using art specific
vocabulary?)
14pts
Total _____ /50

18

STAGE THREE
LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Develop critique guidelines: Before the class critiques a work of art we will discuss the criteriadescription, analysis, interpretation and evaluation. The students review the handout and decide if any questions
need to be added or omitted.
Activity 2: Students will use the How to Critique and Write about Art handout, and complete a written
response to one or more pieces of work throughout the year.
Activity 3: Group activity-The students will be given note cards with specific criteria, for example; most eye
catching, best use of color, best craftsmanship. The classes work will be on display and the students are
encouraged to walk around and vote for their favorite choices in that category. We will review student responses
as a class.
Activity 4: Visit an art venue that will provide students an opportunity to reinforce critique methods and strategies,
for example, museum visits, Teen Arts Festival, galleries and juried shows
HOW TO CRITIQUE AND WRITE ABOUT ART
The following stepsdescription, analysis, interpretation and evaluation are the steps in a formal critique. It
is called the Feldman method. It is an established critique method that has been used by students and
professionals alike for over 50 years.
Please respond to the following sections in paragraph form, using complete sentences. Use the questions
provided as a guide to provide you with information for your paragraphs.
DESCRIBE
This stage is like taking inventory. You want to come up with a list of everything you see in the work. Stick to the
facts. Imagine that you are describing the artwork to someone over the telephone.
LIST
Name of artist, title of work, and gallery or location of artwork.
If this is an in-class critique of your own or another students work, simply list your own or their name. For
example, This is a critique of my self-portrait or This is a critique of Art Sees self-portrait.
NOTE FIRST IMPRESSION
Make a note of your first spontaneous reaction to the artwork. By the end of the process you may understand
your first impression better or you may even change your mind. There are no wrong answers.

19

ANALYZE
Try to figure out what the artist has done to achieve certain effects. You should refer to your first impressions
and try to explain how the artwork achieves that reaction.
Q. Use the vocabulary you learned in class. For example, if youre looking at a piece of pottery, discuss
building method.
Q. How are the elements of art (color, shape, line, texture, space, form, value) and the principles of
design (balance, contrast, emphasis, movement/rhythm, unity, variety) used in this artwork?
Q. What do you notice about the artist's choice of materials?
Q. What grabs your attention in the work? Refer to your first impression.
Q. Do you see any relationship to the things you listed during the description stage?
INTERPRET
Try to figure out what the artwork is about. Your own perspectives, associations and experiences meet with "the
evidence" found in the work of art. All art works are about something. Some art works are about color, their
subject matter, and social or cultural issues. Some art works are very accessible that is, relatively easy for the
viewer to understand what the artist was doing. Other works are highly intellectual, and might not be as easy for
us to readily know what the artist was thinking about.
Q. What is the theme or subject of the work? What mood or emotions does the artwork communicate?
Q. What is the work about; what so you think it means?
Q. Why do you think that artist created this work?
Q. What do you think the artist's view of the world is?
EVALUATE
This is a culminating and reflecting activity. You need to come to some conclusions about the artwork based on
all the information you have gathered and on your interpretations.
Q. Have your thoughts or feelings about the artwork changed since your first impression? If so, how? What made you
change your mind?
Q. If not, can you now explain your first reaction to the work?
Q. What have you seen or learned from this work that you might apply to your own art work or your
own thinking?

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