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2017

SCHOOL PRONOUNCER GUIDE


Spelling Only Edition

CONTENTS
Merriam-Webster Pronunciation Symbols .................................................................................................................. 2
Guidelines Regarding Pronunciation and Language of Origin .................................................................................... 3
Tips for Spelling Bee Officials ........................................................................................................................................ 4
Rules for Local Spelling Bees........................................................................................................ ............................... 6
Words 1225: Words from the 2017 School Spelling Bee Study List ........................................................................ 12
Words 226375: Additional Words ............................................................................................................................ 48
Numerical Index .......................................................................................................................................................... 73
Alphabetical Index ....................................................................................................................................................... 75

2017, Scripps National Spelling Bee


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Merriam-Webster Pronunciation Symbols


........... banana, collect
, ...... humdrum
........... as in one pronunciation used by r-droppers for bird

........... kin, cook, ache


........... as in one pronunciation of loch (alternative \\), as in German

(alternative \\)
........... two-value symbol equivalent to the unstressed variants \\,
\\, as in habit, duchess (\\ = \b, -\)
............ immediately preceding \\, \\, \\, \\, as in battle, mitten,
and in one pronunciation of cap and bells \--\, lock and
key \--\; immediately following \\, \\, \\, as in one
pronunciation of French table, prisme, titre
.......... as in one pronunciation used by r-droppers for bird
(alternative \\)
.......... operation; stressed, as in bird as pronounced by speakers
who do not drop r; stressed and with centered period after the
\\, as in one pronunciation of burry (alternative \\) and in
one pronunciation of hurry (alternative \\); stressed and
with centered period after \r\ as in one pronunciation of
hurry (alternative \\)
........... mat, map
........... day, fade, date, aorta
........... bother, cot; most American speakers have the same vowel in
father, cart
........... father as pronounced by speakers who do not rhyme it with
bother; farther and cart as pronounced by r-droppers
.......... bad, bag, fan as often pronounced in an area having New
York City and Washington, D.C., on its perimeter; in an
emphatic syllable, as before a pause, often \\
.......... as in some pronunciations of bag, bang, pass
......... now, loud, some pronunciations of talcum
........... baby, rib
......... chin, nature \()\ (actually, this sound is \\ + \\)
........... elder, undone
........... as in the usual American pronunciation of latter, ladder
........... bet, bed
, ...... beat, nosebleed, evenly, sleepy
........... as in one pronunciation of evenly, sleepy, envious,
igneous (alternative \\)
.......... (in transcriptions of foreign words only) indicates a vowel
with the quality of e in bet but long, not the sound of ee in
sleep: en arrire \\
......... as in one pronunciation of elk, helm
............ fifty, cuff
........... go, big
........... hat, ahead
........ whale as pronounced by those who do not have the same
pronunciation for both whale and wail
............ tip, one pronunciation of banish (alternative unstressed \\),
one pronunciation of habit (alternative \\; see )

............ lily, pool


.......... murmur, dim, nymph
........... no, own
............ indicates that a preceding vowel is pronounced with the nasal

............ site, side, buy (actually, this sound is \\ + \\, or \\ + \\)


.......... as in one pronunciation of milk, film
............ job, gem, edge, procedure \()\ (actually, this sound is
\\ + \\)

ich-laut

passages open, as in French un bon vin blanc \\

........... sing \\, singer \()\, finger \()\, ink \\


........... bone, snow, beau; one pronunciation of glory
........... saw, all, saurian; one pronunciation of horrid
.......... French buf, German Hlle
.......... French feu, German Hhle
.......... coin, destroy, strawy, sawing
......... (in transcriptions of foreign words only) indicates a vowel
with the quality of o in bone but longer, not the sound of oo
in food: comte \\
........... pepper, lip
............ rarity, one pronunciation of tar
........... source, less
......... with nothing between, as in shy, mission, machine, special
(actually, this is a single sound, not two); with a stress mark
between, two sounds as in deaths-head \\
............ tie, attack; one pronunciation of latter (alternative \\)
.......... with nothing between, as in thin, ether (actually, this is a
single sound, not two); with a stress mark between, two
sounds as in knighthood \\
.......... then, either (actually, this is a single sound, not two)
........... rule, fool, youth, union \\, few \\
........... pull, wood, curable \\
.......... German fllen, hbsch
.......... French rue, German fhlen
........... vivid, give
.......... we, away
........... yard, cue \\, union \\
............ (in transcriptions of foreign words only) indicates that during
articulation of the sound represented by the preceding
character the tip of the tongue has substantially the position it
has for the articulation of the first sound of yard, as in French
digne \\
......... youth, union, cue, few
......... curable
........... zone, raise
......... with nothing between, as in vision, azure \()\ (actually,
this is a single sound, not two); with a stress mark between,
two sounds as in rosehill \\
............ mark preceding a syllable with primary (strongest) stress:
\\
............ mark preceding a syllable with secondary (next-strongest)
stress: \\
()
indicate that what is symbolized between is present in some
utterances but not in others: factory \() \

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Guidelines Regarding Pronunciation and Language of Origin


Pronunciation

For many words in in Merriam-Webster Unabridged, copyright 2016, Merriam-Webster (http://unabridged.merriamwebster.com), more than one pronunciation is offered. In this school pronouncer guide, the chief pronunciation for
a word is most often the first pronunciation given in this dictionary. Occasionally, however, the Bee has chosen to
assign the dictionarys second or third pronunciation as the chief pronunciation. This decision has been made
whenever the Bee has reason to think that a certain pronunciation has become the most prevalent one.
Many of the variations in pronunciation listed in Merriam-Webster Unabridged are included in this publication as
alternate pronunciations and are listed in square brackets under the chief pronunciation. These alternate
pronunciations are all the variants in the dictionarys pronunciation data that differ phonemically from the chief
pronunciation. Minor phonetic variations that are described in the dictionary pages are not included here,
however, such as pronunciations that differ only in the level of stress on given syllables. In addition, this
publication has not included the voluminous treatment of r-dropping and vowel variations before /r/ such as those
that are found in certain geographical dialects of American English. Experience has shown that this information
about nuances of phonetic variation in pronunciation can be the cause for confusion for spellers and pronouncers
alike.
Nevertheless, every pronunciation in Merriam-Webster Unabridged that can offer any clues about spelling is
listed as an alternate pronunciation herein. The phrase no alternate pronunciations means simply that, while the
dictionary entry may or may not contain further details about phonetic differences in different dialects, the word
in question has no other pronunciations that differ phonemically from the chief pronunciation that is provided.

Language of Origin

Information in this guide regarding language of origin is a simplification of that provided in Merriam-Webster
Unabridged. For example, Merriam-Webster Unabridged gives Old English, Middle English, and English, but we
give only English.
With New Latin and International Scientific Vocabulary, however, we tend to provide information that
supplements that provided in Merriam-Webster Unabridged. Where Merriam-Webster Unabridged lists New
Latin as the language of origin, we attempt to list the origin of the roots used to form the new word. We list
International Scientific Vocabulary only when it is difficult to determine instead the languages from which the
International Scientific Vocabulary element came.
We do not always list all of the languages a word passed through before it entered modern English. Only those
languages that significantly altered the word are listed, with the earliest language listed first followed by the
subsequent language(s). We give the separate etymologies of each word element regularly used in MerriamWebster Unabridged, with one exception: combining form(s). Combining forms are word elements regularly used
in English or another language to make a new word, but they do not by themselves constitute words. Examples
include -ly, -ing, -ment, -en, -o-, en-, non-, etc.

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Tips for Spelling Bee Officials


1. Acquaint yourself with the organization of the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide (available in the log-in
section of spellingbee.com).
A. Words 1225:
These words were selected from the 2017 School Spelling Bee Study List for students in grades 18.
Words progress in difficulty by groups of 25 words.
B. Words 226375 (Additional Words):
These words were NOT selected from the 2017 School Spelling Bee Study List for students in grades
18. Instead, these words were selected from Merriam-Webster Unabridged, copyright 2016,
Merriam-Webster (http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com).
2. Acquaint yourself with the Rules for Local Spelling Bees (available in the log-in section of
spellingbee.com and in the front section of the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide).
3. Pronouncers, please note:
Before the spelling bee gets under way, review the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide and familiarize
yourself with the correct pronunciations of the words.
One pronunciation is listed alongside each word in the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide. If the speller
requests an alternate pronunciation, consult the additional pronunciation information provided in
square brackets. Please refer to the guidelines regarding pronunciation provided on page 3 of the 2017
School Pronouncer Guide. Vocabulary sections list only the first pronunciation.
The 2017 School Pronouncer Guide provides language of origin information. Please refer to the
guidelines regarding language of origin on page 3. Consult your dictionary if you desire additional
information or clarity regarding a words language of origin.
Although some words can be more than one part of speech, only one part of speech per word is
provided in the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide. The part of speech provided matches that of the
definition listed and coincides with the words use in the illustrative sentence.

Several words have homonyms or near-homonyms. If you think a word is a homonym and yet a
homonym is not listed, check your dictionary or skip the word. It is possible that we did not note the
fact that the word is a homonym. For the final word in handling homonyms, see the portions of Rules
5, 7 and 11 that refer to homonyms.

4. Judges, please note:


Ensure that you are completely familiar with the Rules for Local Spelling Bees. Pay particular attention to
Rule 6 (Judges role), Rule 10 (End-of-bee procedure) and Rule 11 (Appeals).

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

You may customize the word list in the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide for the circumstances of your
spelling bee. You may omit words. You may place words elsewhere on the list. However, if you choose
to place words elsewhere on the list, avoid placing a School Spelling Bee Study List word (any word with
a number between 1 and 225) in the Additional Words (any word with a number greater than 225) and
vice versa.
Preserve fairness by ensuring that all spellers spelling in the same round receive words from the same
section of the 2017 School Pronouncer Guide.
Merriam-Webster Unabridged is the final authority for the spelling of all words that appear on Scripps
National Spelling Bee word lists. We suggest that you have Merriam-Webster Unabridged open and
available during your spelling bee. If you cannot subscribe to Merriam-Webster Unabridged for whatever
reason, Merriam-Websters Collegiate Dictionary, eleventh edition, copyright 2003, Merriam-Webster,
Inc., is the preferred alternative.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Rules for Local Spelling Bees


Preface
We encourage spellers, parents, teachers and spelling bee officials to read these rules prior to any spelling bee.
These rules are guidelines designed to assist spelling bee officials and spellers at the local level. Spellers should
check with their local spelling bee officials for the rules in effect in their area. Spelling bee officials include the
pronouncer, judges, coordinator and sponsor.
While local spelling bee officials have the prerogative to amend Rules 2 through 11, amendments particularly
any amendments to the end-of-bee procedure should be undertaken only with careful consideration of the various
outcomes that may result from the amendments.
The Scripps National Spelling Bee has no authority over the conduct of local spelling bees (namely, spelling bees
other than the Scripps National Spelling Bee near Washington, D.C.). Consequently, the national office will not
render judgments relating to the conduct of local spelling bees. Individuals bearing complaints about the conduct of
local spelling bees should register their concerns with local spelling bee officials. DECISIONS OF LOCAL
SPELLING BEE OFFICIALS ARE FINAL.
These Rules for Local Spelling Bees are not the rules in effect at the Scripps National Spelling Bee near Washington,
D.C. When a local spelling bee official says, We use the national rules, he or she is probably indicating that the
Rules for Local Spelling Bees are in effect.
The Scripps National Spelling Bee near Washington, D.C., operates under a significantly different set of rules called
the Contest Rules of the 2017 Scripps National Spelling Bee. These rules contain provisions that are specific to
unique conditions at the event near Washington, D.C. Their successful implementation at the local level is
considered impossible and therefore is not recommended.

Rules
1. Eligibility: A speller qualifying for the 2017
Scripps National Spelling Bee near Washington,
D.C., must meet these requirements:
(1) The speller must not have won a Scripps
National Spelling Bee championship near
Washington, D.C.
(2) The speller must attend a school that is
officially enrolled with the Scripps National
Spelling Bee.
(3) The speller must not have passed beyond the
eighth grade on or before February 1, 2017.
(4) The speller must not have repeated any grade
for the purpose of extending spelling bee
eligibility. If the speller has repeated any grade,
the speller must notify the Scripps National
Spelling Bee of the circumstances of grade
repetition by March 31, 2017; and the Scripps
National Spelling Bee will, at its sole discretion,
determine the spellers eligibility status on or
before April 30, 2017.

(5) The speller or the spellers parent, legal


guardian or school official acting on the spellers
behalf must not have declared to another
entity an academic classification higher than
eighth grade for any purpose, including high
school graduation equivalency or proficiency
examinations and/or examinations such as the
PSAT, SAT or ACT.
(6) The speller must not have earned the legal
equivalent of a high school diploma.
(7) The speller must not have completed or have
been enrolled in more than six high school-level
courses or two college-level courses on or before
April 30, 2017.
(8) The speller must not eschew normal school
activity to study for spelling bees. The Scripps
National Spelling Bee defines normal school
activity as adherence to at least four courses of
study other than language arts, spelling, Latin,
Greek, vocabulary and etymology for at least
four hours per weekday for 34 of the 38 weeks
between August 29, 2016, and May 22, 2017.

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(9) The speller must not have reached his/her


15th birthday on or before August 31, 2016.
(10) The speller must have been declared a
champion of a final local spelling bee taking
place on or after February 1, 2017, or be a
spelling champion of a school whose application
for participation in the Scripps National Spelling
Bees school self-sponsorship program has
received final approval by the Scripps National
Spelling Bee.
(11) Once having been disqualified at any level
of a sponsors spelling bee program between
June 2016 and April 2017, the speller remains
disqualified for the 2017 Scripps National
Spelling Bee and may not seek advancement in
the 2017 Scripps National Spelling Bee program
through another sponsor and/or enrollment in
another school.
(12) The speller, upon qualifying for the 2017
Scripps National Spelling Bee near Washington,
D.C., must submit a completed Champion Bio
Form, a Certification of Eligibility Form, a
signed Appearance Consent and Release Form,
and a photo to the Scripps National Spelling Bee.
The speller will notify the Bee at least 24
hours prior to the first day of competition in the
2017 Scripps National Spelling Bee in
Washington, D.C. if any of the statements
made on the Certification of Eligibility Form are
no longer true or require updating. The spellers
sponsor will provide access to the necessary
forms.
(13) The speller must not have any first-, secondor third-degree relatives (i.e., sibling, parent,
grandparent, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew, halfsibling, first cousin or great grandparent) who
are current employees of The E.W. Scripps
Company.
The Scripps National Spelling Bee may disqualify
prior to or during competition any speller who is not
in compliance with any of its eligibility requirements;
and it may at any time between the conclusion of
the 2017 Scripps National Spelling Bee and April 30,
2018 require any speller who is found to have not
been in compliance with any of the eligibility
requirements to forfeit the prizes, rank, and other
benefits accorded to the speller as a result of
participation in the 2017 Scripps National Spelling
Bee.

2. Format: The spelling bee is conducted in rounds.


Each speller remaining in the spelling bee at the start
of a round spells one word or answers one vocabulary
question in each round except in the case of a
written, multiple choice or online test. The spelling
bee may be conducted orally or in writing or in a
manner that is a combination of the two; however, if
the spelling bee officials specify an oral format, the
speller may not demand a written format except
under the conditions of Rule 4.
3. Word list: Local spelling bee officials are
responsible for selecting the word lists for use at each
local spelling bee. Many local spelling bee officials
use word lists generated by the Scripps National
Spelling Bee. These lists include many words that
appear in the current edition of the School Spelling
Bee Study List and Spell It! as well as some end-ofbee words. All words on Scripps National Spelling
Bee word lists are entries in Merriam-Webster
Unabridged, the official dictionary of the Scripps
National Spelling Bee, available at
http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com/.
4. Special needs: Spelling bee officials will strive to
provide accommodation for spellers who have
physical challenges. All requests for spelling bee
officials to accommodate special needs involving
sight, hearing, speech or movement should be
directed to spelling bee officials well in advance of
the spelling bee date. The judges have discretionary
power to amend oral and/or written spelling
requirements on a case-by-case basis for spellers with
diagnosed medical conditions involving sight,
hearing, speech or movement.
5. Pronouncers role: The pronouncer strives to
pronounce words according to the diacritical
markings in Scripps National Spelling Bee word lists.
In Oral Spelling Rounds:
Homonyms: If a word has one or more
homonyms, the pronouncer indicates which word
is to be spelled by defining the word.
Spellers requests: The pronouncer responds to
the spellers requests for a definition, sentence,
part of speech, language(s) of origin and
alternate pronunciation(s). When presented with
requests for alternate pronunciations, the
pronouncer or an aide to the pronouncer checks
for alternate pronunciations in either MerriamWebster Unabridged or Merriam-Websters
Collegiate Dictionary, eleventh edition.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

The pronouncer does not entertain root word


questions, requests for alternate definitions or
requests for markedly slower pronunciation.
Pronouncers sense of helpfulness: The
pronouncer may offer word information
without the speller having requested the
information if the pronouncer senses that the
information is helpful and the information is
presented in the entry for the word in a 2017
Scripps National Spelling Bee word list.
In Oral Vocabulary Rounds:
Procedure: The pronouncer reads aloud the
vocabulary question and both options (A) and
(B), but does not indicate which is correct.
Homonyms: If a word has one or more
homonyms, the pronouncer indicates which word
is in question by spelling the word aloud.
Spellers requests: The pronouncer responds to
the spellers requests for the question and/or
answer options to be repeated. The pronouncer
may also provide the spelling of the word in
question.
6. Judges role: The judges uphold the rules and
determine whether or not words are spelled correctly
or vocabulary items are answered correctly. They
also render final decisions on appeals in accordance
with Rule 11. They are in complete control of the
competition and their decision is final on all
questions.
Interaction with the speller: Because seeing the
spellers lip movements may be critical in
detecting misunderstandings or misspellings, the
judges encourage spellers to face them when
pronouncing and spelling the word.
Notice of rules: The judges ensure that all
spellers and audience members are given an
opportunity to receive a complete copy of the
rules prior to the start of the spelling bee.
Misunderstandings: The judges participate in the
exchange of information between the speller and
pronouncer if they feel that clarification is
needed. Also, the judges listen carefully to the
spellers pronunciation of the word; and, if they
sense that the speller has misunderstood the
word, the judges work with the speller and
pronouncer until they are satisfied that
reasonable attempts have been made to assist the

speller in understanding the word. While the


judges are responsible for attempting to detect a
spellers misunderstanding, it is sometimes
impossible to detect a misunderstanding until an
error has been made. The judges are not
responsible for the spellers misunderstanding.
Pronouncer errors: The judges compare the
pronouncers pronunciation with the diacritical
markings in the word list. If the judges feel that
the pronouncers pronunciation does not match
the pronunciation specified in the diacritical
markings, the judges direct the pronouncer to
correct the error as soon as it is detected.
Disqualifications for reasons other than error:
The judges will disqualify a speller (1) who
refuses a request to start spelling or to provide an
answer to a vocabulary question; (2) who does
not approach the microphone when it is time to
receive the word or question; (3) who does not
comply with the eligibility requirements; (4) who
engages in unsportsmanlike conduct; (5) who, in
the process of retracing a spelling, alters the
letters or sequence of letters from those first
uttered; (6) who, in the process of spelling, utters
unintelligible or nonsense sounds; or (7) who, in
the process of providing an answer in an oral
vocabulary round, provides a blend of correct
and incorrect information. (For example: If in
answering the question, What is porridge made
from? A. fur, or B. grain, the speller provides as
an answer either A. grain or B. fur.).
Speller activities that do not merit
disqualification: The judges may not disqualify a
speller (1) for failing to pronounce the word
either before or after spelling it, (2) for asking a
question, or (3) for noting or failing to note the
capitalization of a word, the presence of a
diacritical mark, the presence of a hyphen or
other form of punctuation, or spacing between
words in an open compound.
7. Spellers role: In a spelling round, the speller
makes an effort to face the judges and pronounce the
word for the judges before spelling it and after
spelling it. The speller while facing the judges makes
an effort to utter each letter distinctly and with
sufficient volume to be understood by the judges. The
speller may ask the pronouncer to say the word again,
define it, use it in a sentence, provide the part of
speech, provide the language(s) of origin, and/or
provide an alternate pronunciation or pronunciations.

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Misunderstandings: The speller is responsible for


any misunderstanding of the word unless (1) the
pronouncer never provided a correct
pronunciation; (2) the pronouncer provided
incorrect information regarding the definition,
part of speech or language of origin; or (3) the
speller correctly spelled a homonym of the word
and the pronouncer failed to either offer a
definition or distinguish the homonyms.
In an oral vocabulary round, a speller may answer the
question by providing (1) the letter associated with
the chosen answer, (2) the chosen answer or (3) both.
If the correct answer is identified by (1) associated
letter alone or (2) by answer alone or (3) by both
correct letter and correct answer, the speller is
correct.
For example: If the speller is offered the question,
What is porridge made from? A. fur, or B. grain,
each of the following methods of answering is
correct: B, grain, or B. grain.
8. Correction of a misspelling: The pronouncer and
judges will not ask the speller to correct another
spellers misspelling, even in end-of-bee
circumstances.
9. Errors: Upon providing an incorrect spelling of a
word or an incorrect answer to a vocabulary question,
the speller immediately drops out of the competition,
except as provided in Rule 10.
10. End-of-bee procedure:
If all spellers in a round misspell or answer
vocabulary questions incorrectly: If none of the
spellers remaining in the spelling bee at the start
of a round spells a word correctly or answers a
vocabulary question correctly during that round,
all remain in the competition and a new spelling
round begins.
Ties: All spellers eliminated in the same round
are tied for the same place. After the champion
has been determined, spelling bee officials may
opt to conduct tiebreakers (of their own design)
if tiebreakers are necessary for the awarding of
prizes or the determination of qualifying spellers
for the next level of competition.
If only one speller in a round spells correctly or
answers a vocabulary question correctly:
If only one speller spells correctly in a round, a
new one-word spelling round begins and the
speller is given an opportunity to spell a word on

the list (anticipated championship word). If the


speller succeeds in correctly spelling the
anticipated championship word in this one-word
round, the speller is declared the champion.
Example: In Round 12 there are four spellers.
Spellers 6 and 21 misspell. Speller 30 spells
correctly. Speller 42 misspells. So, Speller 30 is the
only speller in the round to spell correctly. Speller
30 begins Round 13 a one-word round and is
offered the anticipated championship word. Speller
30 correctly spells the anticipated championship
word and is declared champion.
Example: Two spellers spell in Round 10. Speller
14 misspells. Speller 25 spells correctly. Speller 25
begins Round 11 a one-word round and is
offered the anticipated championship word. Speller
25 correctly spells the anticipated championship
word and is declared champion.
Example: Two spellers spell in Round 16. Speller 3
spells correctly. Speller 9 misspells. Speller 3
begins Round 17 a one-word round and is
offered the anticipated championship word. Speller
3 correctly spells the anticipated championship
word and is declared champion.

VERY IMPORTANT: If a speller misspells the


anticipated championship word in a one-word
round: A new spelling round begins with ALL
the spellers who participated in the previous
round. These spellers spell in their original order.
Example: In Round 8 there are three spellers.
Speller 12 spells correctly and Spellers 23 and 37
misspell. Round 9 a one-word round begins,
and Speller 12 is offered the anticipated
championship word. Speller 12 misspells the
anticipated championship word. Round 10 begins
and includes Spellers 12, 23 and 37. The rules
prescribe that spellers 12, 23 and 37 spell in their
original order; so Speller 12 gets the next word on
the list even though Speller 12 misspelled the
previous word on the list. Round 10 is not complete
until all three spellers have spelled.

Tip: Spelling bee officials may find it helpful to


designate a record keeper or judge to track the
progress of spellers throughout the rounds. The
record keepers information will be helpful in
preventing end-of-bee confusion.
11. Appeals: The spellers parent(s), legal guardian
or teacher may appeal to the judges for the spellers
reinstatement provided that the appeal is in
compliance with the appeal protocol. The judges
render a final decision on the appeal in accordance
with the reinstatement protocol.
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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Appeal protocol
A written appeal must be hand delivered to the
designated official (usually the spelling bee
coordinator/director). The deadline for delivering
an appeal is before the speller affected would
have received his/her next word had he/she
stayed in the spelling bee; however, to minimize
disruptions to the spelling bee, every effort
should be made to deliver an appeal by the end
of the round in which the speller was eliminated.
When five or fewer spellers remain, the written
appeal requirement is suspended, and an oral
appeal must be made before the speller would
have received his/her next word had he/she
stayed in the spelling bee. A written appeal must
provide the spellers name, the word in question
and the reason the speller should be reinstated.
While the competition is in session, individuals
who have filed appeals may not directly
approach the judges unless explicit permission to
approach the judges has been given. The judges
will contact the speller if they decide to reinstate
the speller. To minimize disruption to the pace of
the spelling bee and the concentration of the
spellers, the judges are under no obligation to
stop the spelling bee in order to discuss with the
spellers parent(s), legal guardian or teacher a
denied appeal. The judges decisions are final
and are subject neither to review nor to reversal
by the Scripps National Spelling Bees
headquarters office.
Reinstatement protocol

Spellers misunderstanding: An appeal claiming


that the spellers elimination from the spelling
bee was due to the spellers not understanding
the word (its pronunciation(s) and/or other
information about the word) should be denied. It
is the spellers responsibility to understand the
word.
Speller offered correct spelling for a word in this
guide: An appeal claiming that the speller
correctly spelled the word should be denied
unless an audio recording of the bees
proceedings or bee officials recollections clearly
indicate that the word was indeed spelled
correctly.
Exception: If the spellers spelling is listed in
Merriam-Webster Unabridged, the speller should
be reinstated if all of the following three criteria are
met: (1) The pronunciations of the words are
identical, (2) the definitions of the words are
identical, and (3) the words are clearly identified as
being standard variants of each other. Spellings at
other locations having temporal labels (such as
archaic, obsolete), stylistic labels (such as
substand, nonstand), or regional labels (such as
North, Midland, Irish) which differ from main
entry spellings not having these status labels will
not be accepted as correct.

Speller offered correct spelling, as indicated in a


dictionary other than Merriam-Webster
Unabridged: An appeal claiming that the speller
spelled the word correctly according to a
dictionary other than Merriam-Webster
Unabridged should be denied.

Pronouncer mispronunciation: An appeal


claiming that a spellers elimination from the
spelling bee was due to pronunciation error
should be denied unless there is agreement that
the pronouncer never offered a correct
pronunciation.

Homonym in a spelling round: An appeal


claiming that the spellers elimination was unfair
because the spellers word is a homonym should
be denied unless the pronouncer failed to define
the word and the speller correctly spelled a
homonym of the word.

Alternate pronunciations: An appeal claiming


that the pronouncer did not offer alternate
pronunciations should be denied unless it is
determined that the speller requested alternate
pronunciations and the pronouncer did not
accommodate the spellers request for alternate
pronunciations and it appears that the spellers
spelling almost matches the correct spelling.

Homonym in an oral vocabulary round: An


appeal claiming that the spellers elimination
was unfair because the spellers word is a
homonym should be denied unless the
pronouncer failed to spell the word and the
speller identified an answer matching the
definition of a homonym of the word.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Incorrect or unsolicited information: An appeal


claiming that the spellers elimination was unfair
because the pronouncer offered incorrect or
unsolicited information about the word should be
denied unless it is determined that the
pronouncer indeed gave factually incorrect
information and it appears that the spellers
spelling would have been correct if not for the
incorrect or unsolicited information provided by
the pronouncer.

because the judges and/or pronouncer failed to


correct the spellers mispronunciation of the
word should be denied. It is sometimes
impossible to detect a spellers mispronunciation
or misunderstanding, and ultimately it is the
responsibility of the speller to understand and
correctly pronounce the word.
Disqualification request: An appeal seeking to
dislodge another speller from the spelling bee
should be denied.

Bee officials failed to correct a


misunderstanding: An appeal claiming that the
speller misspelled or incorrectly answered

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Words 1225 are Scripps National Spelling Bee School Level Study Words.
Before starting your bee, inform the spellers of your end-of-bee procedure. If you are using the
Rules for Local Spelling Bees, refer to Rule 10. Failure to inform the spellers of how
you will end your bee may result in complications at the end of the bee.
If a word has a homonym or near-homonym, the words homonym status is probably noted
at the words entry in this guide. We encourage you to include these words in your bee,
provided you indicate the words homonym or near-homonym status to the speller.
If you think a word is a homonym and yet a homonym is not listed, please check Merriam-Webster Unabridged
for further information or skip the word. It is possible that we did not note the fact that the word is a homonym.
For the final word in handling homonyms, see the portions of Rules 5, 7 and 11 that refer to homonyms.

1.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
mad

This word is originally English.


adjective
[Could be confused with mat, Matt.]
angry.
Andre couldnt remember why he was mad at his big sister, but
he was pretty sure it was because she had done something
annoying.

2.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
dots

This word is probably originally English.


plural noun
[Has homonyms: dauts/dawts.]
small round marks made on a surface with a pointed instrument.
When Winnie finished connecting the dots, she saw that the
animal on the page was an owl.

3.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
row

This word is originally English.


noun
[Has homonym: roe.]
a number of objects in an orderly series.
Carla arranged her shoes in a row by the front door.

4.

tiny

This word is from an originally English word.


adjective
very little.
Rachel took a tiny taste of her soup to see if was cool enough to
eat.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

5.

nest

This word is originally English.


noun
the place a bird builds for laying eggs and caring for its young.
Marianne spent hours watching the eggs in the eagles nest with
her binoculars.

6.

ship

This word is originally English.


noun
any large seagoing boat.
Maeve walked down to the harbor to watch the cargo ship sail
in.

7.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
ears

This word is originally English.


plural noun
[Has homonym: ears/eres.]
the organs of hearing and balance in mammals.
Dr. Dressler prescribed an antibiotic to treat the infection in
Claires ears.

8.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
name

This word is originally English.


noun
[Has near-homonym: maim.]
a specific word or phrase that is used to refer to a person or
thing.
Mr. Smith asked Sadie to print her name at the top of the page.

9.

darts

This word passed to English from Germanic-derived French.


plural noun
a game in which small pointed missiles are thrown at a bullseye on a target.
Ophelia and her grandfather played a quick game of darts after
supper.

10.

meal

This word is originally English.


noun
the food eaten at a particular time to satisfy hunger.
Nolan prepared spaghetti, salad and garlic bread for his
evening meal.

11.

sadly

This word is formed from originally English parts.


adverb
in an unhappy manner or way.
Ella pouted sadly when she realized her favorite TV show had
been canceled.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

12.

aim

Originally from Latin, this word passed from French to English.

verb
to point something at an object.
Gabriel will aim his telescope at the North Star to find the
handle of the Little Dipper.

13.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
wash

This word is originally English.

verb
[Could be confused with watch.]
to clean something with water or another liquid.
Isaac and his two sisters wash the dishes each night.

14.

stage

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English.
noun
the raised flooring in a theater or auditorium where people put
on performances.
Ben took his place at the front of the stage and smiled at the
audience.

15.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
maybe

This word is originally English.


adverb
[Has homonyms: geographical term Maybee, proper name
Maeby.]
perhaps.
Noras dad told her that if she helped him cook supper, maybe
they could go out for ice cream for dessert.

16.

cried

This word went from Latin to French to English.


verb
expressed grief, pain or distress by producing tears from the
eyes.
Jonas cried when he stubbed his toe.

17.

straw

This word is originally English.


noun
a tube used for sucking up a drink.
Quinn slurped his chocolate milk through a straw.

18.

open

This word is originally English.


adjective
not shut.
Treys open window let in a cool breeze.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

19.

shell

This word is originally English.

noun
a hard protective covering of an animal.
Casey found a large pink shell next to a piece of driftwood on
the beach.

20.

hugged

This word is perhaps of Scandinavian origin.

verb
held within the arms.
Xavier hugged his parents and blew his little sister a good-night
kiss before heading to bed.

21.

brush

This word went from French to English.

noun
a tool with bristles set in a handle that is used for sweeping,
scrubbing, painting and smoothing.
Anna used a soft brush to remove the tangles from her hair.

22.

trail

This word is from English.

noun
a marked path through a forest or mountainous region.
Joshua and Amy were careful to stick to the trail on their hike
through the woods.

23.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
center or
centre

This word went from Greek to Latin to French to English.

noun
middle area.
Jess chased the soccer ball back toward the center of the field.

24.

lava

This word is from Italian, which took it from a Latin word.

noun
fluid rock that comes out of a volcano or from an opening in the
earths surface.
Lava can flow great distances before cooling and hardening.

25.

bathtub

This word is formed from an English part and a part that passed
from Dutch to English.
noun
a large container in which people wash or soak themselves.
Luke filled the bathtub with water, added bubbles and a rubber
duck, and climbed in.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

26.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
nose

This word is originally English.


noun
[Has homonyms: knows, nos.]
the part of the face that sticks out and has the nostrils.
The girls nose is red because she has a cold.

27.

taxi

This word is from a word that went from German to French.


noun
a car that carries a passenger between any two points (as within
a city) in exchange for money.
It cost Shaan $10 to take a taxi to the museum.

28.

food

This word is originally English.


noun
parts of animals and plants that humans and animals eat.
When Daniel gets hungry, he digs around in the fridge for food
to eat.

29.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
bird

This word is originally English.


noun
[Has chiefly Scottish variant: burd. Has homonym: burred.
Could be confused with proper name Burt.]
a warm-blooded, feathered animal that lays eggs and has wings
instead of arms.
Hildy asked her dad if he knew what kind of bird had just
landed at the feeder.

30.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
wear

This word is originally English.


verb
[Has homonyms: ware, where.]
to use or have on your body.
Gabrielle prefers to wear socks that dont match.

31.

rules

This word passed from Latin to French to English.


plural noun
a set of official codes of behavior that tell you what you can and
cannot do in an activity (such as a sport).
On the first day of practice, the coach explained the rules of the
game to the team.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

32.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
boring

This word is of unknown origin.


adjective
[Has near-homonyms: borine, boreen.]
causing a feeling of weariness or dissatisfaction : dull.
Aaron loved watching soccer, but Ben found it boring.

33.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
ferns

This word is originally English.


plural noun
[Could be confused with firns.]
nonflowering leafy plants that reproduce by spores instead of
seeds.
The gardening website recommended planting ferns in a partly
shaded area.

34.

sandbox

The first part of this word is originally English, and the second
part went from Greek to Latin to English.
noun
a large container filled with a loose material for children to play
in.
Jerry and his dad built a sandbox for the backyard and filled it
with lots of beach toys.

35.

elbow

This word is originally English.


noun
the joint between your upper arm and forearm.
To show how strong she was, Katherine bent her right arm at
the elbow and flexed her muscles.

36.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
braid

This word is originally English.


verb
[Has homonym: brayed. Has chiefly dialectical variant: breid.]
to weave three or more strands (of hair) together into one or
more lengths.
Olivia prefers to braid her hair before swimming so it gets less
tangled.

37.

stuck

This word is originally English.


verb
attached by or as if by gluing or plastering.
Ingrid was upset to see that the oatmeal cookies had stuck to
the pan again.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

38.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
lawn

Originally Celtic in origin, this word passed from French to


English.
noun
[Different definition could be confused with similarly
pronounced archaic laund.]
ground covered with grass that is kept closely mowed.
Before he mowed the lawn, Denny spent a few minutes pulling
up dandelions.

39.

posters

This word is originally English.


plural noun
signs hung in public places that serve as decoration or consist of
pictures.
Steph and Maya made posters to let people know about their
upcoming yard sale.

40.

swift

This word is originally English.


adjective
moving or able to move with great speed.
After the rain storm, the tiny creek swelled into a swift and
dangerous river.

41.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
moody

This word is originally English.


adjective
[Has homonym: moudie/moudy.]
unhappy and rudely grumpy.
The bands lead singer is known for being moody.

42.

grain

Originally from Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
the seed of any cereal grass (as wheat, oats, rice, millet).
Riley visited a mill to see how the grain of wheat is ground into
flour.

43.

coast

This word went from Latin to French to English.


noun
the seashore or land near it.
The Smiths took a trip to the coast last summer to swim at the
beach.

44.

restless

This word is originally English.


adjective
not calm : fidgety, nervous.
The restless child had trouble standing still in line.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

45.

parents

This word went from Latin to French to English.


plural noun
fathers and mothers.
Parker likes to help his parents by doing extra chores around
the house.

46.

shopping

This word is from an originally English word.


noun
searching for, inspecting or buying available goods or services.
Mom says it makes the shopping go quicker if we take a list of
groceries we need.

47.

mouse

This word is originally English.


noun
a small animal with a pointed snout, small ears and a thin tail.
Carla fed her pet mouse some crumbs of bread.

48.

anyone

This word is originally English.


pronoun
a person or some people.
Frances wondered if anyone would be at home when she got
back from her piano lesson.

49.

lookout

This word is originally English.


noun
a person engaged in keeping watch.
Cora asked her brother to be a lookout while she raided the
cookie jar.

50.

The speller should not be disqualified based upon noting or failing to note punctuation or spacing within the following word.
The speller should be judged based upon uttering the correct sequence of letters in the correct order.
fuddy-duddy

This word is perhaps from Scottish.


noun
a person who is old-fashioned or very traditional.
When Fiona learned that Davis preferred to write letters
instead of emails, she called him a fuddy-duddy.

51.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
temper

This word is from a Latin word that passed from French to


English.
noun
[Has near-homonyms: tamper, Templar.]
calmness of mind.
Hayden lost his temper after his puppy chewed his favorite pair
of shoes.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

52.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
paint

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
[Could be confused with pained.]
a mixture of color and a liquid that form a thin coating when
applied to a surface.
Dad scraped and sanded the windowsills before putting two
coats of paint on them.

53.

banana

This word is from an originally African word that passed from


Portuguese to Spanish to English.
noun
a long curved fruit that is yellow when ripe.
Carries favorite breakfast is a bowl of cereal topped with
chopped banana.

54.

untidy

This word consists of originally English elements.


adjective
not neat in appearance : careless.
Allies untidy, tangled hair and wrinkled clothing made her
look as if she had just woken up.

55.

darkest

This word is from an originally English word plus an English


combining form.
adjective
having the least light.
Miriam always requested the darkest hotel room when she
traveled so she could get her beauty rest.

56.

chatter

This word is imitative English.


noun
useless talk.
Lola got tired of Andreas nervous chatter.

57.

sturdy

This word is from a Latin word that passed through French.


adjective
durable : solid.
The salesman told Elis family that all of the bargain boats were
sturdy and worthy of the sea.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

58.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
riddle

This word is originally English.

noun
[Different definition has variant: riddel.]
a puzzling question to be guessed at.
Daniels favorite riddle was so hard to solve that he often forgot
the answer himself.

59.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
dollars

This word is from a Czech geographical name that passed from


German to Dutch.
plural noun
[Different definition has similarly pronounced variant:
talers/thalers.]
notes representing the unit of money used in the United States.
Tessa was alarmed to find the hoodie she wanted cost 50
dollars.

60.

feast

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
an elaborate meal.
The king planned a feast to celebrate his upcoming marriage.

61.

subject

Originally from Latin, this word passed through French before


becoming English.
noun
an area of knowledge or study taught at school.
Arielles favorite subject to study in school is mathematics.

62.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
might

This word is originally English.


verb
[Has homonym: mite.]
used with a main verb to express that something is possible
or could happen.
If Wendy and Jane hurry, they might get home before it rains.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

63.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
flicker

This word is originally English.

verb
[Has homonym: app Flickr. Has near-homonym: proper name
Flicka.]
to burn in spurts.
Karen watched the campfire flicker for a few moments before
dousing it with water.

64.

onion

Originally Latin, this word passed from French to English.

noun
an edible plant with a sharp smell and taste that is used as a
vegetable.
Jacob loved putting onion and lettuce on his cheeseburgers.

65.

strange

This word went from Latin to French to English.

adjective
unusual.
Sean was curious to identify the strange new flowers that were
growing outside his house.

66.

married

This word passed from Latin to French before becoming


English.
adjective
wedded.
The married couple volunteered to pick up trash in their local
park.

67.

pounce

This word came from French before becoming English.


verb
to suddenly grab for something.
Marie sat on the edge of the couch, ready to pounce on her
phone should it ring.

68.

supplies

This word is English in origin.


plural noun
items available for use.
It was Deenas job to gather supplies for the earthquake
victims.

69.

farewell

This word is English in origin.


noun
a good-bye.
Leah bid a farewell to her father as she boarded her plane to
Paris.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

70.

pebbles

Originally English, the first part of this word is probably


imitative in origin.
plural noun
small round stones.
Lyla enjoyed collecting pebbles from the creek by her house.

71.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
young

This word is English in origin.

adjective
[Has homonym: yong/yung (as in egg foo yong).]
in an early stage of life, growth or development.
When children are young, they need to ride in a car seat for
their safety.

72.

vacation

This word went from Latin to French to English.


noun
a time spent away from home or work to travel and relax.
The President of the United States sometimes goes on a
vacation to Camp David.

73.

puzzles

This word is of unknown origin.


plural noun
questions, problems or toys designed to test cleverness.
Katys room was decorated with jigsaw puzzles she had
completed and framed.

74.

skateboard

The first part of this word is from a perhaps originally Germanic


word that passed through French to Dutch, and the second part
is originally English.
noun
a short piece of wood with small wheels used for riding on and
perform tricks.
Avery asked for a new skateboard and helmet for her birthday.

75.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
poem

This word passed from Greek to Latin to French.


noun
[Has homonym: pome.]
writing in verse.
Jacks favorite poem is Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel
Silverstein.

76.

twine

This word is originally English.


noun
a strong string made by twisting two or more strands together.
Arya used twine to tie her packages to her bike so that they
wouldnt fall off as she rode.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

77.

nifty

This word is of unknown origin.


adjective
handy.
Alexs nifty motorized vacuum cleaner was very efficient at
sucking up cat fur.

78.

monkeys

This word is probably of German, Dutch or Flemish origin.


plural noun
primates that are smaller and longer-tailed than apes.
The children enjoyed watching the playful monkeys at the zoo.

79.

contract

This word is from Latin.


noun
an agreement between two or more people to do or not to do
something.
Darcy had to sign a contract on the first day of school
promising her teacher that she would follow the classroom
rules.

80.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
belief

This word is originally English.


noun
[Has near-homonym: believe.]
when trust or confidence is placed in a person or thing.
Joels firm belief in his teammates made him confident they
would win.

81.

janitor

This word is from Latin.


noun
someone who keeps an apartment, office or other building clean
and who makes minor repairs,
Morris took a part-time job as a janitor at an apartment
complex in exchange for free rent.

82.

observe

This word went from Latin to French to English.


verb
obey.
Anyone who does not observe the rules will have to go to
detention hall.

83.

anteater

This word is made up of two originally English parts.


noun
a mammal that has a long narrow snout, long sticky tongue and
usually no teeth that feeds entirely on insects.
The anteater has a tongue that is nearly twice the length of its
head.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

84.

elderly

This word is originally English.


adjective
advanced in years.
Mia took piano lessons from her elderly neighbor every week.

85.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
portable

This word went from Latin to French to English.


adjective
[Could be confused with potable.]
light enough to be carried.
Mason was excited to take his new portable grill on his familys
camping trip.

86.

timidly

This word consists of an originally Latin part plus an English


combining form.
adverb
in a way that is not brave or courageous.
After hitting a baseball into her moms car, Lisa crept timidly
into the house to tell her parents.

87.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
massive

This word came to English from French, which formed it from


an originally Greek element and an originally Latin element.
adjective
[Has near-homonym: massif.]
weighty : heavy.
Joel lifted his massive backpack and nearly toppled over.

88.

trance

This word is from a Latin word that passed through French


before becoming English.
noun
daze.
Greggory went into a trance after he learned he had won the
lottery.

89.

flexible

Originally Latin, this word passed through French before


becoming English.
adjective
bending easily.
Jerry made a basket from thin, flexible strips of wood hed
soaked in water.

90.

teaspoon

The first part of this word is from Chinese and the second is
originally English.
noun
a small spoon used for stirring and drinking tea or coffee.
Paavo used a teaspoon to add sugar to his coffee.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

91.

climbed

This word is originally English.

verb
used your hands to raise yourself upwards.
Bianca climbed the hill near her house so she could see the
view.

92.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
knitting

This word is from an originally English word.

verb
[Has homonym: netting. Has differently pronounced dialectical
variant knet.]
the act of making something (such as clothing) from interlacing
yarn using your hands or machine needles.
Alexis was knitting and catching up on her favorite TV show.

93.

deadline

This word is made up of two originally English parts.

noun
a firm time limit by which something must be completed.
Gemma worked hard to finish her class project before the
deadline.

94.

passage

This word is from Latin-derived French.

noun
a brief section of a written work or speech that is mentioned by
itself.
Graham can quote his favorite passage from A Tale of Two
Cities from memory.

95.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
complaints

This word passed to English from Latin-derived French.


plural noun
[Could be confused with complains.]
expressions of unfairness.
The sign read, Sorry, our deadline for accepting complaints
was yesterday.

96.

nonsense

Both parts of this word were originally Latin and then became
French.
noun
something that is not capable of being understood.
Leeanne said soothing nonsense to the crying baby.

97.

laundry

This word is originally English.

noun
a group of clothes to be washed.
Mikes mother told him that she expects him to put his dirty
laundry in the hamper.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

98.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
lodging

This word is originally Germanic in origin and passed through


French before becoming English.
noun
[Could be confused with logging.]
a temporary place to stay.
Marshall depended on his parents for lodging while his new
house was being built.

99.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
veins

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English.
plural noun
[Has homonym: vanes, vains (obsolete).]
tubes that carry blood from different parts of your body to your
heart.
The marathon runner loved the feeling of her blood coursing
through her veins as she ran.

100.

mountain

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
noun
a high landmass.
Everly wanted to hike every mountain in Switzerland during
her familys vacation.

101.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
hooves

This word is originally English.

plural noun
[Has similarly pronounced variant: hoofs.]
curved, hard coverings that protect the feet of an animal (such
as a horse or goat).
Laura had shoes put on her horse Colonel to protect his hooves
from wear.

102.

indicate

This word is from Latin.


verb
to point at.
Mrs. Marquette asked her toddler to indicate which toy he
wanted.

103.

performance

This word came to English from Latin-derived French.


noun
a public presentation (as of a dramatic work).
Jennifer bought a ticket to a matinee performance of Giselle.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

104.

biology

This word was formed in German from originally Greek parts.


noun
the science of life.
Mikoto is learning about the structure of cells in her biology
class.

105.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
clause

Originally Latin, this word passed through French before


becoming English.
noun
[Has homonym: claws.]
a group of words in a sentence that has its own subject and verb.
Mrs. Hudson told Eddy to simplify his sentence by removing an
extra clause.

106.

specific

This word is from Latin.


adjective
falling into a precisely stated category.
Suzanna is looking for a specific type of table for her entryway.

107.

bemused

This word consists of an originally English part plus a part that


went from Latin to French to English.
adjective
having or showing feelings of wry entertainment especially
from something that is surprising or perplexing.
Nala had a bemused expression on her face as she watched her
brothers Chihuahua try to wrestle her own pet Great Dane.

108.

invisible

This word is from Latin.


adjective
not able to be seen due to lack of physical substance.
The shifting clouds made the stars invisible.

109.

vocabulary

This word went from Latin to French.


noun
the whole amount of words used by a language, group or
individual.
Naima believes studying for spelling bees is a great way to
expand her vocabulary.

110.

contestants

This word went from Latin to French.


plural noun
persons that participate in a competition.
The contestants on the game show were each hoping to win a
million dollars.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

111.

failure

This word is from a Latin-derived French word.

noun
lack of success.
Alia blamed her failure to win the election on her opponents
promise to have free ice cream in the cafeteria every Friday.

112.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
beckon

This word is originally English.

verb
[Has near-homonyms: becken, archaic/dialect becking.]
to appear inviting : attract.
The giant doughnuts in the window of the bakery seemed to
beckon to Deion as he walked by.

113.

fortune

Originally Latin, this word passed through French before


becoming English.
noun
good luck : success.
Cybelle had the fortune to be randomly selected twice in the
prize drawing.

114.

dimension

This word went from Latin to French to English.


noun
measurement in a single line (as length, height or width).
Height is one dimension of a cube.

115.

caterpillar

This word came to English from Latin-derived French.


noun
the larva of a butterfly or moth that is long and looks like a
worm with legs.
Shawna spotted a monarch caterpillar nibbling on a milkweed
plant.

116.

tightrope

The first part of this word is from an originally Scandinavian


word that passed to English and the second part is originally
English.
noun
a tightly stretched cord or wire on which acrobats perform.
The circus performer balanced easily on the tightrope.

117.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
applause

This word is from Latin.


noun
[Could be confused with applauds.]
approval publicly expressed (as by clapping hands).
The cast of the play bowed to enthusiastic applause from the
audience.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

118.

innocent

This word went from Latin to French to English.

adjective
free from legal guilt or responsibility for wrongdoing or failure.
The judge found Tamyra innocent of all charges.

119.

digestive

This word went from Latin to French to English.


adjective
relating to the action or process of converting (food) into a form
that can be absorbed.
Christian was interested to learn that the tongue is considered
part of the digestive system.

120.

settee

This word is from an originally English word.

noun
a medium-sized sofa with arms and a back.
Shobha decided that a red-upholstered settee would look perfect
in the corner in her living room.

121.

cupboard

This word is originally English.

noun
a closet with shelves to receive cups, dishes or food.
Sai looked in the cupboard for more potato chips but found
none.

122.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
marooned

This word is from a word that went from Latin to Spanish.


verb
[Provide definition of this word so that speller will not confuse
with color maroon, which has an alternate spelling
m-a-r-r-o-o-n.]
put ashore on a desolate island or coast and left to ones fate.
The pirates marooned Jack and Elizabeth on a small desert
island.

123.

daunted

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
verb
made (someone) afraid : intimidated.
The rivers treacherous rapids daunted even the experienced
kayakers.

124.

moisture

This word came to English from French, which formed it from a


Latin word.
noun
a small amount of liquid dispersed in air and appearing as fog or
condensed as dew on a cool surface.
Charmaine wiped the moisture from her water glass before
setting it on the nightstand.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

125.

gymnastics

This word went from Greek to French.


plural noun
systematic physical exercises along with performance on
apparatus (as rings or bars) that are designed to promote
strength, flexibility, agility, coordination and body control.
Simone took up both gymnastics and cheerleading when she
was 8 years old.

126.

esteem

This word came to English from French, which formed it from a


Latin word.
noun
approval and respect often blended with great liking because of
worthy qualities.
Elise earned the esteem of her boss because of her strong work
ethic, reliability and attention to detail.

127.

inlet

This word consists of two originally English elements.

noun
a narrow strip of water running into the land or between islands.
Reaching depths of 1,933 meters below sea level, one of the
deepest fjords in the world is Skelton Inlet in Antarctica, which
is filled with ice from a glacier.

128.

microscope

This word consists of two originally Greek parts.


noun
an instrument used for looking at very small objects so that they
appear larger.
Vince looked through the eyepiece of the microscope to view a
droplet of pond water.

129.

auction

This word is from Latin.


noun
a public sale of property to the person who pays the most.
Georgia bought a 19th-century desk and an art deco vase at an
auction.

130.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
thicket

This word is originally English.


noun
[Could be confused with Thick-It (product).]
a dense growth of shrubbery or small trees.
Maisie planted some lilies next to the thicket of trees at the back
of her property.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

131.

mildew

This word is originally English.

noun
a whitish growth produced on organic matter and on plants by
fungi.
Cindy didnt see any mildew on the old book she found in her
grandfathers basement, but it did have a musty smell to it.

132.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
bushel

Originally Celtic in origin, this word passed through French to


English.
noun
[Could be confused with proper name Bushell.]
a unit of dry measure used in the U.S.
Susan bought a bushel of apples to use in her famous
homemade apple butter.

133.

sediment

This word went from Latin to French.


noun
material or a mass of material deposited (as by water, wind or
glaciers).
As the creek dried up, a thick layer of sediment was gradually
exposed.

134.

peculiar

This word is from a word that went from Latin to English.


adjective
distinctive.
When Shaila travels, she tries to learn the customs peculiar to
each country.

135.

clodhopper

This word consists of two originally English elements.


noun
a large heavy shoe.
After a long day of being on his feet, Liam was dismayed to
realize that he had a hole in his left clodhopper.

136.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
quashed

This word went from Latin to French to English.

verb
[Could be confused with similarly pronounced synonymous
cross-reference: squashed.]
put an end to.
The teacher quickly quashed the rebellion and worked to
restore peace to the classroom.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

137.

dandruff

This word probably consists of a part that is of unknown origin


plus a part that is of Scandinavian origin.
noun
small white flakes that form on and shed from skin, especially
the scalp.
Dandruff isnt usually serious, but many people choose to treat
it with special shampoos that can minimize the condition.

138.

cutlery

This word came to English from Latin-derived French.

noun
tools used to cut, serve and eat food.
Bethany and David received a new set of cutlery as a wedding
present.

139.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
gnarled

This word is probably from an originally English word.

adjective
[Could be confused with similarly pronounced synonymous
cross-reference: knurled.]
warped or twisted with or as if with knots.
Rheumatoid arthritis caused the gnarled appearance of
Grandmothers fingers.

140.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
equestrian

The first part of this word is from an originally Latin word, and
the second part is an English combining form.
adjective
[Has near-homonym: equestrienne.]
of, relating to or featuring horseback riding.
The artist was best known for her equestrian paintings.

141.

bedraggled

This word is originally English.


adjective
left wet and limp by or as if by rain.
The children looked bedraggled after walking home from school
in the rain.

142.

paisley

This word is from a Scottish geographical name.


adjective
woven or printed with an elaborate design of curved abstract
figures.
Mr. MacDonald gave his wife a blue and green paisley scarf.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

143.

precursor

This word is from Latin.


noun
a forerunner.
Most people believe that the Turing Machine was a precursor to
modern computers.

144.

infuriating

This word is from Latin.


adjective
enraging, maddening.
Julia found her brothers habit of repeating everything she said
to be infuriating.

145.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
coronet

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin and then French.
noun
[Could be confused with cornet, cornett, cornette.]
a small crown.
The princess only wore her coronet when she was attending
formal events.

146.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
pauper

This word is originally from Latin.


noun
[Has homonym: popper.]
a very poor person.
Reggie didnt want to be a pauper, so he got a summer job at
the local amusement park and opened a savings account.

147.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
suet

Originally Latin, this word went through Anglo-French before


becoming English.
noun
[Could be confused with soot.]
the hard fat about the kidneys and loins in beef and mutton that
when melted forms tallow.
Lucy added a mixture of suet and peanut butter to her bird
feeder.

148.

partridge

Originally Greek, this word went through Latin and French


before becoming English.
noun
a medium-sized, short-winged game bird with short legs and
neck.
A partridge fluttered out of the tall grass and startled Charity.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

149.

algae

This word is from Latin.

plural noun
any of various single- and many-celled usually aquatic plant or
plantlike organisms that are mostly photosynthetic.
Alexis wondered if an accumulation of algae was causing the
water in her pool to look bright green.

150.

marionette

This word is from a French word.


noun
a puppet moved by strings or by hand.
A marionette of Kanye West was the hit of the show.

151.

varsity

This word is the alteration of a word that went from Latin to


French to English.
noun
the main team representing a school or club in a sport or other
competition.
Micah was proud to represent his schools varsity team even
though he was only a sophomore.

152.

enchantment

This word went from Latin to French to English.


noun
the act or action of charming or bewitching.
Because of its breathtaking scenery, New Mexico earned the
nickname the Land of Enchantment.

153.

mystic

This word is from Greek.


noun
a follower of a spiritual way of life.
The mystic was known far and wide for his wisdom.

154.

ravine

This word went from Latin to French.


noun
a small narrow steep-sided valley that is usually worn down by
running water : gorge, gulch.
Sharla and Anton managed to cross the ravine using an old
rope bridge.

155.

perilous

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
adjective
full of or involving danger.
Violet covered her eyes frequently during the movie, unable to
watch her favorite actor face one perilous trap after another.

156.

rendition

This word went from Latin to French before becoming English.


noun
interpretation : performance.
Aunt Berthas rendition of I Will Survive was a little off key
but very enthusiastic.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

157.

avian

This word consists of a Latin part plus an English combining


form.
adjective
of, relating to or characteristic of birds.
Missy is a biologist focusing on avian species.

158.

engineering

This word is from a French word that then became English.


noun
the science that applies the properties of matter and energy to
create machines and structures.
Terry is studying engineering and has a special interest in the
branch concerned with the production of tools and machinery.

159.

feckless

This word is originally English.

adjective
impractical and lazy or lacking ambition.
Chris was worried that his long periods of unemployment would
make him look feckless when he applied for a job.

160.

compatriots

This word was formed in French from Latin elements.


plural noun
close associates or colleagues.
Kendra gathered her compatriots to think up ways to boost
sales at the school snack bar.

161.

heredity

This word went from Latin to French to English.


noun
qualities and traits someone gets from ancestors.
Fiona thanks her heredity for her naturally bright red hair.

162.

indifference

This word went from Latin to French.


noun
an attitude that something does not matter one way or another.
Jasmine regretted her earlier indifference to dinner plans when
she realized her family had elected to eat at her least favorite
restaurant.

163.

opinionated

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English.
adjective
firmly sticking to ones own view or belief : obstinate.
At the risk of sounding too opinionated, Bryce explained that
The Hobbit was without a doubt the best book of all time.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

164.

alliance

This word is from a Latin word that became French and then
English.
noun
a union made in order to work toward common goals or
interests.
The alliance between the reality show contestants helped them
outlast their competition.

165.

epithets

This word went from Greek to Latin.

plural noun
words or phrases meant as insults.
Jeremy was surprised to find that hurling epithets at his smart
phone was not an effective way to increase its storage capacity.

166.

javelin

This word is from a Celtic word that went through French


before becoming English.
noun
a long spear used in a sport in which people see how far they
can throw it.
Lucas threw the javelin only 20 feet on his first attempt.

167.

implacable

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
adjective
not capable of being calmed or soothed.
Austin was nearly implacable after another toddler in the
sandbox broke his favorite toy truck.

168.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
lyre

Originally Greek, this word went from Latin to French to


English.
noun
[Has homonyms: liar, lier. Has similarly pronounced crossreference: lyra.]
a stringed musical instrument used by the ancient Greeks.
The legendary Greek poet Arion is generally depicted holding a
lyre in one hand and a plectrum, or pick, in the other.

169.

austere

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin and then French before becoming English.
adjective
plainly simple and without decoration.
Martins living room was comfortable but austere, with Danish
modern furniture and no pictures on the wall.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

170.

cavalcade

This word was borrowed from French, which formed it from a


word that went from Latin to Italian.
noun
a procession of riders or carriages.
The grand marshal of the Opening Day parade rode in a red
convertible at the beginning of the cavalcade.

171.

tenaciously

This word is made up of an originally Latin part plus English


combining forms.
adverb
in a very determined manner : persistently.
On the first day of school, Sybil vowed to tenaciously pursue
her goal of being named to her schools honor roll.

172.

Icarus

This word went from Greek to Latin.


noun
a figure in Greek mythology who flies away from imprisonment
using artificial wings but falls when he flies too close to the sun,
melting the wax of his wings.
The character of Icarus is often used as a metaphor for striving
too hard and consequently failing.

173.

scrumptiously

This word is probably an alteration of a word that went from


Latin to French, plus English combining forms.
adverb
in a delightful or excellent manner.
Phoenix thanked his mom for the scrumptiously prepared meal
in honor of the A+ on his pre-algebra test.

174.

burglarious

This word is from an originally Germanic word that went from


Latin to Anglo-French to English.
adjective
of or suitable for the use of one who breaks into a building
illegally especially with intent to steal.
The prosecutor asked the defendant to explain why he had
burglarious tools in his automobile.

175.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
thaumaturge

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin and then French.
noun
[Has differently pronounced variant: thaumaturg.]
a person who performs miracles : a magician.
Before Grant had even mastered his first card trick, he had
picked out a stage name to use in his magic act: Thor the
Thaumaturge.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

176.

vulpine

This word is from Latin.

adjective
marked by slyness or predatoriness : crafty.
Jon detected a certain vulpine expression on the face of his
chess opponent, so he started looking for a trap.

177.

Honolulu

This word is a United States geographical name.


geographical entry
the most populous city, port and capital of Hawaii.
Naomi and Konrad spent part of their honeymoon in Honolulu.

178.

neutron

This word probably consists of a part that went from Latin to


French plus a part that is from an originally Greek part.
noun
an elementary particle that has no electrical charge and that has
a mass nearly equal to that of the proton.
The neutron together with the proton make up the nucleus of an
atom.

179.

catastrophic

This word consists of an originally Greek part plus an English


combining form.
adjective
of, relating to, resembling or resulting in disaster.
It took months to repair the damage left in the wake of the
catastrophic earthquake.

180.

mahogany

This word is of unknown origin.


noun
the durable yellowish brown to reddish brown wood of a West
Indian tree that is widely used for cabinetwork and fine finish
work.
Kates bedroom furniture is made of solid mahogany.

181.

avalanche

This word is from a French word.


noun
a large mass of snow, ice, dirt, rock or other material sliding
swiftly down a mountainside.
The movies hero avoided getting caught in the avalanche by
totally realistically grabbing onto the landing skids of a nearby
helicopter.

182.

perpetrator

This word is from Latin.


noun
one that commits an offense or crime.
After a long investigation, police finally identified the
perpetrator of the robbery.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

183.

insulin

The first part of this word is from an originally Latin word, and
the second part is an English combining form.
noun
a protein pancreatic hormone that is essential especially for the
metabolism of carbohydrates and which is used in the treatment
and control of diabetes.
Marty gives himself an injection of insulin every morning to
help control his diabetes.

184.

Mylar

This word is from a trademark.

trademark
used for a polyester film.
Sheldon kept all of his collectible comic books inside protective
Mylar bags.

185.

physicists

Originally Greek, this word passed from Latin to French to


English.
plural noun
specialists in the science of matter and energy and their
interactions.
Inspired by the work of Chien-Shiung Wu, Lene Hau and other
women physicists, Renee decided she wanted to be a scientist
when she grew up.

186.

Stilton

This word is from an English geographic name.

noun
a blue-veined cheese with wrinkled rind made of whole cows
milk enriched with cream and usually aged two years.
Paige served a cheese course featuring Stilton with walnuts and
crackers.

187.

conflagration

This word is from Latin.


noun
a large disastrous fire involving many buildings.
Sixty fire trucks were called in to battle the conflagration.

188.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
habanero

This word is from Spanish.


noun
[Could be confused with habanera.]
a very hot roundish chili pepper that is usually orange when
mature.
The habanero is often used for seasoning in Caribbean cuisine.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

189.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
allegiance

This word is from a French word that then became English.


noun
[Has homonym: plural noun allegiants.]
devotion or loyalty especially to a person, group or cause.
The knight swore his allegiance to the new queen.

190.

legitimately

This word is from Latin.


adverb
according to law or rules.
Mabel owned her car legitimately, even though she couldnt
find her title or registration.

191.

pilgrimages

This word is from Latin-derived French.


plural noun
trips taken to visit a place of historic or sentimental interest or to
participate in a specific event or for a definite purpose.
Over the years, Meena made several pilgrimages to Europe to
experience where her relatives were originally from.

192.

concussion

This word is from Latin.


noun
a jarring injury of the brain resulting in disturbance of cerebral
function and sometimes marked by permanent damage.
After Amy slipped on ice and banged her head, her doctor
checked to make sure she hadnt suffered a concussion.

193.

vengeance

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
infliction of punishment in return for an injury or offense.
Chris swore vengeance after the prank his brother played on
him.

194.

unscrupulous

This word consists of an originally English element plus an


originally Latin element.
adjective
lacking or exhibiting a lack of moral principles.
The kings adviser was an unscrupulous man who only wanted
power for himself.

195.

overweening

This word is originally English.


adjective
excessive, exaggerated, unrestrained.
Liam felt an overweening pride in every one of his amateur
paintings.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

196.

inconceivable

This word consists of three originally Latin parts.


adjective
falling outside the limit of what can be comprehended, accepted
as true or tolerated.
It is inconceivable to Wallace that he would lose in a game of
wits.

197.

semaphore

This word is made up of Greek-derived elements and may have


been formed first in French.
noun
a system of visual signaling (as between ships) in which the
sender holds a flag in each hand and moves his or her arms to
different positions according to a code alphabet.
Mr. Jackson taught the Eagle Scouts semaphore on the campout by having them climb hills and then signaling them the
days dinner menu.

198.

enervating

This word is from Latin.


verb
lessening the nerve, vitality or strength of.
Zara found that working in the hot sun all day was enervating
her.

199.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
Jacobean

The first part of this word is from a Latinized English name and
the second is an English combining form.
adjective
[Has homonym: Jacobian. Could be confused with Jacobin.]
of or relating to James I of England, his reign or his times.
Shakespeares Macbeth is a Jacobean drama written in 1606.

200.

silhouetted

This word is from a French name.


verb
projected upon a background like an outline of a person or
thing.
With their leaves gone, the bare trees silhouetted against the
sky.

201.

recusant

This word is from Latin.


adjective
refusing to submit to authority.
Lest she lose phone privileges for not obeying her parents,
Tammy decided to change her recusant ways.

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202.

potentialities

This word is from Latin.


plural noun
things that have a possibility for changing or developing into a
state of reality.
Simones science class discussed the potentialities inherent in
modern technology.

203.

gesticulations

This word is from Latin.


plural noun
expressive motions of the body or limbs.
Martas wild gesticulations gave away her excitement as she
retold the story.

204.

Patagonia

This word is a South American geographical name.


geographical entry
a region of South America in southern Argentina and southern
Chile that is a barren, broad, level, elevated area between the
Andes Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean.
Patagonia has an area of about 260,000 square miles and is
sometimes considered to include the Tierra del Fuego
archipelago.

205.

interminableness

The first part of this word is from Latin and the second is an
English combining form.
noun
the state or quality of having no end or being drawn out to the
point of boredom.
The interminableness of Essies graduation ceremony was
mostly due to the keynote speakers hour-long summary of his
successes.

206.

prestidigitation

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
noun
the practice of magic or trickery usually involving manual
dexterity.
Coreys display of prestidigitation dazzled the class.

207.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
constabulary

This word is from Latin.


noun
[Has near-homonym: constablery.]
a body of police officers (as of a particular town, district,
country).
The local constabulary was out in force to keep the peace at the
Halloween celebration.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

208.

pugnacious

This word is from Latin.


adjective
having an assertive, hostile or combative nature : aggressive.
The safari leader told the group about his encounter with a
pugnacious bushpig.

209.

eucalyptus

This word is from originally Greek parts.


noun
an evergreen tree or shrub mostly native to western Australia
that provides wood, oil and other products.
The eucalyptus is the koalas main source of food.

210.

moiety

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
one of the portions into which something is divided :
component, part.
The whistle-blower received a moiety of the large fine imposed
upon his employer for supplying faulty engine parts to the
military.

211.

Lilliput

This word is from an imaginary geographical name.


adjective
extremely small.
Sallys mother planted some bright, Lilliput zinnias in her
garden.

212.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
pertinacity

This word is from Latin-derived French.


noun
[Could be confused with similarly pronounced obsolete variant:
pertinacy.]
the quality or state of being stubbornly unshakable.
The athlete was known for his pertinacity in the face of injuries.

213.

castellated

The first part of this word is from Latin and the second is an
English combining form.
adjective
built or formed like a castle.
Elons castellated sand sculpture took first place in the
competition.

214.

Hebrides

This word is a Scottish geographical name.


geographical entry
islands of western Scotland in the Atlantic.
Tyler was stunned by the rugged beauty of the landscape in the
Hebrides.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

215.

nautilus

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin.
noun
any of several cephalopod mollusks of the southern Pacific and
Indian Oceans with a spiral chambered shell that is pearly on
the inside.
Frank keeps the polished shell of a nautilus on his bookcase.

216.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
phosphine

This word consists of an originally Greek part plus an originally


Latin part.
noun
[Has homonym: phosphene. Has near-homonym not in
Websters Unabridged: phosphane.]
a colorless very poisonous gaseous compound that may ignite
spontaneously when mixed with air or oxygen and that is a
weaker base than ammonia.
Phosphine is commonly used to destroy pests in stored grain.

217.

rheumatic

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin and then French.
adjective
of or relating to any of numerous conditions characterized by
inflammation or pain in muscles, joints or fibrous tissue.
Benjamin Franklin, Henry VIII and my uncle Tom all suffered
from gout, a rheumatic disease.

218.

The speller should not be disqualified based upon noting or failing to note punctuation or spacing within the following word.
The speller should be judged based upon uttering the correct sequence of letters in the correct order.
Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
outr

This word is from Latin-derived French.

adjective
[Has homonym: archaic verb outray.]
not conforming to conventional behavior, custom or style :
bizarre, extravagant.
The singers outr ensembles turned heads at every awards
ceremony.

219.

phrenologists

This word was formed from three originally Greek parts.


plural noun
those versed in the study of the shape of the skull based on the
belief that it indicates a persons mental faculties and character.
In her lecture on pseudoscientific fads, Professor Granthorne
explained that phrenologists both observed and felt a persons
skull to determine his or her psychological attributes.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

220.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
malacca

This word is from a Malayan geographical name.


noun
[Could be confused with geographical entry Melaka/Malacca.]
the often spotted, slender woody stem of an Asian rattan palm
used especially for walking sticks and umbrella handles.
Davids walking stick is made from a single stem of malacca.

221.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
chevalier

This word is from Latin-derived French.


noun
[Could be confused with chevalet.]
a member of the lowest rank of a French order of merit.
Henri has the honor of being a chevalier in the Order of Arts
and Letters in France.

222.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
ague

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English.
noun
[Could be confused with French word aigu.]
a fever resembling malaria marked by sudden attacks of chills,
fever and sweating that recur at regular intervals.
Eddie tried to sleep through his spells of ague but found doing
so nearly impossible.

223.

The speller should not be disqualified based upon noting or failing to note punctuation or spacing within the following word.
The speller should be judged based upon uttering the correct sequence of letters in the correct order.
hors de combat

This word is from French.


adjective
out of action : in a disabled condition.
The soldier was hors de combat after an injury in a previous
battle.

224.

netsuke

This word is from Japanese.


noun
a small object carved in wood or ivory or made of metal used by
the Japanese as a toggle to fasten a small pouch or purse to the
kimono sash.
Hiroko cherishes her grandmothers ivory netsuke.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

225.

The speller should not be disqualified based upon noting or failing to note punctuation or spacing within the following word.
The speller should be judged based upon uttering the correct sequence of letters in the correct order.
a posteriori

This word is from Latin.


adjective
of or relating to what cannot be known except from experience :
proved by induction from facts obtained by observation or
experiment.
Later, Margery realized the a posteriori truth that a cat coated
in peanut butter is hard to catch.

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Additional Words
Words 226375 do not appear on Scripps National Spelling Bee Study Word Lists
There is no rule stating that you must proceed word-for-word from this list.
You may skip a word if you sense that the word may present a problem at your bee.

226.

tiptoe

This word is originally English.


noun
the end of one of the digits of a foot.
Misty danced on tiptoe across the wooden floor.

227.

spry

This word is perhaps of Scandinavian origin.


adjective
chipper : nimble : brisk.
Mr. Larsen, who is quite spry for a man in his nineties, walks
over a mile each day.

228.

chopstick

The first part of this word is from a word that passed from
Chinese to English and the second part is originally English.
noun
a slender stick held between the thumb and fingers used for
picking up food and eating.
Fang dropped a chopstick on the ground while struggling to eat
her noodles.

229.

blubber

This word is from English, probably of imitative origin.


verb
to weep noisily and excessively : sob.
Crystal couldnt help but blubber at the sappy but satisfying
ending of the romantic comedy.

230.

townsfolk

This word is made up of two originally English parts.


plural noun
the citizens or inhabitants of a particular city.
The townsfolk gathered in the town square to hear the mayors
announcement.

231.

ringlet

The first part of this word is originally English, and the second
part came to English from Latin-derived French.
noun
curl; especially : a long curl of hair.
Rachelle tied her hair in a bun, but she left one ringlet to hang
down her neck.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

232.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
battery

This word is from a French word.

noun
[Has homonym: batterie.]
a group of two or more cells connected together to furnish
electric current, or a single voltaic cell.
Before his run, Brent changed the battery in his fitness tracker
to make sure it counted all his steps.

233.

warbler

This word is from an originally Germanic word that became


French before becoming English.
noun
any of numerous small brightly colored American songbirds
that have a song which is generally weak and unmusical.
Tess was justifiably offended when the concert reviewer likened
her singing to that of a warbler.

234.

closure

This word went from Latin through French to English.

noun
a means of filling a space or gap especially by sealing it or of
closing an opening (as in a garment or luggage).
Mimi prefers jeans with a button-fly closure as opposed to a
zipper.

235.

settlers

This word is originally English.

plural noun
those who first move into a new region : colonists.
The original settlers of the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, called it
Losantiville.

236.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
beaker

This word went from Old Saxon to Old Norse to English.


noun
[Could be confused with proper name Beeker.]
a deep openmouthed thin vessel that often has a projecting lip
for pouring and is used especially by chemists and pharmacists.
As Gilberto reached for his textbook, he accidentally knocked
an acid-filled beaker off the lab table.

237.

steamroller

This word is originally English.


noun
a road roller driven by water vapor kept under pressure.
The cartoon character was flattened by a huge steamroller.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

238.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
tollbooth or
tolbooth

This word is originally English.


noun
a simple building where taxes or fees are paid for some liberty
or privilege.
Johnna drove past the tollbooth and waved at the officer
working there every morning on her way to work.

239.

compute

This word is from Latin.


verb
to make sense.
When Austin said he doesnt like dessert, Tilda responded in her
best robot voice, Does not compute.

240.

gallons

This word is from a French word that then became English.

plural noun
an extremely large quantity or number.
During the heavy storm, Larissas basement flooded with
gallons of rainwater.

241.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
spelt

Originally Germanic, this word passed through Latin before


entering English.
noun
[Could be confused with verbs spelled, spilled/spilt. Could be
confused with similarly pronounced synonymous crossreference speltz.]
the grain of an ancient wheat with long spikelets containing two
light red flattened grains.
Rudy made pancakes from spelt and served them with a berry
compote for breakfast.

242.

trombone

This word is from a Germanic element that went into Italian


before entering English.
noun
a brass instrument consisting of a long cylindrical metal tube
with two turns that end in a bell and having a movable slide for
varying musical sounds.
Gregory plays the trombone in the marching band.

243.

prisoner

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
a person held under arrest or in jail.
For good behavior at the penitentiary, the prisoner was
released after serving one-third of his sentence.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

244.

cringing

This word is originally English.

adjective
that shrinks in fear or servility.
At the sight of the bear in the distance, the cringing hikers
gathered their courage and backed slowly toward their car.

245.

extract

This word is from Latin.


noun
a solution in alcohol of flavor and odor constituents (as from an
aromatic plant).
The cookie dough recipe called for one teaspoon of vanilla
extract.

246.

sprocket

This word is of unknown origin.


noun
a tooth or projection (as on the periphery of a wheel) shaped so
as to engage with a chain.
Elle placed a drop of oil on a sprocket on her bike so the chain
would move more freely.

247.

peppermint

This word is made up of two originally English parts.


noun
a sharp and strong smelling plant with dark green leaves and
whorls of small pink flowers in spikes.
Mariana was excited to grow peppermint in her garden so she
could put the leaves in her tea.

248.

captured

This word is from a Latin word that passed through French.


verb
seized and occupied.
The queens troops captured the city after a three-day battle.

249.

garland

This word is from an originally Germanic word that became


French before becoming English.
noun
a wreath or festoon of leaves or flowers to be worn on the head
or used to decorate an object.
Clementine solemnly placed a garland of daisies on the statues
head while the choir sang the school song.

250.

winced

This word is from an originally Germanic word that became


French before becoming English.
verb
shrank back involuntarily.
Britton winced at the suns glare.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

251.

select

This word is from Latin.

verb
to choose something from a number or group.
Mrs. Fielding told Ruby she could select one candy from the
bowl at the reception desk.

252.

feature

This word went from Latin to French to English.

noun
a marked element of something : something that is especially
prominent.
Keith thinks his salt-and-pepper hair is his best feature.

253.

couplet

This word is from Latin-derived French.

noun
two successive lines of verse usually having some unity greater
than that of mere contiguity (as that provided by rhyming).
George struggled to find a word that rhymed with orange for
the second line of his couplet.

254.

juncture

This word is from Latin.


noun
a joint : a seam.
Welding the two steel plates together created a raised ridge at
their juncture.

255.

scuffle

This word is probably of Scandinavian origin.

noun
a rough haphazard struggle with scrambling and confusion.
After a brief scuffle, Keneesha emerged victorious with the
brides bouquet.

256.

clarify

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
verb
explain in a manner that is without obscurity or ambiguity :
make understandable.
When Rooney answered the question with the response
President Roosevelt, Ms. Kessler asked her to clarify whether
she meant Theodore or Franklin.

257.

hostage

This word went from Latin through French before becoming


English.
noun
a person in a state of being given or kept as a pledge pending
the fulfillment of an agreement, demand or treaty.
The prisoners held a guard as a hostage in an attempt to gain
their demands.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

258.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
treasure

This word went from Greek to Latin to French to English.

noun
[Has near-homonym: tressure.]
something of great worth or value.
The museums greatest treasure is a recently unearthed ancient
Greek statue.

259.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
pigeon

This word went from Latin to French to English.

noun
[Has homonym: pidgin.]
a bird having a stout body with rather short legs and smooth and
compact plumage.
A pigeon fluttered about the eaves of the old barn.

260.

cargo

This word went from Latin to Spanish.

noun
the lading or freight of a ship, airplane or vehicle.
The planes departure was delayed due to lack of workers to
load the cargo.

261.

revolve

This word went from Latin to English.

verb
to move in a curved path around a center or axis.
Mr. Anderson hung a mobile in his classroom that showed how
the planets revolve around the sun.

262.

position

This word is from Latin.


noun
any of the postures of the feet and arms on which all steps and
movements of classical ballet are based.
Victoria instructed her ballet students to assume the first
position.

263.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
nettle

This word is from English.


noun
[Could be confused with niddle, meddle, metal, medal, nattle.]
any of numerous prickly or stinging plants of the genus Urtica.
The nettle, which features stinging hairs on its leaves and stems,
has long been used as a source of medicine.

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264.

federal

This word is from a Latin part plus an English combining form.


adjective
of, relating to or derived from a compact between states which
by the terms of the compact surrender their general sovereignty
and consolidate into a new state.
In the United States, some issues are handled by the federal
government while others are decided by state governments.

265.

destitute

This word went from Latin to English.


adjective
lacking possessions and resources; especially : lacking the
necessaries of life.
Last weekends tornado left many families destitute.

266.

rectangle

This word is from Latin.


noun
a parallelogram all of whose angles are right angles.
A square is a rectangle with sides that are all equal in length.

267.

hemlock

This word is originally English.


noun
any of several poisonous herbs having finely cut leaves and
small white flowers.
Poisoning can occur when a victim confuses the root of the
hemlock with wild parsnip or its leaves with parsley.

268.

warden

This word is from an originally Germanic word that became


French before becoming English.
noun
one having care or charge of something : guardian, keeper.
The warden of the nature center works to preserve and nurture
local plant life.

269.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
surround

This word is from a Latin word that became French and then
English.
verb
[Could be confused with sewround.]
be situated or found in all or various directions from a fixed
point or in a ring about.
Many cottages surround the lake.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

270.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
pallor

This word is from Latin.

noun
[Has homonym: Pallar.]
abnormal paleness.
The pallor of Julians stage makeup gave his girlfriend a fright.

271.

intellect

This word is from Latin.

noun
the power or faculty of knowing.
Although Tara is very pretty, she is much more proud of her
intellect than her looks.

272.

sensitive

This word went from Latin to French to English.


adjective
having a capacity of being easily affected or moved.
Because her eyes are extremely sensitive to light, Amy never
leaves the house without her sunglasses.

273.

yearling

This word is originally English.


noun
one that is a year old; especially : an animal one year old or in
the second year of its age.
Although its small size made Kara think the cow was a yearling,
it was actually closer to three years old.

274.

unfurl

This word is made up of an English combining form plus a


Latin word that became French and then English.
verb
release or open out (as a sail or flag) from a rolled-up state.
Kendra embroidered her schools motto on the new flag she will
unfurl during tomorrows assembly.

275.

monitor

This word is from Latin.


noun
an instrument that measures (as vital signs during surgery) or
gives warning (as of excessive radiation).
Laura wears a heart rate monitor on her wrist when running in
order to precisely control the intensity of her exercise.

276.

plumage

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
the entire clothing of feathers of a bird.
The plumage of the male peacock is more colorful than that of
the female.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

277.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
tawny

This word went from French to English.

adjective
[Could be confused with synonymous cross-reference
tenne/tenney/tenny.]
of a brownish orange to light brown color.
There is a classic childrens story about a tawny scrawny lion
who loves carrot stew.

278.

demolish

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
verb
to pull or tear down (something, such as a building) : raze.
The town will demolish the crumbling apartments to make room
for a playground.

279.

frustrated

This word is from Latin.


adjective
filled with a deep chronic sense of insecurity, discouragement
and dissatisfaction.
Some workers feel frustrated because they do not have the
opportunity to use their talents in their jobs.

280.

bereft

This word is from English.

adjective
deprived or robbed of the possession or use of something.
Scott feels that the summer blockbuster season at the movie
theater offers only films that are bereft of any true meaning.

281.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
eon or
aeon

This word came from a Latin word that borrowed it from Greek.

noun
an immeasurably or indefinitely long period of time.
Carla estimated that she had been waiting for the bus for at
least an eon.

282.

sectional

This word consists of an originally Latin word plus an English


combining form.
adjective
made up of sections to be added or reduced at will.
Clarence tried configuring his sectional sofa a few different
ways before deciding.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

283.

oddity

The first part of this word is from Norse and the second part is
an either Latin or French combining form.
noun
something unique or curiously unusual.
Sofias mother liked to remark that a man who could cook
dinner for himself was an oddity.

284.

combination

This word went from Latin to French.


noun
a series of events or results occurring in an ordered sequence.
Delia found that the most difficult part about going back to
school each fall was remembering the combination for her new
lock.

285.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
symbol

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin.
noun
[Has homonym: cymbal.]
a visible sign of something (such as a concept or an institution)
that is invisible.
The image of a dove is often used as a symbol of peace.

286.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
poplar

This word went from Latin to French to English.

noun
[Could be confused with popular, popper/pauper.]
a tall North American tree with large greenish yellow flowers
and soft white wood that is often used for cabinetwork.
A poplar is the state tree of Kentucky.

287.

rivet

This word is from a French word that then became English.

noun
a headed pin or bolt used for uniting two or more pieces.
A rivet in Esthers jeans scratched one of her familys dining
room chairs.

288.

codify

Both parts of this word went from Latin to French to English.

verb
to arrange in systematic order.
Before they started to recruit members, the founders of the new
Maplewood Junior High Spelling Beehive decided to codify
their club rules.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

289.

identical

This word is from a Latin part plus an English combining form.


adjective
showing exact likeness.
During the baking competition, Dean made sure the decoration
on each of his cookies was identical.

290.

conducive

This word is from Latin.


adjective
tending to promote.
Layla believed a quiet environment was conducive to good
studying.

291.

distribute

This word went from Latin to English.


verb
to divide among several or many : deal out.
Mr. Paxton asked for a volunteer to distribute the worksheets to
the class.

292.

excitement

This word is from two originally Latin parts that both passed
through French before becoming English.
noun
the act of stirring to feeling or causing strong emotion.
The excitement over the reopening of the ice cream shop spread
throughout the town.

293.

pedestal

This word is from a word that went from Italian to French.


noun
the base of an upright structure (as a statue, vase, lamp).
Because tourists did so much damage to the statue in the town
square, it was moved to a much higher pedestal.

294.

literate

This word is from Latin.


adjective
able to read and write.
The governments goal for all adult citizens to be literate in 20
years needs a strategic plan.

295.

ferocity

This word went from Latin to French to English.


noun
savage wildness or fury.
Ellen was shocked by the ferocity with which her tiny puppy
growled at the Great Dane.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

296.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
sizable or
sizeable

The first part of this word is originally French and the second
part is originally Latin.
adjective
fairly large.
As Margery watched her grandpa remove the sizable cake from
the oven, her stomach growled loudly in anticipation.

297.

lavish

Originally from a Latin word, this word came through French


before becoming English.
adjective
characterized by profusion or excess.
Although the lavish buffet at her Sweet 16 party included
lobster, caviar and truffles, London opted to eat a grilled cheese
sandwich instead.

298.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
expansive

This word is from an originally Latin word plus an English


combining form.
adjective
[Could be confused with expensive.]
having considerable extent.
The lecturers were directed to choose expansive topics of broad
interest.

299.

panama

This word came from possibly Tupi to a Central American


geographical name.
noun
a fine lightweight hat of natural-colored straw hand-plaited of
narrow strips from the young leaves of the jipijapa.
While on vacation, Mr. Tulley bought a handwoven panama to
shade his head.

300.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
warrant

This word is from an originally Germanic word that became


French before becoming English.
noun
[Could be confused with warren.]
a formal written document authorizing an officer to make an
arrest, a seizure or a search.
Police officers, armed with a search warrant, entered the
suspects apartment and seized the stolen computers.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

301.

equation

This word is from a word that went from Latin to English.


noun
a mathematical or chemical statement of equivalence.
Mrs. Drake asked her students to write an equation that
corresponded to the story problem.

302.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
textural

This word is from Latin.


adjective
[Could be confused with textual.]
of, relating to, or marked by the visual or tactile surface
characteristics and appearance of something.
For a baby shower gift, Meredith purchased a board book that
had many entertaining textural differences.

303.

flaxen

This word is originally English.


adjective
resembling a flowering plant that is cultivated for its fibers and
seeds especially in being of pale soft strawy color used
chiefly of the hair.
Marion brushed her flaxen hair and tied it back with a ribbon.

304.

raspingly

This word is from an originally Germanic word that went


through French to English plus English combining forms.
adverb
in a grating harsh manner.
Dont try me, Mr. Wilson said in a raspingly mean voice.

305.

liberation

This word is from Latin.


noun
the act of freeing from control or domination by a foreign power
or the state of being freed from such power.
The liberation of the city from enemy control was an occasion
of great celebration.

306.

exposure

This word consists of a part that went from Latin to French to


English plus an English combining form.
noun
a condition or an instance of being subjected to an experience or
influence.
Kingston decided to travel abroad because he wanted to gain
exposure to foreign languages and cultures.

307.

recital

This word is from Latin.


noun
an exhibition concert given by music pupils.
After the recital, Mrs. Lee hosted a reception.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

308.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
assess

This word is from Latin.

verb
[Could be confused with excess, access.]
determine the rate or amount of.
Jason and Robin assess damages as part of their job with the
insurance company.

309.

buzzard

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
noun
any of various birds of prey such as a turkey vulture or a
condor.
The buzzard is a common figure in cartoons, making its
appearance when other characters are sick or dying.

310.

coordinate

This word is from Latin.


verb
bring into a common action, movement or condition.
Nicole will coordinate the efforts of the various committees that
are working on the homecoming dance.

311.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
riotous

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English plus an English combining form.
adjective
[Has obsolete homonym: riotise.]
abundant, exuberant, profuse.
Even though she didnt mean it to be funny, Nikitas story of
dropping her ice cream in the street was met with riotous
laughter from her friends.

312.

verdant

Originally Latin, this word went through French before


becoming English.
adjective
green in tint or color.
Kory wants to dye her hair a shade as verdant as the Jokers.

313.

economist

This word is from Greek.


noun
a specialist in or student of the social science that studies the
production, distribution and consumption of commodities.
Adam Smith was the most influential economist of the 18th
century.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

314.

predator

This word is from Latin.


noun
an animal that preys on or devours other animals for its food.
An insect may be of value because it is a predator of another
insect that is a pest to humans.

315.

factorial

This word is from Latin.


adjective
involving or based on replication with a variable introduced in
each replicate.
A factorial design is the most common way to frame a study of
two or more variables perceived to be independent.

316.

tabulation

This word consists of an originally Latin part plus two English


combining forms.
noun
a result of putting data into summary form.
Jackie used the tabulation of accounts owed data to create
client invoices.

317.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
illusive

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English plus an English combining form.
adjective
[Has homonym: elusive.]
deceptive : unreal.
Graham found the illusive quality of the heavy fog eerie and
nightmarish.

318.

articulate

This word is from Latin.


verb
become united or connected by means of a joint.
The jaw and the skull articulate by means of the
temporomandibular joint.

319.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
immersed

This word is from Latin.


adjective
[Could be confused with immerse, emersed.]
completely engrossed.
Immersed in his reading assignment, Nathan was unaware that
a thunderstorm was raging outside.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

320.

appropriate

This word is from Latin.


adjective
specially suitable : fit : proper.
Celias idea of appropriate attire for school is not in line with
the schools dress code.

321.

commonwealth

The first part of this word was originally Latin and went
through French before becoming English, and the second part is
originally English.
noun
a state in which the supreme power resides with the people and
their representatives : a republic.
Oliver Cromwell declared England a commonwealth in 1649.

322.

obligation

This word is from Latin.


noun
something that one is bound to do : an imperative duty.
Because of Ciaras past assistance, Craig felt an obligation to
return the favor.

323.

technicality

The first part of this word is originally Greek, and the second
part is an English combining form.
noun
a detail that has meaning only for the specialist.
Because of a legal technicality, a mistrial was declared and the
defendant had to be retried for the offense.

324.

veneer

This word is from an originally German word.

noun
a thin sheet of wood cut or sawed from a log and adapted for
adherence to a smooth surface (as of wood).
The maple veneer really spruced up the old pine table.

325.

nutrient

This word is from Latin.


adjective
providing nourishment : promoting growth.
Researchers have moved well beyond the days of thinking that a
single nutrient substance can solve all our health problems.

326.

accordingly

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English plus English combining forms.
adverb
in conformity with a given set of circumstances :
correspondingly.
Jane checked the weather for her trip and packed her suitcase
accordingly.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

327.

replica

This word went from Latin to Italian.


noun
a copy of an original work of art.
Katie bought a replica of Van Goghs The Starry Night to
hang in her dining room.

328.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
yodel or
jodel

This word is originally German.


verb
to sing in a manner common among the Swiss and Tyrolean
mountaineers by suddenly changing from chest voice to head
voice.
Isaac was determined to learn to yodel so that he could audition
for Americas Got Talent.

329.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
thesis

This word went from Greek to Latin.


noun
[Could be confused with plural theses.]
a claim put forward : statement, proposition.
Brianna wrote an article for the school newspaper in support of
her thesis that more healthy options should be offered in the
cafeteria.

330.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
antenna

This word is from Latin.


noun
[Could be confused with plural antennae.]
one of the paired movable appendages on the head of certain
arthropods, such as crustaceans and insects.
Bens favorite plush bee has one bent antenna on its head.

331.

consumption

This word is from Latin.


noun
the wasting, using up or wearing away of something.
The chart showed the relationship between consumption of
natural resources and industrialization.

332.

presumably

This word is a word that was formed in French from Latin parts
plus an English combining form.
adverb
by reasonable assumption : probably.
Richard is presumably going to the holiday party this year.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

333.

cavernous

This word is from Latin.


adjective
constituting or suggesting a large underground chamber.
The thick grove of vine-covered trees threw a cavernous gloom
over the area.

334.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
adherence

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
noun
[Has homonym: adherents.]
the act, action, or quality of holding, following, or maintaining
loyalty steadily and consistently.
Jacks adherence to his beliefs won him great admiration.

335.

contemptible

This word is from Latin.


adjective
meriting scorn and condemnation as paltry, mean or vile.
Though most people viewed the accused man as a contemptible
person, Sister Helen pitied him and reached out to him.

336.

municipality

This word went from Latin to French.


noun
a primarily urban political unit (as a town or city) having
corporate status and usually powers of self-government.
The municipality passed a new recycling collection law.

337.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
flammable

This word is from Latin.


adjective
[Could be confused with flambeau.]
capable of being easily ignited and of burning with extreme
rapidity.
Gasoline and kerosene are both flammable, but gasoline is
more explosive.

338.

indecisively

This word is from originally Latin parts plus English combining


forms.
adverb
indistinctly : vaguely.
Because he was unsure, Tim gave his answer indecisively.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

339.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
plaque or
placque

This word is from a word that passed from Dutch to French.

noun
an inscribed metal tablet that identifies a site or commemorates
an individual or event.
The plaque on the front of the local dog shelter told visitors that
the building was listed as a historic site.

340.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
gnu

This word is from Bushman.

noun
[Has homonyms: new, knew and nu.]
a large African antelope with a head like an ox, short mane,
long tail and horns that curve downward and outward and then
up.
The brindled gnu, sometimes called a wildebeest, is one of
the fastest animals in southern Africa.

341.

amendment

The first part of this word is from an originally Latin word, and
the second part is an English combining form.
noun
the process of changing or modifying in any way for the better
(as a motion, bill, act or constitution).
A well-drafted constitution will provide for its own amendment.

342.

detestable

This word is from Latin.


adjective
very unpleasant : deserving repulsion or disgusted loathing.
When traveling internationally, its important to remember that
manners that may seem detestable are sometimes the result of
cultural differences.

343.

component

This word is from Latin.


noun
a constituent part : ingredient.
Katy believes the most important component of her famous
soup is the homemade broth.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

344.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
aplomb

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
noun
[Could be confused with aplome.]
complete confidence or assurance in oneself : poise.
A seasoned public relations officer, Karen handles difficult
situations with aplomb.

345.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
maudlin

This word is originally from a biblical Greek name that went


through Latin and French before becoming English.
adjective
[Could be confused with madeleine, modeling.]
tearfully or weakly emotional : effusively sentimental.
Brian allowed himself to become maudlin only on St. Patricks
Day.

346.

reminisce

This word went from Latin through French.


verb
indulge in the practice of thinking about past experiences.
Grandpa and Grandma reminisce about their youth whenever
they look at old photographs.

347.

Say to the speller This word has a near-homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and
definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
poutine

This word is from Canadian French.

noun
[Has near-homonym: poteen/potteen/potheen.]
a dish of French fries covered with brown gravy and cheese
curds.
On their recent trip to Montreal, Nicolette and Samuel sampled
poutine for the first time.

348.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
intestate

This word is from Latin.


adjective
[Could be confused with interstate.]
having made no valid will.
Everyone, especially her children, was shocked to learn that
Mrs. Rockwell had died intestate.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

349.

Victrola

This word is a trademark.


trademark
used for an instrument for reproducing sounds by means of
the vibration of a stylus or needle following a spiral groove on a
revolving circular disc or cylinder.
On special occasions, Sampson gets out his grandfathers
Victrola and plays some music.

350.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
Austenite

This word is formed from an English name plus a combining


form that went from Latin to French to English.
noun
[Has homonym: austinite.]
an authority on or devotee of an early 19th-century English
author or her writings.
Lydia was a devoted Austenite who had read Pride and
Prejudice at least a hundred times.

351.

predominant

This word came from French, which formed it from Latin.


adjective
having superior strength, influence, authority or position.
Fir is one of the predominant tree species in the rain forests of
the northwestern United States.

352.

emoji

This word is from Japanese.

noun
any of various small images, symbols or icons used in text fields
in electronic communication (as in text messages, e-mail and
social media) to express the emotional attitude of the writer,
convey information succinctly or communicate a message
playfully without using words.
Annie ended every text to her best friend with a heart emoji.

353.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
The speller should not be disqualified based upon noting or failing to note punctuation or spacing within the following word.
The speller should be judged based upon uttering the correct sequence of letters in the correct order.
higgledy-piggledy or
higglety-pigglety

This word is of unknown origin.


adverb
in confusion : without order.
The books in Franks library were shoved higgledy-piggledy
into every nook and cranny.

354.

solarium

This word is from Latin.


noun
a glass-enclosed porch or living room.
Lacey moved her sunlight-starved fern from her bedroom to the
solarium.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

355.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
kerosene or
kerosine

This word is from an originally Greek part plus an originally


English part.
noun
a flammable hydrocarbon oil usually obtained by distillation of
petroleum and used as a fuel, solvent and thinner.
Maya filled the lantern with kerosene in preparation for her
camping trip.

356.

Zamboni

This word is a trademark.


trademark
used for an ice resurfacing machine.
The crowd cheered when Michelle drove the Zamboni onto the
ice during intermission.

357.

dermatology

Both parts of this word are originally Greek.


noun
a branch of science that is concerned with the skin, its structure,
functions and diseases.
The cosmetics company employed only individuals
knowledgeable in dermatology to assist in its laboratory.

358.

statuesque

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


English plus a French-derived English combining form.
adjective
having a massive dignity or impressiveness : majestic.
A statuesque sculpture stood in the town square.

359.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
woebegone

This word is originally English.


adjective
[Could be confused with fictional Lake Wobegon.]
exhibiting a condition of suffering, great distress, sorrow or
misery.
The childrens woebegone faces began to brighten as they saw
the cake and ice cream.

360.

reprehensible

This word is from a word that went from Latin to English.


adjective
deserving rebuke or reprimand : censurable.
Although Daniel seemed pleasant enough, he was apparently
hiding very reprehensible feelings.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

361.

negativism

This word consists of an originally Latin part plus an English


combining form.
noun
an attitude of mind marked by regular denial of or skepticism
about nearly everything affirmed by others : habitual
skepticism.
Lina was concerned that Joes negativism was self-defeating.

362.

Say to the speller This word has a homonym. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of speech and definition.
Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
populace

Originally Latin, this word passed from Italian to French.


noun
[Has homonym and near-homonym: populous, populist.]
the total number of people or inhabitants.
When the state tried to change the motto on their license plate,
the populace erupted in protest.

363.

voltmeter

This word was formed in International Scientific Vocabulary


from an Italian name and an originally Greek part.
noun
an instrument for measuring the differences of potential
between different points of an electrical circuit.
The voltmeter showed no current moving through the wire.

364.

exponentially

This word is from Latin.


adverb
in a manner indicating variation in which one variable factor
depends upon another variable factor, characterized by an
extremely rapid increase (as in size or extent).
For the past decade, sales of smartphones have been growing
exponentially.

365.

stereotype

This word came to English from French, which formed it from


Greek parts.
noun
something conforming to a fixed or general pattern and lacking
individual distinguishing marks or qualities.
Kane dismisses the idea that healthy food cant taste good as a
silly stereotype.

366.

quarantine

This word is from a word that went from Latin to French to


Italian.
noun
a regulation restraining a ship from physical connections with
the shore while suspected of offering a threat of contagion.
Were it not for the quarantine, the port city might have
experienced an outbreak of a deadly strain of influenza.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

367.

Say to the speller This word could be confused with a similar word. Next, say the word. Then, provide the words part of
speech and definition. Finally, answer spellers questions, if any, about the word.
armoire

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
noun
[Could be confused with armor/armour.]
a usually large and ornate cupboard, wardrobe or clothespress.
Stella gave her armoire to her brother when she moved to
Maryland.

368.

coniferous

This word is formed from two Latin elements plus an English


combining form.
adjective
bearing cones.
A covering of coniferous trees keeps some mountains green all
winter.

369.

benzene

This word was formed in International Scientific Vocabulary


from an originally French element and an originally Greek
element.
noun
a colorless volatile flammable toxic liquid aromatic
hydrocarbon that burns with a luminous flame.
A benzene molecule has six carbon atoms arranged in a
hexagon, with each side of the hexagon representing the bond
between two carbon atoms.

370.

nasturtium

This word is from Latin.


noun
any of several tropical American pungent herbs having showy
variously colored spurred flowers.
Ginas mother picked flowers from the nasturtium outside her
back door and added them to the salad she was preparing.

371.

The following word has two or more correct spellings. Either one of the two spellings listed below should be accepted as
correct; the speller only needs to provide one correct spelling.
anesthesia or
anaesthesia

This word is from an originally Greek word that passed into


Latin.
noun
loss of feeling and usually consciousness through the use of
medicine.
Upon waking up from anesthesia, Ashley wanted to know if they
rumors about Jay-Z and Beyonc were true or if she had dreamt
them.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

372.

velocipede

This word came from French, which formed it from a Latin


word.
noun
a lightweight wheeled vehicle propelled by the rider.
The hipster built a replica of an 1830s velocipede in order to
have the perfect transportation mode to complement his vintage
style.

373.

The speller should not be disqualified based upon noting or failing to note punctuation or spacing within the following word.
The speller should be judged based upon uttering the correct sequence of letters in the correct order.
cul-de-sac

This word is originally French.


noun
a street that is closed at one end but usually has a circular area
for turning around at that end.
When shopping for a house, Fiona and Scott told their realtor
they wanted to live on a cul-de-sac.

374.

edamame

This word is from Japanese.


noun
immature green soybeans usually in the pod.
Theas favorite appetizer is edamame topped with a sprinkling
of sea salt.

375.

diminuendo

This word came from Italian, which formed it from a Latin


word.
adverb
with gradually diminishing volume or intensity used as a
direction in music.
When the orchestra played diminuendo, the flutes became more
prominent.

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Numerical Index of Spelling Words


1. mad
2. dots
3. row
4. tiny
5. nest
6. ship
7. ears
8. name
9. darts
10. meal
11. sadly
12. aim
13. wash
14. stage
15. maybe
16. cried
17. straw
18. open
19. shell
20. hugged
21. brush
22. trail
23. center or
centre
24. lava
25. bathtub
26. nose
27. taxi
28. food
29. bird
30. wear
31. rules
32. boring
33. ferns
34. sandbox
35. elbow
36. braid
37. stuck
38. lawn
39. posters
40. swift
41. moody
42. grain
43. coast
44. restless
45. parents
46. shopping
47. mouse
48. anyone
49. lookout
50. fuddy-duddy
51. temper
52. paint
53. banana

54. untidy
55. darkest
56. chatter
57. sturdy
58. riddle
59. dollars
60. feast
61. subject
62. might
63. flicker
64. onion
65. strange
66. married
67. pounce
68. supplies
69. farewell
70. pebbles
71. young
72. vacation
73. puzzles
74. skateboard
75. poem
76. twine
77. nifty
78. monkeys
79. contract
80. belief
81. janitor
82. observe
83. anteater
84. elderly
85. portable
86. timidly
87. massive
88. trance
89. flexible
90. teaspoon
91. climbed
92. knitting
93. deadline
94. passage
95. complaints
96. nonsense
97. laundry
98. lodging
99. veins
100. mountain
101. hooves
102. indicate
103. performance
104. biology
105. clause
106. specific
107. bemused

108. invisible
109. vocabulary
110. contestants
111. failure
112. beckon
113. fortune
114. dimension
115. caterpillar
116. tightrope
117. applause
118. innocent
119. digestive
120. settee
121. cupboard
122. marooned
123. daunted
124. moisture
125. gymnastics
126. esteem
127. inlet
128. microscope
129. auction
130. thicket
131. mildew
132. bushel
133. sediment
134. peculiar
135. clodhopper
136. quashed
137. dandruff
138. cutlery
139. gnarled
140. equestrian
141. bedraggled
142. paisley
143. precursor
144. infuriating
145. coronet
146. pauper
147. suet
148. partridge
149. algae
150. marionette
151. varsity
152. enchantment
153. mystic
154. ravine
155. perilous
156. rendition
157. avian
158. engineering
159. feckless
160. compatriots
161. heredity

162. indifference
163. opinionated
164. alliance
165. epithets
166. javelin
167. implacable
168. lyre
169. austere
170. cavalcade
171. tenaciously
172. Icarus
173. scrumptiously
174. burglarious
175. thaumaturge
176. vulpine
177. Honolulu
178. neutron
179. catastrophic
180. mahogany
181. avalanche
182. perpetrator
183. insulin
184. Mylar
185. physicists
186. Stilton
187. conflagration
188. habanero
189. allegiance
190. legitimately
191. pilgrimages
192. concussion
193. vengeance
194. unscrupulous
195. overweening
196. inconceivable
197. semaphore
198. enervating
199. Jacobean
200. silhouetted
201. recusant
202. potentialities
203. gesticulations
204. Patagonia
205. interminableness
206. prestidigitation
207. constabulary
208. pugnacious
209. eucalyptus
210. moiety
211. Lilliput
212. pertinacity
213. castellated
214. Hebrides
215. nautilus

216. phosphine
217. rheumatic
218. outr
219. phrenologists
220. malacca
221. chevalier
222. ague
223. hors de combat
224. netsuke
225. a posteriori
226. tiptoe
227. spry
228. chopstick
229. blubber
230. townsfolk
231. ringlet
232. battery
233. warbler
234. closure
235. settlers
236. beaker
237. steamroller
238. tollbooth or
tolbooth
239. compute
240. gallons
241. spelt
242. trombone
243. prisoner
244. cringing
245. extract
246. sprocket
247. peppermint
248. captured
249. garland
250. winced
251. select
252. feature
253. couplet
254. juncture
255. scuffle
256. clarify
257. hostage
258. treasure
259. pigeon
260. cargo
261. revolve
262. position
263. nettle
264. federal
265. destitute
266. rectangle
267. hemlock
268. warden

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

269. surround
270. pallor
271. intellect
272. sensitive
273. yearling
274. unfurl
275. monitor
276. plumage
277. tawny
278. demolish
279. frustrated
280. bereft
281. eon or
aeon
282. sectional
283. oddity
284. combination
285. symbol
286. poplar
287. rivet
288. codify
289. identical
290. conducive
291. distribute
292. excitement
293. pedestal
294. literate
295. ferocity
296. sizable or
sizeable
297. lavish
298. expansive
299. panama
300. warrant
301. equation
302. textural
303. flaxen
304. raspingly
305. liberation
306. exposure
307. recital
308. assess
309. buzzard
310. coordinate
311. riotous
312. verdant
313. economist
314. predator
315. factorial
316. tabulation
317. illusive
318. articulate
319. immersed
320. appropriate
321. commonwealth
322. obligation

323. technicality
324. veneer
325. nutrient
326. accordingly
327. replica
328. yodel or
jodel
329. thesis
330. antenna
331. consumption
332. presumably
333. cavernous
334. adherence
335. contemptible
336. municipality
337. flammable
338. indecisively
339. plaque or
placque
340. gnu
341. amendment
342. detestable
343. component
344. aplomb
345. maudlin
346. reminisce
347. poutine
348. intestate
349. Victrola
350. Austenite
351. predominant
352. emoji
353. higgledy-piggledy
or higglety-pigglety
354. solarium
355. kerosene or
kerosine
356. Zamboni
357. dermatology
358. statuesque
359. woebegone
360. reprehensible
361. negativism
362. populace
363. voltmeter
364. exponentially
365. stereotype
366. quarantine
367. armoire
368. coniferous
369. benzene
370. nasturtium
371. anesthesia or
anaesthesia
372. velocipede
373. cul-de-sac

374. edamame
375. diminuendo

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

Alphabetical Index of Spelling Words


A
a posteriori 225
accordingly 326
adherence 334
ague 222
aim 12
algae 149
allegiance 189
alliance 164
amendment 341
anesthesia or
anaesthesia 371
anteater 83
antenna 330
anyone 48
aplomb 344
applause 117
appropriate 320
armoire 367
articulate 318
assess 308
auction 129
Austenite 350
austere 169
avalanche 181
avian 157
B
banana 53
bathtub 25
battery 232
beaker 236
beckon 112
bedraggled 141
belief 80
bemused 107
benzene 369
bereft 280
biology 104
bird 29
blubber 229
boring 32
braid 36
brush 21
burglarious 174
bushel 132
buzzard 309
C
captured 248
cargo 260
castellated 213
catastrophic 179
caterpillar 115

cavalcade 170
cavernous 333
center or
centre 23
chatter 56
chevalier 221
chopstick 228
clarify 256
clause 105
climbed 91
clodhopper 135
closure 234
coast 43
codify 288
combination 284
commonwealth 321
compatriots 160
complaints 95
component 343
compute 239
concussion 192
conducive 290
conflagration 187
coniferous 368
constabulary 207
consumption 331
contemptible 335
contestants 110
contract 79
coordinate 310
coronet 145
couplet 253
cried 16
cringing 244
cul-de-sac 373
cupboard 121
cutlery 138
D
dandruff 137
darkest 55
darts 9
daunted 123
deadline 93
demolish 278
dermatology 357
destitute 265
detestable 342
digestive 119
dimension 114
diminuendo 375
distribute 291
dollars 59
dots 2

E
ears 7
economist 313
edamame 374
elbow 35
elderly 84
emoji 352
enchantment 152
enervating 198
engineering 158
eon or
aeon 281
epithets 165
equation 301
equestrian 140
esteem 126
eucalyptus 209
excitement 292
expansive 298
exponentially 364
exposure 306
extract 245
F
factorial 315
failure 111
farewell 69
feast 60
feature 252
feckless 159
federal 264
ferns 33
ferocity 295
flammable 337
flaxen 303
flexible 89
flicker 63
food 28
fortune 113
frustrated 279
fuddy-duddy 50
G
gallons 240
garland 249
gesticulations 203
gnarled 139
gnu 340
grain 42
gymnastics 125
H
habanero 188
Hebrides 214
hemlock 267

heredity 161
higgledy-piggledy or
higglety-pigglety 353
Honolulu 177
hooves 101
hors de combat 223
hostage 257
hugged 20
I
Icarus 172
identical 289
illusive 317
immersed 319
implacable 167
inconceivable 196
indecisively 338
indicate 102
indifference 162
infuriating 144
inlet 127
innocent 118
insulin 183
intellect 271
interminableness 205
intestate 348
invisible 108
J
Jacobean 199
janitor 81
javelin 166
juncture 254
K
kerosene or
kerosine 355
knitting 92
L
laundry 97
lava 24
lavish 297
lawn 38
legitimately 190
liberation 305
Lilliput 211
literate 294
lodging 98
lookout 49
lyre 168
M
mad 1
mahogany 180
malacca 220
marionette 150

marooned 122
married 66
massive 87
maudlin 345
maybe 15
meal 10
microscope 128
might 62
mildew 131
moiety 210
moisture 124
monitor 275
monkeys 78
moody 41
mountain 100
mouse 47
municipality 336
Mylar 184
mystic 153
N
name 8
nasturtium 370
nautilus 215
negativism 361
nest 5
netsuke 224
nettle 263
neutron 178
nifty 77
nonsense 96
nose 26
nutrient 325
O
obligation 322
observe 82
oddity 283
onion 64
open 18
opinionated 163
outr 218
overweening 195
P
paint 52
paisley 142
pallor 270
panama 299
parents 45
partridge 148
passage 94
Patagonia 204
pauper 146
pebbles 70

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide

peculiar 134
pedestal 293
peppermint 247
performance 103
perilous 155
perpetrator 182
pertinacity 212
phosphine 216
phrenologists 219
physicists 185
pigeon 259
pilgrimages 191
plaque or
placque 339
plumage 276
poem 75
poplar 286
populace 362
portable 85
position 262
posters 39
potentialities 202
pounce 67
poutine 347
precursor 143
predator 314
predominant 351
prestidigitation 206
presumably 332
prisoner 243
pugnacious 208
puzzles 73
Q
quarantine 366
quashed 136
R
raspingly 304
ravine 154
recital 307
rectangle 266
recusant 201
reminisce 346
rendition 156
replica 327
reprehensible 360
restless 44
revolve 261
rheumatic 217
riddle 58
ringlet 231
riotous 311
rivet 287
row 3
rules 31

S
sadly 11
sandbox 34
scrumptiously 173
scuffle 255
sectional 282
sediment 133
select 251
semaphore 197
sensitive 272
settee 120
settlers 235
shell 19
ship 6
shopping 46
silhouetted 200
sizable or
sizeable 296
skateboard 74
solarium 354
specific 106
spelt 241
sprocket 246
spry 227
stage 14
statuesque 358
steamroller 237
stereotype 365
Stilton 186
strange 65
straw 17
stuck 37
sturdy 57
subject 61
suet 147
supplies 68
surround 269
swift 40
symbol 285

tollbooth or
tolbooth 238
townsfolk 230
trail 22
trance 88
treasure 258
trombone 242
twine 76

T
tabulation 316
tawny 277
taxi 27
teaspoon 90
technicality 323
temper 51
tenaciously 171
textural 302
thaumaturge 175
thesis 329
thicket 130
tightrope 116
timidly 86
tiny 4
tiptoe 226

Z
Zamboni 356

U
unfurl 274
unscrupulous 194
untidy 54
V
vacation 72
varsity 151
veins 99
velocipede 372
veneer 324
vengeance 193
verdant 312
Victrola 349
vocabulary 109
voltmeter 363
vulpine 176
W
warbler 233
warden 268
warrant 300
wash 13
wear 30
winced 250
woebegone 359
Y
yearling 273
yodel or
jodel 328
young 71

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2017 School Pronouncer Guide